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Encyclopedia > Jutland
Jutland Peninsula

Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. The Jutland Peninsula also comprises the northernmost part of Germany. Download high resolution version (514x774, 13 KB)jutland peninsula, europe Licensed for use in accordance with the GFDL. This image was created using this online map creation tool. ... Download high resolution version (514x774, 13 KB)jutland peninsula, europe Licensed for use in accordance with the GFDL. This image was created using this online map creation tool. ... This article is about the Frisian languages, as spoken in the north of the Netherlands and Germany. ... Northern Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nordneddersassisch or Platt) is a Low Saxon dialect. ... Denmark was historically divided into three lands: Skåneland or Terra Scania Zealand and the islands Jutland See also: Lands of Sweden Categories: Stub | Historical regions ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The Baltic Sea The Kattegat (Danish), or Kattegatt (Swedish), is a bay of the North Sea and a continuation of the Skagerrak, bounded by Denmark and Sweden. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...

Contents

Geography

Its terrain is relatively flat, with heaths, plains and peat bogs in the west and a more elevated and slightly hilly terrain in the east. The Danish portion has an area of 29,775 km² (11,496 square miles) and a population of 2,513,601 (2007). Population density is 84 per km² (218 per sq.mi.). Peat in Lewis, Scotland Peat is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation matter. ...


The northernmost part of Jutland is separated by the Limfjord from the mainland, but is still commonly reckoned as part of the peninsula. It only became an island following a flood in 1825. The area is called the North Jutlandic Island, Vendsyssel-Thy (after its districts) or simply Jutland north of the Limfjord; it is only partly coterminous with the region called North Jutland. a bridge over Limfjord (Aalborg/Nørresundby) The Limfjord is a shallow sound in Denmark that separates the island of Vendsyssel-Thy from the rest of Jutland Peninsula. ... This article is about the geomorphological/geopolitical term; MAINLAND is also a cheese brand owned by Fonterra, a New Zealand dairy company. ... Flooding in Amphoe Sena, Ayutthaya Province, Thailand. ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Vendsyssel-Thy or Nørrejyske Ø (Danish for North Jutlandic Island) is the northernmost part of Denmark. ... Vendsyssel-Thy or Nørrejyske Ø (Danish for North Jutland Island) is the northmost part of the Jutland Peninsula (Denmark) and the second largest island of Denmark. ... Most modern English speakers think of thou as a relic of Shakespeares day This article is about the pronoun. ... Nordjyllands Amt (English North Jutland County) is a county in northern Denmark, on the peninsula of Jutland. ...


The islands Læsø, Anholt and Samsø in Kattegat and and Als at the rim of the Baltic Sea South are administratively and historically tied to Jutland, although especially the latter two are also regarded traditional districts of their own. Inhabitants of Als would agree to be South Jutlanders, but not necessarily Jutlanders. Læsø is the largest island in the North Sea bay of Kattegat and a municipality in northern Denmark in the county of North Jutland, 19 kilometers off the Jutland Peninsula. ... Anholt is a Danish island in the Kattegat. ... Samsø is an island in the North Sea bay of Kattegat 15 kilometers off the Jutland Peninsula. ... The Baltic Sea The Kattegat (Danish), or Kattegatt (Swedish), is a bay of the North Sea and a continuation of the Skagerrak, bounded by Denmark and Sweden. ... Als Als (German: ) is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...


The Danish Wadden Sea Islands and the German North Frisian Islands stretch along the southwest coast of Jutland in the German Bight. Windmill on Fanø The Danish Wadden Sea Islands are a group of islands on the western coast of Jutland, Denmark. ... Map of North Frisian Islands The North Frisian Islands are a group of islands in the Wadden Sea, a part of the North Sea, off the western coast of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany and Jutland, Denmark. ... Satellite view of the German Bight, Jutland to the right (east). ...


Southern border

The southern third of the peninsula is made up of the German Bundesland of Schleswig-Holstein, comprising the former duchies of Schleswig (also: South Jutland) and Holstein, both of which have passed back and forth between the Danes and various German rulers. The last adjustment of the border followed the Schleswig Plebiscites in 1920 and resulted in Denmark's regaining Northern Schleswig (Danish: Nordslesvig or more commonly today: Sønderjylland). Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 Bundesländer in Germany. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... Map over South Jutland (1918) South Jutland (Danish: Sønderjylland) is the name for the region south of the KongeÃ¥ in Jutland. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... The Schleswig Plebiscites were two plebiscites, organized according to section XII, articles 109 to 114 the Treaty of Versailles of June 28, 1919, in order to determine the future border between Denmark and Germany. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Sønderjyllands Amt (English: South Jutland County) is a county in southern Denmark, on the peninsula of Jutland. ...


The historical southern border of Jutland is the river Eider, which is also the border between the former duchies of Schleswig and Holstein, as well as the historical border between the Danish and German realms from c. 800 to 1864. Although the German part of Schleswig is historically Jutland, most residents would disagree or regard the question as irrelevant. The medieval Jutlandic Code applied for Schleswig until 1900 when it was replaced by the Prussian Civil Code. Some rarely used clauses of the Jutlandic Code still apply north of the Eider today, but not south of the Eider. Species Eiders are large seaducks in the genus Somateria. ... Events December 25, Rome, coronation of Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor by Pope Leo III. Celtic monks begin work on the Book of Kells on the Island of Iona. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Motto Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Government Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I (first)  - 1688–1701 Frederick III (last) King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I (first)  - 1888–1918 William II (last) Prime Minister1,2... Publication in the Reich Law Gazette on August 24, 1896 The Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch (or BGB) is the civil code of Germany. ...


Jutland Peninsula

Holstein has never been part of Jutland proper, but is geographically situated on the Jutland Peninsula. The peninsula is also called the Cimbrian Peninsula, Jutland-Holstein or Jutland-Schleswig-Holstein. The southern border of the peninsula is a matter of definition, at its furthest including all of Schleswig-Holstein down to the river Elbe, or just to a line between the mouth of the Elbe and Lübeck where the narrowing into a peninsula starts. Hamburg lies mainly north of the Elbe, but is not a part of Holstein and would rarely be regarded as lying on the Jutland Peninsula. Same accounts for Lübeck which only became incorporated into Holstein in 1937. This article is about a river in Central Europe. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Dialect

See also: Danish language: Dialects

Typical of Jutland are the distinctive Jutish (or Jutlandic) dialects which differ substantially from Standard Danish, especially West Jutlandic and South Jutlandic. Dialect usage, although in decline, is better preserved in Jutland than in eastern Denmark and the dialect-speaking Jutlander remains a stereotype among many Copenhageners and eastern Danes. Danish (dansk) is one of the North Germanic languages (also called Scandinavian languages), a sub-group of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Jutlandic or Jutish (Danish: jysk or, in old spelling, jydsk ) is a term for the western dialects of Danish, spoken on the peninsula of Jutland. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ...


Cities

The largest cities in the Danish section of Jutland are:

  1. Århus
  2. Aalborg
  3. Esbjerg
  4. Randers
  5. Kolding
  6. Vejle
  7. Horsens

The largest cities in the German part of Jutland or the Jutland Peninsula are: The cityhall of Århus. ... View of Aalborg railroad station from J.F. Kennedys Square, 2004 Aalborg (help· info) is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... Old watertower in Esbjerg View to Esbjerg harbour from the watertower (May 2005) Map of the municipality Esbjerg is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in Region Syddanmark (South Denmark Region) on the west coast of the Jutland peninsula in southwest Denmark. ... The old Town Hall on the square in Randers with statue of Niels Ebbesen in front. ... Evangelical Lutheran church in Kolding Kolding is a Danish seaport located at the head of Kolding Fjord in Region Syddanmark (Region of Southern Denmark). ... Vejle as seen from Vejle Fjord Bridge Vejle – in IPA: – town in Denmark and site of the council of both Vejle municipality (kommune) and Vejle County (amt), located in southeast of Jutland peninsula. ... Horsens is a Danish town in east Jutland. ...

  1. Kiel
  2. Flensburg
  3. Neumünster
Red: The Danish part of Jutland. Pink: The islands Læsø, Anholt, Samsø and Als, by administration and history parts of Jutland. Brown: Southern Schleswig, historically a part of Jutland, although now in Germany. Yellow: Holstein, not part of Jutland, but situated on the Jutland Peninsula.
Red: The Danish part of Jutland. Pink: The islands Læsø, Anholt, Samsø and Als, by administration and history parts of Jutland. Brown: Southern Schleswig, historically a part of Jutland, although now in Germany. Yellow: Holstein, not part of Jutland, but situated on the Jutland Peninsula.

Administratively, Jutland consists of Region Nordjylland, Region Midtjylland, and the western half of Region Syddanmark which also covers Funen. Kiel ( ) is a city in northern Germany and the capital of the Bundesland Schleswig-Holstein. ... Flensburg (Danish: Flensborg, Low Saxon: Flensborg, North Frisian: Flansborj) is an independent town in the North of the German state Schleswig-Holstein. ... Neumünster is one of four independent towns in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 332 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (964 × 1741 pixel, file size: 171 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 332 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (964 × 1741 pixel, file size: 171 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Southern Schleswig is a name for the geographical area covering the 30-40 most northern kilometers of Germany where Germany borders to Denmark. ... Region Nordjylland (English: Region North Jutland) is a future administrative region created under the Danish Municipal Reform, which replaces the traditional counties (amter) with five larger regions. ... Region Midtjylland (English: Region Central Jutland) is an administrative region of Denmark established on January 1, 2007 as part of the 2007 Danish Municipal Reform, which replaced the traditional counties (amter) with five larger regions. ... Region Syddanmark (English: Region South Denmark) is a new region created under the Danish Municipal Reform, which replaces the traditional counties (amter) with five larger regions as well as unites a number of smaller municipalities into larger units. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ...


History

Main articles: History of Denmark and History of Schleswig-Holstein.

Jutland has historically been one of the three lands of Denmark, the other two being Scania and Zealand. Before that, according to Ptolomy, Jutland or the Cimbric Chersonese was the home of Teutons, Cimbrians and Charudes. This is a history of the Kingdom of Denmark and the areas comprising modern day Denmark. ... // Jutland is a long peninsula in Northern Europe, and the current Schleswig-Holstein is its southern part. ... Denmark was historically divided into three lands: Skåneland or Terra Scania Zealand and the islands Jutland See also: Lands of Sweden Categories: Stub | Historical regions ... Scania (SkÃ¥ne in Swedish  ) is a geographical region of Sweden on the southernmost tip of the Scandinavian peninsula, a historical province (landskap)[1] of the Kingdom of Sweden, since 1997 a county (Län) of Sweden, before 1658 part of the Kingdom of Denmark. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... There have been several people named Ptolemy: Claudius Ptolemaeus, called Ptolemy, was an ancient Greek geographer and astronomer; The Ptolemaic dynasty of ancient Egypt included several kings by that name (for a full list, see that article); Ptolemy, a disciple of the Gnostic Valentinius is known only for writing a... This entry is about the tribe of the Teutons. ... Cimbrian refers to any of several local Upper German dialects spoken in northeastern Italy, especially in South Tyrol. ... Charudes is the scholarly Latinization of an ethnic identity known in Ptolemy as the Charoudes. ...


Some Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and Vandals moved from continental Europe to Great Britain starting in c. 450 AD. The Angles themselves gave their name to the new emerging kingdoms called England (Angle-land). This is thought by some to be related to the drive of the Huns from Asia across Europe, although the arrival of the Danes would more likely have been a major contributory factor, since conflicts between the Danes and the Jutes were both many and bloody.[citation needed] White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... Jutland peninsula The Jutes were a Germanic people who are believed to have originated from Jutland in modern Denmark and part of the Frisian coast. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe which entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... Continental Europe, also referred to as mainland Europe or simply the Continent, is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and, at times, peninsulas. ... Events August 25 - Marcian proclaimed Eastern Roman Emperor by Aspar and Pulcheria. ... The Huns were an early confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... Small Text For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ...


The Danes took considerable steps to protect themselves from the depredations of the Christian Frankish emperors, principally with the building of the Danevirke, a wall stretching across South Jutland at the shortest distance from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea. Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. ... // For the town in New Zealand, see Dannevirke. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...


Charlemagne removed pagan Saxons from the southernmost part of the peninsula at the Baltic Sea — the later Holstein area — and moved Abodrites (or Obotrites), a group of Wendish Slavs who pledged allegiance to Charlemagne and who had for the most part converted to Christianity, into the area instead. Charlemagne and Pippin the Hunchback. ... Look up pagan, heathen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... The Obotrites (sometimes Abodrites, Obodrites) were a group of Slavic peoples who had in the 6th century settled in the regions later known as Mecklenburg and Schleswig-Holstein in what is now north-eastern Germany. ... Wends (German: Wenden, Latin: Venedi) is the English name for some Slavic people from north-central Europe. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar...


To speed transit between the Baltic and the North Sea, canals have been built across the peninsula, notably the Eiderkanal in the late 18th century and the Kiel Canal, completed in 1895 and still in use. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Kiel Canal (in German Nord-Ostsee-Kanal, formerly Kaiser-Wilhelm-Kanal) is a 98 kilometre long waterway linking the North Sea at Brunsbüttel, Germany to the Baltic Sea at Kiel-Holtenau, Germany. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


During World War I, the Battle of Jutland was one of the largest naval battles in history. In this pitched battle, the British Royal Navy engaged the German Navy leading to massive casualties and ship losses on both sides. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Grand Fleet of the Royal Navy High Seas Fleet of the Kaiserliche Marine Commanders Sir John Jellicoe Sir David Beatty Reinhard Scheer Franz von Hipper Strength 28 battleships 9 battlecruisers 8 heavy cruisers 26 light cruisers 78 destroyers 1 minelayer 1 seaplane carrier 16 battleships 5 battlecruisers 6 pre... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Jutland

  Results from FactBites:
 
HMS Jutland (D62) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (327 words)
HMS Jutland (D62) was a later or 1943 Battle-class fleet destroyer of the United Kingdom's Royal Navy.
She was named after the Battle of Jutland, the largest naval battle of the First World War.
In September 1948, Jutland in company with the two carriers Theseus and Vengeance, as-well as two of her sister-ships and a frigate, deployed on a cruise mainly to South Africa, visiting a number of ports on the way.
AllRefer.com - Jutland, Scandinavia (Scandinavian Physical Geography) - Encyclopedia (358 words)
The east coast of Jutland is fertile and densely populated.
Dairying and livestock raising are the main occupations of E Jutland; arhus and alborg are the chief ports.
Jutland was known to the ancients as the Cimbric Peninsula (Lat.
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