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Encyclopedia > Jupiter (god)
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Roman Mythology

Roman Mythology
Important Gods:
Legendary History:
The Aeneid
Roman religion
Greek/Roman myth compared
"Jupiter et Thétis" - by Jean Ingres, 1811.
"Jupiter et Thétis" - by Jean Ingres, 1811.

In Roman mythology, Jupiter held the same role as Zeus in the Greek pantheon. He was called Jupiter Optimus Maximus (Jupiter Highest, Greatest) as the patron deity of the Roman state, in charge of laws and social order. Jupiter is, properly speaking, a derivation of Jove and pater (Latin for father) Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... This page is about the Roman god Quirinus. ... A bust of Julius Caesar. ... The famous statue of Octavian at the Prima Porta Caesar Augustus (Latin:IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS) ¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known to modern historians as Octavian for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, is considered the first and one of the most... Juno was a Roman goddess, the rough equivalent of the Greek Hera, queen of the gods. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology, analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology. ... Minerva was a Roman goddess of crafts and wisdom. ... This article treats Mercury in cult practice and in archaic Rome. ... Vulcan, in Roman mythology, is the son of Jupiter and Juno, and husband of Maia and Venus. ... Ceres, in Roman mythology, equivalent to the Greek Demeter (see which for more details), daughter of Saturn and Rhea, wife-sister of Jupiter, mother of Proserpina by Jupiter, sister of Juno, Vesta, Neptune and Pluto, and patron of Sicily. ... Statue of Venus in the British Museum Venus is a Roman goddess principally associated with love, broadly, although not completely, equivalent to Greek Aphrodite and Etruscan Turan. ... Diana was the equivalent in Roman mythology of the Greek Artemis (see Roman/Greek equivalency in mythology for more details). ... Lares (pl. ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (Greek equivalent Tyche) was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind, as modern depictions of Justice are... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ... Aeneas (Greek: Αινείας, Aineías) was a Trojan hero, the son of prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite (Venus in Roman sources). ... Romulus and Remus, (771 BC¹- July 5, 717 BC Romulus) (771 BC- April 21, 753 BC Remus), the traditional founders of Rome, appeared in Roman mythology as the twin sons of the priestess Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war Mars. ... Numa Pompilius (April 21, 753 BC - 674 BC) succeeded Romulus as the second King of Rome. ... King of Rome redirects here. ... Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... A vestal Virgin, engraving by Sir Frederick Leighton, ca 1890: Leightons artistic sense has won over his passion for historical accuracy in showing the veil over the Vestals head at sacrifices, the suffibulum, as translucent, instead of fine white wool. ... The Flamen Dialis was an important position in Roman religion. ... A flamen was a priest of the Roman religion. ... The rex Nemorensis, (Latin: the king of Nemi or the king of the grove) was a sort of sacred king who served as priest of the goddess Diana at Aricia in Italy, by the shores of lake Nemi. ... The Augur was a priest or official in ancient Rome. ... Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology and Etruscan mythology. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (571x680, 298 KB) Description: Jupiter et Thétis, 1811 Source: [1] Date:  Author: Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Permission:  Other versions of this file:  File links The following pages link to this file: Jupiter (god) ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (571x680, 298 KB) Description: Jupiter et Thétis, 1811 Source: [1] Date:  Author: Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Permission:  Other versions of this file:  File links The following pages link to this file: Jupiter (god) ... Self-portrait at age 24, 1804 Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (August 29, 1780 – January 14, 1867) was a French painter. ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2. ...


This article focuses on Jupiter in early Rome and in cultic practice. For information on mythological accounts of Jupiter, which are heavily influenced by Greek mythology, see Zeus. Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ...


The name of the god was also adopted as the name of the planet Jupiter, and was the original namesake of the weekday that would come to be known in English as Thursday (the etymological root can be seen in French jeudi, from Jovis Dies). Linguistic studies identify him as deriving from the same god as the Germanic *Tiwaz (and Zeus), whose name was given to Tuesday. Another etymological reference is Dyaus Pita of the Vedic religion. Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... This article is about Tyr, the god. ... In vedic religion, Dyaus Pita is the Sky Father, husband of Prthivi and father of Agni and Indra (RV 4. ... The adjective Vedic may refer to The Vedas, the oldest preserved Indo-Aryan texts. ...

Contents


Background of Jupiter:

  1. Jupiter Caelestis ("heavenly")
  2. Jupiter Fulgurator ("of the lightning")
  3. Jupiter Latarius ("God of Latium")
  4. Jupiter Lucetius ("of the light")
  5. Jupiter Pluvius ("sender of rain") See also Pluvius
  6. Jupiter Stator (from stare meaning "standing")
  7. Jupiter Terminus or Jupiter Terminalus (defends boundaries). See also Terminus
  8. Jupiter Tonans ("thunderer")
  9. Jupiter Victor (led Roman armies to victory)
  10. Jupiter Summanus (sender of nocturnal thunder)
  11. Jupiter Feretrius ("who carries away [the spoils of war]")
  12. Jupiter Optimus Maximus (best and greatest)
  13. Jupiter Homoscus Maximus (Lover of Gods)

Jupiter has a glorious background and was believed to be the most powerful of the gods. The Romans respected his open homosexuality, which signified a love of masculine strength and courage. Jupiter is known to have had relationships with a number of the major Roman gods. Jupiter loved Neptune more than any of the gods, but Neptune was in love with Juno and declined Jupiter's advances. Jupiter became jealous and angry and made an unsuccessful attempt to kill Neptune. Neptune was the clear victor and Jupiter never went to the sea again. Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... In Roman mythology, Jupiter Pluvius was the reliever of droughts. ... In Roman mythology, Terminus was the god of boundaries. ...


Jupiter and Roman sovereignty

The several aspects of sovereignty implied by some of Jupiter's titles are made explicit in the legendary history of early Rome (as transmitted, for example, in Plutarch's Roman Lives and the first few books of Livy). Thus the warlike Romulus invokes Jupiter Stator to halt and terrify Rome's enemies, while the peaceful legislator Numa Pompilius has a close relationship with Dius Fidius, who presides over oaths. Plutarch Mestrius Plutarchus (c. ... Bust of Livy Titus Livius (around 59 BC - 17 AD), known as Livy in English, wrote a monumental history of Rome, Ab urbe condita, from its founding (traditionally dated to 753 BC). ... Numa Pompilius (April 21, 753 BC - 674 BC) succeeded Romulus as the second King of Rome. ...


Jupiter also stands at the head of the Archaic Triad of Jupiter, Mars and Quirinus. This grouping has been seen as a religious representation of early Roman society, wherein: Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... This page is about the Roman god Quirinus. ...

  • Jupiter stands in for the ritual and augural authority of the Flamen Dialis (high priest of Jupiter) and the chief priestly colleges.
  • Mars, with his warrior and agricultural functions, stands in for the power of the king and young nobles to bring prosperity and victory through sympathetic magic with rituals like the October Horse and the Lupercalia.
  • Quirinus, from co-viri "men together", stands in for the combined strength of the Roman populus.

Later, during the Imperial period, the emperors Claudius and Domitian adopted traits of Jupiter in their portraiture, to emphasize their sovereignty over the whole world. The Augur was a priest or official in ancient Rome. ... The Flamen Dialis was an important position in Roman religion. ... Magic (also called magick to distinguish it from stage magic) is a supposed way of influencing the world through supernatural, mystical, or paranormal means. ... The Lupercalia was an annual Roman festival held on February 15 to honour Faunus, god of fertility and forests. ... The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Augustus). ... A statue of Emperor Claudius Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 1, 10 BC – October 13, 54), previously Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero Germanicus, was the fourth Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from January 24, 41 to his death in 54. ... Domitian bust in the Louvre Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman emperor of the gens Flavia. ...


Capitoline Jupiter

The largest temple in Rome was that of Jupiter Optimus Maximus on the Capitoline Hill. Here he was worshipped alongside Juno and Minerva, forming the Capitoline Triad. Temples to Jupiter Optimus Maximus or the Capitoline Triad as a whole were commonly built by the Romans at the center of new cities in their colonies. The numbers and architecture of Roman temples reflect the citys receptivity to all the religions of the world. ... Juno can refer to: Juno, the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Hera A guardian spirit for Roman women (equivalent of the male Genius) Jupiter IRBM rocket (Juno II) the Jupiter-C IRBM rocket (Juno or Juno I) the Juno Awards, a Canadian music award festival Juno Beach, one of... Minerva was a Roman goddess of crafts and wisdom. ...


The building was begun by Tarquinius Priscus and completed by the last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, although it was only inaugurated at the beginning of the Republican era in 509 BC. Lucius Tarquinius Priscus (also called Tarquin I) was the legendary fifth King of Rome, said to have reigned from 616 BC to 579 BC. Tarquinius Priscus came from the Etruscan city of Tarquinii and was actually named Lucumo (it is now known that lucumo is the common name of an... Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (also called Tarquin the Great or Tarquin II) was the last of the seven legendary kings of Rome, son of Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, and son-in-law of Servius Tullius. ...


The temple building stands on a high podium with an entrance staircase to the front. On three of its sides it was probably surrounded by a colonnade, with another two rows of pillars drawn up in line with those on the façade of the deep pronaos which precedes the three cells, the central one being wider than the other two - in accordance with the canons of the Tuscanic temple. Rosie is cool


The surviving remains of the foundations and of the podium, most of which lie underneath Palazzo Caffarelli, are made up of enormous parallel sections of walling made in blocks of grey tufa- quadriga stone (cappellaccio) and bear witness to the sheer size of the surface area of temple's base (about 55 x 60 m).


The roof bears traces of a splendid terracotta auriga by the Etruscan artist Vulca of Veius in the VI century BC, commissioned by Tarquinius Superbus; it was replaced by a bronze one at the beginning of the III century BC. Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (also called Tarquin the Great or Tarquin II) was the last of the seven legendary kings of Rome, son of Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, and son-in-law of Servius Tullius. ...


The temple was rebuilt in marble after total destruction had been wrought by terrible fires in 83 BC, 69 BC and 80 AD.


The large square in front of the temple (the Area Capitolina) featured a number of temples dedicated to minor divinities, in addition to other religious buildings, statues and trophies.


In language

It was once believed that the Roman god Jupiter (Zeus in Greece) was in charge of cosmic Justice, and in ancient Rome, people swore to Jove in their courts of law, which lead to the common expression "By Jove," that many people use today. Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... Justice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In Roman mythology, Jupiter (sometimes shortened to Jove) held the same role as Zeus in the Greek pantheon. ...


References

  • Article "Jupiter" in The Oxford Classical Dictionary. ISBN 0198606419.
  • Georges Dumézil, Archaic Roman Religion. ISBN 0801854814.
  • Georges Dumézil, Mitra-Varuna. ISBN 0942299132.

http://www.museicapitolini.org/en/museo/sezioni.asp?l1=5&l2=3 Georges Dumézil (March 4, 1898 - October 11, 1986) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty and power in Indo-European religion and society. ... Georges Dumézil (March 4, 1898 - October 11, 1986) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty and power in Indo-European religion and society. ...

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Jupiter (mythology)

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