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Encyclopedia > Jungle

Jungle usually refers to a dense forest in a hot climate, such as a tropical rainforest. About 6% of the Earth's surface is classified as jungle. Jungles are vital to sustaining the ecosystems of the Earth as we know it. About 40% of all species live in jungle environments [1]. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Box_Log_Falls. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Box_Log_Falls. ... Lamington is a national park in Queensland, Australia, lying on the Lamington Plateau 75 km south of Brisbane. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... This article is about a community of trees. ... Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests of the world Amazon river rain forest in Peru Amazon river rain forest in Brazil Tropical rainforests are rainforests generally found near the equator. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ...


The word jungle originates from a Sanskrit word jangala, meaning "desert". In many languages of the Indian subcontinent, including Indian English, it is generally used to refer to any wild, untended or uncultivated land, including forest, scrub, or desert landscapes.



Sometimes an urban environment can be called a jungle, as "concrete jungle".


The term may still be used in a technical context to describe the forest biome rainforest, a forest characterised by extensive biodiversity and densely tangled undergrowth including young trees, vines and lianas, and herbaceous plants. As a forest biome, "jungles" are present in both equatorial and tropical climatic zones, and are associated with preclimax stages of the rainforest. For this reason, jungle is to be distinguished from tropical rainforest in that the former is a profuse thicket of tropical shrubs, vines, and small trees growing in areas outside the light-blocking canopy of a tropical rainforest. Hence, jungle may be found at the edges of such forests. A biome is a climate and geographical area of ecologically similar communities of plants, animals, and soil organisms, often referred to as ecosystems. ... The Daintree Rainforest in Queensland, Australia. ... Rainforests are among the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth Biodiversity is the variation of taxonomic life forms within a given ecosystem, biome or for the entire Earth. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Liana tangle across a forest in the Western Ghats Woman swinging on a liana in Aokigahara forest, Japan A canopy that has formed over Monkey Ladder Vine A liana is a woody climber [1] that starts at ground level, and uses trees to climb up to the canopy where it... This article is about the plants used in cooking and medicine. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... The Daintree Rainforest in Queensland, Australia. ...


Not all regions called "jungles" would qualify as "rain forests" because many would apply "jungle" to the forests of northern Thailand or southern Guangdong in China: but scientifically, these are "monsoon forests" or "tropical deciduous forests" but not "rain forests". Not to be confused with the former Kwantung Leased Territory in north-eastern China. ... Bold text[[ // [[Image:Media:Example. ... Deciduous forest after leaf fall Like many deciduous plants, Forsythia flowers during the leafless season For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ...


Metaphorical Use

The term "jungle" is frequently used as a metaphor for a lawless situation where the strong may devour the weak with impunity. It is used in connection with situations of the collapse of social order where robbery, rape or murder may be committed with no police to interfere, and also in reference to situations in international relations where strong states are perceived as committing naked aggression against smaller and weaker ones.


Upton Sinclair gave the title The Jungle to his book about the life of workers at the Chicago Stockyards in order to imply that the workers were being mercilessly exploited and had no legal or other recourse. Upton Sinclair Jr. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ... Union Stock Yards, 1941 The Union Stock Yard & Transit Co. ...


The term "The Law of the Jungle" is also used in this kind of context, drawn from kipling's The Jungle Book - though in the society of jungle animals portrayed in that book and obviously meant as a metaphor for human society, that phrase referred to an intricate code of laws which Kipling describes in detail, and not at all to a lawless chaos. The Law of the Jungle is usually an expression that means every one for himself and anything goes. ... Rudyard Kipling, British author Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30, 1865 – January 18, 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India. ... Embossed cover from the original MacMillan edition of The Jungle Book, 1894, based on art by John Lockwood Kipling (Rudyards father) For other uses, see The Jungle Book (disambiguation). ...


In Hobo lingo, "Jungle" denoted an area off a railroad where hoboes camp and congregate, lighting fires at night; a "Jungle Buzzard" referred to a hobo or tramp that preys on their own. The "Hobo Code" adopted in the 1889 National Hobo Convention in St. Louis, Missouri and intended as a concrete set of laws to govern the Nation-wide Hobo Body, included "If in a community jungle [i.e. of the Hobo community] always pitch in and help" This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ...


The "Cities in Flight" Science Fiction series by James Blish depicted spaceborne cities flying through the galaxy, which the writer compared to Hobos or Okies of space. The term "jungle", borrowed from the above Hobo term, is used for an area of space where such flying cities congregate. James Benjamin Blish (East Orange, New Jersey, May 23, 1921 – Henley-on-Thames, July 30, 1975) was an American author of fantasy and science fiction. ... James Benjamin Blish (East Orange, New Jersey, May 23, 1921 – Henley-on-Thames, July 30, 1975) was an American author of fantasy and science fiction. ... Rear view of an Okies car, passing through Amarillo, Texas, heading west, 1941 Okie, also known as a Pafundi in Northern Oklahoma, is a synonym, dating from as early as 1905, denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. ...


See also

This article is about a community of trees. ... The Daintree Rainforest in Queensland, Australia. ... Embossed cover from the original MacMillan edition of The Jungle Book, 1894, based on art by John Lockwood Kipling (Rudyards father) For other uses, see The Jungle Book (disambiguation). ... Rudyard Kipling, British author Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30, 1865 – January 18, 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... The Law of the Jungle is usually an expression that means every one for himself and anything goes. ...

External links

  • BBC interactive site
  • Link illustrating Biomes

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Jungle Book personalized starring YOU as Mowgli in a special paperback edition! (261 words)
Meet Mowgli, raised by wolves in the Indian jungle, and the animals that live there — Baloo the bear, Bagheera the fl panther, Kaa the snake, Shere Khan the tiger, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi the mongoose, and Toomai the elephant.
Enter Rudyard Kipling's enchanting world as Mowgli, an abandoned child adopted by wolves who eventually becomes an accepted part of the Seeonee pack led by Akela the wise.
Along the way he learns the laws of the jungle and its creatures from the grizzled Baloo and Bagheera, and encounters adventures aplenty, involving the Bandar Log (Monkey People), Shere Khan the fierce tiger, Kaa the snake and others.
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. Search, Read, Study, Discuss. (878 words)
Raised by wolves, young Mowgli is taught the law of the jungle by his animal friends: old Baloo the wise brown bear, and Bagheera, the sleek, fl Panther.
But looming in the darkness of the jungle is the cunning and sinister tiger, Shere Khan, who silently watches Mowgli, awaiting his moment to pounce.
Kipling's work, "The jungle book" is one of my favorites which involves such imagination that if you think about it, anyone may want to have the gift to talk to animals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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