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Encyclopedia > Justice Society of America
Justice Society of America


The cover to Justice Society of America vol. 3, #1.
Art by Alex Ross. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x832, 119 KB) Summary By Alex Ross. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance All Star Comics #3 (Winter 1940)
Created by Sheldon Mayer
Gardner Fox
Roster
Citizen Steel
Cyclone
Damage
Doctor Mid-Nite
The Flash
Green Lantern
Hawkman
Hourman
Jakeem Thunder
Liberty Belle
Mister Terrific
Obsidian
Power Girl
Sandman
Stargirl
Starman
Wildcat (Ted Grant)
Wildcat (Tom Bronson)
See: List of Justice Society members

The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. Conceived by editor Sheldon Mayer and writer Gardner Fox, the JSA first appeared in All Star Comics #3 (Winter 1940). DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... Sheldon Mayer was an American comic book writer. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Steel is a name used by several fictional characters owned and published by DC Comics. ... Cyclone (alias Maxine Hunkel) is a fictional superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... Damage is a DC Comics superhero who first appeared in a comic book of the same name during the Zero Hour crisis. ... Doctor Mid-Nite is a DC Comics superhero. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Carter Hall is a DC Comics superhero, the original Hawkman. ... Hourman (Rick Tyler) is a fictional character, a superhero who was created by Roy Thomas, Dann Thomas and Todd McFarlane and first appeared in Infinity Inc. ... Jakeem Johnny Thunder (initially called J.J. Thunder, a name he dislikes) is a fictional character published by DC Comics and a member of the current version of the superhero team the Justice Society of America. ... Jesse Chambers is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Michael Holt is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Obsidian is a fictional character who has been both a superhero and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Sanderson Sandy Hawkins, formerly known as Sandy the Golden Boy, now known as Sand, is a fictional character, superhero in the DC Comics universe created by Mort Weisinger and Paul Norris. ... Courtney Whitmore is the fictional superheroine Stargirl in the DC Comics Universe. ... Star Boy is the name of several comic book characters owned by DC Comics. ... Wildcat is the name of four DC Comics characters, three of them superheroes. ... Wildcat is the name of four DC Comics characters, three of them superheroes. ... The Justice Society of America is a team of comic book superheroes published by DC Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Sheldon Mayer was an American comic book writer. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ...


Unlike subsequent "all-star" teams, the JSA was limited to heroes not already featured in their own titles because the publisher wanted to expose their lesser known characters. Hence, Superman and Batman were only honorary members and Flash and Green Lantern's early tenures were brief, ending when each character was awarded his own book. However, a 1944 change in policy allowed them back into the group. Other popular members were Hawkman, the Spectre, Hourman, Doctor Fate and the Atom. Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Carter Hall is a DC Comics superhero, the original Hawkman. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Al Pratt is a character in the DC Comics Universe, the original hero to fight crime as the Atom. ...


The team was popular throughout the 1940s, but after superheroes fell out of favor, its series All Star Comics became All-Star Western in 1951, ceasing the team’s adventures. During the Silver Age, DC reinvented several popular Justice Society members and banded many of them together in the Justice League of America. However, instead of considering the JSA replaced, DC revealed that the team existed on "Earth-Two" and the Justice League on "Earth-One". This allowed for annual, cross-dimensional team-ups of the teams, lasting from 1963 until 1985. It also allowed for new series, such as All-Star Squadron, Infinity, Inc. and a new All-Star Comics, which featured the JSA, their children and their heirs. These series explored the issues of aging, generational differences and contrasts between the Golden Age and subsequent eras. All-Star Western is a comic published by DC Comics. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... First appearance of Earth-Two Earth-Two was a fictional reality within the stories of DC Comics. ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics fictional superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981). ... Infinity Inc. ...


In 1985, DC rewrote its continuity in the Crisis on Infinite Earths maxi-series. The series merged all of the company's various realities into one, placing the JSA as World War II-era predecessors to the company's modern characters. A few unsuccessful and often controversial revivals were attempted, until a new series, titled JSA, was launched in 1999, continuing until July 2006. A new Justice Society of America series was launched in December 2006. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... A maxiseries or maxi-series is an occasional title given to a comic book miniseries which lasts for eight issues or longer (usually twelve) and forms a complete story. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Contents



All Star Comics (Golden Age)

A classic Justice Society line-upCover to The Justice Society Returns. Art by Dave Johnson.
A classic Justice Society line-up
Cover to The Justice Society Returns. Art by Dave Johnson.

The JSA first appeared in All-American Comics' All Star Comics #3 (Winter 1940), during the Golden age of comic books. The team initially included National Comics' Doctor Fate, Hour-Man (as it was then spelled), the Spectre and the Sandman and All-American's Atom, the Flash, Green Lantern and Hawkman. An in-house rule (explicitly laid out on the last page of All Star Comics #5, reprinted on p.206 of All Star Comics Archives - Vol. 1) required that whenever a member received his or her own title, he or she would leave All Star Comics, becoming an "honorary member" of the JSA. Thus, the Flash was replaced by Johnny Thunder after #6; Green Lantern left shortly thereafter for the same reason. This also explains why Superman and Batman were established as already being "honorary" members prior to All Star Comics #3; how these two heroes helped found the JSA before becoming honorary members was not explained until DC Special #29 in 1977. Hawkman is the only member to appear in every JSA adventure in the original run of All Star Comics, a fact invoked sixty years later in the current JSA series when Hawkman temporarily takes command of the team. The Atom missed two issues. Image File history File links Classic_JSA.jpg Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Classic_JSA.jpg Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Justice Society Returns is a story arc that ran through a number of comic books published by DC Comics in 1999, reviving the Golden Age superhero team, which had previously been revived in the 1980s. ... In comic books, the term first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Sandman, alias Wesley Dodds, is a fictional masked crimefighter in the DC Comics universe. ... Al Pratt is a character in the DC Comics Universe, the original hero to fight crime as the Atom. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Carter Hall is a DC Comics superhero, the original Hawkman. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Carter Hall is a DC Comics superhero, the original Hawkman. ... Al Pratt is a character in the DC Comics Universe, the original hero to fight crime as the Atom. ...


All Star Comics is also notable for featuring the first appearance of Wonder Woman, in #8 (Dec. 1941). Unlike the other characters who had their own titles, she was allowed to appear in the book, but only as the JSA's secretary and did not actively take part in most adventures until much later in the series (a fact sometimes seen as chauvinistic today), although she was excluded from the title due to the rules that had excluded Flash, Green Lantern, Superman and Batman from the title. It was also shown during interviews for the All Star Comics Archive series published by DC Comics that William Moulton Marston had a hand in this issue. It seems her two Justice Society story arc appearances (as opposed to her front and back-end appearances in All Star) were actually written by Marston. Gardner Fox (then-writer) basically excluded her from any storylines (other than the front and back-end appearances) until after Marston's death. For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Chauvinism (IPA:) is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group. ...


The early JSA adventures were written by Gardner Fox and illustrated by a legion of artists including E. E. Hibbard, Jack Burnley, Jack Kirby and Joe Kubert. The first JSA story featured the team's first meeting, a framing sequence for each member telling a story of an individual exploit. In the next issue, the team worked together on a common case, but each story from there on still featured the members individually on a mission involving part of the case, and then banding together in the end to wrap things up. Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Jack Burnley is the pen name of Hardin Burnley, a comic-book artist active from 1929 until 1976. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ...


By All Star Comics #24, a real-world schism between Detective Comics, Inc. and All-American Publications — a nominally independent company run by Charlie Gaines and Jack Liebowitz — had occurred, which resulted in the Detective Comics, Inc heroes being removed from the title. As a result, Flash and Green Lantern returned to the book. Eight months later, Detective Comics bought out Charlie Gaines' share of All-American and the two companies merged to form National Comics. However, the JSA roster remained mostly the same for the rest of the series. The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ...


All Star Comics and the Golden Age adventures of the JSA ended with #57, the title becoming All-Star Western, with no superheroes. While Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman continued to have their own adventures, most of the characters lay dormant for several years during the slump in superhero comic books in the early to mid-1950s.


The explanation for the team's disappearance and the inactivity of most of its roster after the early 1950s was first given in Adventure Comics #466 ("The Defeat of the Justice Society!"; December, 1979) by writer Paul Levitz, which explained that most of the Society chose to disband and retire rather than appear in front of the fictional Joint Un-American Activities Committee, which demanded that they unmask themselves; this was later retconned into the real House Un-American Activities Committee. Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


The chairmanship of the Justice Society mostly resided with Hawkman, although initially the Flash and later Green Lantern took their turns at leading the team. For a brief period in 1942 they were known as the Justice Battalion, as they became an extension of the armed forces of the United States of America during World War II. It was later revealed that the reason the JSA didn't invade Europe and end the war was due to the influence of the Spear of Destiny which caused the JSA's most powerful members to fall under the control of its wielder, Adolf Hitler. It was also revealed in the 1980s that the JSA had a loose affiliation with the All-Star Squadron; the All-Star Squadron's adventures were set in the 1940s, and considered to have happened concurrently with the Justice Society's, an example of "retconning", or retroactive continuity, where new material is inserted into already existent continuity. Both teams were the brainchild of American president Franklin D. Roosevelt. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Lance. ... Hitler redirects here. ... The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics fictional superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981). ... FDR redirects here. ...


The headquarters for the JSA was initially a hotel suite in New York City, and after the war, the team settled on a brownstone building in Civic City and later in Gotham City. For a very brief period, the JSA was provided a satellite headquarters, much like their later day counterparts, the JLA; however, this turned out to be a deathtrap orchestrated by a crooked senator's henchman from Eliminations, Inc. The Gotham City brownstone remained unoccupied until years later, when the team was active again.


The entire original run of All Star Comics has been collected in hardcover volumes in DC's series of Archive Editions. DC Archive Editions, edited by Dale Crain for DC Comics, collect early, sometimes rare, comic books published by DC and other publishers into a permanent hardcover series. ...


Guests in Justice League of America (Silver Age)

Having successfully re-introduced several of their Golden Age characters (Flash, Green Lantern, etc.) during the late 1950s, DC tapped industry veteran (and former Justice Society writer) Gardner Fox to pen a new version of the Justice Society, which Fox re-named the Justice League. As Barry Allen (the Silver Age Flash) was to Jay Garrick (the Golden Age Flash), so the Justice League was to the Justice Society: the same team, but with an updated roster and a fresh start. Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


In Flash #123 (September 1961), the Silver Age Flash met his Golden Age counterpart, Jay Garrick, who (along with the rest of the original Justice Society) was said to inhabit an alternate universe. This meeting set the stage for Justice League of America #21 (August 1963), wherein the Golden Age Justice Society teamed up with the Silver Age Justice League to combat a team of villains from both worlds. This was the first of a series of annual summer team-ups of the two supergroups, which tradition was carried on until 1985. These summer meetings produced a number of notable events in JSA history, including the Black Canary leaving to join the Justice League, the return of a Golden Age team called the Seven Soldiers of Victory, and the creation of a team called the Freedom Fighters composed of several one-time Quality Comics heroes. Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... The Seven Soldiers of Victory (also known as Laws Legionaires) is a fictional team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... Freedom Fighters is the name of a DC Comics comic book superhero team made up of characters acquired from the defunct company Quality Comics. ... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ...


Unlike most superhero characters, the JSA members were portrayed as middle-aged — and often wiser — versions of their younger, contemporary counterparts.


Other appearances

Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... A showcase is a performance or exhibit highlighting the work of a performer or group of performers, a particular culture or ethnic group, or of a nationality. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ...

Return to All-Star Comics (Modern Age)

The post-Crisis version of the JSA's Golden Age roster.

The JSA's popularity gradually grew until they regained their own title. All-Star Comics #58 (January–February 1976) saw the group return as mentors to a younger set of heroes (briefly called the "Super Squad", until they were integrated into the JSA proper). This run only lasted until #74, with a brief run thereafter in Adventure Comics #461–466, but it had three significant developments: It introduced the popular character Power Girl (All-Star Comics #58); it chronicled the death of the Golden Age Batman (Adventure Comics #461–462); and, after nearly 40 years, it finally provided the JSA with an origin story in DC Special #29. This run was mainly written by Gerry Conway and Paul Levitz, and artists included Wally Wood, Joe Staton, Keith Giffen and Bob Layton. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Gerard F. Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... Wallace Wally Wood (born June 17, 1927, Menahga, Minnesota, United States; died November 2, 1981), was an American writer-artist best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad. ... Joe Staton (born January 19, 1948 in North Carolina), is an American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Bob Layton is a USA comic book artist. ...


The series was noteworthy for depicting the heroes as having aged into their 50s; the artwork gave them graying hair and lined faces. It was highly unusual, then or now, for a comic book to have heroes this old. Most obscure the timelines or periodically relaunch the series to keep the characters youthful. This depiction was a consequence of the fact that the heroes were closely linked to World War II era. This became problematic in the 1980s when the heroes would logically be well into their 60s. The explanation given for this by writer Roy Thomas in All-Star Squadron Annual #3 was that the team (and several friends) had absorbed energy from the magical villain Ian Karkul during an adventure in the 1940s that retarded the aging process. Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics fictional superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981). ...


Meanwhile, the JSA continued their annual team-ups with the Justice League. Notable events included meeting the Fawcett Comics heroes, including Captain Marvel, the death of Mr. Terrific and an explanation for why Black Canary hadn't aged much despite debuting in the 1940s. A particularly popular JLA/JSA team-up came in #195–197, in which the two teams had to contend with a reformed Secret Society of Super-Villains, lavishly drawn by George Pérez. Whiz Comics #2, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, the companys most popular character. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Terry Sloane is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Universe. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSOSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... New Teen Titans #1. ...


A series taking place in the team's original setting of the wartime 1940s called All-Star Squadron featured the JSA frequently along with several other Golden Age superheroes. This led to a spin-off, modern day series entitled Infinity, Inc. which starred the children and heirs of the JSA members. Both series were written by noted JSA fan Roy Thomas and featured art by Rich Buckler, Jerry Ordway, Todd McFarlane and others. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics fictional superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981). ... Infinity Inc. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Cover to Daredevil #131. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ...


In 1985, DC retconned many details of the DC Universe in Crisis on Infinite Earths. Among the changes, the Golden Age Superman, Batman, Robin and Wonder Woman ceased to exist, and the Earth-One/Earth-Two dichotomy was resolved by merging the Multiverse into a single universe. This posed a variety of problems for the JSA, whose history—especially in the 1980s comics — was strongly tied up in these four characters. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


The JLA/JSA team-ups ended during the Crisis with Justice League of America #244.


Other appearances

Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics fictional superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981). ... Infinity Inc. ... America vs. ... Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ...

After Crisis on Infinite Earths

One of Roy Thomas' efforts to resolve the Crisis-created inconsistencies was to introduce some analogues to Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, in a sequel to All-Star Squadron entitled The Young All-Stars. The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981–1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic...


Meanwhile, DC editoral decided that the time had come to write off the JSA from active continuity. A 1986 one-shot issue called The Last Days of the Justice Society involved the JSA battling the forces of evil while merged with the Norse gods in an ever-repeating Ragnarok (written by Thomas, with art by David Ross and Mike Gustovich). Only Power Girl, the Star-Spangled Kid, the Spectre and Dr. Fate escaped the cataclysm. In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... Norse gods Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including Jotun, the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... // [edit] Character history [edit] Star-Spangled Kid The original Star-Spangled Kid was Sylvester Pemberton, a Golden Age character. ...


Thomas also revised the JSA's origin for post-Crisis continuity in Secret Origins #31. Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ...


Justice Society of America (volumes 1 & 2)

Justice Society of America vol. 2, #1.
Justice Society of America vol. 2, #1.
Justice Society of America (vols. 1 & 2)
Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format (vol. 1): Mini-series
(vol. 2): Ongoing
Publication dates (vol. 1):
April 1991 - November 1991
(vol. 2):
August 1992 - May 1993
Number of issues (vol. 1): 8
(vol. 2): 10
Creative team
Writer(s) various
Artist(s) various
Creator(s) Len Strazewski

Fan interest, however, resulted in DC bringing back the JSA in the early 1990s. An eight-issue Justice Society of America limited series telling an untold JSA story set in the 1950s was published in 1991. In the final issues of the four-issue Armageddon: Inferno limited series, the JSA returned to the modern-day DC Universe when Waverider transported the "daemen" of the interdimensional Abraxis to Asgard as a substitute for the JSA in the Ragnarok cycle, allowing the team to return to Earth. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x603, 80 KB) Cover to Justice Society of America (vol. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x603, 80 KB) Cover to Justice Society of America (vol. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


In 1992, the JSA was given an ongoing monthly series titled Justice Society of America, written by Len Strazewski with art by Mike Parobeck, featuring the original team adjusting to life after returning from Ragnarok. Though Justice Socity of America was intended as an ongoing series, and was popular with readers, it was cancelled after only ten issues. Writer Len Strazewski, in an interview explaining the cancellation of this surprise hit series, said, "It was a capricious decision made personally by Mike Carlin because he didn't like Mike's artwork or my writing and believed that senior citizen super-heroes was not what DC should be publishing. He made his opinion clear to me several times after the cancellation." Much more "cartoony" than the more realistic artwork favored at the time, Parobeck's art was a pioneering example of the "animation" style that would become quite popular with Batman: The Animated Series. Justice Society of America included the first appearance of Jesse Quick, the daughter of All-Star Squadron members Liberty Belle and Johnny Quick. Mike Parobeck was the working name of Michael J. Parobeck (born July 1965, died 2 July 1996), an American comics artist best known for his work on the Batman Adventures comic book. ... Ten can refer to: 10, a number AD 10, a year 10 BC, a year 10, a 1979 motion picture Ten, any one of a number of rock albums Network Ten, an Australian television network Trans-European Networks (TEN) Total Entertainment Network, an early-1990s attempt at an online server... Michael Mike Carlin is a comic book writer and editor, he worked principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and is currently an Executive Editor at DC Comics. ... Jesse Chambers is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... For other Liberty Belle, see Liberty Belle (disambiguation). ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ...


Not long after, most of the team was incapacitated or killed off in the controversial 1994 crossover series Zero Hour. During the battle between the Justice Society and the villain Extant, the latter removes the chronal energies keeping the Justice Society young. The Atom, Dr. Mid-Nite and Hourman die immediately. Hawkman and Hawkgirl (who were separated from the rest of the Justice Society by being pulled into the timestream) merge into a new Hawkgod being, resulting in their deaths. Dr. Fate dies of the resulting aging shortly after Zero Hour. Green Lantern is kept young due to the mystical effects of the Starheart but loses his ring and subsequently changes his name to Sentinel. The rest of the team is now too physically old to continue fighting crime and retires. Starman retires and passes on the Starman legacies to his sons resulting in one of the new series created following Zero Hour, James Robinson's Starman. The new Starman series brought new attention to the JSA legacy. Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... Hank Hall is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe who first appeared in Showcase #75 as Hawk of Hawk and Dove. ... Doctor Mid-Nite is a DC Comics superhero. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... Katar Hol is a DC Comics superhero, the Silver Age Hawkman. ... For other people with the same name, see Ted Knight (disambiguation). ... James Dale Robinson is a writer of comic books and screenplays, notably of the comic book series Starman. ... Starman is Jack Knight, a comic book superhero in the DC Comics Universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ...

JSA


The cover to JSA #1. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x618, 59 KB) Cover to JSA #1. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Publication dates August 1999 - July 2006
Number of issues 87
Creative team
Writer(s) James Robinson, David S. Goyer, Geoff Johns, Paul Levitz
Artist(s) various

DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... James Dale Robinson is a writer of comic books and screenplays, notably of the comic book series Starman. ... David S. Goyer is a comic book writer, screenwriter, and film director. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ...

JSA

The Justice Society was again revived in 1999 in a popular and critically acclaimed series (called simply JSA) which mixed the few remaining original members with younger counterparts. This incarnation of the team was focused on the theme of generational legacy and of carrying on the heroic example established by their predecessors. The modern JSA was unique among superhero teams in that its membership contained three different generations of characters. The series was launched by James Robinson and David S. Goyer. Goyer later co-wrote the series with Geoff Johns, who went on write the series solo after Goyer's departure. The series featured the art of Stephen Sadowski, Leonard Kirk and Don Kramer, among others. In 2005, JSA's popularity led to a spin-off series, JSA Classified, which tells stories of the team at various points in its existence, as well as spotlighting specific members in solo stories. James Dale Robinson is a writer of comic books and screenplays, notably of the comic book series Starman. ... David S. Goyer is a comic book writer, screenwriter, and film director. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Leonard Kirk (Leonard Kirk born xxx) is an American born Comic Book artist living in Canada. ... Don Kramer is a Korean-born American comics artist. ...


As a result of the events of Infinite Crisis, some of the surviving Golden Age characters, such as Wildcat and the Gentleman Ghost, are aware of the existence of Earth-Two. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Wildcat is the name of four DC Comics characters, three of them superheroes. ... The Gentleman Ghost is a recurring nemesis of Hawkman and Hawkgirl. ...


52 Week 52 revealed the existence of a new Multiverse and a new Earth-2. This Earth includes an alternate version of the Justice Society with alternate versions of the Flash (Jay Garrick), Robin, Wonder Woman, Huntress (Helena Wayne), the Atom (Al Pratt), Jade, Obsidian, Green Lantern (Alan Scott), and Dr. Fate (Kent Nelson) as members. Its versions of Power Girl and Superman (Kal-L) are shown to be missing. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Not to be confused with Kal-El, the mainstream Superman. ...


Other appearances

  • The Last Days of the Justice Society Special 1986
  • Secret Origins vol. 3, #31
  • The Young All-Stars: various issues
  • The Golden Age #1-4 (alternate history story based on the All-Star Squadron set-up, written by James Robinson and drawn by Paul Smith)
  • Zero Hour #4-0 (this series was published with numbering in reverse order, reflecting a "countdown")
  • Wonder Woman vol. 2, #130-133 (1940s adventure by John Byrne, retroactively establishes Queen Hippolyta as the Golden Age Wonder Woman)
  • Sandman Mystery Theatre #1-70 (solo Sandman series written by Matt Wagner, set in the 1940s; not strictly in regular DCU continuity)
  • Sandman Mystery Theatre Annual #1
  • JLA #28-31 ("Crisis Times Five" - first post-Crisis JLA/JSA team-up, introduces Jakeem Thunder)
  • The Justice Society Returns! issues (issues named with various 1940s-era titles, set in the 1940s)
  • JLA/JSA: Virtue And Vice (hardcover graphic novel)

Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ... The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981–1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... James Dale Robinson is a writer of comic books and screenplays, notably of the comic book series Starman. ... X-Men cover by Paul Smith and John Sibal. ... Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... For the Marvel Comics character, see: Hippolyta (Marvel Comics). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Sandman, alias Wesley Dodds, is a fictional masked crimefighter in the DC Comics universe. ... Mage: The Hero Defined cover by Matt Wagner Grendel: Devil Tales cover by Matt Wagner Matt Wagner (born 1961) is an American comic book writer and artist best known as the creator of two irregular series, Mage and Grendel. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Jakeem Johnny Thunder (initially called J.J. Thunder, a name he dislikes) is a fictional character published by DC Comics and a member of the current version of the superhero team the Justice Society of America. ...

One Year Later

After the events of Infinite Crisis, JSA members Jay Garrick, Alan Scott, and Ted Grant decided to revive the Justice Society after the World War III event that was chronicled in 52. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


Justice Society of America vol. 3 (2006 - current)

Justice Society of America (vol. 3)


Variant incentive cover to Justice Society of America #1.
Art by Dale Eaglesham. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 907 pixel, file size: 211 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is from a comic strip, webcomic or from the cover or interior of a comic book. ... Dale Eaglesham is a veteran comic book illustrator who has been working in the industry since 1986. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Publication dates December 2006 - Current
Number of issues 10 (as of November 2007)
Creative team
Writer(s) Geoff Johns
Artist(s) Dale Eaglesham

On December 6, 2006 a new series was launched with the creative team of Geoff Johns (writer), Dale Eaglesham (pencils), and Alex Ross (cover art). According to a pre-release interview in Newsarama, Alex Ross also has the "honorary" title of "creative advisor".[citation needed] DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Dale Eaglesham is a veteran comic book illustrator who has been working in the industry since 1986. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ...


The beginning of the new series shows JSA veterans Flash, Green Lantern and Wildcat choosing members of the new generation of superheroes to train. Continuing a major theme from the previous JSA title, this new series focuses on the team being the caretakers of the superhero legacy from one generation to the next. Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Wildcat is the name of four DC Comics characters, three of them superheroes. ...


Initially, they invite somewhat experienced heroes such as Mister Terrific, Power Girl, the new Liberty Belle, Hourman, Stargirl and Doctor Mid-Nite, many of whom had worked with previous incarnations of the JSA. They also seek out new young individuals with little or no experience as heroes, such as Maxine Hunkel, Damage and a new Starman, all of whom have connections to heroes from the Golden Age. Michael Holt is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Jesse Chambers is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Hourman (Rick Tyler) is a fictional character, a superhero who was created by Roy Thomas, Dann Thomas and Todd McFarlane and first appeared in Infinity Inc. ... Courtney Whitmore is the fictional superheroine Stargirl in the DC Comics Universe. ... Doctor Mid-Nite is a DC Comics superhero. ... Cyclone (alias Maxine Hunkel) is a fictional superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... Damage is a DC Comics superhero who first appeared in a comic book of the same name during the Zero Hour crisis. ... Starman is a name used by several different fictional DC Comics superheroes, most prominently Ted Knight and his son Jack. ...


Wildcat finds out he has a grown son—Tom Bronson who can change into a "were-panther" creature—and inducts him into the JSA. At the same time, the JSA uncovers Vandal Savage's plans to assassinate the original members of the Society and their descendants. Nathan Heywood, Commander Steel's grandson, is introduced and becomes Citizen Steel. Vandal Savage is a fictional character and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Steel is a name used by several fictional characters owned and published by DC Comics. ... Commander Steel is the name of a fictional characters, a DC Comics superheroes. ...


Power Girl is elected chairwoman of the Justice Society. The JSA teams up with the JLA in "The Lightning Saga" crossover soon afterwards. For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The Lightning Saga is a five-part 2007 crossover event between the new Justice League of America and Justice Society of America series. ...


Some time later, the Justice Society helps to stop a fire started at a paint factory. Starman opens a black hole inside the factory in an attempt to suck all the flames into it and put out the fire, but instead opens a dimensional rift which accidentally pulls the Superman from Earth-22 into their world. After Starman reveals the exsitence of the Multiverse, the alternate Superman escapes from the Justice Society's headquarters and stops a girl from committing suicide. Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Kingdom Come was a four-issue comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics. ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ...


Solicitations for issue 12 reveal that Jakeem Thunder will return along with the new Mr. America, Judomaster, Amazing Man.
Terry Hollywood Hogan Bollea Terry Bollea, aka Hulk Hogan and later Hollywood Hogan, (born August 11, 1953) is an American professional wrestler and actor. ... A Charlton Comics super hero created in 1965 by writer Joe Gill & artist Frank McLaughlin in Special War Series #4 Cover. ... Amazing Man is a name used by several fictional characters, all of them superheroes. ...


Collected editions

The Golden Age issues of All Star Comics have been collected in the following hardcover DC Archive Editions: This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... DC Archive Editions, edited by Dale Crain for DC Comics, collect early, sometimes rare, comic books published by DC and other publishers into a permanent hardcover series. ...

# Title Issues Collected Writers/Pencillers Pages ISBN
0 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 0 All Star Comics #1-2 Gardner Fox, et al. 144 ISBN 1401207915
1 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 1 All Star Comics #3-6 Gardner Fox, et al. 272 ISBN 1563890194
2 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 2 All Star Comics #7-10 Gardner Fox, et al. 256 ISBN 0930289129
3 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 3 All Star Comics #11-14 Gardner Fox, et al. 240 ISBN 1563893703
4 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 4 All Star Comics #15-18 Gardner Fox, et al. 224 ISBN 1563894335
5 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 5 All Star Comics #19-23 Gardner Fox, et al. 224 ISBN 1563894971
6 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 6 All Star Comics #24-28 Gardner Fox, et al. 240 ISBN 1563896362
7 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 7 All Star Comics #29-33 Gardner Fox, et al. 216 ISBN 1563897202
8 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 8 All Star Comics #34-38 Gardner Fox, et al. 208 ISBN 1563898128
9 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 9 All Star Comics #39-43 Gardner Fox, et al. 192 ISBN 140120001X
10 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 10 All Star Comics #44-49 Gardner Fox, et al. 216 ISBN 1401201598
11 All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 11 All Star Comics #50-57 Gardner Fox, et al. 276 ISBN 1401204031

(Note: Volume 0 was published after Volume 11)


The JSA (1999 - 2006) series has been collected in the following trade paperbacks:

Vol. # Title Issues Collected Writers/Pencillers Pages ISBN
1 Justice Be Done JSA #1 - 5, JSA Secret Files #1 James Robinson, David S. Goyer, Steve Sadowski 160 ISBN 1-56389-620-6
2 Darkness Falls JSA #6 - 15 David S. Goyer, Geoff Johns, Steve Sadowski 232 ISBN 1-56389-739-3
3 Return Of Hawkman JSA #16 - 25, JSA Secret Files #1 David S. Goyer, Geoff Johns, Steve Sadowski 256 ISBN 1-56389-912-4
4 Fair Play JSA #26 - 31, JSA Secret Files #2 Geoff Johns 176 ISBN 1-56389-959-0
5 Stealing Thunder JSA #32 - 38 Geoff Johns, David S. Goyer, Leonard Kirk 176 ISBN 1-56389-994-9
6 Savage Times JSA #39 - 45 Geoff Johns, David S. Goyer 168 ISBN 1-4012-0253-5
7 Princes Of Darkness JSA #46 - 55 Geoff Johns, David S. Goyer 256 ISBN 1-4012-0469-4
8 Black Reign JSA #56 - 58, Hawkman #23 - 25 Geoff Johns, Don Kramer, Rags Morales 144 ISBN 1-4012-0480-5
9 Lost JSA #59 - #67 Geoff Johns 208 ISBN 1-4012-0722-7
10 Black Vengeance JSA #68 - 75 Geoff Johns 208 ISBN 1-4012-0966-1
11 Mixed Signals JSA #76 - 81 Geoff Johns, Keith Champagne 144 ISBN 1-4012-0967-X
12 Ghost Stories JSA #82 - 87 Paul Levitz, Rags Morales, George Perez, Jerry Ordway 144 ISBN 1-4012-1196-8

Several JSA mini-series, Elseworlds (non-canon) graphic novels, Silver Age collections and one-shots have been collected in the following trade paperbacks:

# Title Issues Collected Writers/Pencillers Pages ISBN
1 Justice Society: Volume 1 All-Star Comics #58 - 67, DC Special #29 Gerry Conway, Paul Levitz 224 ISBN 1-4012-0970-X
2 Justice Society: Volume 2 All-Star Comics #68 - 74, Adventure Comics #461 - 466 Paul Levitz, Joe Staton, Bob Layton 224 ISBN 1-4012-1194-1
3 JSA: The Liberty Files (Elseworlds) JSA: The Liberty Files #1 - 2, JSA: The Unholy Three #1 - 2 Dan Jolley, Tony Harris 264 ISBN 1-4012-0203-9
4 JSA: The Golden Age (Elseworlds) The Golden Age #1-4 James Robinson 200 ISBN 1-4012-0711-1
5 JSA: All-Stars JSA: All-Stars #1 - 8 Various Artists 208 ISBN 1-4012-0219-5
6 Justice Society Returns David S. Goyer, James Robinson, Chuck Dixon, Geoff Johns, Ron Marz 256 ISBN 1-4012-0090-7
7 Doctor Mid-Nite Doctor Mid-Nite #1 - 3 (limited series) Matt Wagner, John K. Snyder III 147 ISBN 1-56389-607-9
8 Power Girl JSA Classified #1 - 4, Showcase #97 - 99 and Secret Origins #11 Geoff Johns, Paul Levitz, Amanda Conner, Joe Staton 176 ISBN 1-4012-0968-8
9 JSA Classified: Honor Among Thieves JSA Classified #5 - 9 Jen Van Meter, Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Olliffe, Don Kramer 128 ISBN 1-4012-1218-2
10 The Huntress: Darknight Daughter DC Super Stars #17, Batman Family #18-20 and Wonder Woman #271-287, 289-290, 294-295 Paul Levitz, Joe Staton, Steve Mitchell, Bob Layton, Bruce Patterson, et al. 224 ISBN 1-4012-0913-0

The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...

Awards

The Justice Society received a 1965 Alley Award for Strip or Book Most Desired for Revival. The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ...


Appearances in other media

Justice League

A Justice League two-part episode called Legends pays homage to the Justice Society with a team of imaginary comic book superheroes in a perfect world. The team was called the Justice Guild of America. Justice Guild as shown in the Justice League series The Justice Guild of America is a superhero team featured in the Justice League animated series two-part episode Legends, a homage to the Golden Age Justice Society of America, and to a degree the Silver Age Justice League of America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Justice Guild as shown in the Justice League series The Justice Guild of America is a superhero team featured in the Justice League animated series two-part episode Legends, a homage to the Golden Age Justice Society of America, and to a degree the Silver Age Justice League of America. ...


Justice League Unlimited

Many members of the current incarnation of the JSA have been featured in Justice League Unlimited, including Atom Smasher, Stargirl (with STRIPE), Sand, Mr. Terrific, Dr. Mid-Nite, Wildcat, Obsidian and the second Hourman. Stargirl and Mr. Terrific were the two with the most exposure; Stargirl had a speaking part in at least two episodes, while Mr. Terrific took over Martian Manhunter's job of manning the Watchtower. Wildcat had one episode, "Cat and the Canary" in which he was prominently featured. A version of Power Girl appeared as Galatea, and a reference to Jay Garrick appeared in an issue of the (non-continuity) JLU comic (his helmet can be seen in the episode "Flash and Substance"). Hawkman appears in the series and believes that he and Hawkgirl are reincarnations of a King and Queen of Egypt. Albert Rothstein (known by the aliases Nuklon and Atom Smasher -- sometimes spelled Atom-Smasher) is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Courtney Whitmore is the fictional superheroine Stargirl in the DC Comics Universe. ... S.T.R.I.P.E. (Special Tactics Robotic Integrated Power Enhancer) is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Sanderson Sandy Hawkins, formerly known as Sandy the Golden Boy, now known as Sand, is a fictional character, superhero in the DC Comics universe created by Mort Weisinger and Paul Norris. ... Michael Holt is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Doctor Mid-Nite is a DC Comics superhero. ... Wildcat is the name of four DC Comics characters, three of them superheroes. ... Obsidian is a fictional character who has been both a superhero and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Hourman (Rick Tyler) is a fictional character, a superhero who was created by Roy Thomas, Dann Thomas and Todd McFarlane and first appeared in Infinity Inc. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... List of Justice League episodes Flash and Substance is the fifth episode of the second season of the Justice League Unlimited TV series. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ...


Power Girl and Jay Garrick are seen in the Justice League Unlimited comic, even though the comic doesn't follow the same continuity as the TV seres.


References

Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... TwoMorrows Publishing is a publisher of magazines about comic books. ...

See also

  • Roy Thomas, The All-Star Companion (TwoMorrows Publishing, 2000)
  • Roy Thomas, The All-Star Companion, vol. 2 (TwoMorrows Publishing, 2007)
  • Roy Thomas, The All-Star Companion, vol. 3 (TwoMorrows Publishing, forthcoming, 2007)

The Justice Society of America is a team of comic book superheroes published by DC Comics. ...

External links

  • Fact File: The Justice Society of America 1940–2004
  • Index of the Earth-Two adventures of the JSA
  • DC Cosmic Teams: JSA
  • Comics Nexus - A look at the JSA's Golden Age heart and Modern Age influences
  • THE JSA FILES
  • Justice Society's secret origin at dccomics.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Justice Society of America - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2854 words)
The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history.
It was later revealed that the reason the JSA didn't invade Europe and end the war was due to the influence of the Spear of Destiny which caused the JSA's most powerful members to fall under the control of its wielder, Adolf Hitler.
It was also revealed in the 1980s that the JSA had a loose affiliation with the All-Star Squadron, a new team of the time, whose adventures were set in the past, of which each of its members were a part, as both teams were the brainchild of American president Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Justice League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3593 words)
In 1962's Justice League of America #9 Earth was infiltrated by the Appelaxians, competing alien warriors sent to see who could conquer Earth first to determine who will become the new ruler of their home planet.
Justice League of America initially was amongst the most popular of DC Comics' publications, but by the end of the 1960s, it was overshadowed in sales and quality by Marvel Comics' superteam the Avengers.
The Super Buddies were the remainder of the Justice League International that regrouped to be a team accessible to the common man. With most of the heavy hitters from the group already in the Justice League or Justice Society, the team was fairly incompetent and is not looked upon very well by the League.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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