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Encyclopedia > Justice League
Justice League

Variant cover art for Justice League of America #12.
Art by Michael Turner.
Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... This article is not to be confused with the upcoming Justice League film. ... Joe Louis Arena, nicknamed Hockeytown, The Joe, and JLA, is the home of the National Hockey League franchise the Detroit Red Wings. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 395 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 910 pixel, file size: 120 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is from a comic strip, webcomic or from the cover or interior of a comic book. ... Michael Turner (born April 21, 1971) is an American comic book artist born in Crossville, Tennessee and primarily known for his work on Witchblade, Black Panther, and Fathom. ...

Publication information
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance The Brave and the Bold # 28 (February-March 1960)
Created by Gardner Fox
In story information
Base(s) of operation The Hall and the Satellite
Watchtower
The Refuge
JLI Embassies
Detroit Bunker
Satellite
Secret Sanctuary
Roster Batman
Black Canary
Black Lightning
Flash
Green Lantern (Hal Jordan)
Green Lantern (John Stewart)
Hawkgirl
Red Arrow
Red Tornado
Superman
Vixen
Wonder Woman
See:List of Justice League members
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The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Comics superhero team. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The Hall of Justice is the earth-based headquarters of the Justice League. ... The Justice League Satellite is a fictional location, the base of operations for the DC Comics superhero team the Justice League of America. ... The Watchtower is the name of various bases used by the Justice League of America in DC Comics and various other media. ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... Bunkers in Albania A bunker is a defensive military fortification. ... The Justice League Satellite is a fictional location, the base of operations for the DC Comics superhero team the Justice League of America. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... For references to Black Lightning in the work of William Golding, see Pincher Martin. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Red Tornado is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Vixen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Justice League (q. ... FicTioNaL is a Gaming Legend. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ...


First appearing in The Brave and the Bold #28 (1960), the League originally appeared with a line-up that included Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash, Green Lantern, Aquaman and the Martian Manhunter. However, the team roster has rotated throughout the years to include such recognizable characters as Green Arrow, Atom, Hawkman, Black Canary, Captain Marvel, Plastic Man and dozens of others. Throughout the years, various incarnations or subsections of the team have also operated as Justice League America, Justice League Europe, Justice League International, Justice League Task Force, Justice League Elite, and Extreme Justice. The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ... Justice League Task Force was a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics from June 1993 to August 1996; it lasted 37 issues. ... Justice League Elite was a 12-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. ... Extreme Justice #0. ...


Various comic book series featuring the League have remained generally popular with fans since inception because, in most incarnations, its roster includes DC's most popular characters. The League concept has also been adapted into various other entertainment media, including the classic Saturday morning Super Friends animated series (1973-1986), a lesser known live action television movie, and most recently the successful animated series Justice League (2001-2004) and Justice League Unlimited (2004-2006). A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... This article is not to be confused with the upcoming Justice League film. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ...

Contents



Publication history

Silver and Bronze Age / Justice League of America

The Brave and the Bold #28: Debut of the Justice League. Art by Mike Sekowsky and Murphy Anderson.
The Brave and the Bold #28: Debut of the Justice League. Art by Mike Sekowsky and Murphy Anderson.
Justice League of America

Cover to Justice League of America #1.
Art by Mike Sekowsky.
This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ... Murphy Anderson (born 1926) is an American comic book penciller and inker who has worked for companies such as DC Comics for over 50 years, starting in the 1930s-40s Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Image File history File links JLofA-1. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Ongoing
Publication date October 1961 - 1986
Number of issues 261
Creative team
Writer(s) various
Artist(s) various
Creator(s) Gardner Fox
Mike Sekowsky
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Having successfully re-introduced a number of their Golden Age superhero characters (Flash, Green Lantern, etc.) during the late 1950s, DC Comics asked writer Gardner Fox to re-introduce the Justice Society of America. Fox, influenced by the popularity of the National Football League and Major League Baseball, decided to change the name of the team from Justice Society to Justice League.[1] The Justice League of America debuted in The Brave and the Bold #28 (1960), and quickly became one of the company's best-selling titles. Fox wrote virtually all of the League's adventures during the 1960s, and artist Mike Sekowsky pencilled the first five years. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ...


As with the Justice Society, the concept of the Justice League was simple: to include all of DC's most popular characters in one book (hence the original lineup included Superman, Batman, Aquaman, the Flash, Green Lantern and Wonder Woman). Three of DC's other surviving or revived characters, Green Arrow, Atom, and Hawkman were quickly added to the roster, the latter two having been re-introduced by Gardner Fox himself. JLA's early success was indirectly responsible for the creation of the Fantastic Four, and by extension the entire Marvel universe. In his autobiography Stan Lee relates how, during a round of golf, DC publisher Jack Liebowitz mentioned to Marvel-Timely owner Martin Goodman how well DC's new book (Justice League) was selling. Later that day Goodman told Lee to come up with a team of superheroes for Marvel; Lee and Jack Kirby produced the Fantastic Four.[2] This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... Katar Hol is a DC Comics superhero, the Silver Age Hawkman. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


The Justice League operated from a secret cave outside of the small town of Happy Harbor, Rhode Island. Teenager Snapper Carr tagged along on missions, and was both the team's mascot and an official member. Snapper, noted for speaking in beatnik dialect and snapping his fingers, helped the League to defeat giant space starfish Starro the Conqueror in the team's first appearance. In Justice League of America #77 (December 1969), Snapper was tricked into betraying the cave headquarters' secret location to the Joker, resulting in his resignation from the team. His resignation followed the resignations of two of the league's original members, Wonder Woman (in Justice League of America #69) and J'onn J'onnz (in Justice League of America #71). Both resignations appear to have been retconned due to changes in DC continuity. Happy Harbor is a fictional United States location in Rhode Island, referenced in DC Comics as the location of the first headquarters, Justice Mountain or the Secret Sanctuary, of the Justice League of America, first appearing in The Brave and the Bold #28. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Lucas Snapper Carr is a fictional supporting character in the DC Universe. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearances of both the Justice League and Starro. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Satellite years

In need of a new secure headquarters, the Justice League moved into an orbiting "satellite" headquarters in Justice League of America #78 (February 1970). Through this period, the membership was limited to the remaining founders along with Green Arrow, Atom, and Hawkman, who were joined by Black Canary, Phantom Stranger, Elongated Man, Red Tornado and, eventually, the return of Wonder Woman. The League's twelve-member limit (sometimes explained as a "no duplication of powers" policy) was conceded (in Justice League of America #161) to have been simply a charter provision about numbers, once the League had formally removed the limitation and admitted Hawkwoman and hoped to admit more members. (Indeed, through this period, several League members challenged and joked about the notion that they shared skills and talents, for example, with speed races between Superman and Flash, and Hawkman's use of archery in combat.) The policy change allowed Zatanna and Firestorm to be admitted as well. The Justice League Satellite is a fictional location, the base of operations for the DC Comics superhero team the Justice League of America. ... The Justice League Satellite is a fictional location, the base of operations for the DC Comics superhero team the Justice League of America. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... Katar Hol is a DC Comics superhero, the Silver Age Hawkman. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Red Tornado is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Hawkwoman is the name of a fictional characters, superheroines in the DC Comics universe. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the Ronnie Raymond/Martin Stein version of Firestorm. ...


Those involved in producing the Justice League of America comic during the 1970s include writers Gerry Conway, Cary Bates, E. Nelson Bridwell, and Steve Englehart, while Dick Dillin primarily handled the art chores. Justice League of America had a brief spike in popularity in 1982 when artist George Pérez stepped in following Dillin's death, but the commercial success was short-lived. Gerard F. Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. ... Cary Bates is a comic book and animation writer. ... E. Nelson Bridwell was a writer for Mad magazine and for DC Comics. ... Steve Englehart (born April 22, 1947, Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American comic book writer best known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, particularly in the 1970s. ... Richard Allen Dick Dillin (b. ... New Teen Titans #1. ...


Detroit

The Detroit based team. Cover to Justice League of America #238 by Paris Cullins.

In 1984, in an attempt to emulate the success of DC's most successful comic at that time, The New Teen Titans, DC editorial had most of the regular members replaced by newer, younger characters. DC also moved the team from its satellite headquarters into a base in Detroit, Michigan. This move was highly unpopular with readers, who dubbed this period of time the "Justice League Detroit" era. The major criticism was that this Justice League was filled with second-rate heroes. Created by Conway and artist Chuck Patton, the team was initially led by Aquaman and featured Justice League veterans Zatanna, the Martian Manhunter and the Elongated Man, but the majority of the stories focused on newly recruited heroes Vixen, Gypsy, Steel and Vibe. Zatanna, Aquaman and the Elongated Man soon left the series, leaving behind minor characters. Even the return of Batman to the team in Justice League of America # 250 could not halt the decline of the series.[3] The final issue of the original Justice League of America series, issue #261 by Writer J. M. DeMatteis and artist Luke McDonnell, culminated with long-time Justice League enemy Professor Ivo's murders of Vibe and Steel at the onset of DC's Legends miniseries. Image File history File links JLofA238. ... Image File history File links JLofA238. ... Blue Devil #1 (June 1984). ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Vixen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Gypsy (Cynthia Cindy Reynolds) is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Steel is a name used by several fictional characters owned and published by DC Comics. ... Vibe was a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... John Marc DeMatteis (born December 15, 1953) is an American writer of comic books. ... Luke McDonnel is an American artist of comic books. ... Professor Ivo is a fictional mad scientist in the DC universe. ... Legends was a six issue comic book limited series published in 1986-1987 by DC Comics, which had plot threads running through several other DC comic titles, crossing over into them (each individual crossover/tie-in had a Legends Chapter # header on the cover). ...


Modern incarnations

Justice League International

Cover to Justice League #1. Art by Kevin Maguire.

The 1987 company-wide crossover Legends featured the formation of a new Justice League. The new team was dubbed "Justice League" then "Justice League International" (JLI) and was given a mandate with less of an American focus. The new series, written by Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis with art by Kevin Maguire (and later Adam Hughes), added quirky humor to the team's stories. In this incarnation the membership consisted partly of heroes from Earths that, prior to their merging in the Crisis on Infinite Earths, were separate. The initial team included Batman, Black Canary, Blue Beetle, Captain Marvel, Doctor Light (a new Japanese female character, emerging from the Crisis of Infinite Earths, not the super-villain who had appeared previously), Doctor Fate, Martian Manhunter, Mister Miracle, and Guy Gardner; and soon after inception, added Booster Gold, Captain Atom, Fire (formerly known as the Global Guardians' Green Flame), Ice (formerly known as the Global Guardians' Ice Maiden), and two Rocket Reds (one was a Manhunter spy, and one was Dimitri Pushkin). The series' humorous tone and high level of characterization proved very popular, but writers following Giffen and DeMatteis were unable to capture the same balance of humor and heroics, resulting in the decline of the series' popularity. New writers gave the storylines a more serious tone. By the mid- to late-1990s, with the series' commercial success fading, it was eventually cancelled, along with spin-offs Justice League Europe, Extreme Justice, and Justice League Task Force. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x608, 81 KB) Summary Cover to Justice League #1 (1987). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x608, 81 KB) Summary Cover to Justice League #1 (1987). ... The Defenders, as drawn by Maguire Kevin Maguire (born 1960) is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on the Justice League series in the late 1980s for DC Comics. ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... Legends was a six issue comic book limited series published in 1986-1987 by DC Comics, which had plot threads running through several other DC comic titles, crossing over into them (each individual crossover/tie-in had a Legends Chapter # header on the cover). ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... John Marc DeMatteis is an American writer of comic books. ... The Defenders, as drawn by Maguire Kevin Maguire (born 1960) is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on the Justice League series in the late 1980s for DC Comics. ... I am Adam Hughes. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue American comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 to simplify their then-55-year-old continuity. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Blue Beetle is Theodore (or Edward) Ted Kord, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Doctor Light is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... Mister Miracle is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Booster Gold is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Fire is a fictional superheroine published by DC Comics. ... Ice (Tora Olafsdotter) is a fictional character, a superheroine in publications from DC Comics. ... The Rocket Red Brigade is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Manhunter is the name given to several different DC Comics superheroes/antiheroes, as well as the Manhunters an entire race of androids created by the Guardians of the Universe, as a forerunner to the Green Lantern Corps. ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... Extreme Justice #0. ... Justice League Task Force was a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics from June 1993 to August 1996; it lasted 37 issues. ...


JLA

JLA

Cover for JLA #1, by Howard Porter and John Dell. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x614, 194 KB) Summary Cover to JLA #1 by Howard Porter and John Dell. ... The cover to The Flash #225, artwork by Howard Porter and John Livesay. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Ongoing
Publication date January 1997 - February 2006
Number of issues 125
Creative team
Writer(s) Grant Morrison, Mark Waid, Joe Kelly, Chuck Austen, Kurt Busiek, Geoff Johns, Alan Heinberg, Bob Harras
Artist(s) various
Creator(s) Grant Morrison
Howard Porter
John Dell
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The low sales of the various Justice League spinoff books prompted DC to revamp the League as a single team (all the various branch teams were disbanded) on a single title. A Justice League of America formed in the September 1996 limited series Justice League: A Midsummer's Nightmare by Mark Waid and Fabian Nicieza. In 1997, DC Comics launched a new Justice League series titled JLA, written by Grant Morrison with art by Howard Porter and John Dell. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Cover to #8 of Kelly and Chris Bachalos creator owned Steampunk series (2001) Joseph Joe Kelly is an American comic book writer who has written such titles as Uncanny X-Men, Action Comics, and JLA. As part of the comics creator group Man of Action, Kelly is one of... Chuck Austen (born Chuck Beckum) is an American writer and artist of comic books, most famous for his work on the popular Uncanny X-Men title, as well as on other Marvel and DC titles. ... Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is a comic book writer. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Allan Heinberg is an American writer, who currently writes Young Avengers for Marvel Comics, and has been a writer and producer on Party of Five, Sex and the City, Gilmore Girls, as well as Co-Executive Producer on the Fox networks series, The O.C.. He is renowned for... Robert Bob Harras was editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics from 1995 to 2000. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... The cover to The Flash #225, artwork by Howard Porter and John Livesay. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Cover to New Warriors #1 (July, 1990), one of Niciezas earliest successes. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... The cover to The Flash #225, artwork by Howard Porter and John Livesay. ...


This series, in an attempt at a "back-to-basics" approach, used as its core the team's original and most famous seven members (or their successors): Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Flash (Wally West), Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner), and the Martian Manhunter. Additionally, the team received a new headquarters, the "Watchtower", based on the Moon. Morrison introduced the idea of the JLA allegorically representing a pantheon of gods, with their different powers and personalities, incorporating such characters as Barbara Gordon (Oracle), John Henry Irons (Steel), and Plastic Man. For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... The Watchtower is the name of various bases used by the Justice League of America in DC Comics and various other media. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... A pantheon (from Greek Πάνθειον, temple of all gods, from πᾶν, all + θεός, god) is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Norse, Egyptian, Shintoism, Greek, vodun, Yoruba Mythology and Roman mythology. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... John Henry Irons is the third hero known as Steel, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ...


Since this new league included most of DC's most powerful heroes, the focus of the stories changed. The League now dealt only with Earth-shattering, highest-priority threats which could challenge their tremendous combined power. Enemies faced by this new JLA included an invading army of aliens, a malfunctioning war machine from the future, a horde of renegade angels, a newly reformed coalition of villains as a counter-league, mercenaries armed with individualized take-down strategies for each superhero, various cosmic threats, and the enraged spirit of the Earth itself. In addition, because almost all of the members had their own comics, the stories were almost always self-contained, with all chapters occurring within JLA itself and very rarely affecting events outside of that series. Developments from a hero's own title (such as the new costume temporarily adopted by Superman) were reflected in the League's comic book, however.


The new approach worked, and JLA quickly became DC's best-selling title[citation needed], a position it enjoyed for several years[citation needed]. Despite this, DC did not create continuing spinoff series as it had done before. Instead, a large number of miniseries and one-shots featuring the team were released. One spin-off team, the Justice League Elite was created following the events of JLA # 100, but their series was limited to 12 issues, and the team appeared only once after the title ended its allotted run. JLA's popularity was also able to launch the critically acclaimed JSA series, which was relaunched as Justice Society of America to coincide with the new Justice League of America book. Justice League Elite was a 12-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ...


In 2005, a story arc by Geoff Johns and Alan Heinberg called "Crisis of Conscience" (JLA #115-119) depicts the dissolution of the Justice League of America as the breakdown of trust shown in the 2004 limited series Identity Crisis reaches its zenith. At the end of the arc, Superboy-Prime destroys the Justice League Watchtower. JLA, one of several titles to be cancelled at the conclusion of the Infinite Crisis storyline, ended with issue #125. Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Allan Heinberg is an American writer, who currently writes Young Avengers for Marvel Comics, and has been a writer and producer on Party of Five, Sex and the City, Gilmore Girls, as well as Co-Executive Producer on the Fox networks series, The O.C.. He is renowned for... This article is about the DC Comics series. ... Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... The Watchtower is the name of various bases used by the Justice League of America in DC Comics and various other media. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


As depicted in the "Villains United Infinite Crisis Special" and the final issue of Infinite Crisis itself, preparations for the defense of Metropolis against an army of organized super-villains required a brief and temporary expansion of the Justice League to its largest roster to date. The main defensive teams of the JLA, JSA, Teen Titans and Outsiders already being occupied elsewhere by the Crisis, it fell on Oracle and the Martian Manhunter to contact and deputize seemingly every active or once active hero in the DC Universe as effective Justice League members to form a last line of defense for the city. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


52

Main article: 52 (comic book)

In 52 Week 24, Firestorm recruits a group to reform the Justice League. It consists of Firehawk, Super-Chief, Bulleteer and Ambush Bug. They fight a deranged Skeets who takes Super-Chief's powers and kills him as well as numerous persons given powers by Lex Luthor's Everyman Project. Afterwards Firestorm breaks up the team. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Jason Rusch is a fictional hero from the DC Comics Universe and is the third person to take the mantle of Firestorm. ... Firehawk is a superheroine in the DC Comics DC Universe. ... A view of the Super Chief being serviced at the Albuquerque, New Mexico depot in March of 1943. ... Bulleteer is a fictional character and DC Comics superheroine, a member of the Seven Soldiers of Victory. ... Ambush Bug is a fictional comic book character who has appeared in several DC Comics. ... Skeets is a fictional artificial intelligence robot from the future in the DC Comics Universe. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ...


Also in the series, Luthor's new Infinity, Inc. was informally referred to as a "Justice League" in solicitations and on covers. Infinity Inc. ...


Justice League of America (vol. 2)

Justice League of America (vol. 2)

Variant incentive cover for Justice League of America #1
Art by Michael Turner.
Image File history File links JLA1_turner. ... Michael Turner (born April 21, 1971) is an American comic book artist born in Crossville, Tennessee and primarily known for his work on Witchblade, Black Panther, and Fathom. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Ongoing
Publication date August 2006 -
Number of issues 19 (including #0) as of February 2008
Creative team
Writer(s) Brad Meltzer
Dwayne McDuffie
Artist(s) Ed Benes
Creator(s) Brad Meltzer
Ed Benes
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One year after the events of Infinite Crisis, Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman reunite in the Batcave to re-form the League in Justice League of America #0, the kick-off for a new series by Brad Meltzer and Ed Benes. They select Green Lantern (Hal Jordan), Black Canary, Red Arrow (Green Arrow's former sidekick), Red Tornado, Vixen, Black Lightning, and Hawkgirl. The three founders built a new headquarters for the Justice League, consisting of two buildings linked by a transporter. The first site is The Hall, located in Washington D.C. at the location of the Justice Society of America and the All-Star Squadron's former headquarters, paid for by Batman and designed by Wonder Woman and John Stewart, who is later elected to join the team alongside Hal Jordan. The Hall, functioning as the League's embassy on Earth, features an extensive collection of rare historical items of significance to the League and its forebearers, including several pieces of deactivated weaponry and technology from former heroes and villains. The transporter leads both to the Batcave and to the League's new orbiting satellite headquarters in space: the new Watchtower. Black Canary is elected as the first official Chairwoman. In issue #10, the Flash (Wally West) is brought back from another dimension, and then inducted into the Justice League. Dwayne McDuffie took over the writing job with #13. At the end of issue #15, Firestorm is "invited" to join the League so that someone with his powers but lack of experience will not be "unsupervised". After the Injustice Gang story arc, Amanda Waller had taken those villains in custody and tranported them to Hell Planet without any regard or without anyone's consent. Recently the Key, among other villains, broke into the headquarters of the Justice League. Once the League handled that situation Waller and her squad came to the Hall of Justice and took the villains into custody. Batman has been secretly communicating with J'onn J'ozz, finding out that Waller has been sending villains to this distant planet. Upon notifying the League they quickly went to the planet to check on the villains. Telepathically communicating with the League in space, J'onn asked for help but little did the League know it was Kanjar Ro impersonating J'onn and tried to capture the League and extract their DNA. The Justice League quickly disposed of Kanjar Ro and have since stated that they will find out where the villains have been transported to and also to rescue J'onn. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Brad Meltzer (b. ... Dwayne McDuffie is a comic book animation writer and a creator of the Emmy Award winning show Static Shock. ... José Edilbenes Bezerra (born in 1972 in Alto Santo, Ceara Brazil) is a Brazilian comic book artist, better known as his pen name Ed Benes. ... Brad Meltzer (b. ... José Edilbenes Bezerra (born in 1972 in Alto Santo, Ceara Brazil) is a Brazilian comic book artist, better known as his pen name Ed Benes. ... One Year Later event logo. ... The Batcave. ... Brad Meltzer (b. ... José Edilbenes Bezerra (born in 1972 in Alto Santo, Ceara Brazil) is a Brazilian comic book artist, better known as his pen name Ed Benes. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Red Tornado is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Vixen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... For references to Black Lightning in the work of William Golding, see Pincher Martin. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... The Hall of Justice is the earth-based headquarters of the Justice League. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics fictional superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981). ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... The Batcave. ... The Watchtower is the name of various bases used by the Justice League of America in DC Comics and various other media. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Dwayne McDuffie is a comic book animation writer and a creator of the Emmy Award winning show Static Shock. ... Jason Rusch is a fictional hero from the DC Comics Universe and is the third person to take the mantle of Firestorm. ...


Various origins of the Justice League

In 1962's Justice League of America #9 Earth was infiltrated by the Appelaxians, competing alien warriors sent to see who could conquer Earth first to determine who will become the new ruler of their home planet. The aliens' attacks drew the attentions of Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash (Barry Allen), Green Lantern (Hal Jordan), Aquaman, and the Martian Manhunter. While the superheroes individually defeated most of the invaders, the heroes fell prey to a single competitor's attack; only by working together were they able to defeat the competitor. For many years, the heroes heralded this adventure as the event that prompted them to agree to pool resources when confronted with similar menaces. The Appelaxians are a fictional alien race in DC Comics. ... Green people redirects here. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Flash redirects here. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ...


Years later, however (as revealed in Justice League of America #144), Green Arrow uncovered inconsistencies in League records and extracted admissions from his colleagues that the seven founders had actually formed the League after the Martian Manhunter was rescued from Martian forces by the other six founders, along with Robin, who did not join the League because of his young age. Green Lantern participated in this first adventure primarily as Hal Jordan, though he finally appeared as Green Lantern when the group formalized their agreement, news of which they mutually suppressed because of anti-Martian hysteria (mirroring the real-world backdrop of Martian scares and anti-communist hysteria of the 1950s). Because the League members had not revealed their identities to each other at the time, they did not realize that Jordan and Green Lantern were one and the same. While most subsequent accounts of the League have made little mention of this first adventure, the animated Justice League series adapted this tale as the origin of the League as well. This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ...


1989's, Secret Origins #32 updated the Justice League of America's origin for Post-Crisis continuity. Differences included the inclusion of Black Canary as a founding member and the absence of Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman (though Batman and Superman had cameo appearances they did not join the League yet, but Bruce Wayne was secretly funding them). Additionally, while the confident and good-looking Hal Jordan served as the public face of the Justice League, this iteration of the League's origin cast the Flash as the team's unofficial leader, since it was the methodical Allen who usually came up with the plans that best utilized everyone's powers. 1998's JLA: Year One limited series, by Mark Waid, Brian Augustyn and Barry Kitson, further expanded upon the Secret Origins depiction. Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... 2002 Lincoln cent, obverse, proof with cameo Cameo is a method of carving, or an item of jewelry made in this manner. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Brian Augustyn is a comic book editor and writer. ... Barry Kitson is an artist best known as a Penciler of major superhero comicbooks published by Marvel and DC. His first professional work was Spider-Man for Marvel UK. He also drew the first 2000AD Judge Dredd comicbook written by Grant Morrison. ...


In 1994's Justice League Task Force #15, during Zero Hour, an unknown superhuman named Triumph appeared. It was revealed that, in a plotline never explored before, Triumph was revealed to have been a founding member of the Justice League, serving as their leader. On his first mission with the fledgling Justice League, Triumph seemingly "saved the world", but was teleported into a dimensional limbo that also affected the timestream, resulting in no one having any memory of him. This was to explain how all the heroes ended up in Washington for their first meeting. Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... Triumph is a fictional character, a former superhero in the DC Comics universe who first appeared in Justice League America #92 (September 1994), and was created by Christopher Priest and Luke Ross. ...


In 2006's Infinite Crisis #7, the formation of "New Earth" (the new name for the Post-Crisis Earth) resulted in the retcon that Wonder Woman was a founding member of the Justice League in the early days. In Brad Meltzer's Justice League of America (vol. 2) #0 (2006), it was also revealed that both Superman and Batman were founding members as well. No official changes in continuity for Hawkman and Hawkgirl's involvement with the team have been confirmed. 52 Week 51 confirmed that the 1989 Secret Origins and JLA: Year One origins are still in canon, with Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman joining the team (consisting of Aquaman, Black Canary, Flash, Green Lantern, and Martian Manhunter) with founding members' status shortly after the group's formation.[4] Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Brad Meltzer (b. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


Related series

Formerly Known as the Justice League

Main article: Super Buddies

In 2003, Giffen, DeMatteis, and Maguire returned with a separate limited series called Formerly Known as the Justice League with the same humor as their Justice League run, and featuring some of the same characters in a team called the "Super Buddies" (a parody of the Super Friends). A follow-up limited series, entitled I Can't Believe It's Not the Justice League, soon was prepared, although it was delayed due to the events shown in the Identity Crisis limited series, but was eventually released as the second arc in JLA: Classified. The Super Buddies consisted of Blue Beetle, Booster Gold, Captain Atom, Fire, Mary Marvel, the Elongated Man with his wife, Sue Dibny, Maxwell Lord, and L-Ron. The second story arc of JLA: Classified focuses on the Super Buddies in a humorous story that features Power Girl, Guy Gardner, and Doctor Fate. The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... This article is about the DC Comics series. ... Fire is a fictional superheroine published by DC Comics. ... Mary Marvel is a fictional character, a comic book superheroine, originally published by Fawcett Comics and now owned by DC Comics. ... Susan Sue Dearbon Dibny is a fictional character from DC comics. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ...


JLA/Avengers

Main article: JLA/Avengers

In 2004, George Pérez and Kurt Busiek came out with a JLA/Avengers crossover, an idea that had been delayed for 20 years for various reasons. In this limited series, the Justice League and the Avengers were forced to find key artifacts in one another's universe, as well as deal with the threats of villains Krona and the Grandmaster. A key moment in League history occurs in this series, when the Avenger Hawkeye becomes the first Marvel Comics character to be inducted into the Justice League. JLA/Avengers is a crossover limited series published by DC Comics and Marvel Comics, and features two teams of superheroes, DC Comics Justice League of America and Marvels Avengers. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is a comic book writer. ... JLA/Avengers is a crossover limited series published by DC Comics and Marvel Comics, and features two teams of superheroes, DC Comics Justice League of America and Marvels Avengers. ... Krona is a fictional extraterrestrial villain in the DC Comics universe. ... The Grandmaster is a fictional character published by Marvel Comics, he first appeared in Avengers #69. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...


JLA: Classified

JLA: Classified

Cover of JLA: Classified #1 by Ed McGuinness. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (498x750, 103 KB) Licensing This image is of the cover of a single issue of a comic book, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the comic book or the artist(s) which produced...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Ongoing
Publication date January 2005 -
Number of issues 41 (as of August 22)
Creative team
Writer(s) various
Artist(s) various
Creator(s) Grant Morrison
Ed McGuinness
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In 2004, DC began an anthology series titled JLA: Classified, which would feature rotating writers and artists producing self-contained story-arcs starring the JLA. JLA Classified is in official continuity; the stories take place somewhere in the team's past.[citation needed] The first arc features Grant Morrison's return to the team with artist Ed McGuiness and a storyline featuring a "proto-universe" that was first seen in Morrison's JLA run as well as his then-upcoming Seven Soldiers limited series. Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis then did the sequel to "Formerly Known as the Justice League" entitled "I Can't Believe It's Not the Justice League". Then Warren Ellis, Gail Simone, and Howard Chaykin wrote the following stories with other writers taking over after that. Dan Jurgens and Dan Slott produced the six part bi-weekly "4th Parallel" storyline which ran through issues #32-36, introducing a new villain named the Red King. Creators rumored to do upcoming arcs include Tom Mandrake and Garth Ennis. Garth Ennis had stated that his final Hitman story would be published in JLA Classified, but it has since been published as the JLA/Hitman two part mini-series. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Edward Ed McGuinness is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on Superman, Deadpool and Superman/Batman. ... Power Girl from Superman/Batman #4 (2004). ... The Seven Soldiers of Victory (also known as Laws Legionaires) is a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... This article is about the comic book author. ... Gail Simone at the 2002 SDCC. Photo copyright 2002-2005 Lea Hernandez Gail Simone is a popular American writer of comic books. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Dan Slott Dan Slott is an American comic book writer best known for Avengers: The Initiative and She-Hulk. ... The Red King is a fictional supervillain published by DC Comics. ... Garth Ennis (born January 16, 1970 in Holywood, Northern Ireland) is a Northern Irish comics writer, best known for the DC/Vertigo series Preacher, co-created with artist Steve Dillon. ... “Tommy Monaghan” redirects here. ...


Justice

Main article: Justice (DC Comics)

In October 2005, DC began publishing Justice with stories by Jim Krueger and Alex Ross and art by Ross and Doug Braithwaite. In this new out-of-continuity maxi-series, it is not a single foe that they face, but rather the combined forces of the most infamous criminal masterminds ever to grace DC's pages, e.g. Lex Luthor, Riddler, Joker, Brainiac, Black Manta, etc. These villains have all shared the same nightmare of the Earth's destruction, and the shared nature of this vision leads them to believe it is a premonition of an actual impending event, one which they believe the Justice League is responsible for. Instead of using their combined strength for destructive ends, the new criminal mega-team is using their unified power to attain humanitarian aid in the form of large floating cities in which the impoverished people of Earth can live. They also use the power of rhetoric to criticize the Justice League for not having done enough humanitarian work themselves prior to this. In truth, this is a prelude to a coordinated attack on the Leaguers, which involves learning their secret identities, physically attacking them on multiple fronts, and unleashing microscopic mechanical organisms on a number of them that cause those infected to become murderous psychotics. With help from Doc Magnus and the Metal Men, the Leaguers resolve to build special armor that will protect them from the mechanical worms. During the battle, John Stewart manages to erase knowledge of the League's secret identities from the villains' minds, and Brainiac, who had taken control of all of Earth's nuclear weapons, in a ploy to restore the glory of his planet Colu on Earth, is defeated. Justice is a 12-issue limited series comic book published bi-monthly by DC Comics from August 2005 through June 2007. ... Earth X Hard Cover TPB (2005), cover by Alex Ross Jim Krueger is a comics writer. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... For the black project spyplane, see TR-3A Black Manta For Black Manta the musician, see Black Manta (musician) Black Manta is a fictional character, a supervillain appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an archenemy of Aquaman. ... This article is about the mainstream DCU character. ... The Metal Men are fictional characters, a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ...


Justice League

Revealed at Wizard World LA 2008; James Robinson will do his own Justice League known simply as Justice League. According to Robinson, this series is about "justice and seeking justice, rather than responding to emergencies, letting the problems come to them, and being almost entirely reactive". What will bring them together will be a murder, and Robinson revealed that the series will be tied to Final Crisis. Look up wizard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... James Dale Robinson is a writer of comic books and screenplays, notably of the comic book series Starman. ... Final Crisis is a comic book limited series to be published by DC Comics, in 2008, directly following the conclusion of the 52-issue Countdown to Final Crisis. ...


Robinson explained that "Hal Jordan decides that he wants a pro-active team. This team will go after the equivalent of the FBI's most wanted list, sometimes in different countries, sometimes through time. It's a nice eclectic team of established teams and some oddball characters I've thrown in." He also said that "The difference is, the Justice League of America is all about the league, it's a family. While this is about justice. It's all about bringing in the bad guys."[1]


The members will be made up of their leaders; Green Lantern and Green Arrow. Followed by an non-Atom Ray Palmer, Supergirl, Batwoman, Freddy Freeman complete with a new superhero identity, Starman, and Congorilla. [2] Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... The Atom is a fictional comicbook superhero published by DC Comics. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Supergirl. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Captain Marvel, Jr. ... Starman is a name used by several different fictional DC Comics superheroes, most prominently Ted Knight and his son Jack. ... Congo Bill was a long running DC Comics adventure comic strip, first published in More Fun Comics #56 (June, 1940). ...


Related teams

  • The Justice League occasionally has worked with its predecessor, the Justice Society of America. Between 1963 and 1985, a popular annual series of team-ups between the two teams to tackle some sort of mutual threat was seen. They often encountered other worlds in the Multiverse, such as Earth-S, home to Captain Marvel and Shazam. Now that the teams inhabit the same Earth, the JLA and JSA have Thanksgiving dinner together each year, with the location varying year to year between their respective headquarters. A crossover between the two teams in 2007 involved the Legion of Super-Heroes.
  • A team originally formed by the teen sidekicks of a few Justice League members (and thus known as a "Junior Justice League" of sorts) is called the Teen Titans.
  • In light of the increased UN scrutiny of super-powered teams after the events of Infinite Crisis and 52 (comics), Batman has re-formed his own team of Outsiders, to work under his direction tackling politically sensitive problems that might prove problematic were the Justice League of America to become directly involved.
  • A team formed by some rejects from the Legion of Superheroes that are native to Earth as shown in Action Comics # 859. This "Justice League of Earth" has twisted the legacy of Superman to promote their xenophobic agenda. Members include:
    • Earth-Man: Kirt Niedrigh, formerely Absorbency Boy. Has the ability to absorb and duplicate superpowers, albeit temporarily. Leader.
    • Spider Girl: Sussa Paka. Has web-like hair and former member of the Legion of Super-Villains.
    • Tusker: Horace Lafeaugh. Has an unbreakable skeleton.
    • Storm Boy: Myke Chypurz. Has weather-making machines implanted in his chest cavity, giving him the ability to generate wind and lightning.
    • Golden Boy: Klint Stewirt. Has a midas touch and a solid gold body. Finances the team.
    • Eyeful Ethel: Ethel Lynn Niwtyn. Has the ability to grow extra eyes anywhere on her body. Acts as a teacher at the "Earth Cultural Center", telling students about Superman's false hatred of aliens.
    • Radiation Roy: Roy Travich. A living radioactive isotope. Must wear a red containment suit as his powers have damaged his body. Former member of the Legion of Super-Villains.
  • In the final issue of 52 a new multiverse was created, containing 52 worlds, some of which have alternate versions of the justice league. On Earth 11, a world where all the genders are reversed form the characters of New Earth, There is a Justice League led by Superwoman and Batwoman; its members include Kylie Rayner, Olivia Queen, a Blue Beetle who is similar in costume and power to Jaimie Reyes (however dialogue suggests it may be a female version of Ted Kord), a Flash (whose blonde hair suggests she may be a female Barry Allen), Aquawoman (a female Arthur Curry), Atom (whose costume resembles Ryan Choi's), and Plastic Woman. Female versions of Red Tornado and Martain Manhunter are also members as well as a male version of Black Canary. Wonderman was also a member but was kicked off the team for killing Maxine Lord.

The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... This article is about the wizard character Shazam. ... For the Canadian holiday, see Thanksgiving (Canada). ... LSH redirects here. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... The Outsiders are fictional characters, a DC Comics superhero group. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future. ... Spider-Girl (May Mayday Parker) is a fictional character, a comic book superheroine active in an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Legion of Super-Villains are a team of comic book supervillains the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Midas (disambiguation). ... The Legion of Super-Villains are a team of comic book supervillains the DC Comics universe. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ...

Justice League parodies/references

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Boys is a creator-owned comic book series, written by Garth Ennis and illustrated by Darick Robertson. ... Steven Spielberg Presents Tiny Toon Adventures (also known as Tiny Toon Adventures or Tiny Toons) is an American animated television series created and produced as a collaborative effort between Steven Spielberg and Warner Bros. ... Histeria! was an animated television series of the late-1990s, created by Tom Ruegger (who also created Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, and Pinky and the Brain) at Warner Bros. ... Omni-Man (based on Superman) Marks superhero father, actually a Viltrumite who used his superhero status to prepare for an invasion of earth. ... Invincible is a comic book created by writer Robert Kirkman and artist Cory Walker, published monthly by Image Comics. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Astro City, vol. ... Apollo is a comic book superhero who first appeared in the Stormwatch series, but is best known for his role in The Authority. ... Midnighter is a comic book superhero who first appeared in the Stormwatch series, but is best known for his role in The Authority. ... Stormwatch is a fictional United Nations-sponsored superhero team in the Wildstorm Universe. ... Planetary is an American comic book series created by Warren Ellis (writer) and John Cassaday (artist), published by the Wildstorm imprint of DC Comics. ... This article is about authority as a concept. ... This article is about the author. ... Dexters Laboratory (Dexters Lab for short) is an American animated television series created by Genndy Tartakovsky. ... This article is about the superhero. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Planetary Brigade is a series published by Boom! Studios. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... John Marc DeMatteis (born December 15, 1953) is an American writer of comic books. ... This article is about the television series. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Darkwing Duck is an Emmy-nominated American animated television series produced by The Walt Disney Company that ran from 1991-1995 on both the syndicated programming block The Disney Afternoon and Saturday mornings on ABC. It featured an eponymous superhero anthropomorphic duck with the alter ego of Drake Mallard (voiced... This article is about the TV series. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Siddhartha and Gautama redirect here. ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... Lao Zi (also spelled Laozi, Lao Tzu, or Lao Tse) was a famous Chinese philosopher who is believed to have lived in approximately the 4th century BC, during the Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Periods. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... David Blaine (born David Blaine White on April 4, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York, U.S.) is an American illusionist and stunt performer. ... The Freedom League is a fictional superhero team in the Freedom City campaign setting of the Mutants and Masterminds role-playing game. ... Freedom City is a fictional, city-based campaign setting for the roleplaying game Mutants and Masterminds. ... A campaign setting is usually a fictional world which serves as a setting for a role-playing game or wargame campaign. ... Mutants & Masterminds (abbreviated M&M or MnM) is a superhero role-playing game written by Steve Kenson and published by Green Ronin Publishing based on a variant of the d20 System by Wizards of the Coast. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... This article is about the series. ... Drawn Together is an American animated television series that uses a sitcom format with a TV reality show setting. ... Ghostesses in the Slot Machine is the thirteenth episode of the animated series Drawn Together. ... Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is an American comic book published by Mirage Studios since 1984. ... Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is an American animated television series set in New York City. ... TMNT redirects here. ... Return of the Justice Force is the forty-eighth episode of the animated series Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2003), which originally aired on May 8, 2004. ... The Underground is a sketch comedy series produced by and starring Damon Wayans. ... Bang Cartoon is a website which features satirical cartoons based almost exclusively on the NFL. It is owned and operated by American John Tayman. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... William Laird Cowher (born May 8, 1957) is a former American football coach and player. ... Thomas Edward Brady, Jr. ... Donovan Jamal McNabb (born November 25, 1976 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American football quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. ... Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American football quarterback who plays for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League. ... Aaron Lafette Brooks (born March 24, 1976 in Newport News, Virginia) is an American football quarterback in the NFL, who currently is a free agent. ... Jeffrey Jason Garcia (born February 24, 1970 in Gilroy, California) is a Mexican American professional quarterback currently employed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. ... Matthew Stephen Leinart (born May 11, 1983 in Santa Ana, California) is an American football quarterback (QB) for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League. ... Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981) is an American celebrity and socialite. ... Matthew George Millen (born March 12, 1958 in Hokendauqua, Pennsylvania) Punisher was here Prior to assuming leadership of the Detroit Lions in 2001, Millen was a professional football linebacker for the Oakland Raiders, the San Francisco 49ers and the Washington Redskins of the NFL. In Millens 12-year NFL... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... The Fairly OddParents is one of the most popular cartoons on Nickelodeon The Fairly OddParents is an animated series created by Butch Hartman and was first aired in March 30, 2001. ...

Awards

The original Justice League of America series has won:

The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ... The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... Murphy Anderson (born 1926) is an American comic book penciller and inker who has worked for companies such as DC Comics for over 50 years, starting in the 1930s-40s Golden Age of Comic Books. ... The Shazam Awards or Academey of Comic Book Arts Awards was given between 1970 and 1975. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ...

Bibliography

  • Silver Age Justice League of America

This series has been collected in the following:

# Title Material collected
1 Justice League of America Archives volume 1 Brave and the Bold #28–30, Justice League of America #1–6
2 Justice League of America Archives volume 2 Justice League of America #7–14
3 Justice League of America Archives volume 3 Justice League of America #15–22
4 Justice League of America Archives volume 4 Justice League of America #23–30
5 Justice League of America Archives volume 5 Justice League of America #31–38, 40*
6 Justice League of America Archives volume 6 Justice League of America #41–47, 49–50*
7 Justice League of America Archives volume 7 Justice League of America #51–57, 59–60*
8 Justice League of America Archives volume 8 Justice League of America #61–66, 68–70*
9 Justice League of America Archives volume 9 Justice League of America #71–80

*omitted issues featured reprints of material from earlier Archives.

  • JLA #1-125 (January 1997 - February 2006)

This series has been collected in the following trade paperbacks:

# Title Material collected
1 New World Order JLA #1-4
2 American Dreams JLA #5-9
3 Rock Of Ages JLA #10-15
4 Strength In Numbers JLA #16-23, JLA Secret Files #2, Prometheus One-shot
5 Justice For All JLA #24-33
6 World War Three JLA #34-41
7 Tower of Babel JLA #42-46, JLA Secret Files 3, JLA 80-Page Giant 1
8 Divided We Fall JLA #47-54
9 Terror Incognita JLA #55-60
10 Golden Perfect JLA #61-65
11 The Obsidian Age (Book 1) JLA #66-71
12 The Obsidian Age (Book 2) JLA #72-76
13 Rules Of Engagement JLA #77-82
14 Trial By Fire JLA #84-89
15 The Tenth Circle JLA #94-99
16 Pain Of The Gods JLA #101-106
17 Syndicate Rules JLA #107-114 and a story from JLA Secret Files 2004
18 Crisis Of Conscience JLA #115-119
19 World Without A Justice League JLA #120-125
  • Justice League of America vol. 2 #1-onwards (August 2006-onwards)

This series has been collected in the following hardcover collections:

# Title Material collected
1 The Tornado's Path Justice League of America #1-7
2 The Lightning Saga Justice League of America #0, #8-12, Justice Society of America #5-6

In other media

Television

Justice League of America has been adapted for television numerous times.


Animation

Cartoon Network's Justice League
Cartoon Network's Justice League
  • The first animated appearance of the Justice League was in the 1967 television series The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure. The team appeared in only three segments of the run of the show.
  • The longest-running version of the Justice League was the loosely adapted series called the Super Friends, which ran in various incarnations from 1973 to 1986.
  • The Justice League make their first appearance in the DC Animated Universe in "The Call," a two-parted episode of Batman Beyond. It portrayed a futuristic version of the team, referred to as "Justice League Unlimited," or "JLU" for short. The lineup consisted of an aging Superman, a brand new Green Lantern, Big Barda, plus new characters: Aquagirl (Aquaman's daughter), Micron (similar to Atom), and Warhawk (who is later revealed to be the son of John Stewart and Hawkgirl).
  • Cartoon Network's Justice League series debuted in 2001 and lasted for two seasons. Although not the Justice League's first appearance in the DC Animated Universe, it was their first chronological appearance. In July 2004, the series was retitled and revised for its third season as Justice League Unlimited. Both of these were extensions of the DC Animated Universe, continuing the continuity begun by Batman: The Animated Series, Superman: The Animated Series, Static Shock, and Batman Beyond.
  • In the two-part fourth season finale of The Batman, titled "The Joining", Batman allied with Martian Manhunter against aliens known as "the Joining." At the end of the second episode, J'onn contacts Batman and asks him to join his group, prompting Batman to remark that J'onn has formed "quite a league". The members of the "League" featured in this sequence were Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Hawkman, and the Flash. Much of the fifth season revolves around teamups with League members and Batman. Other elements that were put forth included Batman recruiting Superman, and a headquarters combining elements of the Hall of Justice from Super Friends and the Watchtower from Justice League.

Image File history File links The original cast of Super Friends. ... Image File history File links The original cast of Super Friends. ... Super Friends is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1985. ... Image File history File links Justiceleaguetimmartpromo. ... Image File history File links Justiceleaguetimmartpromo. ... Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ... Batman Beyond (known as Batman of the Future in Europe, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and India) is an American animated television series created by The WB Television Network in collaboration with DC Comics as a continuation of the Batman legacy. ... Kai-ro is a fictional Asian American character that has appeared in both Batman Beyond and Justice League Unlimited in the DC Comics Animated Universe as the Green Lantern of the future. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Warhawk. ... John Stewart may be: John Walking Stewart (1747–1822), English traveller and philosopher John D. Stewart (1833–1894), United States Representative from Georgia John Knox Stewart (1853–1919), United States Representative from New York John K. Stewart (1870–1916), American entrepreneur and inventor John Smith Stewart (1878–1970), Canadian Member... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Static Shock is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Batman Beyond (known as Batman of the Future in Europe, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and India) is an American animated television series created by The WB Television Network in collaboration with DC Comics as a continuation of the Batman legacy. ... A season finale (British English last in the series) is the final episode of a season of a television program. ... The Batman is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Flash redirects here. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...

Live action

  • Legends of the Superheroes was a two-part special that adapted the Justice League that appeared in the 1970s. It featured Adam West, Burt Ward and Frank Gorshin returning to their roles from the 1960s live-action Batman television series: Batman, Robin, and the Riddler respectively. Other heroes portrayed on the show included Black Canary, Captain Marvel, Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, Huntress and more.
  • The "League" from the live action television pilot of Justice League of America.
    The "League" from the live action television pilot of Justice League of America.
    A series pilot for Justice League of America was produced in 1997, but failed to sell. The pilot used less well-known characters to avoid the licensing issues surrounding Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman.[citation needed] The characters used included the Martian Manhunter, the Guy Gardner Green Lantern, Fire, Ice, the Barry Allen Flash, and the Ray Palmer Atom set against a version of the Weather Wizard.
  • A "Justice League" as featured in the Smallville Season 6 episode Justice.
    Smallville featured a version of the Justice League in its sixth season episode "Justice". The members of the team were drawn from versions of DC Comics heroes that had previously appeared in the show: "Impulse" from the season four episode "Run"; "Aquaman" from the season five episode "Aqua"; "Cyborg" from the season five episode of the same name, and "Green Arrow" who had been appearing as a regular character through the sixth season. The episode had the team temporarily recruiting main characters Clark Kent, who Green Arrow dubs "Boy Scout", and Chloe Sullivan, who acts as the team's advisor through a computer network under the codename "Watchtower". Later, in the Season Seven episode "Siren," the Black Canary joined Oliver's team as well.


The online spin-off series Smallville Legends: Justice & Doom follows the exploits of Oliver Queen's proto-Justice League. Episode one suggests an unknown connection with Dr. Virgil Swann. In the picture from left to right: Impulse, Green Arrow, Clark Kent, Aquaman, and Cyborg. Barbara Joyce as the Huntress from Legends of the Superheroes. ... Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928) is an American actor who is best known for playing the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne on the 1960s TV series Batman (which also had a film adaptation). ... Burt Ward (born Bert John Gervis, Jr. ... Frank Gorshin as the Riddler, from the Batman TV series. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x1024, 88 KB)I took this screen shot with my computer, Im not sure who the copyright holder would be, But I found an image similiar to this one on a few web sites after a Google image search This... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x1024, 88 KB)I took this screen shot with my computer, Im not sure who the copyright holder would be, But I found an image similiar to this one on a few web sites after a Google image search This... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Fire is a fictional superheroine published by DC Comics. ... Ice (Tora Olafsdotter) is a fictional character, a superheroine in publications from DC Comics. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... The Atom is a DC Comics superhero, introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961). ... Weather Wizard is the name of a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1080x608, 147 KB) Image taken from Kryptonsite. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1080x608, 147 KB) Image taken from Kryptonsite. ... This article contains a complete summary of the sixth season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the Teen Titans member. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Chloe Ann Sullivan is a fictional character from the television series Smallville, played by Allison Mack. ...


Video games

Justice League Task Force is a Super NES and Sega Mega Drive/Genesis tournament fighting game developed by Blizzard Entertainment and published by Acclaim Entertainment. ... The Mega Drive/Genesis was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in Japan (1988), Europe (1990) and most of the rest of the world as the Mega Drive. ... Justice League Heroes is a console game released in the fourth quarter of 2006 across 3 different platforms. ... Cross-platform is a term which can refer to computer programs, operating systems, computer languages, programming languages, or other computer software and their implementations which can be made to work on multiple computer platforms. ...

Film

Justice League Mortal

From early 2007, it had been announced that a Justice League of America movie was in the works, and the project has been subject to much rumour and speculation since then. At present, the working title for the film stands as Justice League Mortal and is set to be directed by Australian director George Miller. Hiring an entirely new cast, the film is not set in the same continuity as the Batman or Superman film series. Instead, it will set up spin-offs for other Justice League members, similar to the X-Men film series.[5] George (Miliotis) Miller (born March 3, 1945), is an Academy-Award winning Australian film and television screenwriter, director and producer. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ...


In February 2007, Warner Bros. hired Kieran and Michele Mulroney to write a script for Justice League Mortal,[6] which they handed in that June to positive feedback from the studio.[7] George Miller signed to direct in September 2007, while the studio hoped filming would start before the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike. In addition, the studio was considering filming Justice League Mortal completely in motion capture, similar to Beowulf.[8] Barrie Osbourne will produce,[9] with a $220 million budget.[10] “WB” redirects here. ... Kieran Mulroney (born in Alexandria, Virginia in 1965) is an American television actor known for his numerous television appearances. ... George (Miliotis) Miller (born March 3, 1945), is an Academy-Award winning Australian film and television screenwriter, director and producer. ... Motion capture, or mocap, is a technique of digitally recording the movements of real things — usually humans — it originally developed as an analysis tool in biomechanics research, but has grown increasingly important as a source of motion data for computer animation. ... Beowulf is a 2007 animated film adaptation of the Old English epic poem of the same name. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ...


Filming was supposed to start in February 2008,[11] in Australia, where post-production would also be conducted.[12] Some shooting was to take place at Sydney Heads, while local colleges were scouted.[9] But in January 2008, Warner Bros. announced the film was on indefinite hold, allowing an options lapse for the cast. The studio felt the script needed perfecting, which was impossible because of the writer's strike.[13] As soon as the strike ended, Warners wanted to start filming in mid-April 2008.[5] They are still adamant for a mid-2009 release date,[14] and hope to have filming start in mid-July 2008.[15] In February 2008 it was announced that production would go to Canada, despite Miller's wishes to keep production at Fox Studios Australia.[10] Warner Bros. still faces the possibility of a June 2008 Screen Actors Guild strike. The Mulroneys went back to rewrite the script for Warner Bros. and Miller's approval.[5] On March 19, 2008, the title Justice League Mortal was announced, and it was finally official that Australia would not be housing the production of the film. Miller explained, "A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the Australian film industry is being frittered away because of very lazy thinking. They're throwing away hundreds of millions of dollars of investment that the rest of the world is competing for and, much more significantly, highly skilled creative jobs."[16] Sydney Heads (also known as the Heads) is the geographical area representing the entrance to Port Jackson (and therefore also to Sydney Harbour) bordered by North Head and Quarantine Head to the north, South Head to the south and Middle Head to the west. ... In the film industry, an option is a contractual agreement between a movie studio, a production company, or a producer (henceforth called the producer) and a writer, in which the producer obtains the right to buy a screenplay from the writer, before a certain date. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Marit Allen was originally hired as costume designer, but she died in November 2007.[17] Weta Workshop took over costume designer, a decision which opens the possibility of their sister company, Weta Digital, doing the visual effects.[18] Costume designer is a cinema term which refers to a person whose responsibilty is to design costumes for a movie or stage production. ... Weta Workshop is a physical effects company based in Miramar, New Zealand, producing effects for television and film. ... Weta Digital is a digital visual effects company based in Wellington, New Zealand, an offshoot of the Weta Workshop physical effects company. ... Visual effects (or VFX for short) is the term given in which images or film frames are created and manipulated for film and video. ...


Cast

Director George Miller cast younger actors because he wanted them to grow into their roles over the course of several movies.[25] This decision has received negative feedback from comic book fans on the internet.[5] Brody, Common, Gale and Hammer will have to physically train for their roles.[26] Adam Jared Brody (born December 15, 1979) is an American film and television actor. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Columbus Keith Short Jr. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Megan Gale (born August 7, 1976) is an Australian supermodel and actress who has achieved considerable fame, first in Italy but now equally so in her native Australia. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Jessica Claire Biel (born March 3, 1982) is an American actress and former fashion model best known for appearing in several Hollywood films such as Summer Catch, the remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Illusionist, as well as for her early television role of Mary Camden in the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Teresa Edwina Palmer (born February 26, 1986) is an Australian actress born in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Shannon Marie Sossamon (born October 3, 1978), better known as Shannyn Sossamon, is an American actress, musician and dancer. ... Christina Milian (born Christine Flores on September 26, 1981) is an American R&B and pop singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, actress, and former MTV VJ. She has released three studio albums and one compilation album. ... Armie Hammer (born Armand Douglas Hammer) was born on August 28, 1986 in Los Angeles, California to Michael and Dru Hammer. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Teresa Edwina Palmer (born February 26, 1986) is an Australian actress born in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... George (Miliotis) Miller (born March 3, 1945), is an Academy-Award winning Australian film and television screenwriter, director and producer. ...


Hugh Keays-Byrne has been cast in an unnamed role. Aquaman and Martian Manhunter have yet to be cast.[10][25] In October 2007, roughly 40 actors and actresses auditioned for the League, among them; Joseph Cross, Michael Angarano, Max Thieriot, Minka Kelly, Adrianne Palicki and Scott Porter.[25] Hugh Keays-Byrne (born 1947 in Kashmir, India) is an Australian actor. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... Joseph Michael Cross (born May 28, 1986) is an American actor. ... Michael Anthony Angarano (born December 3, 1987) is an American actor. ... Max Drake Thieriot (born October 14, 1988) is an American actor. ... Minka Kelly (born June 24, 1980) is an American actress. ... Palicki Adrianne Palicki (b. ... Scott Porter is an actor who plays Jason Street in Friday Night Lights. ...


Direct-to-video

Justice League: The New Frontier is a direct-to-video animated film adaptation of popular DC Comics storyline DC: The New Frontier. The film was written by Justice League writer Stan Berkowitz, with Darwyn Cooke serving as story and visual consultant. Justice League: The New Frontier was released on DVD, HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc in the United States on February 26th, 2008. It contains both widescreen and full screen aspect ratios. The Official Justice League: The New Frontier Movie site is http://www.warnervideo.com/jlnewfrontier/. A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... // Regular Context The line of a story. ... Cover to Solo #5, featuring Slam Bradley. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... Blu-ray Disc (also known as Blu-ray or BD) is an optical disc storage media format. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ "League was a stronger word, one that the readers could identify with because of baseball leagues"
  2. ^ Lee, Stan and George, Mair (2002) Excelsior! The Amazing Like of Stan Lee. ISBN 0-684-87305-2
  3. ^ "Sales dropped by tens of thousands, [with very little favorable fan response for the new team"]
  4. ^ Mark Waid. The Origin of the Justice League of America. DC Comics. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Michael Cieply. "A Film’s Superheroes Face Threat of Strike", The New York Times, 2008-03-01. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  6. ^ Pamela McClintock; Ben Fritz. "Justice prevails for Warner Bros.", Variety, 2007-02-22. Retrieved on 2007-04-12. 
  7. ^ Pamela McClintock. "Justice League film gets script", Variety, 2007-06-15. Retrieved on 2008-03-14. 
  8. ^ Diane Garrett. "George Miller to lead Justice League", Variety, 2007-09-20. Retrieved on 2007-09-20. 
  9. ^ a b "Sydney mooted as location for Megan Gale's Wonder Woman flick", The Daily Telegraph, 2008-02-20. Retrieved on 2008-02-27. 
  10. ^ a b c Garry Maddox. "Unhappy feet may flee Sydney", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2008-02-25. Retrieved on 2008-02-25. 
  11. ^ Andrew Hornery. "Gale is lassoed for film", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2008-02-09. Retrieved on 2008-02-27. 
  12. ^ Michaela Boland. "Australia awaits decisions", Variety, 2007-11-30. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  13. ^ Michaela Boland. "Australia denies killing Justice League", Variety, 2008-01-17. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  14. ^ Diane Garrett. "Warner Bros. to serve Justice in '09", Variety, 2008-02-26. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  15. ^ Michael Fleming; Pamela McClintock. "Film greenlights in limbo", Variety, 2008-02-27. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  16. ^ Garry Maddox. "Mega movie refused rebate", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2008-03-19. Retrieved on 2008-03-19. 
  17. ^ "Costumer Marit Allen dies at 66", Variety, 2007-11-30. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  18. ^ Tom Cardy. "Weta triumphs in clash of the superheroes", The Dominion Post, 2008-01-07. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  19. ^ a b Diane Garrett; Michael Fleming. "Warner pulls plug on Justice League", Variety, 2008-01-16. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  20. ^ Shawn Adler. "Common Confirms He’s Green Lantern In Justice League", MTV, 2008-02-08. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  21. ^ Larry Carroll. "Columbus Short Turns Down Lantern Ring For Justice League", MTV, 2007-10-30. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  22. ^ Tatiana Siegel. "Jessica Biel in talks for Justice", Variety, 2007-09-24. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  23. ^ Shawn Adler. "Mary Elizabeth Winstead Envisions Bulking Up For Wonder Woman", MTV, 2007-10-26. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  24. ^ Jennifer Vineyard. "Christina Milian Wants Wonder Woman Role In Justice League Flick — But She'll Have To Fight For It", MTV, 2007-10-15. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  25. ^ a b c Borys Kit. "The Vine: Young actors seek 'Justice'", The Hollywood Reporter, 2007-10-15. Retrieved on 2008-03-16. 
  26. ^ Silas Lesnick. "Exclusive Updates on Justice League and Happy Feet 2!", IESB, 2008-03-10. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Telegraph is a tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Nationwide News, part of News Corporation. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dominion Post is a metropolitan broadsheet newspaper published in Wellington, owned by the Australian Fairfax group, owners of The Age of Melbourne and The Sydney Morning Herald. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The Justice League (q. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article is not to be confused with the upcoming Justice League film. ...

Spin-off groups

Extreme Justice #0. ... Justice Leagues was a six-issue crossover event published by DC Comics in 2001, which introduced a revamped Justice League of America. ... 1990 Justice League America Annual featuring the Justice League Antarctica. ... Justice League Elite was a 12-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ... Justice League Task Force was a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics from June 1993 to August 1996; it lasted 37 issues. ... The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Justice League (TV series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (987 words)
Justice League was an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network.
It is based on the Justice League and associated comic book characters published by DC Comics.
Justice League Unlimited features a greatly expanded roster of heroes, usually with only a few appearing in any given episode, although there are a few featuring just about the entire roster fighting against one giant enemy.
Justice League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3596 words)
The League's twelve-member limit (sometimes explained as a "no duplication of powers" policy) was conceded (in Justice League of America #161) to simply have been a charter provision about numbers, once the League had formally removed the limitation and admitted Hawkwoman and hoped to admit more members.
The Super Buddies were the remainder of the Justice League International that regrouped to be a team accessible to the common man. With most of the heavy hitters from the group already in the Justice League or Justice Society, the team was fairly incompetent and is not looked upon very well by the League.
Legends of the Superheroes were two live-action adaptations of the Justice League that appeared in the 1970s, and saw Adam West, Burt Ward and Frank Gorshin return to their fabled roles of Batman, Robin, and the Riddler (respectively) from the 1960s live-action Batman television series.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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