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Encyclopedia > Kaaba

The Kaaba (Arabic: الكعبة al-Ka‘bah; IPA: ['kɑʕbɑ]) , also known as al-Kaʿbatu l-Mušarrafah (الكعبة المشرًّفة), al-Baytu l-ʿAtīq ( البيت العتيق "The Primordial House"), or al-Baytu l-Ḥarām (البيت الحرام "The Sacred House"), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The mosque was built around the original Kaaba. Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... In anatomy, the cuboid bone is a bone in the foot. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Masjid al Haram Al-Masjid al-Haram (Arabic: ) is a very large mosque in the city of Makkah (Mecca). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Muslim pilgrims around the Kaaba performing Umrah (lesser pilgrimage)

The Kaaba is the holiest place in Islam.[1] The qibla, the direction Muslims face during prayer, is the direction from their location on Earth towards the Kaaba. It is around the Kaaba that ritual circumambulation is performed by Muslims during the Hajj (pilgrimage) season as well as during the Umrah (lesser pilgrimage).[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Kaaba1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kaaba1. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Umrah or (Arabic: عمرة ) is a pilgrimage to Mecca performed by Muslims that can be undertaken at any time of the year. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy of Holies. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... Facing the Qibla at a prayer in Damascus The geometrical calculation of Qibla Qibla () is an Arabic word for the direction that should be faced when a Muslim prays. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... In Islamic context, Tawaf refers to the ritual of circumambulating the Kabah (the holiest building in Mecca) during the Hajj (pilgrimage). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Hajj (Arabic: , transliteration: ; Turkish: ; Ottoman Turkish: حاج, Hāc; Malay: , Bosnian: ) is the Pilgrimage to Mecca in Islam. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Umrah or (Arabic: عمرة ) is a pilgrimage to Mecca performed by Muslims that can be undertaken at any time of the year. ...

Contents

Location and physical attributes

The Kaaba is a large masonry structure roughly the shape of a cube. (The name Kaaba comes from the Arabic word "muka'ab" meaning "cube".) It is made of granite from the hills near Makkah, and stands upon a ten inch (25 cm) marble base, which projects outwards about 0.3 metres (1-foot).[1] Approximations for the structural dimensions are: 13.10 metres (43 feet) high, with sides measuring 11.03 metres by 12.62 metres.[2][3] The four corners of the Kaaba roughly face the four points of the compass.[1] In the eastern corner of the Kaaba is the "Rukn-al-Aswad" (the Black Stone or al-Ħajaru l-Aswad), generally thought to be a meteorite remnant; at the northern corner is the "Rukn-al-Iraqi" ('The Iraqi corner'); at the west lies "Rukn-al-Shami" ('The Levantine corner') and at the south "Rukn-al-Yamani" ('The Yemeni corner').[1][3] Three dimensions A cube (or hexahedron) is a Platonic solid composed of six square faces, with three meeting at each vertex. ... Close-up of granite from Yosemite National Park, valley of the Merced River Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ... Mecca or Makkah (in full: Makkah al-Mukkaramah; Arabic مكة المكرمة) is revered as the holiest site of Islam, and a pilgrimage to it is required of all Muslims who can afford to go. ... Venus de Milo, front. ... The metre or meter is a measure of length. ... The Black Stone, surrounded by its silver frame and the black cloth kiswa on the Kaaba in Mecca This article is about the Islamic holy relic. ... Willamette Meteorite A meteorite is a natural object originating in outer space that survives an impact with the Earths surface without being destroyed. ...


It is covered by a black silk curtain decorated with gold-embroidered calligraphy. This cloth is known as the kiswah; it is replaced yearly.[4][5] The Shahada is outlined in the weave of the fabric. About two-thirds of the way up runs a gold embroidered band covered with Qur'anic text. Kiswah is the cloth that covers the kabah in Mecca. ... There is also a town called Shāhāda, which is now in Nandurbār district (formerly in Dhule district) in the northwest corner of Maharashtra state in India. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Entrance to the inside of the Kaaba is gained through a door set 7 feet (2 m) above the ground on the north-eastern wall of the Kaaba, which acts as the façade.[1] It is accessed by a wooden staircase on wheels, usually stored between the arch-shaped gate of Banu Shaybah and the well of Zamzam. Inside the Kaaba, there is a marble floor. The interior walls are clad with marble half-way to the roof; tablets with Qur'anic inscriptions are inset in the marble. The top part of the walls are covered with a green cloth decorated with gold embroidered Qur'anic verses. The building is believed to be otherwise empty. Caretakers perfume the marble cladding with scented oil, the same oil used to anoint the Black Stone outside. Drinking the water from Zamzam spring. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Black Stone, surrounded by its silver frame and the black cloth kiswa on the Kaaba in Mecca This article is about the Islamic holy relic. ...


Although not directly connected to it, there is a semi-circular wall opposite the north-west wall of the Kaaba, known as the hatīm. It is 3 ft (0.9 m) in height and 5 ft (1.5 m) in length, and is composed of white marble. The space between the hatīm and the Kaaba was for a time belonging to the Kaaba itself, and so is generally not entered during the tawaf (ritual circumambulation). It is also thought by some that this space bears the graves of prophet Ishmael and his mother Hagar.[1] Venus de Milo, front. ... In Islamic context, Tawaf refers to the ritual of circumambulating the Kabah (the holiest building in Mecca) during the Hajj (pilgrimage). ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Hagar can refer to: Hagar (Bible), in the Book of Genesis, the handmaiden of Sarah and wife of Abraham Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World, title name taken from the above lady Hagar (company), an Icelandic retailer company, part of the Baugur Group Hägar the Horrible, the comic...


Muslims throughout the world face the Kaaba during prayers, which are five times a day. For most places around the world, coordinates for Mecca suffice. In the Sacred Mosque, worshippers pray in concentric circles radiating outwards around the Kaaba. Therefore, the focus point is in the middle of the Kaaba. Masjid al Haram Al-Masjid al-Haram (Arabic: ) is a very large mosque in the city of Makkah (Mecca). ... Concentric objects share the same center, axis or origin with one inside the other. ...


History

Before Islam

Little is known of the pre-Islamic history of the Kaaba. Wensinck, writing in the Encyclopedia of Islam, identifies it with a place called Macoraba mentioned by the Roman geographer Ptolemy mention of Mecca. Ptolemy's text is believed to date from the second century AD., before the rise of Islam.[6] Jahiliyyah is an Islamic concept referring to the spiritual condition of pre-Islamic Arabian society. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


Patricia Crone disagrees with most academic historians on most issues concerning the history of early Islam, including the history of the Kabaa. In Meccan Trade and the Rise of Islam, Crone writes that she believes that the identification of Macoraba with the kaaba is false, and that Macoraba was a town in southern Arabia, in what was then known as Arabia Felix.[7] Patricia Crone, Ph. ...


Many accounts, including Muslim accounts, and some accounts written by academic historians, stress the power and importance of the pre-Islamic Mecca. They depict it as a city grown rich on the proceeds of the spice trade. Crone believes that this is an exaggeration and that Mecca may only have been an outpost trading with nomads for leather, cloth, and camel butter. Crone argues that if Mecca had been a well-known center of trade, it would have been mentioned by later authors such as Procopius, Nonnosus, and the Syrian church chroniclers writing in Syriac. However, the town is absent from any geographies or histories written in the last three centuries before the rise of Islam.[8] Spices at the central market of Agadir, Morocco in May 2005 The spice trade has been of major economic importance throughout human history and it particularly helped spur the Age of Exploration. ...


According to The Encyclopaedia Britannica, "before the rise of Islam it was revered as a sacred sanctuary and was a site of pilgrimage."[9] According to the German historian Eduard Glaser, the name "Kaaba" may have been related to the southern Arabian or Ethiopian word "mikrab", signifying a temple.[6] Again, Crone disputes this etymology. The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general encyclopedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...


The Muslim view

Picture of the Kaaba taken in 1898
Picture of the Kaaba taken in 1898

According to the Qur'an, the Kaaba was built by Ibrahim (Abraham) and his son Ismail (Ishmael [1]). Islamic traditions assert that the Kaaba "reflects" a house in heaven called al-Baytu l-Maˤmur[10] (Arabic: البيت المعمور) and that it was first built by the first man, Adam. Ibrahim and Ismail rebuilt the Kaaba on the old foundations. [11] Image File history File links Kaba. ... Image File history File links Kaba. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Ibrahim (Arabic: ابراهيم), also known as Abraham, is very important in Islam, both in his own right as prophet and as the father of the prophet Ismail (Ishmael), his firstborn son, who is considered the Father of the Arabs. ... The angel prevents the sacrifice of Isaac (Rembrandt, 1634) Abraham (Hebrew: , Standard Avraham Ashkenazi Avrohom or Avruhom Tiberian  ; Arabic: ,  ; Geez: , ) is a figure in the Bible and Quran who is by believers regarded as the founding patriarch of the Israelites and of the Nabataean people in Jewish, Christian and... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ...


When Muhammad conquered Mecca, he destroyed the 360 idols around Kaaba which the Meccan pagans possessed. [12][13] There was one god for each day of the year. [12] While destroying each idol, Muhammad recited Qur'an 17:81 which says "Truth has arrived and falsehood has perished for falsehood is by its nature bound to perish.'" [12][13] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Muhammad then entered the Ka`abah and ordered all the pictures to be destroyed. [13]


At the time of Muhammad

A 1315 image of Muhammad lifting the Black Stone into place, when the Kaaba was rebuilt in the early 600s For more information on this image, please see Depictions of Muhammad.
A 1315 image of Muhammad lifting the Black Stone into place, when the Kaaba was rebuilt in the early 600s
 
For more information on this image, please see Depictions of Muhammad.

At the time of Muhammad (570-632 AD), his tribe the Quraysh was in charge of the Kaaba, which was at that time a shrine to numerous Arabian tribal gods. Muhammad earned the enmity of his tribe by claiming their shrine for the religion of Islam that he preached. He wanted the Kaaba to be dedicated to the worship of God (Allah) alone, and all the other statues evicted. The Quraysh persecuted and harassed him continuously, and he and his followers eventually migrated to Medina in 622 AD. After this pivotal migration, or Hijra, the Muslim community became a political and military force. In 630 AD, Muhammad and his followers returned to Mecca as conquerors and the Kaaba was re-dedicated as an Islamic house of worship. Henceforth, the annual pilgrimage was to be a Muslim rite, the Hajj.[citation needed] Image File history File links Mohammed_kaaba_1315. ... Image File history File links Mohammed_kaaba_1315. ... The Black Stone, surrounded by its silver frame and the black cloth kiswa on the Kaaba in Mecca This article is about the Islamic holy relic. ... Depictions of Muhammad, drawings of Muhammad are often contentious. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Quraish (Arabic: ‎ translit: ) is the Meccan tribe that the Islamic prophet Muhammad belonged to before he received the revelations of Islam. ... Arabian mythology is the ancient beliefs of the Arabs. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Hijra. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A place of worship is a building or other locations where religious persons may worship their deity, regularly or not. ... The Hajj (Arabic: , transliteration: ; Turkish: ; Ottoman Turkish: حاج, Hāc; Malay: , Bosnian: ) is the Pilgrimage to Mecca in Islam. ...


Islamic histories also mention a reconstruction of the Kaaba around 600 AD. A story found in Ibn Ishaq's Sirat Rasul Allah (as reconstructed and translated by Guillaume) shows Muhammad settling a quarrel between Meccan clans as to which clan should set the Black Stone cornerstone in place. His solution was to have all the clan elders raise the cornerstone on a cloak, and then Muhammad set the stone into its final place with his own hands.[14][15][16] Ibn Ishaq says that the timber for the reconstruction of the Kaaba came from a Greek ship that had been wrecked on the Red Sea coast at Shu'ayba.[citation needed] Ibn Ishaq (or ibn Ishaq), (d. ... The Black Stone, surrounded by its silver frame and the black cloth kiswa on the Kaaba in Mecca This article is about the Islamic holy relic. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ...


It is also claimed by the Shi'a that the Kaaba is the birth place of Ali ibn Abi Talib, the fourth caliph and the cousin and son-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[citation needed] Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... For main article see: Caliphate Khalif is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, or global Islamic nation. ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets. ...


Since Muhammad's (PBUH)time

The Kaaba has been repaired and reconstructed many times since Muhammad's(PBUH) day.

  • Abd-Allah ibn al-Zubayr, an early Muslim who ruled Mecca for many years between the death of Ali ibn Abi Talib and the consolidation of Ummayad power, is said to have demolished the old Kaaba and rebuilt it to include the hatīm, a semi-circular wall now outside the Kaaba. He did so on the basis of a tradition (found in several hadith collections[17]) that the hatīm was a remnant of the foundations of the Abrahamic Kaaba, and that Muhammad (PBUH) himself had wished to rebuild so as to include it.
  • This structure was destroyed (or partially destroyed) in 683, during the war between al-Zubayr and Umayyad forces commanded by Al-Hajjaj bin Yousef. Al-Hajjaj used stone-throwing catapults against the Meccans. This episode has been depicted by many Muslim chroniclers as a black mark against the Ummayad caliph Yazid I, who ordered the campaign against Mecca. Yazid died in 683, the year his forces attacked the Hijaz.
  • The Ummayads under Abdul Malik bin Marwan finally reunited all the former Islamic possessions and ended the long civil war (see First Islamic civil war). In 693 he had the remnants of al-Zubayr's Kaaba razed, and rebuilt on the foundations set by the Quraysh.[18] The Kaaba returned to the cube shape it had taken during Muhammad's (PBUH) lifetime.

Apart from repair work, the basic shape and structure of the Kaaba have not changed since then.[19] Abd Allah al-Zubayr or Ibn Zubayr or Abdullah ibn az-Zubayr (624 - 692) (Arabic: عبد الله بن الزبير) was the son of Zubair, who was the nephew of Khadija, and Asma bint Abu Bakr. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... The Umayyad Dynasty (Arabic الأمويون / بنو أمية umawiyy; in Turkish, Emevi) was the first dynasty of caliphs of the Prophet Muhammad who were not closely related to Muhammad himself, though they were of the same Meccan tribe, the... This is a sub-article of hadith. ... Abu Abdullah Zubayr ibn al-Awwam was a Sahabi, or companion, of the prophet Muhammad. ... Al-Hajjaj bin Yousef (661 - June in Taif, 714 in Wasit, Iraq) (Arabic: الحجاج بن يوسف also known as Al Hajjaj bin Yousef Al saqafe) was an important Arab administrator during the Umayyad caliphate. ... al-Hajjaj can refer to one of a number of different people: Al-Hajjaj bin Yousef, Military governor of the Umayyad caliphate Muslim b. ... Yazid Ibn Muawiyah Ibn Abu Sufyan (July 23, 645 - 683) (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان) was the second Caliph of the Umayyad dynasty. ... Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (646-705) (Arabic: عبد الملك بن مروان ) was an Umayyad caliph. ... The First Islamic civil war, 656–661 CE, followed the assassination of the caliph Uthman ibn Affan, continued during the brief caliphate of Ali ibn Abu Talib, and was ended, on the whole, by Muawiyas assumption of the caliphate. ...


Cleaning

The building is opened twice a year for a ceremony known as "the cleaning of the Kaaba." This ceremony takes place roughly fifteen days before the start of the month of Ramadan and the same period of time before the start of the annual pilgrimage. The fourth pillar of Islam, which is fasting, is practiced during the month of Ramadan. ...


The keys to the Kaaba are held by the Banī Shaybat (بني شيبة) tribe. Members of the tribe greet visitors to the inside of the Kaaba on the occasion of the cleaning ceremony. A small number of dignitaries and foreign diplomats are invited to participate in the ceremony. The governor of Mecca leads the honored guests who ritually clean the structure, using simple brooms. Washing of the Kaaba is done with a mixture of Zamzam and rosewater.[20] The BanÄ« Shaybat(or BanÄ« Shaiba) are an Islamic tribe that hold the keys to the Kabba. ... Drinking the water from Zamzam spring. ... Rosewater or rose syrup (Persian: Golâb Turkish: Gül suyu) is the hydrosol portion of the distillate of rose petals. ...


Tradition has it that when the Black Stone on the corner of the shrine came to earth, it was white. It turned black under the burden of millions of sins.[21] The Black Stone, surrounded by its silver frame and the black cloth kiswa on the Kaaba in Mecca This article is about the Islamic holy relic. ...


Qibla and prayer

Main article: Qibla
Supplicating pilgrim at Masjid al Haram
Supplicating pilgrim at Masjid al Haram

For any reference point on the Earth, the Qibla is the direction to the Kaaba. Muslims are ordered to face this direction during prayer (Qur'an 2:143-144). While it may appear to some non-Muslims that Muslims worship the Kaaba, the Kaaba is simply the focal point for prayer. Facing the Qibla at a prayer in Damascus The geometrical calculation of Qibla Qibla () is an Arabic word for the direction that should be faced when a Muslim prays. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 258 KB) Description : Supplicating Pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 258 KB) Description : Supplicating Pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram. ... A reference point is a location that is used in measurement of a huge variety of phenomena. ... Facing the Qibla at a prayer in Damascus The geometrical calculation of Qibla Qibla () is an Arabic word for the direction that should be faced when a Muslim prays. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Taken during a Hindu prayer ceremony on the eve of Diwali. ...


Like Jews, the earliest Muslims prayed facing Jerusalem. According to Islamic tradition, when Muhammad was praying in the Al-Qiblatain mosque (in Medina), he was ordered by God to change the qibla direction from Jerusalem to Mecca and the Kaaba. Various theories are advanced as to the reason for the change,[2] and most historians find it was the reluctance of the Jews of Medina to convert to his religion that prompted the move.[3] Masjid al-Qiblatain is a mosque in Medina that is historically important for Muslims as the place where the prophet Muhammad is said to have been commanded to change the direction of prayer (qibla) from Jerusalem to Mecca. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Muslim groups in the United States differ as to how the qibla should be oriented - some believe that the direction should be calculated as a straight line drawn on a flat map, like the familiar Mercator projection of the globe; others say that the direction is determined by the shortest line on the globe of the earth, or a great circle. At times this controversy has lead to heated disputes. Flat-map Muslims in the United States pray east and slightly south; great-circle Muslims face in a north-easterly direction. In both cases, the exact orientation will vary from city to city. [4] Mercator world map Nova et Aucta Orbis Terrae Descriptio ad Usum Navigatium Emendate (1569) The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator, in 1569. ... For the Brisbane bus routes known collectively as the Great Circle Line (598 & 599), see the following list of Brisbane Transport routes A great circle on a sphere A great circle is a circle on the surface of a sphere that has the same diameter as the sphere, dividing the...


Some Muslims carry qibla compasses that tell them which direction to face no matter where they are. This method requires one to align the north arrow with a particular point on the compass corresponding to one's location. Once so aligned, one simply turns toward the direction indicated by the compass's Qibla pointer, which is often in the shape of a minaret. "Qibla numbers" for various locations are listed in an accompanying booklet and also indexed online. A qibla compass or qiblih compass (sometimes also called qibla/qiblih indicator) is a modified compass designed to indicate the direction of prayer. ...


See also

  • Ḥ-R-M

(ح ر م) is the triconsonantal root of many Arabic words, and many of those words are used as names. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Wensinck, A. J; Ka`ba. Encyclopaedia of Islam IV p. 317
  2. ^ Peterson, Andrew (1996). Dictionary of Islamic Architecture.. London: Routledge. 
  3. ^ a b Hawting, G.R; Ka`ba. Encyclopaedia of the Qur'an p. 76
  4. ^ 'House of God' Kaaba gets new cloth. The Age Company Ltd. (2003). Retrieved on 2006-08-17.
  5. ^ The Kiswa - (Kaaba Covering). Al-Islaah Publications. Retrieved on 2006-08-17.
  6. ^ a b Wensinck, A. J; Ka`ba. Encyclopaedia of Islam IV p. 318
  7. ^ Crone, Patricia (2004). Meccan Trade and the Rise of Islam. Piscataway, New Jersey: Gorgias.  pp. 134-137
  8. ^ Crone, Patricia (2004). Meccan Trade and the Rise of Islam. Piscataway, New Jersey: Gorgias.  p. 137
  9. ^ Britannica 2002 Deluxe Edition CD-ROM, "Ka'bah."
  10. ^ Hajj-e-Baytullah. Baytullah - The House of Allah. Retrieved on August 13, 2006.
  11. ^ Azraqi, Akhbar Makkah, vol. 1, pp. 58-66
  12. ^ a b c Islam, iconography and the Taliban
  13. ^ a b c Conquest of Makkah - USC MSA
  14. ^ Guillaume, A. (1955). The Life of Muhammad. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  pp. 84-87
  15. ^ University of Southern California. The Prophet of Islam - His Biography. Retrieved on August 12, 2006.
  16. ^ Saifur Rahman al-Mubarakpuri, translated by Issam Diab (1979). Muhammad's Birth and Forty Years prior to Prophethood. Ar-Raheeq Al-Makhtum (The Sealed Nectar): Memoirs of the Noble Prophet. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  17. ^ Sahih Bukhari 1506, 1508;Sahih Muslim 1333
  18. ^ Sahih Bukhari 1509; Sahih Muslim 1333
  19. ^ Javed Ahmad Ghamidi. The Rituals of Hajj and ‘Umrah, Mizan, Al-Mawrid
  20. ^ Islam Online.net - Saudi Arabia Readies for Hajj Emergencies (December 29 2005), Retrieved November 30 2006.
  21. ^ Kaaba Colloquium
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Kaaba

The Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI) is the standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Islamic studies. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, ṣaḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, ṣaḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Javed Ahmad Ghamidi (Urdu: جاوید احمد غامدی) (b. ... Not to be confused with Tafsir al-Mizan (a quranic tafsir). ... Al-Mawrid is an Islamic research institute in Lahore, Pakistan founded in 1983 and then re-established in 1991. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links

Muslim articles on the Kaaba

Pictures, movies, models and Maps

Qibla

Coordinates: 21°25′21″N, 39°49′34″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kaaba - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1121 words)
The Kaaba is a large masonry structure roughly the shape of a cube.
The keys to the Kaaba are held by the Banī Shaybat (بني شيبة) tribe.
It is also claimed by the Shi'a that the Kaaba is the birth place of Ali ibn Abi Talib, the fourth caliph and the cousin and son-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.
Black Stone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (696 words)
It is one of the cornerstones of the Kaaba, the ancient stone building towards which all Muslims pray.
The Kaaba is located in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where it is surrounded by the enormous Masjid al-Haram, the Grand Mosque.
Early chroniclers say that the Kaaba was rebuilt during Muhammad's youth, and that there was some contention among the Quraysh, Mecca's ruling clan, as to who should have the honor of raising the Black Stone to its place in the new structure.
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