FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
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Encyclopedia > June 2004


2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December
See also: June 2004 in sports 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli-Palestinian... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 Czesław Miłosz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert Bootzin • 8 Fay... -1... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2004 in sports : June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: Other events in June 2004 Deaths in June • 27 Darrell Russell • 17 Gerry McNeil • 16 Rob Derksen • 13 Dick Durrance • 8 Mack Jones Other recent deaths Related pages • 2005 in sports • 2004 in sports • 2003 in sports • 2002...

< June 2004 >
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Deaths in June

28 Anthony Buckeridge
26 Naomi Shemer
26 Yash Johar
22 Bob Bemer
22 Thomas Gold
22 Francisco Ortiz Franco
16 Thanom Kittikachorn
10 Ray Charles
5 Ronald Reagan
3 Frances Shand Kydd
1 William Manchester
Other recent deaths 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... (Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... Anthony Malcolm Buckeridge OBE (June 20, 1912 - June 28, 2004) was an English author, best known for his Jennings and Rex Milligan series of childrens books. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Naomi Shemer (1931-June 26, 2004) was one of Israels most important and prolific song writers, considered by some the First Lady of Israeli Song. Shemer wrote both words and lyrics to her own songs, composed music to words by others (such as the poet Rachel), and set Hebrew... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Yash Johar (September 6, 1929 - June 26, 2004) was an Indian Bollywood film producer. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... Bob Bemer (Robert William Bemer February 8, 1920-June 22, 2004) was a computer scientist best known for his work at IBM during the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... Thomas Gold (May 22, 1920 – June 22, 2004) was an Austrian astrophysicist, a professor of astronomy at Cornell University and a member of the US National Academy of Sciences. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... Francisco Javier Ortiz Franco (Guanajuato, 1954 – Tijuana, 22 June 2004) was a Mexican journalist. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... Thanom Kittikachorn Field Marshal Thanom Kittikachorn (August 11, 1912 -June 16, 2004, Thai ถนอม กิตติขจร) was a Thai military leader and former prime minister of Thailand. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... Ray Charles at the piano. ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: 21 January 1981 – 20 January 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: 6 February 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: 5 June 2004 Place of death: Bel-Air... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... Frances Shand-Kydd Frances Ruth Shand Kydd (January 20, 1936 - June 3, 2004) was the mother of Diana, Princess of Wales. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... William Manchester William Manchester (April 1, 1922–June 1, 2004) was a historian and biographer, notable as the author of 18 books that have been translated into 20 languages. ... The following is a list of figures who died in 2005. ...

Ongoing events

UEFA Euro 2004
Reconstruction of Iraq
Occupation & Resistance
Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Liberal Party of Canada scandal
War on Terrorism
Afghanistan timeline June 2004
USA 9-11 Commission
Same-sex marriage in the USA
Darfur conflict in Sudan
AIDS epidemic
Abu Ghraib investigation
Ongoing wars (Redirected from 2004 UEFA European Championship) Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called EURO 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ... The Reconstruction of Iraq is the transitional period following the U.S. led invasion of Iraq in March 2003, after U.S. led forces transferred power in Iraq to the Coalition Provisional Authority. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The sponsorship scandal is an ongoing scandal that has affected the government of Canada, and particularly the ruling Liberal Party of Canada for a number of years, but rose to especially great prominence in 2004. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... Afghanistan timeline June 30, 2004 Bombs hidden in fruit carts exploded at two sepaarate security checkpoints in Afghanistan, killing four and injuring 23. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... The push by some civil rights supporters to create legal recognition of same-sex marriage in the United States has been taking shape since the early 1970s. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... The Red Ribbon symbol is used internationally to represent the fight against AIDS. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, rarely written Aids) is a disease characterized by the destruction of the human immune system. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... This is a list of wars. ...

Election results in June

June 10: UK local and regional
June 1013: European Parliament
June 13: Belgian regions
June 13: Serbian pres., round 1
June 26: Icelandic president
June 27: Lithuanian pres., round 2
June 27: Serbian pres., round 2
June 28: Canadian Parliament
June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... Many elections in the United Kingdom took place on Super Thursday, June 10, 2004. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held from June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... On June 13, 2004, regional elections were held in Belgium, to choose representatives in the regional councils of Flanders, Wallonia, and Brussels, as well as in the German Community Council. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... Serbia held the first round of its 2004 elections for President of Serbia on Sunday, 13 June 2004, and the second round on Sunday, 27 June 2004. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... A presidential election was held in Iceland on Saturday, 26 June 2004. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... Presidential elections are being held in Lithuania in June 2004. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... Serbia held the first round of its 2004 elections for President of Serbia on Sunday, 13 June 2004, and the second round on Sunday, 27 June 2004. ... (Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...

Related pages

About this page
Year in...
Wikipedia Announcements The following is a list of articles devoted to events from 2004 in narrow subject areas: Culture 2004 in architecture 2004 in film 2004 in games 2004 in literature 2004 in music 2004 in television 2004 in video gaming 2004 in Art People Deaths in 2004 State leaders in 2004...

June 30, 2004

June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining, and the last day of June. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... The multi-national force in Iraq invaded the country in March 2003 (see 2003 invasion of Iraq). ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... An interest rate is the rental price of money. ... Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The President is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Presidential elections, legislative elections and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 10, 2004. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... In 2004, the new Socialist government of Spain began a process to legalise same-sex marriage in Spain. ... There are two classes of interpersonal status known today as common-law marriage (or common law marriage). ... Transgender is generally used as a catch-all umbrella term for a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups centered around the full or partial reversal of gender roles; however, compare other definitions below. ... Name change is a basic legal act that is recognized in practically all legal systems to allow an individual the opportunity to adopt a name other than the name given by birth, marriage, or adoption. ... Sex reassignment surgery (SRS) includes the surgical procedures by which a persons physical appearance and function of their existing sexual characteristics are changed to that of the other sex. ... The barrier route as of February 2005 The Israeli West Bank barrier (also called the West Bank security fence, or West Bank wall by its opponents) is a physical barrier consisting of a network of fences, walls, and trenches, constructed by Israel in the occupied West Bank. ...

June 29, 2004

June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chaudhry Shujat Hussein;Prime Minister of Pakistan Chaudhry Shujat Hussain (born 1946) is a politician from Pakistan who was the Prime Minister of that country from June 30, 2004 until August 28, 2004. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali (born January 1, 1944) is a former Prime Minister of Pakistan. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... The Child Online Protection Act (COPA) is a law in the United States of America, passed in 1998 with the declared purpose of protecting children from harmful sexual material on the internet. ... The Child Online Protection Act (COPA) is a law in the United States of America, passed in 1998 with the declared purpose of protecting children from harmful sexual material on the internet. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... Prime Ministers of the Constitutional Monarchy (1834-1910) First Republic (1911-1926) Military Dictatorship (1926-1932) Estado Novo (1932-1974) Third Republic (since 1974) See also: List of Presidents of Portugal, Politics of Portugal, Lists of incumbents Categories: Lists of office-holders | Portugal ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, ) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th)  - Land 642,317 km²  - Water 19,531 km² (2. ... . A Legislative Assembly in British constitutional thought is the second-to-top or third-to-top tier of a government led by a Governor-General, Governor or a Lieutenant-Governor, inferior to an Executive Council and equal to or inferior to a Legislative Council. ... Gary Masyk (born 1960) is an Albertan businessman and politician. ... In Canada, a Premier is the head of government of a province. ... The Honourable Ralph Phillip Klein (born November 1, 1942), leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives, is current premier of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... (Redirected from 2004 Canadian election) A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004. ... The Alberta Progressive Conservative Party is a provincial right-of-centre party in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Alberta Alliance is a right wing political party in Alberta. ...

June 28, 2004

(Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Chemical Structure of Mustard Gas Compound Mustard gas (HD) is a chemical compound that was first used as a chemical weapon in World War I. In pure form, it is a colourless, odourless, viscous liquid at room temperature and causes blistering of the skin. ... Qiqihar (Simplified Chinese: 齐齐哈尔; Traditional Chinese: 齊齊哈爾; Pinyin: Qíqíhāěr; Postal Pinyin: Tsitsihar; Wade-Giles: Chi-chi-ha-er) is a major city in the Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China. ... A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... For minority régime, see Apartheid. ... The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique) is a social democratic political party in Canada. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful belligerent according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... Camp X-Ray, shown here under construction, was a temporary holding facility for detainees held at U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ... The Kroon is the official currency of Estonia. ... The Litas (LTL or Lt, Lithuanian plural form Litai) is the official currency of Lithuania. ... The tolar has been the currency of Slovenia since October 1991. ... The European exchange rate mechanism (or ERM) was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange-rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for Economic and Monetary Union and the introduction of a single... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... L. Paul Bremer Lewis Paul Bremer III, also known as Jerry Bremer, (born September 30, 1941) was named Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq following the 2003 invasion of Iraq to replace Jay Garner on May 6, 2003. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... U.S. Army PFC Keith Maupin. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... US Military Private First Class insignia (U.S. Army) Private First Class insignia (U.S. Marine Corps) In the U.S. Army, Private First Class is the third lowest enlisted rank, just above Private and below Corporal or Specialist. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... The Mongolian Peoples Revolutionary Party (Mongolian: Mongol Ardyn Khuvsgatt Nam, Монгол Ардын Хувьсгалт Нам) is a political party in Mongolia. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, ) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician. ... Prime Ministers of the Constitutional Monarchy (1834-1910) First Republic Military Dictatorship Estado Novo Third Republic See also: List of Presidents of Portugal, Politics of Portugal, Lists of incumbents This article contains content from HierarchyPedia article Prime Minister of Portugal, used here under the GNU Free Documentation License. ... The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union. ... Nina Wang or Kung Ru Xin (Chinese: 龔如心, pinyin: Gŏng Rúxīn) (b. ...

June 27, 2004

June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is a high-grossing, award-winning documentary film by American filmmaker Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004. ... A documentary is a work in a visual or auditory medium presenting political, scientific, social, or historical subjects in a factual and informative manner. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Serbia held the first round of its 2004 elections for President of Serbia on Sunday, 13 June 2004, and the second round on Sunday, 27 June 2004. ... Boris Tadić  listen? (born January 15, 1958) is the President of Serbia. ... Categories: People stubs | Serbian politicians ... Presidential elections are being held in Lithuania in June 2004. ... Related Link List of Presidents of Lithuania Categories: Stub | 1926 births | Lithuanian politicians ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... For the Finno-Ugric people, see Votes. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Iraqi insurgency is a neologism to describe a loosely organized hostile opposition to the United States run Coalition of the Willing, which, according to the US military is centered in Fallujah. ... Beheading—Facsimile of a Miniature on Wood in the Cosmographie Universelle of Munster: in folio, Basle, 1552. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Gay Pride in San Francisco The gay pride or simply pride campaign of the gay rights movement has three main premises: that people should be proud of what they are, that sexual diversity is a gift, and that sexual orientation and gender identity are inherent and cannot be intentionally altered. ... The Stonewall riots were a series of violent conflicts between homosexuals and police officers in New York City. ... LGBT (or GLBT) is an acronym used as a collective term to refer to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...

June 26, 2004

June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali (born January 1, 1944) is a former Prime Minister of Pakistan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996 and 2000. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an activist attorney who opposes the power of large corporations and has worked for decades on environmental, consumer rights, and pro-democracy issues. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... David Cobb David Keith Cobb (born 1963, San Leon, Texas) is an American lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 under the belief that Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an activist attorney who opposes the power of large corporations and has worked for decades on environmental, consumer rights, and pro-democracy issues. ... Portland skyline. ... State nickname: Beaver State Other U.S. States Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski Official languages None Area 255,026 km² (9th)  - Land 248,849 km²  - Water 6,177 km² (2. ... In United States presidential politics, a swing state (also, battleground state) is a state in which no candidate has overwhelming support, meaning that any of the major candidates have a reasonable chance of winning the states electoral college votes. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Office: Junior Senator, Massachusetts Political party: Democratic Term of office: January 1985 – Present Preceded by: Paul Tsongas Succeeded by: Incumbent (2009) Date of birth: December 11, 1943 Place of birth: Aurora, Colorado Marriage: (1) Julia Thorne, divorced (2) Teresa Heinz Kerry John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the... In computing, Download. ... Internet Explorer, abbreviated IE or MSIE, is a proprietary web browser made by Microsoft and currently available as part of Microsoft Windows. ... A backdoor in a computer system (or a cryptosystem, or even in an algorithm) is a method of bypassing normal authentication or obtaining remote access to a computer, while intended to remain hidden to casual inspection. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Vladimír Špidla Vladimír Špidla (born April 21, 1951 in Prague) is a Czech social democratic politician. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... In military science, an attack is the aggressive attempt to conquer enemy territory, installations, personnel, or equipment or to deny the enemy the use of territory, installations, personnel, or equipment, for example by destroying the equipment. ... For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Nablus also spelled Nabulus (Arabic نابلس; Hebrew שכם, Shechem) is a major city (pop. ... The Al_Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al_Fatah faction. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ...

June 25, 2004

June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Siemens AG (NYSE: SI) is the worlds largest electronics company. ... North Rhine-Westphalia (German: Nordrhein-Westfalen) is the largest in population (though only fourth in area) among Germanys 16 federal states. ... IG Metall (Industriegewerkschaft Metall - German Metalworkers Union) is the dominant metalworkers union in Germany. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... The workweek, literally, refers to the period of time that an individual spends at paid occupational labor. ... The 35-hour workweek is a measure adopted first in France, in February 2000, under Prime Minister Lionel Jospins administration. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Jack Ryan ran for the United States Senate from Illinois and was forced to withdraw due to reports of past sexual behavior. ... Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine, wearing the silver catsuit for which the character was noted. ... Sex clubs are nightclubs where people can have sexual intercourse with one another, either in private rooms or in public areas. ... Her Majestys Attorney General for England and Wales, usually known as the Attorney General, is the chief legal adviser of the Crown in England and Wales. ... Peter Henry Goldsmith, Baron Goldsmith, PC, is the current Attorney General of England and Wales. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... What constitutes a military tribunal varies according to nation and sometimes even military branch and regional jurisdiction. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an activist attorney who opposes the power of large corporations and has worked for decades on environmental, consumer rights, and pro-democracy issues. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... (Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The classical guitar typically has 3 nylon and 3 nickel-wound strings. ... Eric Clapton at the Tsunami Relief concert in Cardiffs Millennium Stadium, January 22nd 2005 Eric Clapton CBE (born Eric Patrick Clapp on March 30, 1945) is a British guitarist and composer, nicknamed slowhand. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petra – rock and oleum – oil), crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish flammable liquid, which exists in the upper strata of some areas of the Earths crust. ... A wage is the amount of money paid for some specified quantity of labour. ... A pension (also known as superannuation) is a retirement plan intended to provide a person with a secure income for life. ...

June 24, 2004

June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princess of Hanover is the eldest child of the late Prince Rainier III of Monaco and is currently heir presumptive to the principalitys throne. ... The ECHR should not be mistaken for the European Court of Justice, an institution of the European Union for the resolution of disputes under EU law. ... Computer crime or e-crime is crime in which a computer plays an essential part. ... JavaScript, in its more modern form, is an object-based scripting programming language based on the concept of prototypes. ... Internet Explorer, abbreviated IE or MSIE, is a proprietary web browser made by Microsoft and currently available as part of Microsoft Windows. ... Microsoft Windows is a range of operating environments for personal computers and servers. ... In computing, Download. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT) headquartered in Redmond, Washington, USA, was founded in 1975 by Bill Gates and Paul Allen. ... In computing, a patch is a software update meant to fix problems with a computer program. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... Jamaat al-Tawhid wal Jihad members with Shosei Koda and with the banner in the background Jamaat al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Arabic: جماعة ال�توحيد والجهاد, Monotheism and Holy Struggle Movement) is the Islamist guerrilla network of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a Jordanian_born Islamist militant believed operating against... This article is about explosive devices. ... Ankara from the Atakule Tower, looking N-NE Ankara is the capital of Turkey and the countrys second largest city after Istanbul. ... This article is about the city. ... Browning Arms Company was founded in Utah in 1927. ... Gavrilo Princip Princip being arrested after the shooting Gavrilo Princip (Гаврило Принцип) (July 25, 1894 – April 28, 1918) was a Bosnian Serb nationalist who killed Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria, and his wife Countess Sophie in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, prompting the Austrian action against Serbia that led to World War... Archduke Franz Ferdinand (right) with his family. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ...

June 23, 2004

June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrent or punishment, or as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The Geneva Conventions consist of treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qāidah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network and alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is the current Secretary of Defense of the United States, since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... The term phobia, which comes from the Greek word for fear (φόβος, fobos), denotes a number of psychological and physiological conditions that can range from serious disabilities to common fears to minor quirks. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sexism is discrimination between people based on their Sex rather than their individual merits. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... In commerce, a retailer buys goods or products in large quantities from manufacturers or importers, either directly or through a wholesaler, and then sells individual items or small quantities to the general public or end user customers, usually in a shop, also called store. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... assassin, see Assassin (disambiguation) Jack Ruby assassinated Lee Harvey Oswald in a very public manner. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion by any irregular armed force that rises up against an established authority, government, administration or occupation. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme authority over a geographic region, group of people, or oneself. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Peoples Liberation Army (PLA) (Traditional Chinese: 人民解放軍, Simplified Chinese: 人民解放军, pinyin: Rénmín Jiěfàng Jūn), which includes an army, navy, air force, and strategic nuclear forces, serves as the military of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ...

June 22, 2004

June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... A health maintenance organization (HMO) is a prepaid health plan. ... In law, malpractice is type of tort in which the misfeasance, mailfeasance or nonfeasance of a professional under a duty to act fails to follow generally accepted professional standards. ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... The Shatt al-Arab (Arabic: شط العرب, Stream of the Arabs) or Arvand (called اروندرود: arvandrÅ«d in Persian), also called the Shatt-al-Arab waterway, is a river in Southwest Asia of some 200 km in length, formed by the confluence of the Euphrates and the Tigris in the town of al... Interrogation is the professional police and military technique of interviewing people, often without their consent, in order to obtain information regarding crimes or military operations. ... Rewrite of the Islamism article This page and Islam as a political movement were proposed (by whom?) as a replacement for Islamism which is disputed. ... Kim Sun-il (September 13, 1970 – June 22, 2004) was a South Korean translator working in Iraq for Gana General Trading Company, a South Korean company under contract to the U.S. military. ... National motto: 널리 인간을 이롭게 하라 Translation: Bring benefit to all people Official language Korean Capital Seoul Largest city Seoul President Roh Moo-hyun Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 107th 99,274 km² 0. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Imran Khan (Mohammad Imran Khan Niazi, born November 25, 1952) was a Pakistani cricketer (1971-1992) and captain of the Pakistani cricket team. ... Objective and summary Cricket is a bat and ball sport. ... Jemima Marcelle Goldsmith, also referred to as Jemima Khan (born January 30, 1974, London), ex-wife of cricketer Imran Khan is the daughter of billionaire Sir James Goldsmith and Lady Annabel Vane Tempest Stewart. ... Sir James Goldsmith (1933 - 1997) was a British businessman and founder of the euro-sceptic Referendum Party. ... The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is a special interest group representing the U.S. recording industry, and the body responsible for certifying gold and platinum albums and singles in the USA. For more information about sales data see list of best selling albums and list of best selling... Anti-piracy describes the attempt to prevent misappropriation of intellectual property typically occurring by copying of copyrighted work without permission or payment of royalties to the originator or rights owner. ... There are several common types of campaign: For organized efforts, each toward specific political goals, see political campaign. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... John Doe is the name of: John Doe (musician and actor) (born February 25, 1954) John Doe (Television series) John Doe (comics) In the USA, the name John Doe is used for a defendant or victim in a legal example or for a person whose identity is unknown or is... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... Francisco Javier Ortiz Franco (Guanajuato, 1954 – Tijuana, 22 June 2004) was a Mexican journalist. ... Tijuana is the largest city in the state of Baja California, Mexico. ...

June 21, 2004

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Photographs of Nobel Prize Medals. ... This article is about the presidential campaign of John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and the nominee of the Democratic Party to challenge Republican incumbent President George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential election on November 2, 2004. ... Office: Junior Senator, Massachusetts Political party: Democratic Term of office: January 1985 – Present Preceded by: Paul Tsongas Succeeded by: Incumbent (2009) Date of birth: December 11, 1943 Place of birth: Aurora, Colorado Marriage: (1) Julia Thorne, divorced (2) Teresa Heinz Kerry John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the... This page covers security in the sense of protection from hostile action. ... A critic (derived from the ancient Greek word krites meaning a judge) is a person who offers a value judgement or an interpretation. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... Wiktionary has a definition of: Administration Organisational use In some organisational analyses, administration can refer to the bureaucratic or operational performance of mundane office tasks, usually internally oriented. ... A scientific method or process is considered fundamental to the scientific investigation and acquisition of new knowledge based upon physical evidence. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... Scientific consensus is the majority agreement of the body of scientists in a particular field of science. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1856-2004 Global warming is a term used to describe an increase over time of the average temperature of Earths atmosphere and oceans. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Camp X-Ray, shown here under construction, was a temporary holding facility for detainees held at U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qāidah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network and alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest federal court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States to interpret and decide questions of federal law, including the... Holding A Nevada law requiring suspects to identify themselves during investigative stops by law enforcement officers did not violate the Fourth or Fifth Amendments. ... The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, is related to legal procedure. ... The Miranda warning is given by police in the United States to suspects whom they have arrested and intend to question. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... The Shatt al-Arab (Arabic: شط العرب, Stream of the Arabs) or Arvand (called اروندرود: arvandrÅ«d in Persian), also called the Shatt-al-Arab waterway, is a river in Southwest Asia of some 200 km in length, formed by the confluence of the Euphrates and the Tigris in the town of al... SpaceShipOne is small, having a three-person cabin and short but wide wings. ... A spaceplane is a rocket plane designed to pass the edge of space. ... Space exploration is the physical exploration of outer-Earth objects and generally anything that involves the technologies, science, and politics regarding space endeavors. ... Elbert L. Burt Rutan (born June 17, 1943) is an aircraft designer known for designing light, strong, unusual-looking, energy-efficient aircraft. ... Paul Allen Paul G. Allen (born January 21, 1953) is an entrepreneur who first established himself by co-founding Microsoft Corporation with Bill Gates. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer) (symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... SpaceShipOne test pilot Mike Melvill Michael W. Melvill (born November 1941) is one of the test pilots for SpaceShipOne, the experimental spaceplane developed by Scaled Composites. ... U.S. Space Shuttle astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit. ... The United Nations Fund for Population Activities was started in 1969 and renamed the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in 1987. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland (LSE: RBS)is one of Scotlands four national clearing banks and one of the oldest in the UK, founded in Edinburgh in 1727 by Royal Charter. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ... The Hmong, also known as Miao (Chinese: 苗: Miáo; Vietnamese: Mèo or Hmông; Thai: แม้ว (Maew) or ม้ง (Mong)), are an Asian ethnic group speaking the Hmong language, whose homeland is in the mountainous regions of southern China (especially Guizhou) that cross into northern Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam and Laos). ... Wat Tham Krabok (วัดถ้ำกระบอก, literally Temple of the Bamboo Cave) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Thailand, located in the Phra Bhudhabart district of the Saraburi Province. ... The Vietnam War was fought from 1957 to 1975 between Soviet-supported Vietnamese nationalist and Communist forces and an array of Western and pro-Western forces, most notably the United States. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... The following is a list of Governors of the State of Connecticut, from the Colonial period through present day. ... John G. Rowland (born May 24, 1957 in Waterbury, Connecticut) was the Governor of Connecticut from 1995 to 2004. ... State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell Official languages English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ...

June 20, 2004

June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location within China Qingdao  listen (Simplified Chinese: 青岛; Traditional Chinese: 青島; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-tao; Postal System Pinyin: Tsingtao) is a port sub-provincial city in the Shandong province of China, a naval base, and a major industrial city located at the southern tip of the Shandong Peninsula... A nuclear test explosion is an experiment involving the detonation of a nuclear weapon. ... Nuclear war, or atomic war, is war in which nuclear weapons are used. ... The Congress of the Philippines is the primary legislature of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The President is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Presidential elections, legislative elections and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 10, 2004. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... Tears trickling down the cheeks Lacrimation is the bodys process of producing tears, which are a liquid to clean and lubricate the eyes. ...

June 19, 2004

  • Witnesses and hospital officials say that 22 Iraqis, among them children, women, and youths, are killed in a U.S. air strike in a residential neighborhood in Fallujah. U.S. officials say that they targeted an Abu Musab al-Zarqawi safe house. (Reuters) (CBC) Iraqi locals dispute the American account. (BBC)
  • OpenBeOS becomes Haiku (operating system), announced at the first WalterCon in Columbus, Ohio.

June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... Haiku Incorporateds Logo Haiku, formerly known as OpenBeOS, is an open source project dedicated to the recreation, followed by the extension, of the Be Operating System. ... The Haiku Projects Logo Haiku, formerly known as OpenBeOS, is an open source project dedicated to the recreation, followed by the extension, of the Be Operating System. ...

June 18, 2004

June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Term of office: December 31, 1999 – Preceded by: Boris Yeltsin Succeeded by: Date of birth: October 7, 1952 Place of birth: Leningrad, U.S.S.R. First Lady: Liudmila Putina Political party: None Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин  pronunciation; born October 7, 1952) is a Russian politician and... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... An Intergovernmental Conference (IGC) is the formal procedure for negotiating amendments to the founding treaties of the European Union. ... Such term is not in Wikipedia. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the headquarters of the European Union, as two of its three main institutions have their headquarters in the... The Enlargement of the European Union is the growth in size of the European Union, from the six founding member states in 1952, to the 25 current member states. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... Paul Marshall Johnson, Jr. ... Beheading—Facsimile of a Miniature on Wood in the Cosmographie Universelle of Munster: in folio, Basle, 1552. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Ichthyology is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. ... Families Callorhynchidae Rhinochimaeridae Chimaeridae Other meanings, based on a fantastic animal, are at Chimera Chimaera is the common name of the species in the families Callorhynchidae, Rhinochimaeridae and Chimaeridae which all are closely related to sharks; they are also called ghost sharks. ...

June 17, 2004

June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is a former United States Director of Central Intelligence. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is the current Secretary of Defense of the United States, since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... The Bush administration and many parties have expressed concern about the state of human rights in Iraq after the 2003 occupation of Iraq. ... The Geneva Conventions consist of treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ...

June 16, 2004

  • EU leaders meet in Brussels to try to agree on the draft European constitution amid the showing of popular discontent with national governments in the recent European Parliament election. (BBC) (Guardian)
  • The USA's 9/11 Commission states that although meetings between al Qaeda representatives and Iraqi government officials had taken place, it has found "no credible evidence" of a "collaborative relationship" between Saddam Hussein's Iraq and al Qaeda in the 9/11 attacks or in any other strike against U.S. interests. It also finds that the original plan involved ten jets and that there was dispute within the terrorist network about its implementation until only shortly before September 11. (Washington Post) (AP) (BBC)
  • Iraqi Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr calls upon members of his Mahdi Army to return to their homes and end their attacks. (NYT)
  • The trial begins of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russian oil tycoon on charges of tax evasion and fraud; the proceedings are later adjourned. (VOA) (BBC)
  • 25 people die and 100 hurt in a train derailment on the Konkan Railway in India, near the western city of Mumbai. (Times of India)
  • Jiang Yanyong's wife, Hua Zhongwei, is reported to have been freed from detention incommunicado in China and returned to the couple's Beijing home. (Reuters)
  • The Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change, a group of 27 retired U.S. diplomats and military officers, publishes an open letter that states that U.S. President George W. Bush has so harmed international relations that only a new leader can repair them. (BBC) (Newsweek) (CNN)
  • A computer virus capable of infecting cellphones running the Symbian OS with Bluetooth capabilities, "Cabir", has been developed by software experts. (Forbes) (BBC) (Reuters)
  • The Bloomsday centennial is commemorated in Dublin and around the world. (IHT) (Reuters UK)
  • The Hong Kong securities-industry watchdog obtained a court order freezing all assets belonging to hedge fund manager Charles Schmitt, or his fund of funds, CSA Absolute Return. Mr. Schmitt himself is in the custody of Hong Kong authorities on suspicions that he's misappropriated investor funds. (TheStreet.com)

June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Such term is not in Wikipedia. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the headquarters of the European Union, as two of its three main institutions have their headquarters in the... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held from June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qāidah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network and alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated Islamist terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... A trial is, in the most general sense, a test, usually a test to see whether something does or does not meet a given standard. ... Mikhail Khodorkovsky speaking at an Open Russia forum. ... A business magnate, sometimes referred to as a mogul or a tycoon, is a person who controls a large portion of a particular industry and whose wealth derives primarily from said control. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... The Konkan Railway (KR) is a zone of the Indian Railways which operates along the Konkan coast of India. ... The Gateway of India is the citys most recognisable landmark, visited by thousands daily. ... Jiang Yanyong Jiang Yanyong (Traditional Chinese: 蔣彥永, Simplified Chinese: 蒋彦永, Hanyu Pinyin: Jiǎng Yànyǒng, Wade-Giles: Chiang Yen-yung) (born 4 October 1931) is a Chinese physician from Beijing who publicized a coverup of the SARS epidemic in China. ... Beijing  listen? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... This article deals with technology from the Cosmic Era timeline of the Gundam metaseries. ... Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change is an ad hoc organization in the United States of 27 retired Foreign Service and U.S. military officers. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... In computer security technology, a virus is a self-replicating program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents (for a complete definition: see below). ... Cellular redirects here. ... Symbian OS is an operating system with associated libraries, user interface frameworks and reference implementations of common tools, produced by Symbian Ltd. ... This article is about the Bluetooth wireless specification. ... Bloomsday is a secular holiday, celebrated annually on June 16. ... Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath1),is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located2 near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region3. ... In business and accounting an asset is anything owned, whether in possession or by right to take possession, by a person or a group acting together, e. ... The term hedge fund dates back to the first such fund founded by Alfred Winslow Jones in 1949. ...

June 15, 2004

June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... The Millennium Technology Prize is an award for outstanding technological achievements that directly promote peoples quality of life, are based on humane values, and encourage sustainable economic development. The prize is awarded by the Finnish Technology Award Foundation, established in 2002 by eight Finnish organisations supporting technological development and... Helsinki (pronounced with the stress on the first syllable in Finnish: ), or Helsingfors in Swedish  listen?, is the capital of Finland. ... Janis Karpinski wearing her Brigadier General star before being demoted to Colonel Janis L. Karpinski (born c. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Camp X-Ray, shown here under construction, was a temporary holding facility for detainees held at U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Islam  listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Paul Marshall Johnson, Jr. ... Saudi Arabian Airlines (also known as Saudia) is Saudi Arabias domestic and international airline, and one of the largest airlines of the Middle East. ... The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) was established in 1964 as the paramilitary wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias oldest, largest, most capable, and best-equipped insurgent force. ... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... Binomial name Erythroxylon coca For the American comedian, see Imogene Coca. ... Gobernacion de Norte de Santander Categories: Departments of Colombia | Stub ... List of Heads of State (Presidents etc. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Francisco Santos Calderón Term of office: August 7, 2002 – Present Preceded by: Andrés Pastrana Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 4, 1952 Place of birth: Medellín First Lady: Lina Moreno de Uribe Political party: Independent Álvaro Uribe Vélez (born July... Chris Bell can refer to: Chris Bell (politician) Chris Bell (musician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... U.S. Representative Tom DeLay (R-Texas) Tom DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is an American Republican politician from Sugar Land, Texas and current Majority Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... iTunes Music Store currently viewing the United States store. ... The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, can generally refer to the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Los Angeles Lakers is a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ...

June 14, 2004

June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei (born 1942, Egypt) is the Director General of the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an inter-governmental organization under the auspices of the United Nations. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... The Islamic Republic of Irans nuclear program goes back many decades. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest federal court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States to interpret and decide questions of federal law, including the... The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of California District of Guam District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana... Newdow v. ... Dorothea Lange photograph of Japanese-American students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States, and to its national flag. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held from June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... Euroscepticism is scepticism about, or disagreement with, the purposes of the European Union, sometimes coupled with a desire to preserve national sovereignty. ... The name Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish), which means ourselves or we ourselves (not as sometimes incorrectly translated, ourselves alone or we alone) has been applied to a series of political movements since 1905 in Ireland, each of which claim or claimed sole descent from the original... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... The Progressive Democrats (in Irish An Páirtí Daonlathach) is a free market liberal party in the Republic of Ireland founded in 1985. ... Northern Ireland is one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ...

June 13, 2004

June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serbia held the first round of its 2004 elections for President of Serbia on Sunday, 13 June 2004, and the second round on Sunday, 27 June 2004. ... Categories: People stubs | Serbian politicians ... Boris Tadić  listen? (born January 15, 1958) is the President of Serbia. ... Bogoljub Karić is a businessman from Serbia. ... Dragan Marsicanin Dragan Maršićanin [Драган Маршићанин] (born in 1950 in Belgrade) was Serbian Minister of Economy, but his position was put on hold when he decided to run for president in 2004. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... Map of Taiwan Taiwan is mostly mountainous in the east, but gradually transitions to gently sloping plains in the west (satellite photo by NASA). ... Chang Hui-mei (張惠妹, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhāng i) (b. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Hangzhou (Chinese: 杭州; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hang-chou) is a sub-provincial city in China, and the capital of Zhejiang province. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands currently administered by the Republic of China) that is politically... Legislative elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ... The Australian Labor Party or ALP is Australias oldest political party. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called EURO 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ... Zinedine Zidane playing for Real Madrid Zinédine Yazid Zidane (born June 23, 1972, in Marseille, France), nicknamed Zizou, is a French football player for Real Madrid and formerly France. ... First International Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Northern Ireland; 18 February 1882) Worst defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 11 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First... Fabien Barthez, born 28 June 1971 in Lavelanet, France, is the current (as of 2004) goalkeeper for the French Ligue 1 football club Olympique de Marseille. ... David Beckham David Robert Joseph Beckham OBE (born May 2, 1975) is an English footballer born in Leytonstone, London. ... The Peoples Republic of China has set up a system of Internet censorship in Mainland China. ... Logo of the Wikimedia foundation, designed by Wikipedia user Neolux The Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ...

June 12, 2004

  • A meteorite plunges into a family's living room in the Auckland, New Zealand suburb of Ellerslie on Saturday afternoon. No-one is hurt. Weighing 1.3 kilograms (2.9 pounds), it is the ninth ever meteorite to be found in the country, and the first to hit a home. (TVNZ) (Stuff) (Reuters)
  • In a Constitutional referendum in Ireland, the electorate approves a constitutional amendment denying Irish citizenship to all children born in Ireland unless one of the parents is an Irish citizen or the parents were legally resident for three years prior to the birth. This closes a perceived loophole where considerable numbers of women in the late stages of pregnancy were allegedly arriving in Ireland, since the parents of citizens were also allowed to remain in the country. (BBC)
  • Football (soccer): Greece upset favourites Portugal in the Euro 2004 tournament opening match, beating the Portuguese 2-1. (BBC)

June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bacubirito in Culiacan, Mexico is second largest Meteorite in the Americas, fifth largest in the World A meteorite is a relatively small extra-terrestrial body that reaches the Earths surface. ... Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called EURO 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ...

June 11, 2004

  • On the third anniversary of the execution of Timothy McVeigh for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing, the penalty phase of his co-accomplice, Terry Nichols, ends in a deadlocked jury over the issue of handing out a death penalty verdict. By law, the judge in the case must sentence Nichols to life in prison (a term he is already serving). (CNN)
  • Ken Livingstone is re-elected Mayor of London for a second four-year term after polling 828,380 first and second preference votes, defeating his nearest rival Conservative Steve Norris by 161,202 votes. (Guardian)
  • Eleven Chinese road construction workers and an Afghan guard are murdered in their sleep 20 miles south of the Afghan city of Kunduz. Four more Chinese are hospitalized for wounds suffered in the same attack. The dead are among more than 100 engineers and workers engaged on a World Bank project to build a road from Kabul to the Tajikistan border. Mullah Dadullah, one of the top Taliban commanders, recently issued orders to his fighters to strike at road builders. (NYT)
  • The Cassini-Huygens probe approaches within 2000 km (1,250 miles) of Phoebe, the outermost moon of the planet Saturn (Wired News) (BBC)

June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Timothy McVeigh Timothy James McVeigh (April 23, 1968–June 11, 2001), considered by the FBI an American domestic terrorist, was executed for his part in the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing. ... Damage to the Murrah building before cleanup began. ... Terry Nichols (born April 1, 1955) is accused of being the accomplice of Timothy McVeigh, an American terrorist in the Oklahoma City bombing (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, April 19, 1995). ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... Ken Livingstone, Mayor of London Kenneth Robert Livingstone, known as Ken Livingstone (born June 17, 1945) is the current Mayor of London. ... The current Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom. ... Steven Norris is a British Conservative politician. ... Kunduz is a city in Afghanistan; the name has also sometimes been rendered as Kûnduz, Qonduz, Qondûz, Konduz, Kondûz, Kondoz, or Qhunduz. ... Logo of the World Bank The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, in Romance languages: BIRD), better known as the World Bank, is an international organization whose original mission was to finance the reconstruction of nations devastated by WWII. Now, its mission has expanded to fight poverty by means... Kabul (Kâbl, in Persian کابل) is the capital and largest city of Afghanistan with a population variously estimated at 2 to 4 million. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... This is an artists concept of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, just after the main engine has begun firing. ... For other meanings see Phoebe. ... A planet (from the Greek πλανήτης, planētēs which means wanderer or more forcefully vagrant, tramp) is an object in orbit around a star that is not a star in its own right. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ...

June 10, 2004

June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Many elections in the United Kingdom took place on Super Thursday, June 10, 2004. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom, who heads the Greater London Authority and is responsible for budgeting and strategic planning of some governmental functions across the whole of the region of London. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... The Labour Party is a a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq, also called the Iraq War or Operation Iraqi Freedom, began March 20, 2003, initiated by the United States, the United Kingdom and a loosely-defined coalition. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held from June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Mathematics Bogomolny, Alexander: Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles. ... Louis de Branges de Bourcia (born 1932) is a French mathematician. ... In mathematics, the Riemann hypothesis (aka Riemann zeta hypothesis), first formulated by Bernhard Riemann in 1859, is one of the most famous of all unsolved problems. ... The Clay Mathematics Institute (CMI) is a private, non-profit foundation, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and dedicated to increasing and disseminating mathematical knowledge. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Patterns of Global Terrorism is a report published each year on or before April 30 by the United States Department of State. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... A paramilitary is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... Objective and summary Cricket is a bat and ball sport. ... ICC logo The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the governing body for international Test match and One-day International cricket. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Watercooling is a method of heat removal from components. ... Martha Helen Kostyra Stewart (born August 3, 1941) is a popular Polish-American television and magazine personality known for her cooking, gardening, etiquette, and arts and crafts projects, and as a general lifestyle guide and homemaker. ... A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... Obstruction of justice, in a common law state, refers to the crime of offering interference of any sort to the work of police, investigators, regulatory agencies, prosecutors, or other (usually government) officials. ... Logic (from ancient Greek λόγος (logos), meaning reason) is the study of arguments. ... Evidence can mean: Any observable event which tends to prove or disprove a proposition, see scientific method and reality. ...

June 9, 2004

ORGAN - 5th International Organ Competition Paris The 5th International Organ Competition of Paris has been held from 1-9 june 2004. After a first selection on CD basis, the competiton had to be performed on different organs throughout the city of Paris : at the Conservatoire de Paris (1st round), at the Church of St. Ferdinand les Ternes and La Madeleine (semi-final). The final round took place on the organs of the Church Sainte-Clotilde, on the Royal Chapel organ of the Castle of Versailles and in the Church St. Eustache where the four finalist had to perform the sixth concerto for organ and orchestra of Jean Guillou. Michel Chapuis presided the international jury. Ghislain Leroy from France was first prize winner, before Henry Fairs from Great Britain and Els Biesemans from Belgium. Noël Hazebroucq from France won the improvisation competition. June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Map of Germany showing Cologne Cologne (German: Köln [kœln]  listen?) is, in terms of population, the fourth largest city in Germany and largest city of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) is a trade organisation representing the recording industry. ... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikicities has a wiki about Music: Music Music City : a collaborative music database All Music Guide: includes a comprehensive and flexible Genre and Style system MusicWiki: A Collaborative Music-related encyclopedia Science... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrent or punishment, or as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions. ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... The Geneva Conventions consist of treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Waziristan is a mountainous region of northwest Pakistan, bordering Afghanistan and covering some 11,585 km² (4,473 mi²). ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The flag of NATO NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, D.C., on April 4, 1949. ... The most frequently stolen traffic sign in Austria, at the entrance to the village of Fucking. ... A U.S. warning sign about children in the road, and a speed limit notice A U.S. warning sign indicating that drivers who do not wish to exit immediately should merge left, and a prohibitory No Stopping sign Most countries place signs, known as traffic signs or road signs... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

June 8, 2004

June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Consejo Nacional Electoral (National Electoral Council, or CNE) is the institution in charge of all electoral processes that take place in Venezuela. ... Hugo Chavez in 1999, as President of Venezuela Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (born July 28, 1954) is the President of Venezuela. ... The Venezuelan recall referendum of 15 August 2004 was a referendum to determine whether Hugo Chávez, the president of Venezuela, should be recalled from office. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The term Western world can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... A treaty is a binding agreement under international law concluded by subjects of international law, namely states and international organizations. ... Federal law is the body of law created by the federal government of a nation. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrent or punishment, or as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Security measures outside the Houses of Parliament, London, England. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... A sun is the star at the center of a solar system. ... Earth, also known as the Earth or Terra, is the third planet outward from the Sun. ... The 2004 transit of Venus A transit of Venus across the Sun takes place when the planet Venus passes directly between the Sun and the Earth, obscuring a small portion of the Suns disc. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Special forces or special operations forces is a term used to describe relatively small military units raised and trained for reconnaissance, unconventional warfare and special operations. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Baquba (بعقوبه; also transliterated as Baqubah and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala province. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Mosūl (Kurdish: Mûsil, Arabic: موصل, al Mawsil) or Nineveh (Syriac: ܢܝܢܘܐ) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... Minister of Health redirects here. ... John Reid may refer to: Dr. John Reid, a British politician and Cabinet minister. ... Various pipes and cigars Tobacco smoking is the act of smoking tobacco products, especially cigarettes and cigars. ... The Internet has become pervasive in the Peoples Republic of China with universal public dialup access available in most cities. ... The Open Constitutional Initiative (OCI) is an organization in the Peoples Republic of China that advocates the rule of law and greater constitutional protections. ... The Constitution of the Peoples Republic of China (中华人民共和国宪法) is the highest law within the Peoples Republic of China. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 - June 8, 1795) also known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy (1785-1789), Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois (1789-1791), and Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France (1791-1793), was the son of King Louis XVI of France and Marie Antoinette, never actually... The Basilica of Saint Denis (in French, la Basilique de Saint-Denis), a famous burial site for French monarchs, is located in Saint Denis (near Paris). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The period of the French Revolution is very important in the history of France and the world. ... Louis XVI (August 23, 1754 – January 21, 1793), was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French in 1791-1792. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ...

June 7, 2004

June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) is a relief and human development agency, providing education, healthcare, social services and emergency aid to over four million refugees living in the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, Jordan, Lebanon and the Syrian Arab republic. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was formed in 1927 by means of a royal charter. ... Riyadh from space, April 1994 Minestry of interior Faisaliah Centre King Fahad Int. ... Simon Cumbers (1968 - June 6, 2004) was an Irish-born freelance journalist working for the BBC who was murdered by Al Qaeda while filming an Al Qaeda safehouse in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the racing driver. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The North American Free Trade Agreement, known usually as NAFTA, links Canada, the United States, and Mexico in a free trade sphere. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Environmentalism is activism aimed at improving the environment, particularly nature. ... The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), formerly known by the name International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, is one of the largest labor unions in the United States. ... This article is about the city in California. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... PeopleSoft, Inc. ... An Oracle is a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Antitrust or competition laws, legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The Tampa Bay Lightning are a National Hockey League team based in Tampa, Florida. ... The Calgary Flames are a National Hockey League team based in Calgary, Alberta. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ...

June 6, 2004

June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allied forces. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Fatah (Arabic: الفتح) al-fatah—an reverse acronym from arabic words Harakat alTahrir alwatani alFilastini (literally: the movement for liberation of the Palestinian homeland)—is a Palestinian faction founded in 1959 by Yasser Arafat who, until his death, was head of the Palestinian Authority. ... Marwan Barghouti (born June 6, 1959) is a Palestinian leader from the West Bank and a leader of the Fatah movement that forms the backbone of the Palestinian Authority and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... The term Palestinian terrorism is commonly used for militant acts of violence committed by Palestinian citizens or organizations against Israelis, Jews, and at times against nationals of other countries. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Commander is a military rank used in many navies but not generally in armies or air forces. ... Najaf (نجف in the Arabic language) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... A military or miltary force (n. ... This article is about the ending of life. ... Kufa (الكوفة al-Kufa in Arabic) is a city in Iraq, about 170 km south of Baghdad, and 10 km northeast of Najaf. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Gastón Gaudio (born December 9, 1978 in Buenos Aires, Argentina), nicknamed El Gato (The Cat in Spanish), is a professional tennis player from Argentina. ... Guillermo Sebastián Coria (born January 13, 1982), nicknamed El Mago (The Magician in Spanish), is a professional tennis player from Argentina. ...

June 5, 2004

June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The list of Presidents of the United States consists of the 43 (as of 2005) heads of state in the history of the United States. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: 21 January 1981 – 20 January 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: 6 February 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: 5 June 2004 Place of death: Bel-Air... Pseudomembranous colitis is a infection of the colon caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile. ... Binomial name Clostridium difficile Clostridium difficile is a species of genus Clostridium which are gram-positive, anaerobic spore_forming rods. ... This article needs cleanup. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Heart of the new west City of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Location. ... Noël Mamère (born December 25, 1948) is a French politician of the French Green Party (Les Verts). ... City motto: Lilia sola regunt lunam undas castra leonem. ... The legal status of same-sex marriages in France is unclear. ... Dominique de Villepin Photo: David Mendiboure Dominique Marie François René Galouzeau de Villepin (born November 14, 1953, in Rabat, Morocco), simply known as Dominique de Villepin  listen?, is a French diplomat and politician. ... The push by some civil rights supporters to create legal recognition of same-sex marriage in the United States has been taking shape since the early 1970s. ... This article is about the city in California. ... The Derby Stakes, known colloquially as The Derby and internationally as the Epsom Derby, is considered one the most prestigious flat thoroughbred horse races in the world. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ... Birdstone (born May 16, 2001) is a thoroughbred racehorse now best known for winning the 2004 Belmont Stakes. ... Smarty Jones (born February 28, 2001) is a thoroughbred race horse, and winner of the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ...

June 4, 2004

June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the highest civilian award in the United States. ... The Servant of God Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a [1] (May 18, 1920–April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City and of the Holy See for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his... This article describes the positions of world governments prior to the actual initiation of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and not their current positions as they may have changed since then. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq, also called the Iraq War or Operation Iraqi Freedom, began March 20, 2003, initiated by the United States, the United Kingdom and a loosely-defined coalition. ... Thousands of small and large global protests against war in general, the U.S. plan to invade Iraq and the war itself were held from 2002 to 2005. ... Rome - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... The Unknown Rebel — This famous photo, taken by Associated Press photographer Jeff Widener, depicts a lone protester whose actions halted the progress of a column of advancing tanks for over half an hour. ... Tiananmen Square (Simplified Chinese: 天安门广场; Traditional Chinese: 天安門廣場; pinyin: ) is a very large plaza near the center of Beijing, China, named for the Tiananmen (literally, Gate of Heavenly Peace) which sits to its north, separating it from the Forbidden City. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... James Pavitt was Deputy Director of Operations (DDO) for the CIA, the second high-ranking CIA official until October 2004 when he retired early, after 31 years, citing personal reasons - leading to speculation that the resignations of himself and former Director George Tenet are possibly linked with the Iraq weapons... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is a former United States Director of Central Intelligence. ... Introduction The government of Iraq used, possessed and intended to acquire weapons of mass destruction (WMD) during the reign of Saddam Hussein. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated Islamist terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... A rocket propelled grenade (RPG) is a man-portable, shoulder-launched weapon capable of firing an explosive device longer distances than an otherwise unassisted soldier could throw. ... Overhead view of Sadr City Sadr City (formerly known as Saddam City and Al Thawra) is a vast low-income neighbourhood in northeastern Baghdad, home to some two million Shia Muslims. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ...

June 3, 2004

June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bilderberg Group is an informal, secretive and international association of powerful people, meeting every year. ... Location within Italy Piazza della Scala Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed of Italian regions. ... An aircraft is any machine capable of atmospheric flight. ... Air Traffic Control Towers (ATCTs) at Schiphol Airport Air traffic control (ATC) services are provided by ground based controllers responsible for directing aircraft on the ground and in the air to ensure safe and efficient traffic flow is maintained. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is a former United States Director of Central Intelligence. ... This article is about the CIA official. ... ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is made up of Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela; since 1965, its international headquarters have been in Vienna, Austria. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... August 1st is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ...

June 2, 2004

  • Five aid workers representing Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) are killed in a Taliban ambush in north-western Afghanistan. The workers are one Dutchman, one Belgian, one Norwegian, and two Afghans. The incident leads MSF to temporarily suspend their activities nation-wide, except for life-saving activities. (BBC) (MSF Press Release)
  • In a speech given at the U.S. Air Force Academy, President Bush compares the present War on Terrorism in the Middle East to World War II in Europe. (AP) (BBC)
  • Zhou Zhengyi, the 11th richest businessman in mainland China, is given a three-year jail sentence for stock market fraud. (BBC)
  • Norman Hutchins, who has a fetish for surgical masks becomes the first person in history to be banned from all British hospitals. (BBC)
  • Scaled Composites announces that the world's first private manned space flight is scheduled for June 21, 2004. (BBC)
  • U.S. government prosecutors, preparing for an upcoming trial of four former executives of Merrill Lynch and two former executives of Enron released a document that could prove helpful to the defense -- indicating that the intent of the allegedly fraudulent transaction was, at the least, a bit equivocal. Trial begins Monday. (NYT)

2 June is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Médecins Sans Frontières (abbreviated MSF; known as Doctors Without Borders in English) is a nonprofit private organisation created in 1971 by a small group of French doctors led by Bernard Kouchner. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... Air Force Academy cadets celebrate after graduation in 2003 The United States Air Force Academy, the military academy of the United States Air Force, is located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Zhou Zhengyi (Chinese: 周正毅) (born 1961) is a prominent businessman based in Shanghai, Peoples Republic of China. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... This article concerns the concept of fetishism in anthropology. ... A surgical mask is designed to be worn by health professionals during surgery and at other times to catch the bacteria shed from the wearers mouth and nose. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Scaled Composites (often abbreviated as Scaled) was founded in 1982 in Mojave, California by famous aircraft designer Burt Rutan out of what used to be the Rutan Aircraft Factory. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ...

June 1, 2004

June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan or executive branch of the Republic of China government which currently administers Taiwan. ... Yu Shyi-kun (游錫堃 pinyin: Yóu Xíkūn) (born April 25, 1948), a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, has been Premier of the Republic of China since February 1, 2002. ... The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yùan, literally law-establishing court) is the legislative body of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy, and Matsu Islands. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the tiny New Party (CNP). ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... Ghazi al-Yawer Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer (born 1958? in Mosul, Iraq) is a Vice-President of Iraq under the Iraqi Transitional Government of 2005, and was President of Iraq under the Iraqi Interim Government from 2004 to 2005. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Shia Islam (Arabic: follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 10-15% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The Karachi Port Trust Building Karachi (کراچي) is the largest city of Pakistan and the capital of the province of Sindh. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Stephanie Herseth (born December 3, 1970) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... State nickname: The Mount Rushmore State Other U.S. States Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Governor Mike Rounds Official languages English Area 199,905 km² (17th)  - Land 196,735 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... An Internet service provider (ISP) is a business or organization that offers users access to the Internet and related services. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Various pipes and cigars Tobacco smoking is the act of smoking tobacco products, especially cigarettes and cigars. ... Jennifer Hawkins (born December 22, 1983 in Newcastle, Australia), won the 2004 Miss Universe pageant in Quito, Ecuador on June 1. ... The 2005 Miss Universe Pageant The Miss Universe beauty contest has been held since 1952 (not to be confused with the similar Miss World). ... Quito is the capital city of Ecuador in northwestern South America. ... Jiang Yanyong Jiang Yanyong (Traditional Chinese: 蔣彥永, Simplified Chinese: 蒋彦永, Hanyu Pinyin: Jiǎng Yànyǒng, Wade-Giles: Chiang Yen-yung) (born 4 October 1931) is a Chinese physician from Beijing who publicized a coverup of the SARS epidemic in China. ... The Unknown Rebel — This famous photo, taken by Associated Press photographer Jeff Widener, depicts a lone protester whose actions halted the progress of a column of advancing tanks for over half an hour. ...

Past events by month

2004: January February March April May
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli-Palestinian... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ...


Logarithmic timeline of current events - most important events on last ten years on one page.


News collections and sources

See: Wikipedia:News collections and sources.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Istanbul june 2004 Photo Gallery by Dick Osseman at pbase.com (836 words)
This is a temporary gallery I will use until I have sorted through all pictures from a holiday in June 2004 carrying a new D70 and the "kit" lens as well as the 70-200/2,8 VR zoom (which I find to be outstanding).
I will later, when they are integrated in the main Istanbul gallery, add some more info.
You put Selimiye Mosque in June 2004 Istanbul file, Selimiye Camii is in Edirne not in Istanbul, I would be happy if you correct it.
Blog 702: June 2004 (3962 words)
June 23, 2004) (Ebel, McKay, & Lucero, JJ.).
June 14, 2004) (Seymour, Hartz, & Tymkovich, JJ.).
Ashcroft, No. C 03-4872 PJH (N.D. Cal. June 1, 2004), holding the Partial Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 to be unconstitutional, the media reported the story in the usual way.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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