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Encyclopedia > Justice League Satellite

The Justice League Satellite is a fictional location, the base of operations for the DC Comics superhero team the Justice League of America. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode, see Super Hero (Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode). ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


First satellite

The Justice League original satellite as depicted by George Pérez in Justice League of America # 195.
The Justice League original satellite as depicted by George Pérez in Justice League of America # 195.

When the Justice League of America originally formed, its base of operations was the Secret Sanctuary, made out of a cave in Happy Harbor, Rhode Island. In Justice League of America # 77, honorary member Snapper Carr betrays the location of the Secret Sanctuary to the Joker, causing the League to move its base to a new secure headquarters, an orbiting satellite 22,300 miles above the Earth, in Justice League of America # 78 (February 1970). Image File history File links JLsatellite. ... Image File history File links JLsatellite. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Happy Harbor is a fictional United States location in Rhode Island, referenced in DC Comics as the location of the first headquarters, Justice Mountain or the Secret Sanctuary, of the Justice League of America, first appearing in The Brave and the Bold #28. ... Snapper Carr is a fictional supporting character in the DC Universe. ... The Joker is a comic book supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Those involved in producing the Justice League of America comic during the 1970s include writers Gerry Conway, Cary Bates, E. Nelson Bridwell, and Steve Englehart, while Dick Dillin primarily handled the art chores. Justice League of America had a brief spike in popularity in 1982 when artist George Pérez stepped in following Dillin's death, but the commercial success was short-lived. Gerard F. Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. ... Cary Bates is a comic book and animation writer. ... E. Nelson Bridwell was a writer for Mad magazine and for DC Comics. ... Steve Englehart (born April 22, 1947, Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American comic book writer best known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, particularly in the 1970s. ... Richard Allen Dick Dillin (b. ... New Teen Titans #1. ...


Through this period, the membership was limited to the seven founders along with Green Arrow, Atom, Hawkman, Black Canary, Phantom Stranger, Elongated Man and Red Tornado. It was the largest and most powerful lineup of the League to date, although seldom did all League members assemble. The League's twelve-member limit (sometimes explained as a "no duplication of powers" policy) was conceded (in Justice League of America # 161) to simply have been a charter provision about numbers, once the League had formally removed the limitation and admitted Hawkwoman and hoped to admit more members. (Indeed, through this period, several League members challenged, and joked about, the notion that they shared skills and talents, for example, with speed races between Superman and Flash, and Hawkman's use of archery in combat.) The policy change allowed Zatanna and Firestorm to be admitted as well. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... Katar Hol is a DC Comics superhero, the Silver Age Hawkman. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Red Tornado is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Hawkwoman is the name of a fictional characters, superheroines in the DC Comics universe. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Firestorm is a DC Comics superhero. ...

The Justice League roster during the satellite years. Art by George Pérez.

The satellite would be the League's home for the next several years. Members were able to teleport to and from the satellite using teleportation centers located across the planet. League members took turns on watch duty, monitoring Earth from the satellite and dispatching the League as needed. This era of the Justice League (and its roster of heroes), is commonly referred to as the "Satellite League". Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (474x650, 329 KB) Scanned panel from Justice League of America #195. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (474x650, 329 KB) Scanned panel from Justice League of America #195. ... New Teen Titans #1. ...


It is revealed in Identity Crisis that the satellite base was not quite as secure as the Justice League had hoped, as Sue Dibny was brutally raped by Dr. Light while alone aboard. Identity Crisis is a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics in 2004, written by Brad Meltzer and penciled by Rags Morales. ... Susan Sue Dearbon Dibny is a fictional character from DC comics. ... Name trivia Right Labs logo from the Famicom game RockBoard. ...


The satellite was heavily damaged and rendered effectively inoperable just prior to Aquaman's decision to disband the team in Justice League of America Annual # 2. The League was in a time of transition, not only in its choice of headquarters, but also in its membership. The deepening detachment of members such as Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman caused the three charter Justice League members to resign from active duty with the League. At the same time, the Flash left the team to confront his manslaughter trial and investigate the disappearance of his wife. The death of her mother led Black Canary to leave the team and move to Seattle with Green Arrow. Green Lantern had been temporarily expelled from the Green Lantern Corps and resigned from the League as well to sort out his life. Aquaman is a fictional character, a superhero in DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ...


Aquaman subsequently reformed the Justice League, which now included himself, Martian Manhunter, Zatanna, Elongated Man, Vixen, Gypsy, Vibe, Steel, and later, Batman. Based in Detroit, this era is referred to as "Justice League Detroit". This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Vixen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Gypsy (Cynthia Cindy Reynolds) is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Vibe was a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Steel is a name used by several fictional characters owned and published by DC Comics in their universe. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ...


The satellite met its final and complete destruction during the Crisis on Infinite Earths, when it was destroyed by a self-destructing Red Tornado that had been sabotaged and tampered with by the Anti-Monitor. It was never rebuilt, but the League would return to a spaceborne base of operations in the 1990s when it relocated to the Overmaster's orbiting base known as the Refuge. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Overmaster is the name of a DC Comics supervillain. ...


Second satellite

The new satellite presented in Justice League of America (vol. 2) # 7. Art by Ed Benes.
The new satellite presented in Justice League of America (vol. 2) # 7. Art by Ed Benes.

Following the gathering of the new team as seen in Justice League of America (vol.2) # 7 (April 2007), a new satellite is presented as headquarters. It has been dubbed by many as the Watchtower, like the previous JLA HQ. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... José Edilbenes Bezerra (born in 1972 in Alto Santo, Ceara Brazil) is a Brazilian comic book artist, better known as his pen name Ed Benes. ... A cutaway of the JLA Watchtower on the moon. ...


Actually the new satellite works together with The Hall, a building located in Washington D.C. paid by Batman and designed by Wonder Woman and John Stewart. Inside the Hall is a archway-type teleportation system, dubbed 'Slideways' in which a person merely need to walk through the archway to be transported to the League's new orbiting satellite headquarter 22,300 miles above Earth. The Hall of Justice is the earth-based headquarters of the Justice League. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2...


Jim Lee was called to design the new headquarters. Writer Brad Meltzer: "On the satellite, he did six different designs; some that resembled the old League satellite, [or] resembled the JLU satellite. We kind of took a little from Column A and B. I saw in one of his other designs, he also had these drones and I loved those, and I said, 'Can we put those on there as well? I really want to take that!'" This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Brad Meltzer (b. ...


The satellite has a Danger Room-like training room nicknamed The Kitchen because "if you can't stand the heat...". Meltzer also explains that, for the first time, the satellite has defensive and offensive weaponry and two drones that go around it. The Danger Room is a fictional training facility built for the X-Men of Marvel Comics. ... The £124 million Taranis UAV built by BAE Systems An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is an aircraft with no onboard pilot. ...


External Links

  • A Monumental Move (wizarduniverse.com)



 
 

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