FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
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Encyclopedia > June 2005

2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- →
2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in April • 26: Augusto Roa Bastos • 24: Ezer Weizman • 23: Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen • 23: John Mills • 16: Marla Ruzicka • 9: Andrea Dworkin • 6: Prince Rainier III • 5: Dale Messick • 5: Saul Bellow • 2: Pope John... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May...

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Other events in June 2005
World - Sci-Tech - Sports
Britain and Ireland - Canada
Hong Kong and Macao
Australia & NZ - India - US

Deaths in June

June 27: Shelby Foote
June 27: John T. Walton
June 26: Richard Whiteley
June 25: John Fiedler
June 25: Chet Helms
June 24: Paul Winchell
June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin
June 20: Jack Kilby
June 18: Syed Mushtaq Ali
June 13: Lane Smith
June 11: Juan José Saer
June 9: Richard Eberhart
June 6: Anne Bancroft
June 4: Chloe Jones
June 1: George Mikan
2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Todays featured article • Technetium Deaths in June • June 20: Charles D. Keeling • June 20: Jack Kilby Other recent deaths Events • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season • 2005 Pacific hurricane season • 46th Paris Air Show: June 13-19 Related... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → This page deals with current events in the English-speaking places of Europe. ... ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... Shelby Foote (November 7, 1916 – June 27, 2005) was a noted author and historian of the American Civil War. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... John Thomas Walton, (October 8, 1946 – June 27, 2005), was a son of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Richard Whiteley John Richard Whiteley, OBE , DL (28 December 1943 – 26 June 2005) was a British television presenter and journalist. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... John Fiedler (b. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Paul Winchell (December 21, 1922 - June 24, 2005), born Paul Wilchen, was a ventriloquist and voice actor whose fame flourished in the 1950s and 1960s. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... Jaime Cardinal Sin, Archbishop of Manila, Philippines (1974-2003) Jaime Cardinal Sin, also Jaime Lachica Sin (August 31, 1928–June 21, 2005) (Chinese name: 辛海梅; 辛海棉), was a priest of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... Jack Kilby holding an old calculator and one of the newest. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... Syed Mushtaq Ali (December 17, 1914 - June 18, 2005) was a former captain of the Indian cricket team. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... Lane Smith (born April 29, 1936), U.S. actor. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... Juan José Saer (28 June 1937 - 11 June 2005) was an Argentine novelist. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Richard Eberhart (born April 5, 1904 in Austin, Minnesota - June 9, 2005 in Hanover, New Hampshire) is a prolific American poet who has published more than a dozen books of poetry. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... Anne Bancroft in The Graduate Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an American actress, born Anna Maria Louisa Italiano in The Bronx, New York to Italian immigrant parents. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... Chloe Jones (born Melinda Dee Jones in Houston, Texas) (June 17, 1975 – June 4, 2005) was a model and erotic actress. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ...

Deaths in 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → The following is a list of figures who died in June 2005. ...

June 30, 2005 (Thursday)

June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining, and the last day of June. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Herman De Croo is the current sitting president of the Belgian Chamber of Representatives, the lower house of the Belgian Federal Parliament. ... مجلس شورای اسلامی - The Majles; Irans Parliament. ... Haddad-Adel Gholam Ali Haddad-Adel (غلامعلی حداد عادل in Persian) born in 1945 in Tehran, Iran, is the chairman of the Iranian Parliamnet. ... Alcoholic beverages are drinks containing ethanol, popularly called alcohol. ... Anne-Marie Lizin (born January 5, 1949 in Huy) is a Belgian politician from the Socialist Party. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Galina Starovoitova (Галина Старовойтова) (31st December 1946 - November 20, 1998) was a Russian politician, who was born in Chelyabinsk. ... This article deals with the city of Delhi. ... Tigers (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family and one of four big cats in the Panthera genus. ... Poacher has two different meanings: A poacher is someone who engages in poaching – the theft or illegal killing of animals or plants, or sometimes artifacts. ... Fouad Siniora Fouad Siniora (alternative spellings: Fuad Siniora, Fouad Seniora) is the Prime Minister of Lebanon, a position he assumed on 19 July 2005, succeeding Najib Mikati. ... This page lists prime ministers of Lebanon. ... Dr. Hassan abd Allah al-Turabi (الدكتور حسن عبد الله الترابي in Arabic), commonly called Hassan al-Turabi (sometimes transliterated Hassan al-Tourabi) (حسن الترابي), is a political and religious leader in Sudan, who may have been instrumental in institutionalizing Islamic Sharia law in the northern part of the country. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Look up Somalia on Wiktionary, the free dictionary News AllAfrica. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The World Food Programme (WFP) is an agency of the United Nations which distributes food commodities to support development projects, to long-term refugees and displaced persons and as emergency food assistance in situations of natural and man-made disasters. ... The term ransom refers to the practice of holding a prisoner to extort money or property extorted to secure their release, or to the sum of money involved. ... In 2004, the new Socialist government of Spain began a process to legalise same-sex marriage in Spain. ... His Royal Highness, Prince Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud (Arabic: صاحب السمو الملكي الأمير بندر بن سلطان بن عبدالعزيز آل سعود) (born March 2, 1944) is a highly influential Saudi politician and was Saudi ambassador to the United States from 1983 to 2005. ... The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a country on the Arabian Peninsula. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Political separatism is a movement to obtain sovereignty and split a territory or group of people (usually a people with a distinctive national consciousness) from one another (or one nation from another; a colony from the metropolis). ... ETA can refer to: eta is a Basque word for and. Eta (letter) - from the Greek alphabet. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... This article does not give much verifiable information about the subject. ... 2005 Sumatran earthquake - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Valerie Plame with her husband Joseph C. Wilson, photographed after her CIA identity became public knowledge. ... Matthew Cooper is a reporter with TIME magazine, who, along with New York Times reporter Judith Miller was held in contempt of court and threatened with imprisonment for refusing to disclose secret sources in stories connecting the White House with the Valerie Plame exposure scandal. ... EPA redirects here. ... Teflon is the brand name of a polymer compound discovered by Roy J. Plunkett (1910-1994) of DuPont in 1938 and introduced as a commercial product in 1946. ... The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day period during which the new government of Iran after the Iranian Revolution held hostage 66 diplomats and citizens of the United States. ... Order: sixth President of Iran First Vice President: not installed yet Term of office: August 3, 2005 – present Preceded by: Mohammad Khatami Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: 1956 Place of birth: Aradan, Iran Political party: Islamic Society of Engineers Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (محمود احمدی‌نژاد; born 1956), also written Ahmadinezhad, became the sixth... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Wind turbines in Neuenkirchen, Dithmarschen (Germany). ... Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is a left-wing Brazilian politician. ... Ayman Nour Ayman Abd El-Aziz Nour (Arabic: ) is an Egyptian politician, a member of that countrys Parliament and chairman of the al-Ghad party (Tomorrow Party). He became famous around the world following his October 2004 imprisonment by the government of President Hosni Mubarak, which was widely understood... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... For other uses of SEC, see SEC (disambiguation) The Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... William Donaldson (January 4, 1935 - June 22, 2005) was a British satirist, writer, rake and playboy, author of The Henry Root Letters. ...

June 29, 2005 (Wednesday)

June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... Amtrak is the trademark name of the intercity passenger train system created on May 1, 1971 in the United States. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about trains in rail transport. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... United States Capitol . The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in New York City was a complex of seven buildings designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south end... For the tower in Miami, see Freedom Tower (Miami) The Freedom Tower is the name given to the planned centerpiece building of the new World Trade Center in New York City, whose predecessor was destroyed in the attacks of September 11, 2001. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Francisco Franco Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde Salgado Pardo de Andrade (December 4, 1892 – November 20, 1975), abbreviated Francisco Franco Bahamonde and sometimes known as Generalísimo Francisco Franco, was Head of State of Spain from 1936 until his death in 1975. ... Motto: Capital Santiago de Compostela Official languages Galician and Castilian Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 7th  29 574 km²  5,8% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 5th  2 737 370  6,5%  92,36/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Galician  â€“ Spanish  â€“ Portuguese  Galician  galego  gallego  galego Statute of Autonomy April... Etienne Nzabonimana, formerly a small businessman in Kirwa, Rwanda, was convicted in Belgium on June 29, 2005 for his role in the Rwandan genocide of 1994. ... Samuel Ndashyikirwa, formerly a small businessman in Kirwa, Rwanda, was convicted in Belgium on June 29, 2005 for his role in the Rwandan genocide of 1994. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan Genocide was the slaughter of roughly one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus by a group of Hutu extremists known as Interahamwe during a period of 100 days in 1994. ... The Hezbollah flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God, for other designations or alternative spellings, see name part of this article) is a political and military party in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Shebaa Farms is a disputed area consisting of 14 farms located south of Shebaa, a Lebanese village on the western slopes of Mount Hermon, at the corner where Syria, Lebanon and Israel meet. ... UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Forces In Lebanon) was created in 1978 by the United Nations to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon, restore the international peace and security, and help the Lebanese Government restore its effective authority in the area. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Belgrade (Serbian, Београд, Beograd   listen?), is the capital of Serbia since 1404, Serbia and Montenegro (2003–Present) and Yugoslavia (1918–2003). ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević   listen? (Serbian: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced ; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... Jack Ruby murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, in a very public manner In its most common use, assassination has come to mean the killing of an important person. ... Vuk DraÅ¡ković (Вук Драшковић) (November 29, 1946) is a Serbian politician who is presently the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Serbia and Montenegro. ... Milorad Legija Ulemek Milorad Legija Ulemek (Милорад Легија Улемек) (born 1968 in Belgrade) is a former Serbian militant who served in numerous military groups, most notoriously, the Red Berets, a branch of Serbias secret police. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... Petrocaribe S. A. is a Caribbean oil alliance with Venezuela to purchase their oil on conditions of preferential payment, launched in June of 2005. ... ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Charles Gyude Bryant (born January 17, 1949) has been the Chairman of the Transitional Government of Liberia since October 14, 2003. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Human sacrifice was practiced in many ancient cultures. ... A Sudoku puzzle (image hyperlinked to solution) Sudoku (Japanese: s;doku), sometimes spelled Su Doku, is a placement puzzle, also known as Number Place in the United States. ... Bristol is an English city and county and one of the two administrative centres of South West England (the other being Plymouth). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ...

June 28, 2005 (Tuesday)

(Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A member of the motorcycle unit of the Garda Síochána. ... Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath),is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... It has been suggested that Suburbia be merged into this article or section. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... Incest is the sexual activity or marriage between very close family members (and sometimes friends in some societies). ... Dún Laoghaire (pronounced Doonlairah or, roughly, Dunleary) is a seaside town and a ferry port situated 11 km (7 miles) south of Dublin in the council area of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown in County Dublin. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... The Civil Marriage Act (full title: An Act respecting certain aspects of legal capacity for marriage for civil purposes) was introduced as Bill C-38 in the first session of the 38th Canadian Parliament on February 1, 2005. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. ... Antitrust or competition laws, legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... CPU can stand for: in computing: Central processing unit in journalism: Commonwealth Press Union in law enforcement: Crime prevention unit in software: Critical patch update, a type of software patch distributed by Oracle Corporation in Macleans College is often known as Ash Lim. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) (founded 1968) is a U.S.-based multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Supreme Court of Pakistan, Islamabad The Supreme Court is the apex court in Pakistans judicial hierarchy, the final arbiter of legal and constitutional disputes. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ... Mukhtaran has challenged a local tribal councils alleged injustice Mukhtaran Bibi (c. ... Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor, born 21 April 1926), styled Her Majesty The Queen, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... Kaskalot at the 2004 Bristol Harbour festival in England. ... The Battle of Trafalgar, fought on 21 October 1805, was the most significant naval engagement of the Napoleonic Wars and the pivotal naval battle of the 19th century. ... The Charles de Gaulle (R91) is the only serving French aircraft carrier and is the flagship of the French Navy (Marine Nationale). ... The Napoleonic Wars lasted from 1804 until 1815. ... Rhodia is a planet in The Stars, Like Dust by Isaac Asimov. ... The finance minister is a cabinet position in a government. ... Accountancy (British English) or accounting (American English) is the process of maintaining, auditing, and processing financial information for business purposes. ... There are two kinds of trading that are referred to as insider trading: Trading of a security of a company (, shares or options) based on material nonpublic information. ... Thierry Breton (born January 15, 1955 in Paris) is the French Minister of Economy, Finance, and Industry. ... Rhodia is a planet in The Stars, Like Dust by Isaac Asimov. ... Cutaway of the ITER Tokamak Torus incasing. ... Fusion typically refers to the merging of two or more entities into a single one: In physics, nuclear fusion is the combination of two atomic nuclei into a single nucleus. ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ... Cadarache in Provence-Alpes-Côte-dAzur, France is the site of the future international tokamak ITER. This was decided in a final meeting in Moscow on June 28, 2005. ... Emperor Akihito Emperor Akihito (Japanese: 明仁) (born December 23, 1933) is the current Emperor (天皇, tennō) of Japan and the 125th according to the traditional order of succession. ... Empress Michiko of Japan Her Imperial Majesty Empress Michiko of Japan (美智子), (born October 20, 1934) formerly Michiko Shoda (正田美智子 shoda michiko) and later the Crown Princess of Japan (April 10, 1959 to January 7, 1989), is the wife and consort of the reigning Emperor of Japan, Akihito. ... Saipan (IPA: in English) is the largest island and site of the capital of the United States Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, (a chain of 14 tropical islands in the western Pacific Ocean) with a total area of 120 km² (46. ... ... Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering live, albeit weakened, microbes to patients, with the intent of conferring immunity against a targeted form of a related disease agent. ... Lassa fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic fever first described in 1969 in the Nigerian town of Lassa in the Yedseram River valley. ... Location within Italy Image:IMG 8480. ... Kumba Ialá (also spelled Yala) (born 15 March 1953) is a Guinea-Bissau politician and former President. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... Ayman Nour Ayman Abd El-Aziz Nour (Arabic: ) is an Egyptian politician, a member of that countrys Parliament and chairman of the al-Ghad party (Tomorrow Party). He became famous around the world following his October 2004 imprisonment by the government of President Hosni Mubarak, which was widely understood... Hosni Mubarak, President of Egypt Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak (Arabic : محمد حسنى سيد مبارك ) (born May 4, 1928) commonly known as Hosni Mubarak (Arabic: حسنى مبارك ) has been the President of the Arab Republic of Egypt for twenty-four years, since 14 October 1981. ... In the 1990s, Museveni was fêted by the west as part of a new generation of African leaders. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... Léon Mugesera is a Rwandan man, resident in Canada since 1992. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan Genocide was the slaughter of roughly one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus by a group of Hutu extremists known as Interahamwe during a period of 100 days in 1994. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Karlheinz Schreiber is a German-born lobbyist, fundraiser, arms dealer and businessman. ... Ned Kelly the day before his execution Edward Ned Kelly (approx 1854-5 [DOB uncertain] – November 11, 1880) is Australias most famous bushranger, and, to some, a folk hero for his defiance of the colonial authorities. ... Motto: Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Nickname: Sunshine State/Smart State Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Governor Premier Const. ... Birmingham is the largest city in the U.S. state of Alabama and the county seat of Jefferson County. ... Richard M. Scrushy (born 1952 in Selma, Alabama, USA is the founder and former chairman and chief executive officer of the physical rehabilitation healthcare giant HealthSouth, based in Birmingham, Alabama. ... HealthSouth Corporation (NYSE: HRC), based in Birmingham, Alabama, is the nations largest healthcare services provider. ... Creative accounting and earnings management are euphemisms referring to accounting practices that deviate from standard accounting practices. ...

June 27, 2005 (Monday)

June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America, and constitutes the Judicial Branch of the Federal Government, one of three separate and equal governmental bodies, along with the Legislative and the Executive branches. ... Holding Producers of technology who promote the ease of infringing on copyrights can be sued for inducing copyright infringement committed by their users. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... John Thomas Walton, (October 8, 1946 – June 27, 2005), was a son of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property carried out in a way deliberately calculated to cause the death of the perpetrator (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: , al-Qā‘idah; the foundation or the base) is the name given to an international Islamic fundamentalist campaign comprised of independent and collaborative cells that all profess the same cause of reducing outside influence upon Islamic affairs. ... The Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) is a trade union federation in South Africa. ... Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California during the Great Depression. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Subcomandante Insurgente Marcos describes himself as the spokesperson for the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) but, since he is so prominent a figure, he is considered by many to be one of its main leaders. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Identified Victims of Srebrenica Massacre The Srebrenica massacre was the July 1995 killing of a large number of Bosniak males, ranging in age from teenagers to the elderly, in the region of Srebrenica by a Serb Army of Republika Srpska under general Ratko Mladić including Serbian state special forces Scorpions... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Tom Hurndall, 1981-2004 Thomas Tom Hurndall (November 29, 1981 - January 13, 2004) was a British photographer and member of the International Solidarity Movement (ISM) and an activist against the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories. ... The scapegoat was a goat that was driven off into the wilderness as part of the ceremonies of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, in Judaism during the times of the Temple in Jerusalem. ... Pool video released March 1, 2005 of Raders first appearance Dennis Lynn Rader (born March 9, 1945) is an American serial killer, who murdered at least ten people in Sedgwick County (in and around Wichita), Kansas, United States, between 1974 and 1991. ... Sedgwick County (standard abbreviation: SG) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... The BTK killer is a serial killer who killed seven people between 1974 and 1977. ...

June 26, 2005 (Sunday)

June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kremlin (Кремль) is the Russian word for citadel or castle and refers to any major fortified central complex found in historical Russian cities. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article covers the Chechen people as an ethnic group, not Chechen meaning citizens of Chechnya. ... Avars or Caucasian Avars are a modern people of Caucasus, mainly of Dagestan, in which they are the predominant group. ... Ask personally Vladimir Putin before 27 of September. ... The Caucasus , a region bordering Asia Minor, is located between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea which includes the Caucasus mountains and surrounding lowlands. ... Silvan Shalom (b. ... Official seal of the Mossad   Ha-Mossad le-Modiin ule-Tafkidim Meyuhadim? (Hebrew: המוסד למודיעין ולתפקידים מיוחדים, Institute for Intelligence and Special Assignments) is an Israeli intelligence agency, commonly referred to as Mossad. ... Iraqi militants celebrating orders that the surrounding Coalition forces were given to stand-down. ... Elections in Bulgaria gives information on election and election results in Bulgaria. ... For information on mainstream political parties using the term Socialist, see Social democracy and Democratic socialism, For the governments of the USSR, the PRC, and others, see: Communist state, Other variants of Socialism include Marxism, Communism, and Libertarian Socialism. ... A plurality (or relative majority) is the largest share of something, which may or may not be a majority. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... Tsar (Bulgarian цар, Russian царь,   listen?; often spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to 1917 (although... Simeon Sakskoburggotski as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Simeon Borisov Sakskoburggotski, formerly Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,4860 km² (17. ... A large bonfire Fire is a form of combustion. ... The Southwestern United States or simply the Southwest is a region of the United States that is drier in weather than the adjoining Southern United States and Western United States; the population is less dense and, with moderate Mexican and American Indian components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP), classified internationally as a terrorist group, is Colombias oldest, largest, most capable and equipped militant guerrilla group, established in 1964-1966 as the... // Sexual abuse in general Sexual abuse is a form of abuse that is made by means of the sexual behavior between an victim(s) and offender(s). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Guy Drut (born December 6, 1950) is an Olympic champion who won gold at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal in the 110m hurdles. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... 2012 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every two years and alternating between Summer and Winter Games. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Billy Graham The Rev. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ...

June 25, 2005 (Saturday)

June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Destin is a city located in Okaloosa County, Florida. ... State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans, officially (currently Baton Rouge due to the evacuation of New Orleans) Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455... Orders Hexanchiformes Squaliformes Pristiophoriformes Squatiniformes Heterodontiformes Orectolobiformes Carcharhiniformes Lamniformes Sharks are a group (superorder Selachimorpha) of fish, with a full cartilaginous skeleton, a streamlined body plan with between 5 and 7 gill slits along the sides (most often) or side of the head (the first modified slit is behind the... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or commonly mad cow disease) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Elections in Bulgaria gives information on election and election results in Bulgaria. ... Chairmen of the Council of Ministers, 1879-1991 Prime Ministers, 1991-present See also History of Bulgaria Politics of Bulgaria List of Bulgarian monarchs List of Presidents of Bulgaria Categories: Lists of office-holders | Prime Ministers of Bulgaria ... Simeon Sakskoburggotski as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Simeon Borisov Sakskoburggotski, formerly Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... Early Bulgar leaders bore the title of baltavar (balt-avar), which literally means ruler of Avars. Later they acquired the title Khan and Khagan, still later the title tsar. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: ; born April 16, 1927 as Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany) is the 265th reigning pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City. ... Donald Tsang Yam Kuen GBM JP KBE (Chinese: 曾蔭權, born 1944) is currently the Chief Executive of Hong Kong and former career civil servant. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Tamil girls in Tiruvannamalai. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangtung or Canton Province, Jyutping: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The are two Pearl Rivers: The Pearl River (China) (See also the Pearl River Delta) The Pearl River in the U.S. states of Mississippi and Louisiana Pearl River is also the name of some places in the United States of America: Pearl River, Louisiana Pearl River, Mississippi Pearl River... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... Order: sixth President of Iran First Vice President: not installed yet Term of office: August 3, 2005 – present Preceded by: Mohammad Khatami Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: 1956 Place of birth: Aradan, Iran Political party: Islamic Society of Engineers Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (محمود احمدی‌نژاد; born 1956), also written Ahmadinezhad, became the sixth... The Iranian presidential election of 2005, the ninth presidential election in Iranian history, took place in two rounds, first on June 17, 2005, and then as a run-off on June 24. ... Since the overthrow of the Shah in 1979, Iran has been a republic. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Evacuation can have several meanings: In wilderness first aid, evacuation is the transport of a seriously injured person out of the wilderness to the nearest point an ambulance can reach to take them to the hospital, or to the nearest emergency room. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, or NAACP, is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... Bruce S. Gordon is an American business executive, selected in June 2005 to head the NAACP, a major American civil rights organization. ... Billy Graham The Rev. ... William Jefferson Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ...

June 24, 2005 (Friday)

  • Five people are found shot to death at their Yuma, Arizona home, and a sixth victim dies at a local hospital [1]
  • Share prices of American airlines fell sharply as oil neared $60 a barrel. (Reuters)
  • The United States House of Representatives voted to prevent United Airlines from transferring its pension plan obligations to the government insurer, the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation. (Chicago Sun-Times)
  • An Italian judge ordering the arrest of 13 people linked to the CIA on charges of kidnapping terrorism suspect Abu Omar allegedly in order to have him tortured in Egypt dramatizes a growing rift between the US and its allies in the War on Terrorism. (IHT)

(Chicago Tribune) June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yuma is a city located in Yuma county, Arizona, United States. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... United Airlines Airbus A320-200. ... Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr, also known as Abu Omar, is an Egyptian born cleric. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device, though misconceptions about it do exist. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (in US foreign policy circles, the global war on terrorism or GWOT ) is the term used by the United States government, its principal allies, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, and other minor allies, in its ongoing campaign against terrorist groups and...

State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... Bob Taft Robert Alphonso Taft II (born January 8, 1942) has been the Republican governor of the U.S. state of Ohio since 1999. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the army or the Ra) is an Irish Republican paramilitary organisation. ... Derry or Londonderry (in Irish , Doire Cholm Chille or Doire), often called the Maiden City, is a city in Northern Ireland. ... Donald Tsang Yam Kuen GBM JP KBE (Chinese: 曾蔭權, born 1944) is currently the Chief Executive of Hong Kong and former career civil servant. ... The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Chinese: 香港特別行政區行政長官 pinyin (forMandarin Chinese pronounciation): XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng Zhangguān) is the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, and represents the Region. ... Great Hall of the People by Day. ... The Hong Kong Chief Executive election of 2005 is an election to fill the vacancy of the territorys top office. ... The Iranian presidential election of 2005, the ninth presidential election in Iranian history, took place in two rounds, first on June 17, 2005, and then as a run-off on June 24. ... This article is about the political process. ... Order: 4th President of Iran Vice President: Hassan Habibi Term of office: August 3, 1989 – August 2, 1997 Preceded by: Ali Khamenei Succeeded by: Mohammad Khatami Date of birth: 1934 Place of birth: Nough, Iran Political party: Militant Clergy Association Akbar Hashemi Bahramani (Persian: هاشمی بهرمانی), also known as Hashemi Rafsanjani (هاشمی رفسنجانی) , born... Order: sixth President of Iran First Vice President: not installed yet Term of office: August 3, 2005 – present Preceded by: Mohammad Khatami Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: 1956 Place of birth: Aradan, Iran Political party: Islamic Society of Engineers Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (محمود احمدی‌نژاد; born 1956), also written Ahmadinezhad, became the sixth... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Shirin Ebadi Shirin Ebadi (Persian: شیرین عبادی; born June 21, 1947) is an Iranian lawyer and human rights activist. ... Order: sixth President of Iran First Vice President: not installed yet Term of office: August 3, 2005 – present Preceded by: Mohammad Khatami Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: 1956 Place of birth: Aradan, Iran Political party: Islamic Society of Engineers Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (محمود احمدی‌نژاد; born 1956), also written Ahmadinezhad, became the sixth... India is subdivided into 28 states, 6 union territories and a National Capital Territory. ... Bihar (बिहार in Devanagri) is a state situated in the eastern part of India. ... Maoism or Mao Tse-tung Thought (Chinese: 毛泽东思想, pinyin: Máo Zédōng SÄ«xiÇŽng), is a variant of Marxism-Leninism derived from the teachings of Mao Zedong (1893–1976). ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... A drive-by shooting (sometimes referred to merely as a drive-by) is an attack on a person carried out with a firearm discharge from a moving vehicle (or a momentarily stopped vehicle). ... An Israeli settlement refers to a housing development for Israeli Jewish settlers in areas which came under the control of Israel as a result of the 1967 Six-Day War beyond the boundaries defined by the 1949 Armistice Agreements. ... A recent view of the old city of Hebron Hebron (Arabic الخليل al-ḪalÄ«l; Hebrew חֶבְרוֹן, Standard Hebrew Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥeḇrôn: derived from the word friend) is a town in the southern West Bank (in an area known in Israel as Judea) of around 100,000 Palestinians and... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al-Fatah faction. ... Billy Graham The Rev. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ...

June 23, 2005 (Thursday)

  • The Supreme Court of the United States decides 5-4 in the case Kelo v. New London that local governments can seize residential and commercial property for private development projects against the will of property owners as a "public use" under the 5th Amendment. Chit Winterwheat goes on holiday(Market Watch),(New York Times)
  • Elderly former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen was sentenced to 60 years in prison for the 1964 killing of three civil rights workers, the notorious crime that galvanized the civil rights movement and inspired the 1988 movie Mississippi Burning. Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon handed down the maximum possible sentence for the 80-year-old former Baptist preacher, a punishment which will likely keep him in prison for the rest of his life. (Reuters)
  • In Indonesia, the team that is investigating the death of human rights campaigner Munir Said Thalib states that the Indonesian intelligence agency BIN may be involved. Munir died of arsenic poisoning en route to the Netherlands on September 7, 2004. (Channel News Asia)
  • Thousands of workers from UPM-Kymmene and Stora Enso, two leading Finnish companies in the paper industry go on strike over pay and working hours. Finland provides two thirds of the paper supply for the European magazine market. Industry analysts believe that the strike may have serious repercussions on the magazine market of Europe. (BBC)
  • In the United Kingdom, Prince William graduates from St Andrews University (BBC) (BBC "slideshow") (Guardian Unlimited) (Reuters)
  • Japanese Sohgo Security Services announces a security robot GuardRobo D1 (Reuters)
  • In the USA, large fires break out in Arizona and California. In Arizona, 250 people are evacuated and 10 houses destroyed northeast of Phoenix. Two fires break out in California in Morongo Valley and San Bernardino Valley (Los Angeles Times) (KESQ) (Reuters)
  • In Spain, regional Basque parliament elects Juan Jose Ibarretxe as their new president (EITB) (Berria) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Romania, orthodox priest Daniel Corogeanu was arrested for 24 hours and faces charges for death of nun Maricica Irina Cornici. He allegedly crucified her for exorcism and claims that her death was the "Will of God". Four nuns who helped him were arrested as well. Church has closed the convent. (Scotsman) (Reuters)
  • In Israel, Mordechai Vanunu appeals to the supreme court to order Shin Bet to release letters he wrote during his time in prison. Security service claims that the letters contain sensitive information (Haaretz (Reuters)
  • In Lebanon, victorius anti-Syria coalition demands resignation of pro-Syrian president Emile Lahoud. They hold him responsible for assassinations of opposition figures (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Malawi, parliament debates about possible impeachment of president Bingu wa Mutharika. United Democratic Party accuses him for violation of the constitution and misusing public funds. Debate is interrupted when the speaker of the house Rodwell Munyenyembe collapses. (Nation Online, Malawai (about proposed impeachment) (BBC) (Reuters)
  • Cameroon accuses Nigeria of attacks in the disputed and oil-rich Bakassi peninsula (AllAfrica) (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • The investment bank Morgan Stanley agrees to an out-of-court settlement with Italian dairy group Parmalat. The new management of the reorganized Italian company sued Morgan Stanley for work it did that may have assisted the old management in looting the company. (BBC)
  • In the equatorial Pacific Ocean, a Sea Launch Zenit-3SL rocket lifts off at 1403 GMT, and successfully places its payload, the 12,125-pound Intelsat Americas 8 satellite, in orbit. (Spaceflight Now) (Sea Launch)

June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America, and constitutes the Judicial Branch of the Federal Government, one of three separate and equal governmental bodies, along with the Legislative and the Executive branches. ... Court membership Case opinions Laws applied U.S. Const. ... Amendment V (the Fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, is related to legal procedure. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Edgar Ray Preacher Killen (born in 1925) is an American sawmill operator and part-time Baptist minister who conspired to kill several civil rights activists in 1964. ... The Mississippi Civil Rights Workers Murders were the 1964 slayings of three political activists during the Civil Rights Movement. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Movie poster for Mississippi Burning Mississippi Burning is a 1988 film which tells a fictionalized version of the investigation into the real-life murders of three civil rights workers in Mississippi in 1964. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Munir Said Thalib (December 8, 1965 – September 7, 2004), affectionally known simply as Munir, is Indonesias most famous Human Rights and anti-corruption activist. ... In these painful times for Indonesia, between the difficulties of President Wahid disputed by the great political parties indonésiens (SIDE, Golkar, Pdi-p), and the various conflicts in progress in the archipelago, it is a subject which deserves to be tackled: the process of reform within the army indon... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UPM-Kymmene (NYSE: UPM) is a Finnish pulp and paper manufacturer. ... Stora Enso Oyj (NYSE: SEO) is a Finnish–Swedish pulp and paper manufacturer, formed by the merger of Swedish mining and forestry products company Stora and Finnish forestry products company Enso in 1998. ... An International Paper mill in South Carolina The global pulp and paper industry is dominated by North American (United States, Canada), northern European (Sweden, Finland) and East Asian countries (such as Japan). ... HRH Prince William of Wales William Arthur Philip Louis Prince William of Wales (William Arthur Philip Louis Mountbatten-Windsor), born 21 June 1982, is a member of the British Royal Family, grandson of Queen Elizabeth II and first son of the Prince of Wales and the late Diana, Princess of... University of St Andrews The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410-1413 and is the oldest university in Scotland and the third oldest in the United Kingdom. ... State nickname: The Grand Canyon State, The Copper State Other U.S. States Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Governor Janet Napolitano (D) Official languages English Only State Area 295,254 km² (6th)  - Land 294,312 km²  - Water 942 km² (0. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Phoenix was incorporated as a city on February 5, 1881. ... Morongo Valley is a census-designated place located in San Bernardino County, California. ... The San Bernardino Valley is the hub of Southern Californias Inland Empire. ... See also History of Spain Politics of Spain Categories: People stubs | 1957 births | Spanish politicians | Spanish politics | Basque politicians ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, in which the victim was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross (Latin: crux) and left to hang there until dead. ... Exorcism is the practice of evicting or destroying demons or other evil spiritual entities which are supposed to have possessed (taken control of) a person or object. ... Mordechai Vanunu in the garden of St. ... Shabak emblem Defender who shall not be seen The Shabak (in Hebrew, שבכ   Shabak?} an acronym of Sherut ha-Bitachon ha-Klali שירות ביטחון כללי) known abroad as the Shin Bet or the GSS (General Security Service), is the Internal General Security Service of Israel. ... Émile Lahoud General Émile Geamil Lahoud (Arabic:اميل لحود) (born January 12, 1936) is the current President of Lebanon. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... President Bingu wa Mutharika addressing the United Nations General Assembly. ... There are several political parties called the United Democratic Party. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... Bakassi is the peninsular extension of the African territory of Calabar into the Atlantic Ocean. ... Morgan Stanley NYSE: MWD is an investment bank, retail broker, and credit card provider based in New York. ... Parmalat SpA, an Italian dairy and food company and Europes biggest dairy company, was declared bankrupt in late 2003. ... The equator is an imaginary circle drawn around a planet at a distance halfway between the poles. ... Sea Launch is a unique spacecraft launch service that uses a specially modified floating oil drilling platform, positioned in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, for its launch platform. ... Zenit rocket - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... In cargo transport, payload is the valuable contents of the vehicle. ... Intelsat is the worlds largest commercial satellite communications services provider. ... A satellite is an object that orbits another object (known as its primary). ... Earth orbit is an orbit around the planet Earth. ...

June 22, 2005 (Wednesday)

  • German car manufacturer BMW acquires the Formula 1 team Sauber Petronas. In the next season the new team will be probably known as BMW Sauber. BBC Sport
  • The entire network of the Swiss Federal Railways shuts down due to a power failure in its overhead wire system. The power failure is also affecting international transit through Switzerland as such intercity trains use the same system. Initial reports indicate that the power failure started with a voltage drop in Ticino (in the St. Gotthard region) that then spread to the entire system. The initial failure happened at about 1700 local time, with some power supplies restored about 2015, but the last trains did not reach their destinations until 0300. (SwissInfo) (BBC)
  • In Chad, referendum votes to allow president Idriss Deby to stand elections for the third term in office (Reuters SA)
  • According to former U.S. ambassador to South Korea Donald Gregg and former journalist Don Oberdorfer, George W. Bush in 2002 turned down an offer from North Korean leader Kim Jong-il to discuss the issue of nuclear weapons. (Reuters)
  • An Italian military tribunal in La Spezia has sentenced 10 German former Nazi officers in absentia to life imprisonment for their role in a World War II massacre of 560 civilians in the Tuscan village of Sant'Anna di Stazzema. (BBC News)
  • In Colombia, congress approves a draft bill that offers sentences of only eight years to those members of paramilitary militias who give up their weapons. It demands that they confess, return the stolen property and disarm. Critics of president Álvaro Uribe say that the law is too lenient (IHT) (Colombia Journal) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • International Whaling Commission meeting in Ulsan, South Korea, does not support Japan's suggestion to resume coastal whaling or increase its own scientific one. Commission also voted down a request that Japan could catch 150 minke whales a year (Japan Today) (Channel News Asia) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In South Africa, President Thabo Mbeki names energy and minerals minister Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka as his deputy president. She is the first woman to hold the position. (SABC) (Reuters SA) (News24) (BBC profile)
  • The Peruvian government condemns supreme court decision to drop the case of former president Alberto Fujimori for forging signatures for 2000 elections (Reuters AlertNet)
  • The Peruvian government states that it will allow limited growing of coca plant for traditional uses (MercoPress (BBC)
  • In Brazil, heated arguments in the congress result in fighting and the session is suspended. Fighting begun when former chief of staff José Dirceu, who had rejoined the congress, tried to defend the government against the bribery allegations (Bloomberg)
  • In Ethiopia, main opposition group Coalition for Unity and Democracy states that government investigators have dropped all their complaints about possible election fraud. Government still has not released any results (AllAfrica) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • United Nations Security Council votes to send 750 more peacekeepers to Haiti for elections and extend the UN mandate to February 15, 2006 (UN News Centre) (ReliefWeb)
  • In Poland, oppositon demands resignation of prime minister Marek Belka because of allegations that declassified files show he had ties to communist-era security services. Belka refuses to do so, stating that he signed a contract to be allowed to go to study trip to USA (Radio Polonia) (Warsaw business Journal) (Reuters)

June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The BMW logo is a circle (known as a roundel) divided into quadrants of alternating white and light blue color. ... Formula One, abbreviated to F1 and also known as Grand Prix racing, is the highest class of single-seat open-wheel auto racing. ... Sauber, founded and managed by Peter Sauber, is a Formula One team based in Hinwil, Switzerland. ... Swiss Federal Railways (SBB-CFF-FFS) is the national railway company of Switzerland. ... An electric multiple unit pulling into Tile Hill station; Coventry, England. ... Ticino is the southernmost canton of Switzerland. ... Devils bridge (Teufelsbrücke) across the Schoellen St. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Idriss Déby (born 1952) is the president of Chad and the head of the Patriotic Salvation Movement. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... North Korea, officially the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK; Korean: Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk; Hangul: 조선민주주의인민공화국; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in eastern Asia, covering the northern half of the peninsula of Korea. ... Kim Jong-il (born February 16, 1941) has ruled North Korea since 1994. ... Map of Italy showing La Spezia in the northwest La Spezia is a city in the Liguria region of northern Italy, at the head of La Spezia Gulf. ... Look up Nazi in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Absentia is progressive rock band Porcupine Trees sixth studio album and was released on September 24, 2002. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe... Tuscany (Italian Toscana) is a region in central Italy, bordering on Latium to the south, Umbria and Marche to the east, Emilia-Romagna and Liguria to the north, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ... SantAnna di Stazzema is a village in Italian Tuscany where, on August 12, 1944, SS of 16. ... A paramilitary organization is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Álvaro Uribe Vélez (born July 4, 1952) is the President of Colombia (since 2002). ... The International Whaling Commission (IWC) was set up by the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling on December 2, 1946 with a headquarters in Cambridge, England. ... Ulsan, a metropolitan city in the south-east of South Korea, lies on the Sea of Japan (East Sea), 70 kilometres north of Busan at the geographical location 35°33′ N 129°19′ E. In the past the city operated as a major center of Korean whaling, which led to... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales. ... Binomial name Balaenoptera acutorostrata Lacepede, 1804 Binomial name Balaenoptera bonaerensis Burmeister, 1867 Minke Whale range Antarctic Minke Whale range Dwarf Minke Whale range The Minke Whale or Lesser Rorqual is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales. ... The President of South Africa is the head of state and head of government under South Africas Constitution. ... President Thabo Mbeki Thabo Mvuyelwa Mbeki (born June 18, 1942) is the President of the Republic of South Africa. ... Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka (3 November 1955 –) is the current Deputy President of South Africa. ... The Deputy President of South Africa is appointed by the President of South Africa. ... Alberto Kenya Fujimori (アルベルト・ケンヤ・フジモリ Aruberuto Kenya Fujimori, born July 28, 1938), also known as Kenya Fujimori (藤森 謙也 Fujimori Kenya), was President of Peru from July 28, 1990 to November 17, 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Binomial name Erythroxylum coca Lam. ... José Dirceu and his wife Maria Rita. ... The Coalition for Unity and Democracy (commonly referred to as CUD, or occasionally as CDU) is a coalition of four existing political parties of Ethiopia which combined to compete for seats in the Ethiopian General Elections held on May 15, 2005. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... UN Security Council chamber in New York The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Peacekeeping, as defined by the United Nations, is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marek Belka Marek Belka (b. ...

June 21, 2005 (Tuesday)

  • In Canada, after 2 straight days of rain, the city of Calgary, AB is under another state of emergency ands now the Elbow River is now flowing steadily over the Glenmore Dam. The towns of Bragg Creek, High River, Sundre, Okotoks, Drumheller, and Cochrane have to be evacuated. The low lieing area of Calgary also have to be evacuated. This wave of floods is the last of the floods and the damage of the floods is almost incalcuable.
  • The Cosmos 1 experimental solar sail spacecraft, a project of international space advocacy group The Planetary Society and science based entertainment company Cosmos Studios, is launched by a Russian R-29R Volna ICBM from a Russian Delta III submarine submerged in the Barents Sea. However, the spacecraft is feared lost, for the rocket failed 83 seconds after launch. (PhysOrg) (Washington Post) (BBC) (SBS) (The Planetary Society)
  • The LA Times suspends an experiment called "wikitorial" after three days because of vandalism. (MSNBC) (BBC)
  • In Israel 8 people are killed and about 200 injured when a train is reported to have struck a truck on a level crossing near Kiryat Gat. (BBC)
  • At Stonehenge in England, some 19,000 people gather to celebrate the rising sun on the summer solstice.
  • Clearup operation continues in North Yorkshire after the serious flash flooding on Sunday Night / Monday Morning. The towns of Thirsk, Helmsley and Hawnby were seriously affected, as were several villages when the rivers Swale and Rye burst their banks.
  • In Manchester, UK, 30 police raid a house at 5 a.m. and arrest a 40-year old man on suspicion of involvement in suicide bombings in Iraq. Another man resident in the same house is believed to have gone to Iraq in February to carry out a bombing. Last week, police in Spain and Germany also made arrests in connection with bombings in Iraq, but it is not known if the cases are related. (BBC)
  • New Zealand's telecoms network crashes for five hours when a rat chews one of the North Island's main fibre-optic cables at the same time as a workman damaged another cable in another part of the island. Mobile phone and internet communications were badly affected, and the Stock Exchange had to close for several hours. (BBC)
  • In Mexico, Zapatista rebels are in alert, pulling out of villages and closing their radio stations. The reasons are unknown, although the move may be due to an army drug raid in Los Altos. Subcomandante Marcos announces that foreign aid workers can stay only at their own risk. Later news indicate that Zapatistas are gathering for a conference. Marcos announces that the movement is entering a "next step in the struggle" and that the organization has reorganized itself to survive the loss of current leadership. (Indymedia Chiapas, English translation (Indymedia Chiapas, English translation) (Reuters) (Reuters AlertNet) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Brazil, president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva demands that the opposition present proof of its allegations that government had given bribes for political support (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In Lebanon, a remote control bomb that had been placed under the passenger seat of his car kills anti-Syrian politician George Hawi, former secretary general of Lebanese Communist Party (Daily Star) (Ya Libnan) (Al-JAzeera) (IHT) (Reuters)
  • In the Philippines, congress begins an inquiry into allegations that president Gloria Arroyo had rigged votes in last year's presidential elections. President states that she will comment on the process later. Her supporters and the opposition demonstrate in Manila (INQ7, Philippines) (Manila Times) (Sun Star) (Channel News Asia)
  • In Zambia, former health ministry official Kashiba Bulaya has been charged again with accepting a bribe from a Bulgarian firm that manufactures anti-retrovirus drugs against AIDS. Government's decision to halt the case a month ago aroused protests. (Reuters SA) (BBC)
  • A U.S. Court of Appeals struck down a regulation of the SEC designed to ensure an independent board of directors for mutual funds, holding that the SEC didn't comply with the requirements of the Administrative Procedures Act. (Chamber of Commerce)
  • A hitherto unknown poem by Sappho was identified on an Oxyrhynchus papyrus by scholars of Cologne university, and published in the Times Literary Supplement [2].

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... The Glenmore Reservoir is a large manmade reservoir on the Elbow River in the southwest quadrant of Calgary, Alberta. ... Bragg Creek is a town in southern Alberta, west of Calgary on the Elbow River. ... Drumheller is a town in the Badlands of east-central Alberta on the Red Deer River an hour and a half northeast of Calgary. ... An artists rendering of Cosmos 1 orbiting the Earth. ... Concept image of a solar sail spacecraft in the process of unfurling sails. ... Ariane 5 lifts off with the Rosetta space probe on March 2, 2004. ... Space advocacy is a political position that favors the exploration, utilization, and colonization of outer space. ... The Planetary Society is a large organization that has many research projects related to astronomy. ... R-29 is a series of Russian intercontinental ballistic missiles. ... The Volna rocket is a converted R-29R (SS-N-18) Soviet ICBM used for low cost satellite launches. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... A Delta I class submarine. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... Southeastern portion of Barents Sea, the Kola Peninsula and the White Sea. ... The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... A wikitorial is a term coined by the Los Angeles Times to describe a traditional editorial that can be edited in the fashion of a wiki (computer software that allows users to edit text and make changes to one document). ... Vandalism is the conspicuous defacement or destruction of a structure or symbol. ... Qiryat Gat (קרית גת; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Gat) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ... Stonehenge Stonehenge is a Neolithic and Bronze Age monument located near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire, about 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Salisbury. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of summer solstice on northern hemisphere The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the Sun in relation to the celestial equator. ... North Yorkshire is a county within the region of Yorkshire and the Humber in England. ... Thirsk town centre St. ... Helmsley is a market town in North Yorkshire, on the River Rye. ... Swale is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Binomial name Secale cereale M.Bieb. ... Manchester is a city in the North West of England. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Los Altos is the name of several places, including: the city of Los Altos, California the former state of Los Altos, Central America, now part of Guatemala This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Subcomandante Insurgente Marcos describes himself as the spokesperson for the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) but, since he is so prominent a figure, he is considered by many to be one of its main leaders. ... Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is a left-wing Brazilian politician. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ... George Hawi (1938 – June 21, 2005) was a Lebanese politician and former Lebanese Communist Party secretary. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES City of Manila Region: National Capital Region Province: — Dates: Founded—June 24, 1571 Cityhood—June 10, 1574 Population: 2000 census—1,581,082 Density—41,014 per km² Area: 38. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon was created by the late New York-based painter Frank Moore. ... Court of Appeals is the title of certain appellate courts in various jurisdictions. ... A board of directors is a group of individuals chosen by the stockholders of a company to promote their interests through the governance of the company. ... The central idea of a mutual fund is to enable investors to pool their money and place it under professional investment management. ... The federal Administrative Procedure Act (APA) of 1946 governs the way in which administrative agencies of the United States federal government may propose and establish regulations. ... Ancient Greek bust of Sappho the Eresian. ... There are few remains at Oxyrhynchus to be seen above ground: its treasures lie beneath the sands Oxyrhynchus (Greek: Οξύρυγχος; sharp-nosed; ancient Egyptian Per-Medjed; modern Arabic el-Bahnasa) is an archaeological site in Egypt, considered one of the most important ever discovered. ... The University of Cologne (Universität zu Köln) is one of the oldest Universities in Europe and, with over 43,000 students, is one of the largest institutions of higher education in Germany. ... The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS) is a weekly literary review published in London by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ...

June 20, 2005 (Monday)

June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... John Demjanjuk (b. ... A concentration camp is a large detention center created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is a left-wing Brazilian politician. ... José Dirceu and his wife Maria Rita. ... Islamism refers to a set of political ideologies derived from various conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalists, which hold that Islam is not only a religion, but also a political system that governs the legal, economic and social imperatives of the state. ... Metin Kaplan (born November 14, 1952, in the Turkish province of Erzurum) is the leader of the radical Islamist movement Kalifatsstaat (caliphate state) which is based in Cologne, Germany. ... Caliph is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... Cologne skyline at night with river Rhine in the foreground and famous Cologne Cathedral on the right. ... Anitkabir, the mausoleum of Kemal Ataturk, in Ankara, Turkey Anıtkabir is the mausoleum of Kemal Atatürk, the leader of Turkish War of Independence and the founder and first president of the Republic of Turkey. ... A sea of Lebanese flags carried by anti-government protestors in Beirut on 28 February 2005 Cedar Revolution has become the Western medias most commonly used name for the chain of demonstrations and popular civic action in Lebanon (mainly Beirut) triggered by the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister... Saadeddine Rafik Hariri (born April 1970) is the younger son of Rafik Hariri, the assassinated former prime minister of Lebanon. ... The National Assembly of Lebanon is the Lebanese national legislature. ... The 2005 Lebanese General Elections were the first elections in thirty years without a Syrian military or intelligence presence in Lebanon. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The Iraqi Police are the organic civil police force of the Republic of Iraq. ... This article is about the province of Iraq. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Islamic Jihad (Arabic: Harakat al-Jihad al-Islami) is a militant Islamist group based in the Syrian capital, Damascus. ... Jihad (jihād جهاد) is an Islamic term, from the Arabic root jhd (to exert utmost effort, to strive, struggle), which connotes a wide range of meanings: anything from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith to a political or military struggle to further the Islamic cause. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Though the majority of suicide bombers were and are male, female suicide bombers have carried out a number of attacks since 1986. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property carried out in a way deliberately calculated to cause the death of the perpetrator (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al-Fatah faction. ... A couch potato is (originally U.S.) slang for a person who spends most or much of his time sitting or lying on a couch, or perhaps an armchair or recliner,[1] watching television in his underwear and often drinking beer. ... The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a comprehensive dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP). ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (plural form: potatoes) (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... Niigata is the name of several places, times and things: Niigata City Niigata Prefecture This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... The International Whaling Commission (IWC) was set up by the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling on December 2, 1946 with a headquarters in Cambridge, England. ... Ulsan, a metropolitan city in the south-east of South Korea, lies on the Sea of Japan (East Sea), 70 kilometres north of Busan at the geographical location 35°33′ N 129°19′ E. In the past the city operated as a major center of Korean whaling, which led to... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales. ... John J. Rigas was (born November 14, 1924 in Wellsville, New York) was the founder of Adelphia Communications Corporation which at its peak was one of the largest cable companies in the United States. ... Adelphia Communications Corporation (OTC: ADELQ), named after the Greek word for brotherhood, was the sixth largest US cable television operator before it filed for bankruptcy in 2002 due to internal corruption. ...

June 19, 2005 (Sunday)

June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... North Yorkshire is a county within the region of Yorkshire and the Humber in England. ... Thirsk town centre St. ... Helmsley is a market town in North Yorkshire, on the River Rye. ... The River Swale is a river in Yorkshire, England and a major tributary of the River Ure, which itself becomes the River Ouse, emptying into the North Sea via the Humber Estuary. ...

June 18, 2005 (Saturday)

  • In Canada, the rain died down and the state of emergency is over. But with 1 evening of pounding rain and hail and cold tempuratures, the Elbow River is spilling over the dam for the first time. Again the lowlieing areas of Calgary, AB were evacuated, the town of Bragg Creek, the towns of High River and Okotoks, and the small town of Sundre were all evacuated.

June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A large hailstone Hail is a type of graupel (a form of precipitation) composed of spears or irregular lumps of ice. ... The Elbow River is a river located in southern Alberta, Canada. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Bragg Creek is a town in southern Alberta, west of Calgary on the Elbow River. ...

June 17, 2005 (Friday)

June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about landslides of mud; a mudslide is also an alcoholic drink. ... The word Maya or maya can refer to: The Maya – a Native American people of southern Mexico and northern Central America the modern Maya people the pre-Columbian Maya civilization the Maya language Maya – a concept in Hindu/Vedic philosophy a state of misperception of reality the inherent force of... Leon Trotsky, 1940   Leon Davidovich Trotsky? (Russian: Лев Давидович Троцкий; also transliterated Leo, Lev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij and Trotzky ) (October 26 (O.S.) = November 7 (N.S.), 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (Лев Давидович Бронштейн), was a Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist intellectual. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri Rafik Bahaa Edine Hariri (1 November 1944 – 14 February 2005), was a Muslim Lebanese self-made billionaire and business tycoon, and was twice Prime Minister of Lebanon from 1992 to 1998 and again from 2000 to 2004. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Abdul Qadeer Khan (born 1935, Bhopal, India) is a Pakistani engineer widely regarded as the father of Pakistans nuclear weapons programme. ... Bishkek cityscape Bishkek landscape towards the south Bishkek (Бишкек, بىشكهك) (population in 2005 approx. ... The Iranian presidential election of 2005, the ninth presidential election in Iranian history, took place in two rounds, first on June 17, 2005, and then as a run-off on June 24. ... Order: 4th President of Iran Vice President: Hassan Habibi Term of office: August 3, 1989 – August 2, 1997 Preceded by: Ali Khamenei Succeeded by: Mohammad Khatami Date of birth: 1934 Place of birth: Nough, Iran Political party: Militant Clergy Association Akbar Hashemi Bahramani (Persian: هاشمی بهرمانی), also known as Hashemi Rafsanjani (هاشمی رفسنجانی) , born... Categories: Southeast Asia geography stubs | Provinces of Cambodia ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... The pectoral cross Sentamu is seen here wearing is decorated with images and words associated with Oscar Romero. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... In Catholicism, beatification (from Latin beatus, blessed, via Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... The Reverend is an honorary prefix added to the names of Christian clergy and ministers. ... Leon Gustav Dehon (born March 14, 1843 in La Capelle (Soissons), France; died August 12, 1925 in Brussels, Belgium) Raised in a pious family, Leo Dehons mother was especially devoted to the Sacred Heart, and passed this on to Leo. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Credited with Tycos massive expansion in the late 1990s, Dennis Kozlowski is a former CEO of Tyco International. ... Tyco International Ltd. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... This article can be confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ...

June 16, 2005 (Thursday)

  • A report by the Metropolitan Police in the UK states that children are being trafficked into the UK from Africa to be used as 'human sacrifices'. (BBC), (Guardian)
  • 26 of 60 tank cars carrying fuel oil derail near Rzhev, Russia (about 200 km / 125 miles northwest of Moscow), sending a very large amount of oil into the ground contaminating Moscow's water supply and the Volga River after flowing down the Vazuza River from the accident site. It is not yet known if this incident is related to the bomb that was exploded on June 12 that derailed a passenger train. (RIA Novosti) (RIA Novosti) (Pravda)
  • Conflict in Iraq: Five U.S. Marines die from a roadside bomb in Ramadi, Western Iraq. (BBC)
  • A Jewish cemetery in West Ham has been attacked. This was the 117th time a Jewish cemetery in Great Britain has been attacked in 15 years. (The Independent)
  • In Cambodia, 6 unidentified gunmen take over a school in the town of Siem Reap near Angkor Wat and hold a number hostage for six hours. Reports of the number of hostages range from 24 to 70. Many of them were children from foreign families that work in the area. Gunmen demand money, weapons and a car. A Canadian child is executed by the gunmen before the rest are freed. (BBC) (CBC) (Channel News Asia) (Channel News Asia) (Reuters),(Reuters)
  • In Japan, former tycoon Yoshiaki Tsutsumi confesses to financial fraud and insider trading. (Japan Today) (Channel News Asia)
  • Chilean authorities have found a weapons arsenal in Villa Baviera, former Colonia Dignidad, during the investigation of the colony's founder Paul Schaefer (BBC)
  • Uzbekistan deports four members of human rights group International Helsinki Federation after they had investigated unrest in Andijan. (Mosnews) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Brazil, minister José Dirceu resigns due to allegations that he knew about bribery but insists that he is innocent (BBC) (Forbes)
  • Eastern Orthodox Church demotes former patriarch Irenaios I to a rank of a monk (Jerusalem Post/AP) (BBC)

June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... Human sacrifice was practiced in many ancient cultures. ... A modern tank car in a westbound UP train at Rochelle Railroad Park, Rochelle, Illinois, on May 29, 2005. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... Rzhev is the uppermost town situated on the Volga river. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer, symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ... Volga in Yaroslavl (autumn morning) Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge 8,000 m³/s Area watershed 1. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... This article is about trains in rail transport. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Ramădī (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... West Ham is a place in the London Borough of Newham in east London. ... Categories: Southeast Asia geography stubs | Provinces of Cambodia ... The main entrance to the temple proper, seen from the eastern end of the Naga causeway Angkor Wat (or Angkor Vat) is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built for king Suryavarman II in the early 12th century as his state temple and capital city. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... A business magnate, sometimes referred to as a mogul or a tycoon, is a person who controls a large portion of a particular industry and whose wealth derives primarily from said control. ... Yoshiaki Tsutsumi (堤 義明, born May 29, 1934) is a Japanese businessman. ... There are two kinds of trading that are referred to as insider trading: Trading of a security of a company (, shares or options) based on material nonpublic information. ... An Arse is an establishment for the construction, repair, receipt, storage, and excretion and issue of weapons and ammunitionand random iraqis. ... Villa Baviera (formerly named Colonia Dignidad), located near Catillo in southern Chile, is a settlement founded by German immigrants in 1961. ... Colonia Dignidad (Dignity Colony, now known as Villa Baviera, Bavaria Village), is a settlement located in an isolated area in the Maule Region of southern Chile, near the village of Parral. ... Paul Schäfer Paul Schäfer Schneider (born December 4, 1921) is the founder and former leader of a sect and agricultural commune of German immigrants called Colonia Dignidad (Dignity Colony)—later renamed Villa Baviera—located in central Chile, about 340 km south of Santiago. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... José Dirceu and his wife Maria Rita. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional or an authority person money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics or other rules in a variety of situations. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Irenaios Skopelitis (formerly, Patriarch Irenaios, Erinaios the 1st, or Eirinaios the 1st) is the former Patriarch of Jerusalem, the primate of the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem (2001-2005). ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ...

June 15, 2005 (Wednesday)

June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... Luis Posada Carriles in an undated photo. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Kosova (Serbian: Косовa / Kosova, Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova), in English most often called just Kosova, is a province of Serbia. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... President Levy Mwanawasa Levy Patrick Mwanawasa (born September 3, 1948) is the third President of Zambia (since 2002). ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon was created by the late New York-based painter Frank Moore. ... Term of office: 1 December 1970 – 1 December 1976 Preceded by: Gustavo Díaz Ordaz Succeeded by: José López Portillo Date of birth: 17 January 1922 Place of birth: Mexico City Profession: Lawyer First Lady: María Esther Zuno Party: PRI Luis Echeverría Álvarez (born 17 January 1922... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over sixty thousand employees and headquarters in various countries as of May 2004. ... The World in plate carrée projection The World In English, world is rooted in a compound of the obsolete words were, man, and eld, age; thus, its oldest meaning is age or life of man. Its primary modern meaning is the planet Earth, especially when capitalized: the World. ... Flag of the G77. ... Doha, Qatar Doha (Arabic: الدوحة;, Ad-Dawḥah) (population 370,000) is the capital of Qatar, located on the Persian Gulf. ... Sheikh Abdullah ibn Khalifah Al Thani (born 1959) is the current Prime Minister of Qatar. ... The German title Bundeskanzler is also the title of the Chancellor of Austria, and the title of a Swiss federal official (List of Federal Chancellors of Switzerland). ... Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944 in Mossenberg-Wöhren), a German politician, has been serving as Chancellor of Germany since 1998. ... Ú:Maglev can also mean general magnetic levitation. ... Transrapid at the Emsland test facility Transrapid is a German monorail system using magnetic levitation. ... Company headquarters in Munich, Germany Siemens AG NYSE: SI is the worlds largest electronics company. ... German industrial company ThyssenKrupp AG, with about 200,000 employees, mainly operates in the steel industry, but also in the automotive, industrial construction, and shipbuilding areas, as well as manufacturing elevators and providing other technologies and services. ... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... The 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks (also known as 11/3, 3/11, M-11 and 11-M) were a series of coordinated terrorist bombings against the commuter train system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004, which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,800. ... 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shabak emblem Defender who shall not be seen The Shabak (in Hebrew, שבכ   Shabak?} an acronym of Sherut ha-Bitachon ha-Klali שירות ביטחון כללי) known abroad as the Shin Bet or the GSS (General Security Service), is the Internal General Security Service of Israel. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Nāblus (sometimes Nābulus; Arabic: نابلس; pronounced Naablus) ( Hebrew שכם pronounced Shkhem ); 32°13′ N 35°16′ E) is a major city in the West Bank and, with a population of over 100,000, is one of the largest Palestinian population centers in the Middle East. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The Hezbollah flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God, for other designations or alternative spellings, see name part of this article) is a political and military party in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme, established by the United Nations in 1996 and terminated in late 2003, was intended to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine, and other humanitarian needs of ordinary Iraqi citizens who were affected by international economic sanctions in... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ... Archbishop Chaput Archbishop Charles Joseph Chaput, OFM (born September 26, 1944 is the current head of the Archdiocese of Denver, Colorado. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Initial image of Douglas Wood after capture by Iraqi militants. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... This article is about landslides of mud; a mudslide is also an alcoholic drink. ...

June 14, 2005 (Tuesday)

June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... Asafa Powell at the Athens Games 2004 Asafa Powell (born 11 November 1982) is a Jamaican sprinter and the current 100 m world record holder. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... The term dirty war generally refers to a program of state terrorism in response to perceived subversion that threatens a countrys stability. ... Jacob Zuma Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma is a former Deputy President of the Republic of South Africa. ... The President of South Africa is the head of state and head of government under South Africas Constitution. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Kirkuk (Kurdish: Kerkûk, Arabic:كركوك ;originally the Assyrian city of Arrapha) is an ancient city in Iraq, sitting near the Hasa River on the ruins of a 5,000-year-old settlement. ... In typical game play, players attempt to move towards a goal through individual control of the ball, such as by dribbling (running with the ball close to their feet); by passing the ball from team-mate to team-mate; and by taking shots at the goal. ... Sex crimes are forms of human sexual behavior that are crimes. ... George Best (born May 22, 1946 in Belfast) is a former footballer from Northern Ireland. ... Manchester United Football Club is an English football club, based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Chicago Police Department arrests a man An arrest is the action of police or other authority, or even in some circumstances a private civilian, to apprehend and take under guard a person who is suspected of committing a crime. ... Indecent assault is a form of sex crime in many jurisdictions. ... Robin van Persie (born August 6, 1983 in Rotterdam, Netherlands) is a Dutch footballer currently employed by English FA Premier League team Arsenal F.C. He is married to Bouchra van Persie. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are a football club based in north London. ... For other places named Rotterdam, see Rotterdam (disambiguation) Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands (after Amsterdam), located in the province of South Holland. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Logo of The Irish Times The Irish Times is Irelands newspaper of record, launched in the late 1850s. ... Opinion polls are surveys of opinion using sampling. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, two water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses... Epcots logo Spaceship Earth is the symbol of Epcot. ... ... ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... Schapelle Corby at her sentencing in a Bali Court Schapelle Leigh Corby (born July 10, 1977) is a former beauty student from Australia convicted by an Indonesian court of attempting to smuggle 4. ... Topography Map showing Bali within Indonesia Sunset at Jimbaran Beach, Bali Young Balinese Dancers Rice terraces at entrance to Gunung Kawi Temple Balis Sanur Beach Statue of Dewi Sri — Ubud, Bali Bali is an Indonesian island. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property which is deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail is also illegal). ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ...

June 13, 2005 (Monday)

  • In Canada, after 5 days of non-stop rain, the city of Calgary, AB is under it's first local state of emergency. The Elbow River has risen to an extreme high and the town of Bragg Creek, just west of the city, is totally evacuated. This would be the first of 3 waves of major flooding.
  • An earthquake of magnitude 7.9 hits Chile with epicenter in the northern region of Tarapaca near the Bolivian border, killing at least 8 people. (CNN)
  • The jury in Michael Jackson's trial for child molestation finds the pop star not guilty on all counts. (CNN), (BBC)
  • Swedish diplomat Jan Eliasson is unanimously elected President of the United Nations General Assembly. He will take over the presidency on September 20, 2005. (RealOpinion.com)
  • Ninety-two people, almost all children, have died after a flash flood hit a school in Shalan, Heilongjiang province, China. (BBC).
  • Italians end voting in a two-day referendum about strict fertility treatment laws. The Catholic Church has recommended that Catholics boycott the poll, which needs 50% turnout to be valid. Initial turnout has been low and it is projected not to reach the 50% level. (Reuters AlertNet) (Reuters) (BBC) (IHT)
  • In the Philippines, president Gloria Arroyo's press secretary Ignacio Bunye states that the president is ready to face proper impeachment charges if the opposition follows the proper legal process. Many politicians have expressed support to her. (ABS-CBN) (Manila Bulletin)
  • Philippines police are ready to charge former National Bureau of Investigation deputy director Samuel Ong for illegal wiretapping and sedition (Sun Star)
  • The last Australian peacekeeping troops leave East Timor. (SBS) (ABC) (Reuters)
  • In South Korea, Kim Woo Choong, former head of Daewoo Group, intends to return to the country after five years living abroad. He faces charges of fraud after the collapse of Daewoo Group (Korea Times) (Korea Herald) (Channel News Asia) (BBC)
  • In Canada, Cineplex Odeon announces that it is purchasing Famous Players, uniting the two largest movie theatre chains. Famous Players is currently owned by Viacom and will be purchased for about $500 million CDN. In fear of unfair competition, the Federal Commission of Competition has announced that Cineplex needs to sell off 35 of its theatres. (CBC)
  • In Nigeria, president Olusegun Obasanjo gives an order that all illegal oil refineries in the Niger River delta should be destroyed (Reuters SA) (IHT)
  • In Mexico, army soldiers and federales take over the city of Nuevo Laredo near the US border. The whole local police force is detained for investigation in connection to drug trafficking and for drug testing. City's just-appointed police chief Alejandro Dominguez was assassinated last Wednesday. On Saturday, a policeman shot a federal agent (Houston Chronicle) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • 14 people drown off the coast of Morocco in a boat that tried to reach Spain (Al-Jazeera) (BBC)
  • In France, police arrests serial impostor Frederic Bourdin, who had taken a role of a schoolboy (BBC)

June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... The Elbow River is a river located in southern Alberta, Canada. ... Bragg Creek is a town in southern Alberta, west of Calgary on the Elbow River. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... Sarah Ireland is the best person in the world and is a top person. ... Tarapacá is Chiles northernmost administrative region. ... March 10, 2005: Michael Jackson (center) arrives one hour late to trial, and is escorted by father Joseph Jackson (right) In 2005, Michael Jackson went to trial on child molestation charges. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... Jan Eliasson Photo: Pawel Flato Jan Eliasson (born September 17, 1940) is a Swedish diplomat who will take over the post of President of the United Nations General Assembly in September 2005, for its sixtieth session. ... The President of the United Nations General Assembly is a position voted for by representatives in the United Nations General Assembly on a yearly basis. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A flash flood (also a freshet) is a rapid flooding of low-lying areas, rivers and streams that is caused by the intense rainfall associated with a thunderstorm, or multiple training thunderstorms. ... Heilongjiang (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江省; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江省; pinyin: Hēilóngjiāng; Postal System Pinyin: Heilungkiang) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Ignacio Toting Bunye is a politician in the Philippines. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Samuel Ong is a former deputy director of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) of the Philippines and is a whistleblower, declaring that the 2004 national elections was rigged, starting an electoral crisis. ... Telephone tapping or Wire tapping/ Wiretapping (in US) describes the monitoring of telephone conversations by a third party, often by covert means. ... Sedition refers to a legal designation of non-overt conduct that is deemed by a legal authority as being acts of treason, and hence deserving of legal punishment. ... Peacekeeping, as defined by the United Nations, is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... Kim Woo Choong is the former head of Daewoo Group. ... Daewoo (meaning Great Universe) is a major South Korean chaebol (conglomerate). ... Cineplex Odeon Cinemas was one of North Americas largest movie theatre operators, with theatres in its home country of Canada and the United States. ... Famous Players is one of the Canadian movie theatre banners operated by Cineplex Galaxy LP; it includes numerous locations stretching from British Columbia to Quebec. ... Viacom (short for Video & Audio Communications) [pronunciation: pre-Redstone/pre-1987: vee-a-com; post-Redstone acquisition: vi-a-com] NYSE: VIA, NYSE: VIAB is an international media conglomerate. ... Olusegun Obasanjo (born March 5, 1937) has been the President of Nigeria since 1999. ... View of the Tosco (ex Valero, originally Shell) Martinez oil refinery An oil refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into useful petroleum products. ... Map of Niger river. ... Nuevo Laredo is a city in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. ... ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... Drug testing is a subject of a lot of controversy. ... An impostor (or imposter, a common variant) is a person who pretends to be somebody else. ...

June 12, 2005 (Sunday)

  • French journalist Florence Aubenas and her Iraqi interpreter Hussein Hanoun al-Saadi have been freed after five months of captivity in Iraq. (BBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq:
  • A series of Bombs strike the Iranian cities of Ahwaz and Tehran, leaving 8 people dead and dozens wounded. There has been no claim of responsibility. (BBC)
  • Mike Tyson announces he will retire from boxing. Wikinews
  • Lebanese general elections: Results of the third round of the Lebanese parliamentary elections in Mount Lebanon and the Beqaa show the triumph of Michel Aoun's list in the upper part of the region (Metn) and the success of Walid Jumblatt's coalition in the lower part (Chouf). (Daily Star) (ABC) (IHT)(Daily Star) (Reuters) (Al-Jazeera) Last stage of the elections will be next sunday in North Lebanon.
  • Kuwait appoints first female cabinet minister, Massuma al-Mubarak (Al-Jazeera) (Arab News) (IHT)
  • In the Philippines, president Gloria Arroyo asks for unity in the face of so far unproven allegations of electoral fraud. The army is in alert to thwart any coup attempts. Opposition organizes a brief protest to demand Arroyo's resignation (Sun Star, Philippines) (ABS-CBN)
  • Kurdish parliament in Northern Iraq elects Masoud Barzani as a president of the region (Reuters)
  • In China, official death toll in the flood in Heilongjiang Province rises to 92 (Xinhua) (People's Daily)
  • Ethiopian opposition appeals for calm after the last week's protests (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Nepal lifts a ban on Indian television stations. (Deepika) (BBC)

June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Florence Aubenas is a French journalist, taking hostage on January 5, 2005 in Iraq along with her translator Hussein Hanoun Al-Saadi Categories: People stubs | Foreign hostages in Iraq ... Hussein Hanoun al-Saadi was held captive in Iraq for 5 months before being released. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard[1] The combined United States armed forces consists of 1. ... Explosive devices, as used by terrorists, guerrillas or commando forces, are formally known as Improvised Explosive Devices or IEDs. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Iranian province of Khuzestan and has a warm & humid climate. ... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966, Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former American professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion, and is considered by many to be one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time. ... The 2005 Lebanese General Elections were the first elections in thirty years without a Syrian military or intelligence presence in Lebanon. ... Mount Lebanon is the mountain range that extends across the whole country of Lebanon about 160 km (100 mi) parallel to the Mediterranean coast and rising to 3,090 m (10,131 ft). ... Béqaa is a region in Lebanon with a population of 750,000 inhabitants. ... General Michel Aoun in Ehden June 2005 Michel Aoun (born in 1935 in Beirut) is a Lebanese military commander and politician. ... Walid Jumblatt Walid Jumblatt (born August 7, 1949), is the current leader of the Progressive Socialist Party of Lebanon and the most prominent leader of the Druze community. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Massoud Barzani (born August 16, 1946) is the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party. ... Look up Flood on Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... Heilongjiang (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江省; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江省; pinyin: Hēilóngjiāng; Postal System Pinyin: Heilungkiang) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ...

June 11, 2005 (Saturday)

June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... G8 countries. ... Debt is that which is owed. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1, 2005, and will last through November 30, 2005. ... This article is about the inland city of Pensacola. ... The Coalition for Unity and Democracy (commonly referred to as CUD, or occasionally as CDU) is a coalition of four existing political parties of Ethiopia which combined to compete for seats in the Ethiopian General Elections held on May 15, 2005. ... Hailu Shawel (born 1936) is an Ethiopian engineer and the chairman of the Coalition for Unity and Democracy (CDU). ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... General Vasco dos Santos Gonçalves (Lisbon 3 May 1922–11 June 2005) was a Portuguese army officer in the Engineering Corps who took part in the Carnation Revolution and later served as Prime Minister from July 18, 1974, to September 19, 1975. ... The Carnation Revolution (Portuguese, Revolução dos Cravos) was an almost bloodless left-leaning revolution started on April 25, 1974, in Lisbon, Portugal, that effectively changed the Portuguese regime from an authoritarian dictatorship to a liberal democracy at the end of a two-year process of a communist-dominated military... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ...

June 10, 2005 (Friday)

  • In the Philippines, whistleblower Samuel Ong accuses, with audio evidence, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo of rigging the 2004 elections, thus starting an electoral crisis. (IHT)
  • The Colima volcano in Mexico increases its eruptive activity, with strong explosions. (CNN)
  • The Bolivian Congress accepts the resignation of Carlos Mesa and names Supreme Court justice Eduardo Rodríguez as the new interim president (Bloomberg) (Reuters AlertNet) Bolivian military says it is ready to intervene if protests continue (IHT)
  • In Japan, a high school student throws a bomb into classroom in Hikari, Yamaguchi Prefecture. 69 students are injured. (Japan Today) (Reuters)
  • In Australia, a Queensland government inquiry states that medical doctor Jayant Patel should be charged with murder, fraud, negligence and medical malpractice due to the death of 87 of his patients. Jayant Patel has left the country and his current location is unknown. (ABC) (SBS) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In India, Subroto Roy, chairman of Sahara Group, goes public to state that he is healthy. Roy had been out of the public eye since April and his absence had aroused rumors of death, illness, intrafamily conflict and political pressure. (Hindu) (ExpressIndia) (BBC)
  • Kuwait's Crown Prince Sheikh Saad al-Abdulla al-Sabah is taken to the hospital. (Reuters AlertNet)

June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A whistleblower is an employee, former employee, or member of an organization who reports misconduct to people or entities that have the power to take corrective action. ... Samuel Ong is a former deputy director of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) of the Philippines and is a whistleblower, declaring that the 2004 national elections was rigged, starting an electoral crisis. ... Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947) is a politician and the current (14th) president of the Philippines. ... Presidential elections, legislative elections and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 10, 2004. ... President Arroyo during her televised message regarding the alleged wiretapped tapes An electoral crisis emerged in the Philippines in June 2005. ... Colima Volcano is the most active volcano in Mexico, and has erupted more than 40 times since 1576. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... Term of office: June 9, 2005 – present Preceded by: Carlos Mesa Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: March 2, 1956 Place of birth: Cochabamba First Lady: Fanny Elena Arguedas Political party: no party affiliation Eduardo Rodríguez Veltzé (born March 2, 1956) is the current president of the transitional government... Hikari (光市; -shi) is a city located in Yamaguchi, Japan. ... Yamaguchi (山口, mountain entrance/gateway) is the 15th most common Japanese surname. ... Queensland Government Logo The Government of Queensland is commonly known as the Queensland Government. ... Dr Jayant Patel Jayant Patel (born April 10, 1950) is an Indian born and trained doctor and surgeon, who found himself at the center of a political scandal in early 2005 when he was accused of gross incompetence while working for Queensland Health at Bundaberg Base Hospital in the Australian... In law, negligence is a type of tort or delict that can be either criminal or civil in nature. ... Medical malpractice is lay terminology for negligence that occurs in respect of a doctors treatment of a patient. ... Sahara India Pariwar is among Indias largest private enterprises . ...

June 9, 2005 (Thursday)

June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) is one of the largest private international humanitarian organizations in the world, with programmes in over 72 countries. ... Baath Party of Iraq Baath son of Magog of Milesian tradition This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A state of emergency is a governmental declaration that may suspend certain normal functions of government, may work to alert citizens to alter their normal behaviors, or may order government agencies to implement emergency preparedness plans. ... Mullah Krekar in a Norwegian court of law Najmuddin Faraj Ahmad, commonly known as mullah Krekar, born July 7, 1956, is an Iraqi mullah who came to Norway as a refugee from northern Iraq in 1991. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Ansar al-Islam (Arabic: انصار الاسلام, Supporters or Partisans of Islam) is a Kurdish Islamist group, promoting a radical interpretation of Islam and holy war. ... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ... Raúl Salinas de Gortari (b. ... Carlos Salinas de Gortari (born April 3, 1948) was President of Mexico from 1988 to 1994. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... Sayyed Qaboos ibn Sa’id Al ‘Bu Sa’id (Arabic: قابوس بن سعيد ال بو سعيدي born November 18, 1940) is the current Sultan of Oman. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1, 2005, and will last through November 30, 2005. ... ... Drilling rig in a small oil field Near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 An oil field is an area with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (oil) from below ground. ... This article is about the corporation known as BP. See also BP (disambiguation) BP (formerly British Petroleum and briefly known as BP Amoco) (NYSE: BP) is a petroleum company headquartered in London, United Kingdom. ... Repsol YPF is an integrated oil and gas company with operations in 29 countries, principally Spain and Argentina. ... Parliament House Canberra: The main entrance and the flag Parliament House is the name given to two purpose-built buildings in Canberra, the capital of Australia, where the Parliament of Australia has met since 1927. ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... Australian Federal Police logo The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is the Federal or Commonwealth police force of Australia. ... A general strike is a strike action by an entire labour force in a city, region or country. ... Faure Gnassingbé Faure Essozimna Gnassingbé (born June 6, 1966), also known as Faure Eyadéma, has been the President of Togo since May 4, 2005; he was previously president for twenty days from February 5 to February 25, 2005. ... Edouard Kodjovi Kodjo, better known as Edem Kodjo, (born May 23, 1938) is a Togolese politician and diplomat. ... Bank of America (BofA) (NYSE: BAC), based in Charlotte, North Carolina, is the third largest commerical bank in the United States of America, measured in assets. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D)Acting Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ... The term hedge fund dates back to the first such fund founded by Alfred Winslow Jones in 1949. ...

June 8, 2005 (Wednesday)

  • In Canada, rain begins to pound the province of Alberta starting an almost 3-week flooding crisis in the province.
  • The infection source of Norway's recent outbreak of Legionnaire's Disease is surprisingly found to have been an industrial purification installation known as a scrubber, a device which cleans air using water. Reportedly, such facilities have never before caused a Legionnaire's outbreak anywhere in the world. Ten people have been killed, and 52 infected, in the outbreak, which is Norway's largest ever. (Aftenposten)
  • A previously unknown aria written by Johann Sebastian Bach in October of 1713 is discovered in documents from a German library. It is the first new work to be discovered by Bach since 1975.(CNN)
  • In Bolivia, widespread demonstrations continue. Ex-president Carlos Mesa, who has already offered his resignation, states that there is a threat of civil war without immediate elections. Congress will decide on Thursday whether to accept the resignation (Reuters AlertNet) (CNN) (BBC)
  • The Philippine senate is evacuated after a bomb threat. (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Ethiopian general elections: At least 22 Ethiopians are killed at demonstrations in Addis Ababa between police and students who accuse the ruling party of fraud in last month's general elections. (News 24, South Africa) (Guardian)
  • The European Commission and its president José Manuel Barroso survive the no confidence vote (EUpolitix) (IHT) (Bloomberg)
  • HealthSouth and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission reach a settlement. The company will pay $100 million to put the SEC investigation behind it.

June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th) Land 642,317 km² Water 19,531 km² (2. ... Legionellosis is an infection caused by species of the bacterium Legionella, most notably . ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub | Chemistry ... A scrubber is an industrial pollution control device, usually installed on the exhaust chimneys of large furnaces, but may also be used on any number of other air exhaust systems. ... This article is about the musical term aria. ... The 1748 Haussmann portrait of the composer Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 – 28 July 1750)[1] was a German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra and keyboard drew together almost all of the pre-existing strands of the baroque style and brought it to... // Events April 11 - War of the Spanish Succession: Treaty of Utrecht June 23 - French residents of Acadia given one year to declare allegiance to Britain or leave Nova Scotia Canada first Orrery built by George Graham Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calendar Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... Ethiopia held general elections on May 15, 2005, for seats in both its national and in four local parliaments. ... Addis Ababa as seen from space. ... The Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Democratic Front, or EPRDF, is the ruling political party of Ethiopia. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, ) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician. ... ... HealthSouth Corporation (NYSE: HRC), based in Birmingham, Alabama, is the nations largest healthcare services provider. ... For other uses of SEC, see SEC (disambiguation) The Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ...

June 7, 2005 (Tuesday)

June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... László Sólyom, President-Elect of Hungary László Sólyom (pronounced ) born on January 3, 1942 is the incoming President of Hungary, having overcome the Hungarian Socialist Party nominee Katalin Szili in the election on June 7, 2005. ... Katalin Szili was the candidate of the Hungarian Socialist Party during the 2005 Hungarian presidental elections. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is an American politician and businessman. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D)Acting Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States. ... Mayor Douglas Forrester Douglas Forrester is an asshole ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party [1]), is one of the two major political parties in the United States (the other being the Democratic Party). ... Bret Schundler Bret Schundler (born 1960) is a Republican Party politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calendar Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... James E. Jim McGreevey (born August 6, 1957) is an American politician from the Democratic Party. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... Pyroelectricity is the electrical potential created in certain materials when they are heated. ... Quartz crystal A crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a regularly ordered, repeating pattern extending in all three spatial dimensions. ... The degree Celsius (°C or ℃ (Unicode 0x2103)) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... In physics, an electric field or E-field is an effect produced by an electric charge that exerts a force on charged objects in its vicinity. ... The volt (symbol: V) is the SI derived unit of electric potential difference. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... Plural: nuclei In chemistry and physics, the nucleus (atomic nucleus) is the collection of protons and neutrons in the center of an atom that carries the bulk of the atoms mass and positive charge. ... General Name, Symbol, Number helium, He, 2 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 4. ... Charles Bennett examines three cold fusion test cells at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA Cold fusion is a term for any nuclear fusion reaction that occurs well below the temperature required for thermonuclear reactions (which occur at millions of degrees Celsius). ... For other less-common meanings of UDF, see UDF (disambiguation). ... General Motors Corporation NYSE: GM, also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Daewoo, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab, and Vauxhall. ... Siemens has the following uses: Siemens is a German family name carried by generations of the telecommunications industrialists, including Werner von Siemens, Sir William Siemens, Wilhelm von Siemens and Peter von Siemens Siemens AG is a German electrical and telecommunications company, founded as a telegraph equipment manufacturer by Werner von... BenQ is a Taiwan-based industry leader in digital lifestyle devices. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Executive President Vice-President Prime Minister Deputy Prime Minister The Union Ministries Legislative Parliament Rajya Sabha Chairman of the Rajya Sabha Lok Sabha Speaker of the House Judicial Supreme Court Chief Justice of the Supreme Court High Courts District Courts Constitution Fundamental Rights and Directive principles Regions States and territories... Lal Krishna Advani Lal Krishna Advani (Devanagari: लाल कृष्ण आड़वाणी)(born November 8, 1927/1929, Karachi, Pakistan) is the President of the Indian nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and Leader of the Opposition in the 14th Lok Sabha. ... Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah of Pakistan Mohammad Ali Jinnah (referred to in Pakistan as Quaid-e-Azam, or Great Leader, which is a legally defined title) (December 25, 1876 - September 11, 1948) was an Indian Muslim nationalist, who led the movement demanding a separate homeland for Muslims in... Families Brachiosauridae Camarasauridae Cetiosauridae Diplodocidae Euhelopodidae Nemegtosauridae Titanosauridae Vulcanodontidae Sauropoda, the sauropods, are a suborder or infraorder of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) dinosaurs. ... Horizontal is an orientation relating to, or in parallel with the horizon, and thus perpendicular to the vertical. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The New York Legislature is the U.S. state of New Yorks legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... Sheldon Silver is a politician of the United States Democratic Party, currently serving as Speaker of New York State Assembly. ... The word veto comes from Latin and literally means I forbid. ... An artists rendition of how the West Side Stadium would have looked The West Side Stadium (also known as the New York Sports and Convention Center) was a proposed football stadium to be built on a platform over the rail yards on the West Side of Manhattan in New... The New York City 2012 Olympic bid was one of the five short-listed bids for the 2012 Summer Olympics, ultimately won by London 2012. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... (Redirected from 2012 Olympics) Nine cities submitted bids for the 2012 Summer Olympics, and five have made it to the shortlist for hosting the Games of the XXX Olympiad. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The National Assembly (Chinese: 國民大會, pinyin: Gúomín Dàhùi) was the constitutional convention (and formerly an electoral college) of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Constitution of the Republic of China (traditional Chinese: 中華民國憲法; Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó Xiànfǎ; Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó SiànFǎ) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China, namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... Telephone tapping or Wire tapping/ Wiretapping (in US) describes the monitoring of telephone conversations by a third party, often by covert means. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... In the court system of a state or of a subordinate regional entity, an appeals court is a court of second instance where a party to a case on which judgment has been entered can ask to have their case reheard if they suspect an error of law, fact, or... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Human Rights Watch is an international non-governmental organization based in New York City, USA, that conducts advocacy and research on human rights issues. ... An atrocity (from the Latin atrox, atrocious, from Latin ater = matte black (as distinct from niger = shiny black)) is a term used to describe crimes ranging from an act committed against a single person to one committed against a population or ethnic group. ... A defector is generally a person who gives up allegiance to a certain country in exchange for allegiance to another. ... Chen Yonglin is a former Chinese diplomat who sparked fears of a diplomatic incident through his defection to Australia in the summer of 2005. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is a left-wing Brazilian politician. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ...

June 6, 2005 (Monday)

June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Baath Party flag The Ba‘ath Parties (also spelled Baath or Ba‘th; Arabic: اﻟﺒﻌﺚ) comprise political parties representing the political face of the Ba‘ath movement. ... Ethiopia held general elections on May 15, 2005, for seats in both its national and in four local parliaments. ... The Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Democratic Front, or EPRDF, is the ruling political party of Ethiopia. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... Nikolay Timofeyevich Tanayev (born November 5, 1945) is the Prime Minister of Kyrgyzstan. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... Debian, organized by the Debian Project, is a widely used distribution of free software developed through the collaboration of volunteers from around the world. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... The iMac G5, Apples flagship consumer desktop. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) NYSE: IBM (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, NY, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) (founded 1968) is a U.S.-based multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America, and constitutes the Judicial Branch of the Federal Government, one of three separate and equal governmental bodies, along with the Legislative and the Executive branches. ... Cannabis sativa extract. ... Ashcroft v. ... Spector v. ... The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 is the short title of United States Public Law 101-336, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by George H. W. Bush. ... Condoleezza Rice, (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... The Organization of American States (OAS; OEA in the other three official languages) is an international organization, headquartered in Washington, D.C., USA. Its members are the 35 independent nations of the Americas. ... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,4860 km² (17. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... This article is about the island; Bougainville is also the name of a commune in the Somme département of France. ... Joseph Kabui was a seccesionist leader of the island off the coast of Papua New Guinea, Bouganville. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ... Chen Yonglin is a former Chinese diplomat who sparked fears of a diplomatic incident through his defection to Australia in the summer of 2005. ... Power lines leading to a trash dump hover just overhead in El Carpio, a Nicaraguan refugee camp in Costa Rica Under international law, a refugee is a person who is outside his/her country of nationality or habitual residence; has a well-founded fear of persecution because of his/her... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... State nickname: The Evergreen State Other U.S. States Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire (D) Official languages None Area 184,824 km² (18th)  - Land 172,587 km²  - Water 12,237 km² (6. ... The 2004 Washington gubernatorial election was the election for governor of the U.S. state of Washington in the year 2004. ... Governor Christine Gregoire Christine Chris OGrady Gregoire (born March 24, 1947) is the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Washington. ...

June 5, 2005 (Sunday)

  • In separate referendums, the voters of Switzerland decide to ratify the Schengen treaty, abolishing all its normal land border controls by 2007, and also approve the legalizing of civil unions for gay couples, for tax and inheritance purposes, but not for child adoption. The Swiss Government had urged approval of both measures and the Swiss Parliament had previously passed legislation approving them. (BBC News)
  • Wal-Mart holds its annual shareholders' meeting on the campus of the University of Arkansas. Pending proposals include initiatives that would affect how Wal-Mart's board is selected and that would require a break-down of stock options by sex and race, and those addressing other issues. (WLNS News)
  • In Lebanon, Hezbollah and Amal parties claim victory in the parliamentary election in the south of the country. Both groups are supporters of Syria (Daily Star) (Reuters)
  • In Kuwait, two women become the first females to be appointed to municipal council. They are Sheikha Fatima al-Sabah of the ruling Sabah family and engineer Fawziya al-Bahar (Al-Jazeera) (Gulf Daily News) (BBC)
  • Scientists in Canada, France and USA report that they have developed a vaccine that works in monkeys against Marburg virus and Ebola (Medical News Today) (Science Daily) (BBC)
  • In Spain, 250,000 people demonstrate in Madrid against a government plan to negotiate with the Basque ETA (EITB) (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet)

June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Blue: Schengen treaty members Grey: Signatories (not yet implemented) A monument of the Schengen Treaty in Schengen The Schengen treaty is an agreement originally signed on June 14, 1985, by five European countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, and The Netherlands). ... Wikinews has a related story: The Swiss vote yes to same-sex relationships and Schengen/Dublin On June 5th, 2005, the Swiss people approved by 58% in a referendum a government proposal to grant same-sex couples the same rights and protections as heterosexual couples, except: adoption of children fertility... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... University of Arkansas The University of Arkansas (also known as the U. of A. or simply Arkansas) is a public, coeducational, land-grant university system. ... The Hezbollah flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God, for other designations or alternative spellings, see name part of this article) is a political and military party in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... For other uses of Amal, see the disambiguation page. ... State motto: Sabah Maju Jaya Capital Kota Kinabalu Governor Ahmadshah Abdullah Chief Minister Hj. ... A bottle and a syringe containing the influenza vaccine. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... Species Ivory Coast ebolavirus Reston ebolavirus Sudan ebolavirus Zaire virus Ebola hemorrhagic fever (alternatively Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever, EHF, or just Ebola) is a very rare, but severe, usually fatal infectious disease occurring in humans and other primates, caused by the Ebola virus. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... The Basques are an indigenous people who inhabit parts of both Spain and France. ... ETA can refer to: eta is a Basque word for and. Eta (letter) - from the Greek alphabet. ...

June 4, 2005 (Saturday)

June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada. ... Jean-Bernard Landry, born March 9, 1937 in Saint-Jacques, Quebec, (near Joliette), is a Quebec lawyer, teacher, politician, past Premier of Quebec, Canada, (2001–2003), former leader of the Opposition (2003–2005) and former leader of the Parti Québécois (2001–2005). ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada. ... Beginning in 1963, a terrorist group that became known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices and at least two murders by FLQ gunfire and three violent deaths by bombings. ... The Quebec sovereignty movement, also commonly referred to as the Quebec separatist movement and the Quebec Independence movement, is a political movement for the attainment of independence for the Province of Quebec from the nation of Canada. ... The Quran desecration controversy of 2005 captured international attention in April 2005 when Newsweek published an article which appeared to confirm several previous allegations that U.S. personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp had damaged a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Le Monde is a French daily evening newspaper with a circulation in 2002 of 389,200. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... Samir Kassir (Arabic: سـمـيـر قـصـيـر; 1960–June 2, 2005) was a Palestinian-Lebanese teacher, journalist and historian. ... Saadeddine Rafik Hariri (born April 1970) is the younger son of Rafik Hariri, the assassinated former prime minister of Lebanon. ... This page lists prime ministers of Lebanon. ... Rafiq Bahaa Edine Hariri (born November, 1944) is a Lebanese billionaire businessman, and was Prime Minister of Lebanon until his resignation on October 20, 2004. ... The President of the Palestinian Authority is the highest-ranking political position (equivalent to head of state) in the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Lira is the name of the monetary unit of the former currency of Italy. ...

June 3, 2005 (Friday)

  • The German political party Alliance '90/The Greens opens a Wiki that allows all users to contribute to the party's manifesto for the German federal election, 2005 [4](Spiegel online, german)
  • Israeli-Palestinian Conflict:
  • In Australia, a suspicious package containing white powder sent to Foreign Minister Alexander Downer led security guards to close the mail-room of Parliament House in Canberra and enact decontamination procedures. Federal Police later deemed the package harmless, but analysis continues.(News.com.au) (BBC)
  • Cedar Revolution:
  • In Bolivia, president Carlos Mesa calls for a referendum for regional autonomy on October 16 to quell the demonstrations against him. The elections for the constitutional assembly on the same day would reform the constitution in favor of the native majority (Forbes) (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Guantánamo Bay Qur'an desecration allegations:
    • The commander of U.S. Forces at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba reported five known incidents of mishandling the Qur'an by guards at the detention facility, including one incident in which a Qur'an was accidentally splashed with urine. (BBC)
  • Judge Karon O. Bowdre, presiding over the federal trial of Richard M. Scrushy in Birmingham, Alabama, delivers what is called the Allen charge to the jury in that case, in the hope of breaking its deadlock and producing a verdict. (NY Times)

June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Party symbol of Bündnis 90/Die Grünen Bündnis 90/Die Grünen (literally: Alliance 90/The Greens), the German Green Party, is a political party in Germany whose regional predecessors were founded in the late 1970s as part of the new social movements. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Wiki Science A wiki is a web application that allows users to add content, as on an Internet forum, but also allows anyone to edit the content. ... German federal elections took place on September 18, 2005 to elect the members of the 16th German Bundestag, the federal parliament of Germany. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... An Israeli settlement refers to a housing development for Israeli Jewish settlers in areas which came under the control of Israel as a result of the 1967 Six-Day War beyond the boundaries defined by the 1949 Armistice Agreements. ... R. G. Casey House, the headquarters of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade This is a list of Australian Foreign Ministers: Note: Prior to 1970, the office was known as the Minister for External Affairs. ... Hon Alexander Downer Alexander John Gosse Downer (born September 9, 1951), Australian politician, became Foreign Minister of Australia in March 1996. ... Parliament House Canberra: The main entrance and the flag Parliament House is the name given to two purpose-built buildings in Australia, where the Parliament of Australia has met since 1927. ... Canberra is the capital of the Commonwealth of Australia and, with a population of just over 323,000, is also Australias largest inland city. ... Australian Federal Police logo The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is the Federal or Commonwealth police force of Australia. ... A sea of Lebanese flags carried by anti-government protestors in Beirut on 28 February 2005 Cedar Revolution has become the Western medias most commonly used name for the chain of demonstrations and popular civic action in Lebanon (mainly Beirut) triggered by the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister... Samir Kassir (1960–June 2, 2005) (Arabic سـمـيـر قـصـيـر) was a Lebanese-born teacher and journalist. ... Émile Lahoud General Émile Geamil Lahoud (Arabic:اميل لحود) (born January 12, 1936) is the current President of Lebanon. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in Leap years). ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān literally the recitation; also called Al Qurān Al KarÄ«m or The Noble Quran; or transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Richard M. Scrushy (born 1952 in Selma, Alabama, USA is the founder and former chairman and chief executive officer of the physical rehabilitation healthcare giant HealthSouth, based in Birmingham, Alabama. ... Birmingham is the largest city in the U.S. state of Alabama and the county seat of Jefferson County. ...

June 2, 2005 (Thursday)

2 June is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A river in the Amazon rainforest The Amazon is a rainforest in South America. ... Motto: Cygnis Insignis (Distinguished by its swans) Nickname: Wildflower State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Governor Premier Const. ... A beached whale is a whale which has become stranded on land, usually on a beach. ... Binomial name Pseudorca crassidens (Owen, 1846) False Killer Whale range The False Killer Whale (Pseudorca crassidens) is a cetacean and one of the larger members of the oceanic dolphin family (Delphinidae). ... A sea of Lebanese flags carried by anti-government protestors in Beirut on 28 February 2005 Cedar Revolution has become the Western medias most commonly used name for the chain of demonstrations and popular civic action in Lebanon (mainly Beirut) triggered by the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister... Samir Kassir (1960–June 2, 2005) (Arabic سـمـيـر قـصـيـر) was a Lebanese-born teacher and journalist. ... Niamey Niamey, population 665,918, is the capital of Niger and a capital of a department of Tilabery. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon was created by the late New York-based painter Frank Moore. ... A dissident, broadly defined, is a person who actively opposes an established opinion, policy, or structure. ... Schabir Shaik Schabir Shaik is a South African businessman from Durban, who rose to prominence due to his close association with South African Deputy President Jacob Zuma. ... Jacob Zuma Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma is a former Deputy President of the Republic of South Africa. ... President Thabo Mbeki Thabo Mvuyelwa Mbeki (born June 18, 1942) is the President of the Republic of South Africa. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Srebrenica Srebrenica (in Serbian Cyrillic: Сребреница) is a town in the east of Bosnia and Herzegovina in its Republika Srpska entity. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević   listen? (Serbian: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced ; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... Identified Victims of Srebrenica Massacre The Srebrenica massacre was the July 1995 killing of a large number of Bosniak males, ranging in age from teenagers to the elderly, in the region of Srebrenica by a Serb Army of Republika Srpska under general Ratko Mladić including Serbian state special forces Scorpions... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Downing Street memo The Downing Street memo (occasionally DSM), sometimes described by critics of the Iraq War as the smoking gun memo, contains an overview of a secret 23 July 2002 meeting among United Kingdom government, defence and intelligence figures, discussing the... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (中国社会科学院) is the national academy of the Peoples Republic of China for the social sciences. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES City of Manila Region: National Capital Region Province: — Dates: Founded—June 24, 1571 Cityhood—June 10, 1574 Population: 2000 census—1,581,082 Density—41,014 per km² Area: 38. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the headquarters of the European Union, as two of its four main institutions have their headquarters in the... Province Southern Finland Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki City manager Jussi Pajunen Official languages Finnish, Swedish Area  - total  - land ranked 342nd 185. ... Software patents and patents on computer-implemented inventions (CII) are a class of patents and one of many legal aspects of computing. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Islamic Jihad (Arabic: Harakat al-Jihad al-Islami) is a militant Islamist group based in the Syrian capital, Damascus. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property carried out in a way deliberately calculated to cause the death of the perpetrator (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Jerusalem - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ...

June 1, 2005 (Wednesday)

June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Côte dIvoire (often called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. ... Bologna (from Latin Bononia, Bulaggna in the local dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, between the Po River and the Apennines. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... The Red Brigades (Brigate Rosse) are a militant group located in Italy. ... Marco Biagi was an Italian professor of labour law and industrial relations at the University of Modena. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Haim Yavin (b. ... Television news refers to the practice of disseminating current events via the media of television. ... The West Bank The Gaza Strip The term Palestinian territories is used by many mainstream Western journalists as a collective name for the West Bank and the Gaza Strip — two territories in Palestine. ... Shabak emblem Defender who shall not be seen The Shabak (in Hebrew, שבכ   Shabak?} an acronym of Sherut ha-Bitachon ha-Klali שירות ביטחון כללי) known abroad as the Shin Bet or the GSS (General Security Service), is the Internal General Security Service of Israel. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property carried out in a way deliberately calculated to cause the death of the perpetrator (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Jerusalem - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... An explosive belt (also called suicide belt or shaheed belt) is a vest packed with explosives (and often also with nails, screws, bolts and other objects to serve as shrapnel to maximize the number of casualties) and a detonator that is worn by suicide bombers. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... Siloam inscription The Siloam inscription or Silwan inscription is a passage of inscribed text in the Hezekiah tunnel in Jerusalem, written in Hebrew (related to Aramaic), the passage reads: The tunneling was completed. ... East Jerusalem is that part of Jerusalem which was held by Jordan from the 1948 Arab-Israeli War until the Six-Day War in 1967. ... General Dan Halutz   Dan Halutz? (Hebrew: דן חלוץ) (born 1948 in Tel Aviv) is an Israeli General and former Israeli Air Force commander. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF) (Hebrew: חיל האוויר Heyl haAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... The term Chief of Staff can refer to: The White House Chief of Staff, the highest-ranking member of the Executive Office of the President of the United States. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Heroin or diacetylmorphine (INN) is an alkaloid opioid. ... Santiago Creel Santiago Creel Miranda (b. ... Term of office: December 1, 2000 – present Preceded by: Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de León Succeeded by: incumbent Date of birth: July 2, 1942 Place of birth: Mexico City Profession: Industrialist First Lady: Marta Sahagún Political Party: National Action Party Vicente Fox Quesada (born July 2, 1942) is the... The American Family Association (AFA) is a conservative, fundamentalist Christian non-profit organization founded in 1977 by Rev. ... Alternate meanings: Disney (disambiguation) The Walt Disney Company (also known as Disney Enterprises, Inc. ... The Ford Motor Company (often referred to simply as Ford; sometimes nicknamed FoMoCo, NYSE: F is an automobile maker founded by Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan, and incorporated on June 16, 1903. ... Kmart is a retailing division of Sears Holdings Corporation. ... One of the Guys is an earnestly satirical and picaresque novel by Robert Clark Young, published in 1999, concerning the fantastical adventures of a man posing as a chaplain on a U.S. Navy ship which goes berserk and terrorizes a number of ports in the Far East before the... Robert Clark Young (born 1960) is an American author of novels, essays, and short stories. ... Kandahār (or Qandahār) is a city in southern Afghanistan, the capital of Kandahar province. ... The 2005 Indonesian Embassy biological attack occured when Indonesian ambassador to Australia Imron Cotan received a suspect letter addressed to himself at the Indonesian Embassy in Australia on June 1, 2005. ... Schapelle Corby at her sentencing in a Bali Court Schapelle Leigh Corby (born July 10, 1977) is a former beauty student from Australia convicted by an Indonesian court of attempting to smuggle 4. ... The Dutch referendum on the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe is a referendum to be held on 1 June 2005 to decide whether the Netherlands should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... La Paz, Bolivia Central La Paz Panoramic sight of the city of La Paz La Paz is the administrative capital of Bolivia, as well as the departmental capital of La Paz Department. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Wikipedia logo. ... Jimmy Wales in Paris, France Jimmy Donal Jimbo Wales (born August 7, 1966) is the co-founder of Wikipedia. ... For other uses of SEC, see SEC (disambiguation) The Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... William Donaldson (January 4, 1935 - June 22, 2005) was a British satirist, writer, rake and playboy, author of The Henry Root Letters. ...

Events by month

2005: January February March April May June July August September
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in April • 26: Augusto Roa Bastos • 24: Ezer Weizman • 23: Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen • 23: John Mills • 16: Marla Ruzicka • 9: Andrea Dworkin • 6: Prince Rainier III • 5: Dale Messick • 5: Saul Bellow • 2: Pope John... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 4 - Google Inc. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: October 2 - Bankruptcy of Swissair. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


News collections and sources

  • Wikipedia:News collections and sources.
  • Wikipedia:News sources - This has much of the same material organized in a hierarchical manner to help encourage NPOV in our news reporting.

  Results from FactBites:
 
June 2005 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4899 words)
In Washington, United States, the battle over the results of the 2004 gubernatorial election is settled by a county judge, approving the final count in favor of Christine Gregoire.
The November 2005 election will be the first since Governor James McGreevey resigned over a scandal in which he was revealed to be homosexual.
2005 Atlantic hurricane season: Tropical Storm Arlene, the first storm of the season, forms south of Cuba, and is expected to strike Cuba and the U.S. Gulf coast later in the week.
June 2005 in science - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (702 words)
The launch of the next space shuttle mission is scheduled for July 13, 2005.
NASA publishes pictures taken by the Cassini spacecraft showing a feature that could be a lake of liquid methane or ethane, close to the southern pole of Titan.
The first Atlantic Tropical storm of the 2005 season develops south of Cuba.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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