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Encyclopedia > June 2003


June 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Look up June in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... March 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → // Events March 1, 2003 Iraq disarmament crisis: The Turkish speaker of Parliament voids the vote accepting U.S. troops involved in the planned invasion of Iraq into Turkey on constitutional grounds. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... December 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → Events December 31, 2003 In Taiwan, President Chen Shui-bian signs a law that allows referendums to be held. ...


Events

See also:

Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23 is the basis (parent statute) of a security law proposed by the Hong Kong Government. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was an atypical pneumonia that first appeared in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, in the city of Foshan, of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The following is a timeline of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). ... The Monkeypox virus, first identified in 1958 as a pathogen of cynomolgus monkeys, is an orthopoxvirus with a clinical presentation similar to smallpox. ... Afghanistan timeline June 30, 2003 The United States Air Force announced that F-16 fighter pilot Maj. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The European Union (EU) is an intergovernmental and supranational union of 25 member states. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom Poland Australia South Korea Romania Spain Portugal Italy others. ... // This is the ongoing timeline of the 2003 Iraq war, principally the military actions and consequences of the US-led invasion. ... North Korea has been attempting to obtain nuclear weapons since the late 1970s. ... Insert non-formatted text here</nowiki>The European Union and the United States have strong disagreements over the EUs regulation of genetically modified food. ...

June 1, 2003

June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... G-8 work session; July 20-22, 2001. ... Évian-les-Bains or Évian is a commune of France, in the Haute-Savoie département. ... Three Gorges Dam construction site, downstream side, 26 July 2004 Three Gorges Dam, receiving, upstream side, 26 July 2004 Three Gorges Dam, ship locks for river traffic to bypass the dam, May 2004 The Three Gorges Dam (Simplified Chinese: 三峡大坝; Traditional Chinese: 三峽大壩; pinyin: Sānxiá Dàbà) (30. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... The Railroad Museum of the Niagara Frontier is located in the 1922-built Erie Railroad freigh depot in North Tonawanda, New York. ...

June 2, 2003

June 2 is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... This article is about the country in North America. ... Israeli settlements are Jewish communities in areas under Israeli control as a result of the 1967 Six Day War. ... Morgan Tsvangirai - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation or state. ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of Earth; the term continent here referring to a cultural and political distinction, rather than a physiographic one, thus leading to various perspectives about Europes precise borders. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... The European Space Agency (ESA), established in 1975, is an inter-governmental organisation dedicated to the exploration of space, currently with 17 member states. ... Concept model of the Mars Express spacecraft Mars Express is a Mars exploration mission of the European Space Agency and the first planetary mission attempted by the agency. ... Map showing Baikonurs location in Kazakhstan. ... The FCCs official seal. ... Concentration of media ownership (also known as media consolidation or media convergence) is a commonly used term among media critics, policy makers, and others to characterize ownership structure of media industries. ... DOJ headquarters in Washington, D.C. Justice Department redirects here. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...

June 3, 2003

June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in orange and red—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, and the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are an ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... This article is about the country in North America. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Jean-Pierre Serre (born September 15, 1926) is one of the leading mathematicians of the twentieth century, active in algebraic geometry, number theory and topology. ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ... County Oslo NO-03 District Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² {{{arealand}}} km² 0. ... Amelia Vega, Miss Universe 2003. ... Logo of the Miss Universe event. ... This is about the capital of Panama. ... Samuel (Sammy) Sosa Peralta (born November 12, 1968 in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) is a right fielder in Major League Baseball in free agency. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876-present) Central Division (1994-present) Current uniform Ballpark Wrigley Field (1916-present) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1908 â€¢ 1907 NL Pennants (10) 1945 â€¢ 1938 â€¢ 1935 â€¢ 1932 1929 â€¢ 1918 â€¢ 1910 â€¢ 1908 1907 â€¢ 1906 Central Division titles (1) 2003 East Division titles (2) 1984... In baseball, a corked bat is a specially modified baseball bat that has been filled with cork or similar light, less dense substances to make the bat lighter without losing much power. ... Major league affiliations American League (1998-present) East Division (1998-present) Current uniform Ballpark Tropicana Field (1998-present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None AL Pennants (0) None Division titles (0) None Wild card berths (0) None The Tampa Bay Devil Rays are a Major League Baseball team... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... A cork stopper for a wine bottle Champagne corks Varnished cork tiles can be used for flooring, as a substitute for linoleum or tiles. ...

June 4, 2003

June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... (Hebrew: אֲרִיאֵל שָׁרוֹן, also known by his diminutive Arik) (born February 26, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and a retired general. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known by the kunya Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Martha Stewart (neé Kostrya, born August 3, 1941) is an American business magnate, entrepreneur, and homemaking advocate. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offence. ... A grand jury is a type of jury, in the common law legal system, which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ... Civil securities fraud is a form of white collar crime which has been increasing on the rise as the Internet and the World Wide Web have brought white collar criminals and their victims closer together, resulting in an upsurge in global economic crime. ... Modern Obstruction of Justice, in a common law state, refers to the crime of offering interference of any sort to the work of police, investigators, regulatory agencies, prosecutors, Irvine High School students, or other (usually government) officials. ... In the criminal law, a conspiracy is an agreement between two or more natural persons to break the law at some time in the future, and, in some cases, with at least one overt act in furtherance of that agreement. ... Insider trading is a term often used to refer to a practice, which is illegal in many jurisdictions, in which an investor trades securities of a company (, stocks, bonds or stock options) based on material non-public information which was obtained by an officer, manager, or other corporate insider, during... ImClone Systems Incorporated NASDAQ: IMCL is a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to developing biologic medicines in the area of oncology. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... An iconic image of genetic engineering; this autoluminograph from 1986 of a glowing transgenic tobacco plant bearing the luciferase gene of the firefly, illustrating the possibilities of genetic engineering. ... Trinomial name Gallus gallus domesticus A chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a type of domesticated bird which is often raised as a type of poultry. ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is, along with the United States Senate, one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... Intact dilation and extraction (IDX or Intact D&X), is a surgical abortion procedure wherein an intact fetus is removed from the womb via the cervix. ... The Dow Jones Industrial Average (NYSE: DJI) is one of several stock market indices created by Wall Street Journal editor and Dow Jones & Company founder Charles Dow. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...

June 5, 2003

June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Jürgen W. Möllemann (July 15, 1945 - June 5, 2003) was a German politician. ... In computer security, computer virus is a self-replicating computer program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents. ... It has been suggested that Criticism of Microsoft be merged into this article or section. ... Microsoft Windows is a family of operating systems by Microsoft for use on personal computers, although versions of Windows designed for servers, embedded devices, and other platforms also exist. ... In military terms, a demilitarized zone (DMZ) is an area, usually the frontier or boundary between two or more military powers (or alliances), where military activity is not permitted, usually by peace treaty, armistice or other bilateral or multilateral agreement. ... North Korea, officially the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK; Korean: Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk; Hangul: 조선민주주의인민공화국; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in eastern Asia, covering the northern half of the peninsula of Korea. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as Pope of the Catholic Church from... Pontiff is a title of certain religious leaders. ... Early history The Serbs migrated to the Balkans during the reign of Byzantine emperor Heraclius (610-641). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ... A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... Sars may refer to any of the following: Severe acute respiratory syndrome, commonly abbreviated as SARS Michael Sars, a Norwegian biologist, father of Georg Sars Georg Sars, a Norwegian biologist, son of Michael Sars Special Administrative Regions, commonly abbreviated as SARs Sars, Perm Krai, an urban settlement in Perm Krai... Flag of World Health Organization The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. ... United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In the context of war, a war crime is a punishable offense under International Law, for violations of the laws of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... For other people named Charles Taylor, see Charles Taylor (disambiguation). ... An atrocity (from the Latin atrox, atrocious, from Latin ater = matte black (as distinct from niger = shiny black)) is a term used to describe crimes ranging from an act committed against a single person to one committed against a population or ethnic group. ...

June 6, 2003

  • NASA investigators cracked a reinforced carbon fiber wing by shooting it with a piece of insulation, providing more evidence that falling insulation may have caused the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. [7]

June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NASA logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Shuttle debris falling over Texas, on Time cover The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster was the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia over Texas on February 1, 2003, during reentry into the Earths atmosphere on its 28th mission, STS-107. ...

June 7, 2003

June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Erkki Tuomioja (born 1 July 1946) is the foreign affairs minister of Finland (since 2000). ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation[1] (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe named after the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ... Funny Cide is an American thoroughbred race horse bred at WinStar Farm in Versailles, Kentucky, and born on April 20, 2000 at the McMahon of Saratoga Thoroughbred Farm, owned by Joe and Anne McMahon in the upstate New York town of Saratoga. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... Ten Most Wanted by Joey Yung (容祖兒) Released on 2/25/2006 Tracklisting: 1. ...

June 8, 2003

  • After several days of violence and confusion in Mauritania, Pro-Israeli President Maaouiya Ould Taya appears to have defeated the uprising against him. [8]
  • The Polish referendum on EU enlargement entrance finishes today; 78% of the voters voted to join the EU, with approximately 59% turnout.[9]
  • The presence of the monkeypox virus in the United States is confirmed with 4 cases in Wisconsin, sparking the first discovery of the virus in the Western Hemisphere. Dozens of suspected cases have appeared across three Midwest states, where pet enthusiasts came into contact with infected domestic prairie dogs, which caught the disease from the Gambian giant rat.

June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Maaouya Ould SidAhmed Taya Maaouya Ould SidAhmed Taya (Arabic: ) (b. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Monkeypox virus, first identified in 1958 as a pathogen of cynomolgus monkeys, is an orthopoxvirus with a clinical presentation similar to smallpox. ... A common alternate meaning of virus is computer virus. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Species Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidens Prairie dogs are small stout-bodied burrowing rodents with shallow cheek pouches native to both North and Central America. ... Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ...

June 9, 2003

June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (born 29 September 1936) is an Italian politician, entrepreneur, and media proprietor. ... A mummy is a corpse whose skin and dried flesh have been preserved by either intentional or accidental exposure to chemicals, extreme cold or dryness, or airlessness. ... Bust of Nefertiti from Berlins Altes Museum. ... View over the East Valley The Valley of the Kings, or Wadi el-Muluk (وادي الملوك) in Arabic, is a valley in Egypt where tombs were built for the Pharaohs and powerful nobles of the New Kingdom, the Eighteenth through Twentieth Dynasties of Ancient Egypt. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Motto: Nickname: Map Political Statistics Founded 1745 Incorporated County Frederick County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Jennifer Dougherty Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Water 59. ... A letter sent to Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle containing weaponized anthrax powder caused the death of two postal workers. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left) versus Rafael Ortíz Boxing, also called pugilism, prizefighting (when referring to professional boxing) or the sweet science (a common nickname among fans), is a sport in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their fists in a series... George Edward Foreman (b. ... This is a list of notable male boxers. ... The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame is located in Canastota, New York, United States, within driving distance from the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown and the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in the Continental Airlines Arena of the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... Stanley Cup on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Stanley Cup, originally called the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup, is awarded each year by the National Hockey League to the champion of its playoff tournament. ... The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, commonly referred to as the Anaheim Mighty Ducks, are a professional ice hockey team based in Anaheim, California. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Official languages English, French Flower Violet Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Bernard Lord (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 10 10 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 11th 72 908 km² 71 450 km² 1... Bernard Lord, LL.B. , BA (born September 27, 1965 in Roberval, Quebec) is a Canadian politician. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of New Brunswick is a right-of-centre political party in New Brunswick, Canada. ... Shawn Graham (born February 22, 1968 in Kent County, New Brunswick, Canada) is a New Brunswick politician. ... The New Brunswick Liberal Association (NBLA) is one of the two major political parties in the Canadian provice of New Brunswick. ... Results of the 2003 election Starting out as a predicted landslide for Bernard Lords Progressive Conservatives, the New Brunswick general election, 2003 quickly turned around when Shawn Graham, leader of the Liberal Party of New Brunswick, took on auto insurance rates as a cause. ... The New Brunswick New Democratic Party is a social democratic political party in New Brunswick, Canada that is linked with the federal New Democratic Party of Canada. ...

June 10, 2003

June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... For other uses, see Ronald Reagan (disambiguation). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... It has been suggested that Assistant to the President of the United States be merged into this article or section. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... When normal cells are damaged beyond repair, they are eliminated by apoptosis. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (French has some legal status but is not fully co-official) Flower White trillium Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats... A marriage is a relationship between or among individuals, usually recognized by civil authority and/or bound by the religious beliefs of the participants. ... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ... World homosexuality laws Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same gender. ...

June 11, 2003

  • Three 160,000 year old human skulls unearthed in Ethiopia bridge an important gap in the human fossil record and lend support to the "out of Africa" single origin theory of human evolution. [13]
  • Masquerading as an Orthodox Jew, a suicide bomber blows up a bus in Jerusalem, Israel, killing at least sixteen people. An Israeli helicopter attack in the Gaza Strip kills at least seven. [14]
  • Same-sex marriage in Canada: The attorney general of Ontario announces that his government will conform to yesterday's court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage in that province.
  • US Baseball: Six Houston Astros pitchers combine to pitch a no-hitter against the New York Yankees. The game sets several records, including the most pitchers to combine for a no-hitter in Major League Baseball history, and a record for the Yankees for the most sequential games without being no-hit. [15]

June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Fossil. ... In paleoanthropology, the single-origin hypothesis (or Out-of-Africa model) is one of two accounts of the origin of anatomically modern humans, Homo sapiens. ... Human evolution is the part of the theory of evolution by which human beings emerged as a distinct species. ... Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary... Jerusalem (Hebrew: , Yerushaláyim or Yerushalaim; Arabic: , al-Quds; official Arabic in Israel: أورشليم القدس, Urshalim-Al-Quds) is Israels capital, most populous, [1] and largest city, with a population of 724,000 (as of May 24, 2006 [2]) contained in 123 km². An ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (French has some legal status but is not fully co-official) Flower White trillium Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats... This article is about the country in North America. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962-present) Central Division (1994-present) Current uniform Ballpark Minute Maid Park (2002-present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None NL Pennants (1) 2005 Central Division titles (4) 2001 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1997 West Division titles (2) [1][2] 1986 â€¢ 1980 Wild card berths... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Current uniform Ballpark Yankee Stadium (1923-present) Major league titles World Series titles (26) 2000 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1996 1978 â€¢ 1977 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1961 1958 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1953 â€¢ 1952 1951 â€¢ 1950 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 1943 â€¢ 1941 â€¢ 1939 â€¢ 1938 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1932 â€¢ 1928 1927... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ...

June 12, 2003

June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Thomas F. Reilly (February 14, 1942) is the Massachusetts attorney general. ... Luke R Thompson (born August 13, 1984), an American, while a sophomore at Babson College, was sued along with his company Mainline Airways, a tour-operator, in June 2003 for selling travel through his company Mainline Airways LLC. Shortly upon the filing of the suit, the company declared that it... Mainline Airways was an alleged fraud run in 2003 by an American college student, whom authorities said pretended to be an airline company offering cheap tickets between Honolulu and Los Angeles, without the ability to actually provide the flights. ... Ticket (unseperated) of the Kurkino in Berchtesgaden CeBIT Home 1998 student day ticket with barcode A Parisians transport ticket Ticket can mean one of several things: // Permission A ticket is a voucher to indicate that one has paid for admission to a theatre, movie theater, amusement park, zoo, museum... Dr. Zahi Hawass signs an autograph (Aug. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Bust of Nefertiti from Berlins Altes Museum. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, is recognized as the leading United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people. ... This article is about the country in North America. ... The Monkeypox virus, first identified in 1958 as a pathogen of cynomolgus monkeys, is an orthopoxvirus with a clinical presentation similar to smallpox. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the head of Her Majestys Government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the UK Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... The Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA) is a United Kingdom government department. ... Peter Gerald Hain (born February 16, 1950, Nairobi, Kenya) is a British Labour Party politician, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Secretary of State for Wales. ... John Reid (born 8 May 1947) is a British politician who is Home Secretary and Member of Parliament for Scottish the constituency of Airdrie and Shotts. ... The Rt Hon. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged. ... ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვილი; see Other names section) (December 21, 1879[1] – March 5, 1953) was a Bolshevik revolutionary and leader of the Soviet Union. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Fishers of Men, oil on panel by Adriaen van de Venne (1614) Various religious symbols Religion is a human phenomenon that defies easy definition. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by...

June 13, 2003

June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. ... This is not related to the horror film Cabin Fever. ... Natural olive oil Synthetic motor oil Oil, in a general sense, is a chemical compound that is not miscible with water, and is in a liquid state at ambient temperatures. ... Baiji is a city of about 60,000 inhabitants in northern Iraq some 130 miles north of Baghdad, on the main road to Mosul. ... A large bonfire. ... This article is about the country in North America. ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: ‎ translit: , Kurdish: Bexda, from Persian Baagh-daad or Bag-Da-Du meaning “Garden of God” [1]) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Sheikh Ahmed Ismail Yassin (~1937 — March 22, 2004) was the leader of Hamas until he was killed by an Israeli helicopter gunship. ... Assassination is the deliberate killing of an important person, usually a political figure or other strategically important individual. ... Abud Sarhan is an Iraqi shepherd, who is suing US Army General Franks and Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld after 17 family members were killed during the 2003 invasion of Iraq — two missiles hit his camp near Al-Altash (also killing 200 sheep) on April 4, 2003. ... In a draw in a mountainous region, a shepherd guides a flock of about 20 sheep amidst scrub and olive trees. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... General Tommy R. Franks (USCENTCOM photo) Tommy Ray Franks (born June 17, 1945) is a retired General in the United States Army, previously serving as the Commander-in-Chief of United States Central Command, overseeing United States Armed Forces operations in a 25-country region, including the Middle East. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932, Evanston, Illinois), the 21st United States Secretary of Defense. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom Poland Australia South Korea Romania Spain Portugal Italy others. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Thomas F. Reilly (February 14, 1942) is the Massachusetts attorney general. ... Luke R Thompson (born August 13, 1984), an American, while a sophomore at Babson College, was sued along with his company Mainline Airways, a tour-operator, in June 2003 for selling travel through his company Mainline Airways LLC. Shortly upon the filing of the suit, the company declared that it... Mainline Airways was an alleged fraud run in 2003 by an American college student, whom authorities said pretended to be an airline company offering cheap tickets between Honolulu and Los Angeles, without the ability to actually provide the flights. ... Ticket (unseperated) of the Kurkino in Berchtesgaden CeBIT Home 1998 student day ticket with barcode A Parisians transport ticket Ticket can mean one of several things: // Permission A ticket is a voucher to indicate that one has paid for admission to a theatre, movie theater, amusement park, zoo, museum... This article is about the country in North America. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892-present) Central Division (1994-present) Current uniform Ballpark Busch Stadium (III) (2006-present) Major league titles World Series titles (9) 1982 â€¢1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934 â€¢ 1931 1926 NL Pennants (16) 2004 â€¢ 1987 â€¢ 1985 â€¢ 1982 1968 â€¢ 1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1943 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Current uniform Ballpark Yankee Stadium (1923-present) Major league titles World Series titles (26) 2000 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1996 1978 â€¢ 1977 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1961 1958 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1953 â€¢ 1952 1951 â€¢ 1950 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 1943 â€¢ 1941 â€¢ 1939 â€¢ 1938 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1932 â€¢ 1928 1927... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962 in Dayton, Ohio), nicknamed The Rocket, is one of the preeminent Major League baseball pitchers of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, and is widely considered to be one of the greatest pitchers of all time[1]. He has won seven Cy Young Awards... In Major League Baseball, the 3000 strikeout club is an informal term applied to the group of pitchers who have struck out 3000 or more batters in their careers. ... In Major League Baseball, the 300 win club is an informal term applied to the group of pitchers who have won 300 or more games in their careers. ...

June 14, 2003

June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

June 15, 2003

June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bündnis 90/Die Grünen (literally: Alliance 90/The Greens), the German Green Party, is a political party in Germany whose regional predecessors were founded in the late 1970s as part of the new social movements. ... The head of government of Germany has been known as the Chancellor (German: Kanzler) ever since the creation of the post. ... Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944), German politician, was Chancellor of Germany from 1998 to 2005. ... The Agenda 2010 is a series of reforms planned and executed by the German government which they say will modernise the German social system and labour market. ... The San Antonio Spurs are an American professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... A basketball game at Edwards Air Force Base Basketball is a sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points on one other by throwing a ball through a hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... The New Jersey Nets are a professional basketball team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... Genetic linkage occurs when particular alleles are inherited together. ... In biology, mutations are changes to the genetic material (usually DNA or RNA). ... In 2003, a group of American and Canadian researchers published a paper that used gene linkage techniques to identify a mutation in the GRK3 gene as a possible cause of up to 10% of cases of bipolar disorder. ... Bipolar disorder (previously known as manic depression) is a diagnostic category describing a class of mood disorders in which the person experiences states or episodes of depression and/or mania, hypomania, and/or mixed states. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

June 16, 2003

June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

June 17, 2003

June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Linus Benedict Torvalds (born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of Linux. ... Transmeta NASDAQ: TMTA develops computing technologies with focus on reducing power consumption in electronic devices. ... Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) was founded in 2000 and has investment backing from Computer Associates, Fujitsu, Hitachi, Ltd. ... Linux (also known as GNU/Linux) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (French has some legal status but is not fully co-official) Flower White trillium Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats... World homosexuality laws Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same gender. ... Jean Chrétien (born January 11, 1934), was the twentieth Prime Minister Of Canadal, serving from November 4, 1892 to December 12, 2003. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Child abuse is the physical or psychological maltreatment of a child by an adult often synonymous with the term child maltreatment or the term child abuse and neglect. ... The World Wide Association of Specialty Programs and Schools (WWASPS or WWASP) is a Utah, United States based organization that runs programs that they claim can correct what is perceived as inappropriate behavior by children as young as 12. ... Not to be confused with Kyoto Kyodo News (共同通信社) is a nonprofit cooperative news agency based in Minato-ku, Tokyo. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... Ramădī (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... To help compare orders of magnitude; this page lists lengths between 100 and 1,000 km (105 and 106 m). ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: ‎ translit: , Kurdish: Bexda, from Persian Baagh-daad or Bag-Da-Du meaning “Garden of God” [1]) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Child custody and guardianship are the legal terms used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and child, including e. ...

June 18, 2003

June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Prime Minister 2003, MEP 2004- Anneli Tuulikki Jäätteenmäki (Master of Laws, born February 11, 1955 in Lapua) was the first female Prime Minister of Finland, in office April 17th, 2003, to June 18th, 2003. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... A bounty hunter is an individual who seeks out fugitives (hunting) for a monetary reward (bounty), for apprehending by law, if such laws exist. ... Duane Dog Chapman Dog Chapman and wife Beth during their visit aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz. ... Andrew Stuart Luster (b. ... The cosmetic firm Max Factor was named after Max Factor, Sr (b. ... Puerto Vallarta Puerto Vallarta (literally, Port Vallarta) is a city in the state of Jalisco, México. ... The Boeing 727 is a large, single-aisle (narrow-body) commercial jet airliner carrying as many as 189 passengers. ... The Federal Aviation Administration is the entity of the United States government which regulates and oversees all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. // Activities Along with the European Joint Aviation Authorities, the FAA is one of the two main agencies worldwide responsible for the certification of new aircraft. ...

June 19, 2003

June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System is a US Department of Defense Missile Defense Agency program to develop a rudimentary missile defense system, covering the US, by 2005. ...

June 20, 2003

June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... George Galloway George Galloway, MP (born 16 August 1954) is a Scottish and British politician noted for his socialist views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic: ), (born April 28, 1937 ), was the President of Iraq from 1979 until the United States-led invasion of Iraq reached Baghdad on April 9, 2003. ... The Houston Chronicle is a daily newspaper in Houston, Texas, United States. ... NASA logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Nearly sixty countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation, which sets rules on governmental secrecy. ... Shuttle debris falling over Texas, on Time cover The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster was the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia over Texas on February 1, 2003, during reentry into the Earths atmosphere on its 28th mission, STS-107. ...

June 21, 2003

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the book. ... Cover of the first book in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone (British version) Harry Potter is a popular series of fantasy novels by British writer J. K. Rowling. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... Albert P. Hall (born November 10, 1937 in Boothton, Alabama) is an African-American actor. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of England and of the United Kingdom. ...

June 22, 2003

  • Real Madrid clinches the Primera división, the top football league in Spain, beating Real Sociedad by two points. The very next day, Real fires its manager, Vicente Del Bosque
  • Hundreds of US troops raid Iraqi homes in the town of Ramadi, fired up by the Ride of the Valkyries coming through loudspeakers, in a scene which Reuters reporter Alistair Lyon describes as "a bizarre musical reprise from Vietnam war film Apocalypse Now." Meanwhile a group identifying itself as the Iraqi National Front of Fedayeen announces to increase attacks on US troops if they refuse to leave the occupied country. [25]

June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Real Madrid C.F. is a Spanish sports club best known for its football team which was ranked as The 20th Centurys Best Club by FIFA. The club, which went in place of the Spanish FA, was also one of the founding members of FIFA. They play their home... Liga de Fútbol Profesional The Spanish football league is called La Liga. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Real Sociedad is a Spanish football club from the Basque city of San Sebastián/Donostia in Guipúzcoa/Gipuzkoa. ... Mosque in downtown Ramadi Ramădī (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American film about the Vietnam War directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a script by Coppola, John Milius and Michael Herr, which was inspired by Joseph Conrads classic novella Heart of Darkness. ...

June 23, 2003

  • The U.S. Supreme Court issues opinions in Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz and Hamacher v. Bollinger, challenges to the affirmative action admissions policies at the University of Michigan. In Grutter, the Court held that the University of Michigan Law School's admissions policy, which considered race as one of a number of "soft" admissions factors on a case-by-case basis, was constitutional. In Gratz, the Court held that the undergraduate affirmative action admissions policy, which was based on a point system and was more rigid than the Law School's, was unconstitutional. [26]
  • In Peekskill, New York, a 10 month old baby girl survives a seven story fall. Her father, Willie Williams, takes her to the hospital, where she was treated for bruises and cuts, but Mr. Williams is later arrested on charges of attempted murder. [27]
  • Human Rights Watch calls for a criminal investigation into Israeli Prime MinisterAriel Sharon's alleged role in the massacre of civilians in the Palestinian refugee camps of Sabra and Shatilla.

June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175 th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ... Holding University of Michigan Law School admissions program that gave bonus points for certain racial minorities did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment Court membership Case opinions Laws applied U.S. Const. ... Holding A state universitys admission policy violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment because its ranking system gave an automatic point increase to all racial minorities rather than making individual determinations. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... Peekskill is a city located in Westchester County, New York. ... Human Rights Watch Banner Human Rights Watch is a United States-based international non-governmental organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights. ... (Hebrew: אֲרִיאֵל שָׁרוֹן, also known by his diminutive Arik) (born February 26, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and a retired general. ... Autocars Co. ...

June 24, 2003

June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Military Police (RMP) is the military police branch of the British Army. ... Species see text Amara (Bonelli, 1810) is a large genus of carabid beetles (family Carabidae), mostly holarctic, but a few species are neotropical or occurring in eastern Asia. ... An ambush is a long established military tactic in which an ambushing force uses concealment to attack an enemy that passes its position. ...

June 25, 2003

June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

June 26, 2003

June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Marc-Vivien Foé Marc-Vivien Foé (May 1, 1975 – June 26, 2003) was a Cameroonian midfield football player, born in Nkolo, Centre Province, Cameroon. ... The Confederations Cup The FIFA Confederations Cup is a football (soccer) tournament for national teams, held every four years (previously every two years) by FIFA. It is contested by the winners of each of the six FIFA confederation championships (CAF, CONMEBOL, UEFA, AFC, OFC, CONCACAF), along with the FIFA World... Three of the main sights in Lyon, the Cathedral St-Jean, the Basilica Notre Dame de Fourvière, and the Tour métallique de Fourvière City flag City coat of arms Motto: (Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon the best) Coordinates : , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) Administration Subdivisions 9... Olympique Lyonnais (sometimes abbreviated to OL or Lyon) is a French football club founded in 1950. ... Manchester City Football Club are an English football club based in the city of Manchester. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ... Holding A Texas law prohibiting homosexual sodomy violated the liberty under the Fourteenth Amendment of adults to engage in private intimate conduct. ... The word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings over time. ... The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution is one of the post-Civil War amendments and it includes the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses. ... A sodomy law is a law which defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Torture is any act by which severe pain, whether physical or psychological, is intentionally inflicted on a person as a means of intimidation, deterrence, revenge, punishment, or information gathering. ...

June 27, 2003

  • The Federal Trade Commission opens the National Do Not Call Registry. This registry gives consumers an opportunity to limit the telemarketing calls they receive. On October 1, 2003, when the National Do Not Call Registry will be enforced, most telemarketers will be required to remove the numbers on the registry from their call lists. See http://donotcall.gov/ or call 1-888 382-1222 for registration. [32], [33]
  • The Boston Red Sox establish a new Major League Baseball record by scoring 10 runs before recording their first out of the game against the Florida Marlins in Boston. Marlins pitcher Kevin Olsen was injured by a line-drive hit and taken to a local hospital, where he was admitted in good condition. The Red Sox beat the Marlins, 25-8.
  • One day after its Lawrence v. Texas ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court remands the case of Matthew Limon to the Kansas Court of Appeals. Limon was sentenced to 17 years in prison for engaging in consensual oral sex with a 14-year-old boy when he was 18 years old. Kansas law treats homosexual acts differently from heterosexual ones; had he engaged in sex with a girl, he would have been sentenced to 13 to 15 months, possibly without serving any time at all. Lawrence v. Texas calls into question the constitutionality of laws that discriminate between homosexual and heterosexual acts. [34]

June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... FTC headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Federal Trade Commission (or FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act. ... On June 27, 2003 the U.S. Federal Trade Commission opened the National Do Not Call Registry in order to comply with the Do-Not-Call Implementation Act. ... Consumers are individuals or households that consume goods and services generated within the economy. ... Telemarket Office // Early History Telemarketing is a registered trademark owned by Nadji Tehrani who founded TeleMarketing Magazine in 1982. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Current uniform Ballpark Fenway Park (1912-present) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 2004 â€¢ 1918 â€¢ 1916 â€¢ 1915 1912 â€¢ 1903 AL Pennants (11) 2004 â€¢ 1986 â€¢ 1975 â€¢ 1967 1946 â€¢ 1918 â€¢ 1916 â€¢ 1915 1912 â€¢ 1904 â€¢ 1903 East Division titles (5) 1995... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations National League (1993-present) East Division (1993-present) Current uniform Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993-present) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 2003 â€¢ 1997 NL Pennants (2) 2003 â€¢ 1997 East Division titles (0) None Wild card berths (2) 2003 â€¢ 1997 The Florida Marlins are a Major League... Boston is a town and small port c. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to either make contact with it or draw a... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Holding A Texas law prohibiting homosexual sodomy violated the liberty under the Fourteenth Amendment of adults to engage in private intimate conduct. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Consensus has two common meanings. ... Oral sex (from Latin os, oris mouth) consists of all the sexual activities that involve the use of the mouth and tongue, to stimulate genitalia. ... A boy is a young and/or in some way immature male human (usually child or adolescent), as contrasted to its female counterpart, which is called girl; or a young male of another animal or male object. ... Official language(s) English Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq. ... See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Heterosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love or sexual desire exclusively for members of the opposite sex or gender, contrasted with homosexuality and distinguished from bisexuality and asexuality. ... Coition of a Hemisected Man and Woman (c. ... Two Tamil girls in Tiruvannamalai. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ...

June 28, 2003

June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... A pond is a body of water smaller than a lake. ... Motto: Nickname: Map Political Statistics Founded 1745 Incorporated County Frederick County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Jennifer Dougherty Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Water 59. ... A letter sent to Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle containing weaponized anthrax powder caused the death of two postal workers. ... This racing bicycle is built using lightweight, shaped aluminium tubing and carbon fiber stays and forks. ... Loggers on break, c. ... See also: street sign theft External links http://homepages. ... A coin is usually a piece of hard material, generally metal and usually in the shape of a disc, which is issued by a government to be used as a form of money. ... Spinner lure with ring, dish, body/weight and hook In terms of sport fishing, a lure is an object, often designed to resemble fish prey, equipped with one or many hooks that is used to catch fish. ... A handgun is a firearm small enough to be carried and used in one hand. ... SOiL is a five-piece aggressive rock/Nu Metal band from Chicago, formed in 1997 by ex-members of renowned death metal acts Broken Hope and Oppressor. ...

June 29, 2003

  • Actress Katharine Hepburn dies of natural causes at the age of 96 at her family home in

Old Saybrook, Connecticut. June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic four-time Academy Award-winning American star of film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ...


June 30, 2003


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