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Encyclopedia > July 2005

To read and write about current events in detail, please visit our sister project, Wikinews. Wikinews logo. ...

Time: 17:40 UTC  |  Date: August 18
Selected world times (DST adjusted):   Cairo: +3
Frankfurt: +2   Hong Kong: +8   Johannesburg: +2
London: +1   Vancouver: -7   Melbourne: +11
Mexico City: -6   Moscow: +4   New Delhi: +5.5
New York: -4   Rio de Janeiro: -3   Singapore: +8
Tokyo: +9   Wellington: +12
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Other current events
World - Sci-Tech - Sports
current events by region
See also: Wikinews

Ongoing events

• 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes
2005 Maharashtra floods
2005 Gujarat Flood
Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan
Fuel prices
Gomery Comm. (Sponsorship scandal)
Bagram torture and prisoner abuse
Downing Street memo
Angola Marburg virus outbreak
European Constitution Ratification
London bombings investigation
Zimbabwe Home Clearances
2005 Philippine electoral crisis
Plame CIA leak investigation
• 2005 Maccabiah Games
2005 Niger food crisis
Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time or Greenwich Mean Time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Daylight saving time (also called DST, or summer time) is the portion of the year in which a regions local time is advanced by (usually) one hour from its official standard time. ... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; romanized: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ...   Frankfurt am Main? [ˈfraÅ‹kfÊŠrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany. ... City motto: Unity in Development Province Gauteng Mayor Amos Masondo Area  - % water 1,644 km² 0. ... St. ... Members of Parliament Libby Davies, Ujjal Dosanjh, David Emerson, Hedy Fry, Stephen Owen Members of the Legislative Assembly Gordon Campbell, David Chudnovsky, Adrian Dix, Colin Hansen, Jenny Kwan, Lorne Mayencourt, Wally Oppal, Gregor Robertson, Shane Simpson, Carole Taylor Mayor Larry Campbell Governing Body Vancouver City Council Latitude: Longitude: 49°16... The City of Melbournes coat of arms Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia (after Sydney), with a population of 3,600,650 in the Melbourne metropolitan area (June 2004) and 61,670 in the City of... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... Saint Basils Cathedral and Spasskaya Tower of Moscow Kremlin at Red Square. ... This article is about the city which is the capital of India. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Ipanema beach Cristo Redentor A NASA satellite image of Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro (meaning River of January in Portuguese) is the name of both a state and a city in southeastern Brazil. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... Wellington (Te Whanganui-a-Tara or Poneke) is the capital city of New Zealand and the countrys second-largest urban area. ... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes of 2005 • Bagram torture and prisoner abuse • Cindy Sheehan Crawford Protest • Downing Street memo • Edinburgh Festival • European Constitution ratification • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... Todays featured article • Technetium Deaths in August • None entered Other recent deaths Ongoing events • STS-114 mission • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season • 2005 Pacific hurricane season Upcoming events • August 8: Landing of STS-114 • August 10: Launch of MRO spacecraft Related pages • 2005 in science • 2004 in science • 2003 in... // World - global Current events Wikinews Africa Africa Asia and the Middle East China Hong Kong and Macao India Iraq Israel and the West Bank Region Malaysia and Singapore Pakistan The Americas Canada USA Oceania Australia and New Zealand Europe EU Poland Great Britain and Ireland Categories: Section stubs | Current events... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1, 2005, and will last through November 30, 2005. ... The 2005 Pacific hurricane season officially began May 15, 2005 in the eastern Pacific and June 1, 2005 in the central Pacific, and will last until November 30, 2005. ... Image from the Times of India The Maharashtra floods of 2005 refers to the flooding of many parts of the Indian state of Maharashtra including large areas of the metropolis of Mumbai (formerly Bombay), a city located on the coast of the Arabian Sea, on the western coast of India... Heavy Monsoon rains starting later June, 2005 in Gujarat created major flooding affecting many parts of the state. ... A part of the Global Loop at Expo 2005 Expo 2005 is the Worlds Fair held in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, east of the city of Nagoya. ... Aichi Prefecture (愛知県 Aichi-ken) is located in the Chubu region of Japan. ... Oil price in 2003-2005 Oil prices from 1860-1999 in 1999 dollars. ... The Gomery Commission, formally the Commission of Inquiry into the Sponsorship Program and Advertising Activities, is a federal Canadian commission headed by the retired Justice John Gomery for the purpose of investigating the sponsorship scandal, which involves allegations of corruption within the Canadian government. ... The sponsorship scandal or AdScam is an ongoing scandal that may lead to the collapse of the current government of Canada. ... In 2005, a 2,000-page U.S. Army report confirmed the abuse, torture and death of two unarmed civilian Afghan prisoners by U.S. armed forces in 2002. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Downing Street memo The Downing Street memo (occasionally DSM), sometimes described by critics of the Iraq War as the smoking gun memo, allegedly contains the minutes of a secret 23 July 2002 meeting among United Kingdom government, defence and intelligence figures, discussing... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... Family photo of European leaders at the signing of the constitutional treaty in Rome This article discusses the history of the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, which was signed in 2004 and is currently awaiting ratification by European Union member states. ... On Thursday 7 July 2005 a series of four bomb attacks struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Operation Murambatsvina (Shona for Operation Drive Out Trash), also referred to as Operation Restore Order, began as a crackdown against illegal trading and illegal housing, conducted by the government of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe. ... President Arroyo during her televised message regarding the alleged wiretapped tapes President Arroyo during the State of the Nation Address, July 25 An electoral crisis emerged in the Philippines in June 2005. ... It has been suggested that Valerie Plame be merged into this article or section. ... The Maccabiah Games is an international Jewish athletic event similar to the Olympics. ... The 2005 Niger food crisis is a severe but localized food security crisis in the regions of northern Maradi, Tahoua, Tillabéri, and Zinder of Niger. ...

Upcoming events

September 6: John Roberts hearings September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... John G. Roberts, Jr. ...

Deaths in July

July 31: Wim Duisenberg
July 31: John Garang
July 24: Francis Ona
July 24: Sir Richard Doll
July 23: Catherine Woolley
July 22: George Wallace
July 21: Long John Baldry
July 20: James Doohan
July 18: Amy Gillett
July 18: John Tyndall
July 18: William Westmoreland
July 17: Edward Heath
July 11: Gretchen Franklin
July 9: Rafiq Zakaria
July 6: L. Patrick Gray
July 6: Claude Simon
July 5: James Stockdale
July 4: Hank Stram
July 3: Nan Kempner
July 3: Gaylord Nelson
July 1: Luther Vandross
July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... Order: 1st President Nationality: Dutch Vice President: Christian Noyer Lucas Papademos Term of office: June 1, 1998 – October 31, 2003 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: Jean-Claude Trichet Willem Frederik Duisenberg, commonly known as Wim Duisenberg, (July 9, 1935 – July 31, 2005) was a Dutch banker and politician. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... John Garang, August 2004 Dr. John Garang de Mabior (June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005) was the vice president of Sudan and former leader of the rebel Sudan Peoples Liberation Army. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... Francis Ona Francis Ona (1953 - July 24, 2005) was a Bougainvillean seccessionist leader who led an uprising against the Government of Papua New Guinea motivated at least initially by his concerns over the operation of the Panguna mine by Bouganville Copper, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... Sir Richard Doll Professor Sir William Richard Shaboe Doll, KBE CH FRS (28 October 1912–24 July 2005) was a British epidemiologist, physiologist, and a pioneer in the research linking smoking to health problems, being the first in the world to prove that smoking caused lung cancer, and increased the... July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... July 22 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... Long John Baldry, (January 12, 1941 – July 21, 2005) was a pioneering British blues musician. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... James Doohan as Scotty on Star Trek James Montgomery Doohan (March 3, 1920 – July 20, 2005) was a Canadian character and voice actor best known for his portrayal of Scotty in the television and movie series Star Trek. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... Amy Gillett Amy Gillett (January 9, 1976 - July 18, 2005) was an Australian cyclist and rower who represented Australia in both sports before her untimely death in a training accident when a motorist crashed into the Australian squad of cyclists she was training with. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... John Tyndall John Hutchyns Tyndall (July 14, 1934 – July 19, 2005) was a far-right British nationalist politician best known for leading the National Front in the 1970s and for founding the British National Party in the 1980s. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... General William Westmoreland William Childs Westmoreland (March 26, 1914 – July 18, 2005) was a U.S. Army General who commanded American military operations in the Vietnam War from 1964 to 1968 and who served as US Army Chief of Staff from 1968 to 1972. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... The Right Honourable Sir Edward (Ted) Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... Gretchen Franklin (July 7, 1911 – July 11, 2005) was an English actress. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... Book authored by Zakaria Dr. Rafiq Zakaria (5 April 1920-9 July 2005) was an Indian politician and Islamic scholar. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... Louis Patrick Gray III (July 18, 1916 – July 6, 2005) was acting director of the FBI from 1972-73. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... Claude Simon (10 October 1913 - 6 July 2005) was the 1985 Nobel Laureate in Literature who in his novels combined the poets and the painters creativeness with a deepened awareness of time in the depiction of the human condition. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale (December 23, 1923 – July 5, 2005) was one of the most highly decorated officers in the history of the United States Navy. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... Hank Stram being carried off of the field Hank Stram (January 3, 1923 - July 4, 2005), was a former American Football coach. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... Nan Kempner (July 24, 1930-July 3, 2005) was a New York City socialite, famous for dominating society events, shopping, charity work and fashion. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... Gaylord Nelson Gaylord Anton Nelson (June 4, 1916 - July 3, 2005) was an American politician. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... Luther Vandross Luther Vandross (born Luther Ronzoni Vandross Jr. ...

Upcoming elections

August 2: OH 2nd Congressional District (U.S.)
August 31: Singapore presidential
September 12: Norwegian parliamentary
September 17: New Zealand general
September 18: German federal
September 25: Polish parliamentary
October 9: Polish presidential
TBD: CA 48th Congressional District (U.S.)
The following is a list of figures who died in 2005. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... Ohio Second Congressional District Election, 2005 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining, as the final day of August. ... The Singapore presidential election of 2005 will be held on 27 August 2005 to elect the President of Singapore. ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, is scheduled for 12 September 2005. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... The 2005 New Zealand general election will be a nation-wide election for the New Zealand Parliament, and is to be held on 17 September 2005. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... The German federal election of 2005 will be held on 18 September 2005 to elect members to the Bundestag (lower house) of Germany, following the unsuccessful motion of confidence in Gerhard Schröder on 1 July . ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... A general election to the Sejm is not scheduled yet, but there are two options: in spring, probably June 19, 2005 (or other Sunday in June) as it was promised in electoral campaign by winning party SLD, now as the support for ruling party goes down they opt for the... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). ... Presidential elections will be held in Poland on October 9, 2005. ... An election is to be held in the 48th Congressional District of California to choose a United States Representative to replace Christopher Cox, who is expected to resign soon now that the Senate has confirmed him as Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ...

Recent election results

June 1: Dutch EC referendum
June 17: Iran presidential
June 24: Iran presidential runoff
July 3: Albanian general election
July 10: Kyrgyz presidential
July 16: Kuomintang Chairmanship
July 24: Guinea-Bissau presidential
The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... The Dutch referendum on the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe is a referendum to be held on 1 June 2005 to decide whether the Netherlands should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. ... June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... The Iranian presidential election of 2005, the ninth presidential election in Iranian history, took place in two rounds, first on June 17, 2005, and then as a run-off on June 24. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... The Iranian presidential election of 2005, the ninth presidential election in Iranian history, took place in two rounds, first on June 17, 2005, and then as a run-off on June 24. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... Albania will be holding its parliamentary elections in an undefined date between the 3rd of July and the 3rd of August 2005. ... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... Kyrgyzstan held a presidential election on 10 July 2005. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... The Chinese Kuomintang chairmanship election of 2005 was held on July 16, 2005 in the Republic of China (Taiwan) between Ma Ying-jeou and Wang Jin-pyng. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... Guinea-Bissau held a presidential election on 19 June 2005, and a second round run-off vote was held on 24 July. ...

Ongoing armed conflicts

Arab-Israeli conflict (Al-Aqsa Intifada)
Conflict in Chechnya
Second Congo War
Conflict in Iraq (Occupation of Iraq)
Darfur conflict in Sudan
Civil war in Côte d'Ivoire Israel and the Arab League states The Arab-Israeli conflict is a long-running conflict in the Middle East regarding the existence of the state of Israel and its relations with Arab states and with the Palestinian population (see Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The wreckage of a commuter bus in West Jerusalem after a suicide bombing on Tuesday, 18 June 2002. ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn [Nokhchiyn] Respublika, Russian: Чеченская Республика), informal Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno, Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... The Second Congo War was a conflict taking place largely in the territory of Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) that began in 1998 and officially ended in 2002. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Armed insurgents French troops try to separate the belligerents. ...

Upcoming holidays
and observances

August

1: Emancipation Day (Trinidad and Tobago)
1: Civic Holiday (Canada)
9: National Day (Singapore)
14: Tisha B'Av (Judaism)
15: Dormition of the Theotokos (Eastern Orthodox)
15: Assumption of Mary (Roman Catholic)
29: Late Summer Holiday (UK)
List of wars - List of wars before 1000 - List of wars 1000-1499 - List of wars 1500-1799 - List of wars 1800-1899 - List of wars 1900-1945 - List of wars 1945-1989 - List of recent wars List of wars from 1990 1990- 1991 Gulf War 1990- 1992 Rwanda Civil... August 1st is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... Emancipation Day is a national holiday in Trinidad and Tobago which celebrates the Emancipation of slaves in the British Empire on August 1, 1834. ... August 1st is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... In Canada, there are two definitions to the term Civic Holiday. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... The National Day is a designated date on which celebrations mark the nationhood of a country. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... Tisha BAv (תשעה באב tish‘āh bə-āḇ) is a major annual fast day in Judaism. ... Judaism is the religious culture of the Jewish people. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... The Dormition of the Theotokos is the Eastern Orthodox commemoration of the death of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Icon of the Theotokos of Vladimir, one of the most venerated of Orthodox Christian icons of the Virgin Mary. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries According to Roman Catholic theology and the traditions of the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, the body and soul of Mary, the mother of Jesus, venerated by these denominations as the Blessed Virgin Mary or... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian body in the world. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ...

September

5: Labor Day (Canada & USA)
September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ...

Ongoing trials

Chile: Augusto Pinochet
ICTY: Slobodan Milošević
Iraq: Iraqi Special Tribunal
Saddam Hussein, among others
Singapore: Took Leng How
UK: Railtrack shareholders
US: Zacarias Moussaoui
US: Brian Nichols
US: Ali al-Tamimi General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) is a body of the United Nations (UN) established to prosecute war crimes in the former Yugoslavia. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević   listen? (Serbian Cyrillic: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced ; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... The Iraqi Special Tribunal is a body established under Iraqi national law to try Iraqi nationals or residents accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes or other serious crimes committed between 1968 and 2003. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal by coalition forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Took Leng How, a 22 year old Malaysian, is the prime suspect for murdering eight-year old Huang Na on 10 October 2004, in Singapore. ... Railtrack was a group of companies which owned the tracks, signals, tunnels, bridges, level crossings and some stations of the British railway system from its privatisation in 1996 until 2002. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Moussaoui mugshot Zacarias Moussaoui (born May 30, 1968) is a French terrorist of Moroccan descent involved in the conspiracy that resulted in the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Brian Nichols Brian Gene Nichols (born December 10, 1971 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a suspect in the shooting deaths of Judge Rowland W. Barnes, court reporter Julie Brandau, and deputy sheriff Sgt. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Ali al-Tamimi in 2004 Ali Al-Tamimi is an American biologist and Islamic scholar, and convicted terrorist. ...

Related pages

About this page
Year in...
Wikipedia Announcements The following is a list of articles devoted to events from 2005 in narrow subject areas: Culture 2005 in architecture 2005 in film 2005 in games 2005 in literature 2005 in music 2005 in television 2005 in video gaming 2005 in Art People Deaths in 2005 State leaders in 2005...

July 31, 2005 (Sunday)

July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Monsoon in the Vindhya, a mountain chain in central India A monsoon is a periodic wind, especially in the Indian Ocean and southern Asia. ... Mumbai (Marathi: मुम़बई IPA: ), formerly known as Bombay (IPA: ), is the capital of the Indian state of Maharashtra and is the most populous Indian city with a 2005 estimated population of about 17 million. ... Image from the Times of India The Maharashtra floods of 2005 refers to the flooding of many parts of the Indian state of Maharashtra including large areas of the metropolis of Mumbai (formerly Bombay), a city located on the coast of the Arabian Sea, on the western coast of India... Brighton on the southern Sussex coast is one of the largest and most famous seaside resorts in England. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Four small explosions strike Londons transport system On 21 July 2005, four attempted bomb attacks disrupted part of Londons public transport system two weeks after the 7 July 2005 London bombings. ... Order: 1st President Nationality: Dutch Vice President: Christian Noyer Lucas Papademos Term of office: June 1, 1998 – October 31, 2003 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: Jean-Claude Trichet Willem Frederik Duisenberg, commonly known as Wim Duisenberg, (July 9, 1935 – July 31, 2005) was a Dutch banker and politician. ... Rabobank is a Dutch bank with offices all over the world, although primarily in the Netherlands. ... De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB, The Dutch Bank) is the central bank of the Netherlands. ... The European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany is the central bank of the eurozone, in charge of monetary policy for the 12 countries that use the new euro currency. ... There are many Christian Democratic parties. ... Michelle Bachelet Verónica Michelle Bachelet Jeria (born September 29, 1951) is a Chilean socialist politician and Chiles first female Defense Minister. ... Sergei Borisovich Ivanov (Сергей Борисович Иванов in Russian) (born January 31, 1953, Leningrad) is the Defense Minister of the Russian Federation. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is a television and radio network in the United States. ... Chechen can mean: Chechen people, an ethnic group Chechen language Related to Chechnya This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Shamil Basayev Shamil Salmanovich Basayev (Russian: Шамиль Салманович Басаев) (born January 14, 1965) is a Chechen leading an armed group acting in the north Caucasus region of Russia, principally in Chechnya. ... Côte dIvoire (often called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. ... Munir Said Thalib (December 8, 1965 – September 7, 2004), affectionally known simply as Munir, is Indonesias most famous Human Rights and anti-corruption activist. ... A ceasefire is a temporary stoppage of a war, for any of various reasons. ... Order: 4th President of Iran Vice President: Hassan Habibi Term of office: August 3, 1989 – August 2, 1997 Preceded by: Ali Khamenei Succeeded by: Mohammad Khatami Date of birth: 1934 Place of birth: Nough, Iran Political party: Militant Clergy Association Akbar Hashemi Bahramani (Persian: هاشمی بهرمانی), also known as Hashemi Rafsanjani (هاشمی رفسنجانی) , born... Akbar Ganji (اکبر گنجی in Persian) is an Iranian journalist and writer, imprisoned in Evin prison since April 22, 2000 after he took part in a conference held in Berlin on April 7 and 8, 2000. ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ... Atkins Nutritionals, Inc is the company founded in 1989 by Dr Robert Atkins to promote the Atkins Diet. ... Robert Atkins could be Dr Robert C. Atkins, noted for the Atkins Diet The Rt Hon Robert Atkins, the United Kingdom politician This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code governs the process of reorganization under the bankruptcy laws of the United States. ...

July 30, 2005 (Saturday)

July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... For the rock band Riot see Riot (the band) Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... Electronic music is a loose term for music created using electronic equipment. ... CzechTek is annual teknival held at the end of July in the Czech Republic. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Location of Basra Basra (also spelled Başrah or Basara; historically sometimes written Busra, Busrah, and the early form Bassorah; Arabic: , Al-Basrah) is the second largest city of Iraq with an estimated population of c. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law (and in other forms of dispute resolution). ... The President of Iraq is Iraqs head of state and chief of government. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal by coalition forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Thursday is the day of the week between Wednesday and Friday. ... A military base is an isolated facility, settlement, or installation that shelters military equipment and personnel. ...

July 29, 2005 (Friday)

July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a scientist whose area of research is astronomy or astrophysics. ... A trans-Neptunian object (TNO) is any object in the solar system with all or most of its orbit beyond that of Neptune. ... The title of this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 0. ... Artists rendering of the Kuiper Belt and more distant Oort cloud. ... The title of this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The title of this article is incorrect because of technical limitations. ... Moons of solar system scaled to Earths Moon The common noun moon (not capitalized) is used to mean any natural satellite of the other planets. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Nikkah is the contract between a bride and bridegroom and part of a Islamic marriage. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Four small explosions strike Londons transport system On 21 July 2005, four attempted bomb attacks disrupted part of Londons public transport system two weeks after the 7 July 2005 London bombings. ... The President of Pakistan is Pakistans Head of State. ... General Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ; born August 11, 1943, Near Delhi, India) became de facto Head of Government (using the title Chief Executive and assuming extensive powers) of Pakistan on October 12, 1999 following a bloodless coup détat. ... A Madrasah complex in Gambia The word madrasah in Arabic as well as in other Islamic languages such as Urdu, Persian, Turkish, Indonesian etc. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The New Iraqi Army(3-4000 soldiers) is being developed by the Coalition Military Assistance Training Team (CMATT) with the ultimate task of assuming responsibility for all Iraqi land-based military operations following the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. ... Recruit or Army recruit is a term often colloquially used to refer to the lowest military rank in various armed services, particularly the grade of Private E-1 in the United States Army. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... MosÅ«l (36°22′ N 43°07′ E Arabic: al-Mawsil), Kurdish: Mûsil, or Nineveh (Syriac: ܢܝܢܘܐ) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... Image from the Times of India The Maharashtra floods of 2005 refers to the flooding of many parts of the Indian state of Maharashtra including large areas of the metropolis of Mumbai (formerly Bombay), a city located on the coast of the Arabian Sea, on the western coast of India... BBC News and Current Affairs (sometimes abbreviated BBC NCA) is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations news gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... An Israeli settlement refers to housing development for Israeli Jews in areas within the control of Israel (as a result of the 1967 Six Day War), but contested by Palestinians residing in those areas. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... Influenza A virus, the virus that causes Avian flu. ... Ugandans voted to restore a multiparty political system in a constitutional referendum held on 28 July 2005. ... Voter turnout is a measure of the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in any given election. ... Robert Kilroy-Silk (born 19 May 1942) is a British politician and is well-known as the presenter of his former daytime television confessional talk show, Kilroy. ... Veritas is a United Kingdom political party, formed in 2005 as a split from the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP). ...

July 28, 2005 (Thursday)

July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The New Iraqi Army(3-4000 soldiers) is being developed by the Coalition Military Assistance Training Team (CMATT) with the ultimate task of assuming responsibility for all Iraqi land-based military operations following the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... There are various types of trains designed for particular purposes, see rail transport operations. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... A tornado over land. ... The Fujita scale rates a tornados intensity by the damage it inflicts on human-built structures. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The Islamic Human Rights Commission, or IHRC, is a non-profit organization that campaigns against violations of the human rights of Muslims. ... Composite satellite image of the Indian subcontinent Map of South Asia. ... The July 2005 London bombings were synchronised terrorist attacks. ... Ugandans voted to restore a multiparty political system in a constitutional referendum held on 28 July 2005. ... Lal Krishna Advani Lal Krishna Advani (Devanagari: लाल कृष्ण आड़वाणी)(born November 8, 1927/1929, Karachi, Pakistan) is the President of the Indian nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and Leader of the Opposition in the 14th Lok Sabha. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Ayodhya (अयोध्या) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... President George W. Bush acknowledges the applause of legislators and administration officials Tuesday, August 2. ... The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States. ... The Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate is an agreement between six Asia-Pacific nations: Australia, the Peoples Republic of China, India, Japan, South Korea, and the United States to develop and share technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. ... A fatwa (Arabic: ) plural fatāwa (Arabic: ) , is a legal pronouncement in Islam, issued by a religious law specialist on a specific issue. ... The neutrality of this section is disputed. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Radovan Karadžić Radovan Karadžić (born June 19, 1945) is a Bosnian Serb politician, poet, psychiatrist and accused war criminal. ... Sanction is an interesting word, in that, depending on context, it can have diametrically opposing meanings. ... Sasquatch can refer to: A legendary creature also known as Bigfoot. ... The name bison refers to several large bovine mammals: American bison - Bison bison Wisent or European bison - Bison bonasus Steppe Wisent Bison priscus - extinct Frequently confused with bison: Aurochs - Bos primigenius It also refers to several other things: GNU bison is a compiler compiler similar to Yacc. ... The Bulgarian Socialist Party (Bulgarian: Balgarska Socialističeska Partija or Българска социалистическа партия) (BSP or БСП) is a political party in Bulgaria and successor to the Bulgarian Communist Party. ... Georgi Sedefchov Purvanov (Bulgarian: Георги Седефчов Първанов) (born June 28, 1957) has been the President of Bulgaria since January 22, 2002. ... The National Movement Simeon II (Bulgarian: Национално движение Симеон Втори; Nacionalno Dviženie Simeon Vtori)) is a political party in Bulgaria, the vehicle of Simeon Borisov Sakskoburggotski, the deposed Tsar of Bulgaria and current Prime Minister. ... Simeon Sakskoburggotski as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Simeon Borisov Sakskoburggotski (Симеон Сакскобурготски), formerly Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria, (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and is the current Prime Minister of Bulgaria. ... João Bernardo Nino Vieira (born 27 April 1939 in Bissau) is President of Guinea-Bissau who seized power in 1980 and won a presidential election in 1994, but was ousted in 1999, after a civil war; he was elected president again in mid-2005. ... Dr. Christopher Ndarathi Murungaru (Born 1954) is a Kenyan politician, a Member of Parliament for Kieni Constituency in Nyeri District and the Minister of Transport. ...

July 27, 2005 (Wednesday)

July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... It has been alledged that the British Army Special Air Service regiment operated a shoot-to-kill policy in Northern Ireland. ... The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. ... New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ... Sir Ian Blair, QPM (born 19 March 1953) is the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police in London. ... Commissioner may be used for a variety of official positions, especially that of a high-ranking official, or that of a senior police officer. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... Channel 4 News is a television news programme made by ITN for the British TV broadcaster Channel 4. ... The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... The Prime Minister of Iraq is Iraqs head of government. ... Ibrahim al-Jaafari Dr Ibrahim al-Eshaiker al-Jaafari (ابراهيم الاشيقر الجعفري) (born 1947) is the new Prime Minister of Iraq in the Iraqi Transitional Government following the elections of January 2005. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Image from the Times of India The Maharashtra floods of 2005 refers to the flooding of many parts of the Indian state of Maharashtra including large areas of the metropolis of Mumbai (formerly Bombay), a city located on the coast of the Arabian Sea, on the western coast of India... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... Monsoon in the Vindhya, a mountain chain in central India A monsoon is a periodic wind, especially in the Indian Ocean and southern Asia. ... Maharashtra (महाराष्ट्र) is Indias third largest state in terms of area and second largest in terms of population after Uttar Pradesh. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... The Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) on its way to the Vehicle Assembly Building. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-103) is a NASA Space Shuttle. ... Motto: Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites (Newly Risen, How Brightly You Shine) Nickname: First State, Premier State Other Australian states and territories Capital Sydney Government Governor Premier Const. ... Hon Bob Carr Robert John Carr (born 1947), Australian politician, was Premier of New South Wales from 25 March 1995 to 3 August 2005. ... Main languages See Languages of ASEAN Secretary General Ong Keng Yong of Singapore Area  - Total 4,480,000 km2 Population  - Total (2004)  - Density 550,000,000 122. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms The domestic pig is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, though some authors call it , reserving for the wild boar. ... Binomial name Streptococcus suis (ex Elliot 1966) Kilpper-Bälz and Schleifer 1987 Streptococcus suis is an important bacterial pathogen of pigs. ... ONGC (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited) (incorporated on June 23, 1993) is a public sector petroleum company in India. ... Mumbai High is an offshore oilfield off the coast of Mumbai. ... High Tide was a band that was formed in 1969 by Tony Hill (guitar, keyboards, and vocals), Simon House (violin and keyboards), Pete Pavli (bass) and Roger Hadden (drums). ... The Basques are an indigenous people who inhabit parts of both Spain and France. ... ETA can refer to: eta is a Basque word for and. Eta (letter) - from the Greek alphabet. ... Location within France Angers is a city in France in the département of Maine-et-Loire, 191 miles south-west of Paris. ... Geography - United States Bonneville Salt Flats is the name of an ancient lake bed in Utah. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in Leap years). ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Sculpture in France at the tunnels exit. ...

July 26, 2005 (Tuesday)

July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Nationalization or Nationalisation is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The city of Abu Ghraib (أبو غريب in Arabic) in Iraq is located 20 km (12 miles) west of Baghdad just north of the Baghdad International Airport. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... Rain falling For other uses see Rain (disambiguation). ... Maharashtra (महाराष्ट्र) is Indias third largest state in terms of area and second largest in terms of population after Uttar Pradesh. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Mumbai (Marathi: मुम़बई IPA: ), formerly known as Bombay (IPA: ), is the capital of the Indian state of Maharashtra and is the most populous Indian city with a 2005 estimated population of about 17 million. ... Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-103) is a NASA Space Shuttle. ... STS-114 was the Return to Flight Space Shuttle mission which launched Space Shuttle Discovery at 10:39 EDT (14:39 UTC), July 26, 2005. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christs commandments and is one who faithfully upholds his teachings. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Samir Geagea Samir Geagea (born October 25, 1952) is the formerly imprisoned leader of the Lebanese Forces (LF) militia. ... National motto: 널리 인간을 이롭게 하라 Translation: Bring benefit to all people Official language Korean Capital Seoul Largest city Seoul President Roh Moo-hyun Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 107th 99,274 km² 0. ... On July 26, 2005, South Korean ambassador to the US, Hong Seok-Hyun, resigned for alleged involvement with the slush fund scandal of illegal donations during a presidential campaign in 1997. ... Slush fund was originally a nautical term; the slush referred to the fat or grease that was obtained by boiling meat, the sale of which could then be used to provide the crew with special luxuries. ... Main languages See Languages of ASEAN Secretary General Ong Keng Yong of Singapore Area  - Total 4,480,000 km2 Population  - Total (2004)  - Density 550,000,000 122. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... This page is about protests. ... Aromatic vials in the shape of Greek gods, Begram, 2nd century. ... Mohammed Bouyeri Mohammed Bouyeri (b. ... Theo (or Theodore or Theodorus) van Gogh may refer to one of the following members of the Dutch van Gogh family: Theodorus van Gogh (1822-1885), father of Vincent van Gogh Theo van Gogh (art dealer) (1857-1890), brother of Vincent van Gogh Theo van Gogh (film director) (1957-2004... Genetics (from the Greek genno γεννώ= give birth) is the science of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms. ... University of Alberta on the south side of Edmonton The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Sasquatch can refer to: A legendary creature also known as Bigfoot. ... Pulsa diNura or Pulsa Denoura (Aramaic: פולסא דנורא lashes of fire) is a kabbalistic ceremony in which God is asked to curse someone who is believed to be a sinner. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... Term of office: 1 December 1970 – 1 December 1976 Preceded by: Gustavo Díaz Ordaz Succeeded by: José López Portillo Date of birth: 17 January 1922 Place of birth: Mexico City Profession: Lawyer First Lady: María Esther Zuno Party: PRI Luis Echeverría Álvarez (born 17 January 1922... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Most generally, Genocide is the deliberate destruction of a social identity. ... Omri Sharon (Hebrew: עמרי שרון, born August 8, 1964) is the son of current Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and an Israeli Knesset member in the Likud party. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Perjury is lying or making verifiably false statements under oath in a court of law. ... Parliamentary immunity is a system in which members of the parliament are granted partial immunity from prosecution. ... Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed (Somali: Cabdulaahi Yuusuf Axmed) (born December 15, 1934 in Galkayo, Puntland, Somalia) is the transitional Kenya on October 10, 2004, and sworn in on October 14, 2004. ... Jauhar (sometimes written jowhar) was originally the voluntary death on a funeral pyre of the queen or the royal women of defeated Rajput cities or forts in order to avoid capture. ... Sher Bahadur Deuba (born June 13, 1946) was the prime minister of Nepal. ... Embezzlement is the fraudulent appropriation of property by a person to whom it has been entrusted. ... Character assassination is the process of harming a persons reputation enough to cause rejection of that person from their community. ...

July 25, 2005 (Monday)

July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... An electrician is a tradesman specializing in electrical wiring of buildings and related equipment. ... This story is incorrect. ... Stockwell tube station Stockwell tube station is a London Underground station in Stockwell, in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Sunday is considered either the first or the seventh day of the week, between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: ; born April 16, 1927 as Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany) is the 265th reigning pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City. ... // Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula North Korea joined the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) as a non-nuclear weapons state in 1985, and North and South Korean talks begun in 1990 resulted in a 1992 Denuclearization Statement. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is the largest labor union in the United States and the fastest growing, representing 1. ... The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), formerly known by the name International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, is one of the largest labor unions in the United States. ... The AFL-CIO is the largest labor union federation in the United States. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... The labour movement (or labor movement) is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments. ... New Southgate is an area in the south west corner of the London Borough of Enfield, England. ... St. ... London bombings can refer to a number of London attacks: The Blitz Numerous terrorist attacks carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army: October 10, 1981: a bomb blast on Ebury Bridge Road in London kills two people and injures 39. ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms The domestic pig is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, though some authors call it , reserving for the wild boar. ... Phyla/Divisions Actinobacteria Aquificae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chlamydiae/Verrucomicrobia Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Nitrospirae Omnibacteria Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Bacteria is also the fictional name of a warring nation under Benzino Napaloni as dictator, in the 1940 film The Great Dictator... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... Raw Data: Iraqi Constitution Monday, March 08, 2004 BACKGROUND Iraq WarSelect OneList of War Dead Since May 9, 2004List of War Dead From May 1, 2003, to May 9, 2004List of War Dead Prior to May 1, 2003Timeline: Iraq Prison Abuse ScandalRaw Data: Prison Abuse Report (pdf)Raw Data: Centcom... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A border checkpoint is, as its name suggests, a place between borders where the identities of the ongoers or their cargo are evaluated. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... The 2005 New Zealand general election will be a nation-wide election for the New Zealand Parliament, and is to be held on 17 September 2005. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... President Arroyo during her televised message regarding the alleged wiretapped tapes An electoral crisis emerged in the Philippines in June 2005. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Seal of the President of the Philippines The President is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries. ... Q: What is the first sign you may have contracted AIDS? A: A pounding sensation in the arse. ... Ipanema beach Cristo Redentor A NASA satellite image of Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro (meaning River of January in Portuguese) is the name of both a state and a city in southeastern Brazil. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Samir Geagea Samir Geagea (born October 25, 1952) is the formerly imprisoned leader of the Lebanese Forces (LF) militia. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܐܶܝܢܘܪܡ in Syriac, Mâruniyya مارونية in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... Idrissa Seck (born 1959) was the Prime Minister of Senegal from 4 November 2002 until April 21, 2004 when he was dismissed by the president. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... The United National Party (UNP, Sinhalese: Ekshat Jathika Pakshaya, Tamil: ஐக்கிய தேசியக் கட்சி) is a political party in Sri Lanka. ... The Rupee (₨ or Rs. ... Ipanema beach Cristo Redentor A NASA satellite image of Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro (meaning River of January in Portuguese) is the name of both a state and a city in southeastern Brazil. ... Bill Graham The Honourable William C. Graham, PC , LL.D , MP (born March 17, 1939, in Montreal, Quebec) is Canadas current Minister of National Defence. ... Hans Island, 1st August 2003, HDMS Triton Hans Island (Greenlandic/Inuktitut: Tartupaluk, Danish: Hans Ø, French: ÃŽle Hans) is a small uninhabited barren knoll measuring 1. ... President Bingu wa Mutharika addressing the United Nations General Assembly. ... Binomial name Zea mays L. Maize (Zea mays ssp. ... Fertilizers or fertilisers are compounds given to plants with the intention of promoting growth; they are usually applied either via the soil, for uptake by plant roots, or by foliar spraying, for uptake through leaves. ... An eyepatch is a small cloth patch, usually black, that is worn in front of one eye. ... Gen. ... The title of this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...

July 24, 2005 (Sunday)

July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Francis Ona Francis Ona (1953 - July 24, 2005) was a Bougainvillean seccessionist leader who led an uprising against the Government of Papua New Guinea motivated at least initially by his concerns over the operation of the Panguna mine by Bouganville Copper, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto. ... The Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA) was formed in 1988 by Bougainvilleans seeking independence from Papua New Guinea. ... This article is about the island; Bougainville is also the name of a commune in the Somme département of France. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... Map of Nicobar Islands The Nicobar Islands are an island chain in the eastern Indian Ocean, and are part of India. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Chennai (சென்னை in Tamil), formerly known as Madras, is the capital of the state of Tamil Nadu and is Indias fourth largest city. ... Phuket (Thai ภูเก็ต) is one of the southern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. ... TheBus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... Map of Nigeria showing Lagos on the left Lagos is the largest city in Nigeria. ... The Golden Gate Bridge connecting San Francisco and its peninsula to Marin County A bridge is a structure built to span a gorge, valley, road, railroad track, river, body of water, or any other physical obstacle. ... The Gadar Tamburawa River is a river in Nigeria, just south of Kano. ... For other uses of the word Kano see Kano (disambiguation). ... Fatigue may refer to: Fatigue (physical) - tiredness in humans Fatigue (material) - failure by repeated stress in materials Fatigues (uniform) - military uniform (BDU or ACU) Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - a medical condition Battle fatigue - also known as Post-traumatic stress disorder Readers fatigue - a side-effect of parsing poorly formatted textual... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A typical suburban police station in the United States (this one is in San Bruno, California). ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ×”×”×’× ×” לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces, comprising the Israel army, Israel air force and Israel navy. ... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al-Fatah faction. ... The Popular Resistance Committees (PRC) are a Palestinian militant network which operates in the Gaza Strip. ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Jabalia (Arabic: جباليا), with a registered population of 103,646 inhabitants (as of June 30 2002), is the largest Palestinian refugee camp in existence. ... Kibbutz Dan, near Qiryat Shemona, in the Upper Galilee, 1990s A kibbutz (Hebrew: קיבוץ; plural: kibbutzim: קיבוצים, gathering or together) is an Israeli collective community. ... Sederot (שדרות; unofficially also spelled Sderot) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ... Road bicycle racing is a popular bicycle racing sport held on the road (following the geography of the area), using racing bicycles. ... When normal cells are damaged or old they undergo apoptosis; cancer cells, however, avoid apoptosis. ... Armstrong on the cover of Sports Illustrated shortly before the 2005 Tour de France. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... The 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the eighth edition of the Gold Cup, the soccer championship of North and Central America (CONCACAF). ... Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess His Imperial Highness Prince Gu (李玖 이구, born 29 December 1931, in Tokyo, Japan) is the 29th head of the Korean Imperial Household and grandson of Emperor Gojong of the Korean Joseon Dynasty. ... The Joseon Dynasty (alternatively, Choson or Chosun) was the final ruling dynasty of Korea, lasting from 1392 until 1910. ... A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... The Patriotic Front can mean: Patriotic Front (Austria) Patriotic Front (Zambia) Patriotic Front (Zimbabwe) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sedition refers to a legal designation of non-overt conduct that is deemed by a legal authority as being acts of treason, and hence deserving of legal punishment. ... Guinea-Bissau held a presidential election on 19 June 2005, and a second round run-off vote was held on 24 July. ... This article is about the political process. ... Malam Bacai Sanhá (born 5 May 1947) is a Guinea-Bissau politician and former acting President. ... João Bernardo Nino Vieira (born 27 April 1939 in Bissau) is President of Guinea-Bissau who seized power in 1980 and won a presidential election in 1994, but was ousted in 1999, after a civil war; he was elected president again in mid-2005. ... Dawood Ibrahim Dawood Ibrahim (also known as Dawood Ebrahim and Sheikh Dawood Hassan) was born in India and is believed to currently reside in the city of Karachi, Pakistan. ... Mohammad Javed Miandad Khan (born June 12, 1957), popularly called Javed Miandad, was born in Karachi, Pakistan. ... Dubai or Dubayy (in Arabic: دبيّ, IPA , generally in English) refers to either one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula, or that emirates main city, sometimes called Dubai City to distinguish it from the emirate. ...

July 23, 2005 (Saturday)

July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Gujarat (ગુજરાત in Gujarati) is the most industrialized state in India after Maharashtra and is located in western India, bordered by Pakistan to the northwest and Rajasthan to the north. ... Textbooks are defined as a manual of instruction, a standard book in any branch of study. They are further defined by both the age of the person who is to study the text and the classification of the subject matter itself. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889–April 30, 1945) was the Chancellor of Germany from 1933, and Führer und Reichskanzler (Leader and chancellor) of Germany from 1934, to his death. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. ... Look up Undercover in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Being undercover or wearing plainclothes is disguising ones identity for the purposes of gaining the trust of an individual or organization to learn secret information. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... This story is incorrect. ... Barbara Lee Barbara Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the 9th District of California (map). ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Santiago de Compostela (2003 pop. ... There are two well-known places called Galicia: Galicia in Western Europe, an Atlantic Ocean region in Spain. ... A dissident, broadly defined, is a person who actively opposes an established opinion, policy, or structure. ... lvaro Uribe V lez (born July 4, 1952) is the President of Colombia (since 2002). ... A paramilitary is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... General Khin Nyunt (born October 11, 1939 in Kyauktan, Burma) was the Prime Minister of Myanmar and the chief of intelligence of the Myanmar Army. ...

July 22, 2005 (Friday)

  • A bomb explodes from beneath a car in the Lebanese Capital of Beirut causing injuries, but no deaths. (BBC)
  • About 88 people are killed and 200 injured in a series of car bombs in the Egyptian resort of Sharm el-Sheikh at about 0100 local time (2200 UTC Friday). (BBC)
  • Malaysian Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi says that he feels it is his duty to prevent Islam and its symbols from being used to propagate violence. He has set three missions for himself – continuing to remind the world community to understand the root causes of terrorism, explaining that Islam is a religion of peace and opposed to violence, and showcasing Malaysia as a modern Islamic country and a safe place to invest and visit. (The Star) (Iranian Quran News Agency) (Islam Online)
  • Berlin/Germany. A small plane crashes near the Reichstag and the Federal Chancellor's Office, killing the pilot. Suicide suspected, rather than terrorism. (Deutsche Welle) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Dubai, police are on alert due to the wedding of Junaid Miandad and Mahrukh Ibrahim. Junaid is the son of former Pakistani cricket captain Javed Miandad. Mahrukh is the daughter of India's most wanted crime boss, Dawood Ibrahim. (Sify)
  • Pakistan continues to be a principal recruiting ground and logistical center for global terrorists, despite three years of military operations to root out al Qaeda and Taliban members, according to The Wall Street Journal. (HT Times)
  • Microsoft announces that the former codenamed "Windows Longhorn" will now officially be known as "Windows Vista". The first beta test will be launched on August 3.
  • In Mumbai, India, LeT militant and alleged Al-Qaida operative, Mohammed Afroze, is convicted of criminal conspiracy, conspiracy to disturb relations between friendly nations, and forging documents. However, he is acquitted on charges of waging war against the nation. (NDTV)
  • At least 36 people are dead after two days of violent fuel riots in Yemen. (BBC)
  • At least 15 people are killed when a dam collapses in south-west China. (BBC)
  • A South Asian-looking man, suspected of being an attempted suicide bomber, having been chased by plainclothes police has been reportedly pinned to the ground then shot five times at Stockwell tube station in London, and has been confirmed dead by the police. (Wikinews), (the Guardian), (BBC) (CNN) (Sky)
  • A mosque in East London and the surrounding area is evacuated for an hour following receipt of a bomb warning. The all-clear is given after the mosque is searched by police. (Wikinews), (Sky News)
  • Two ships collide off Japan's Chiba prefecture and the Chinese-crewed freighter Wei Hang 9 sinks. One crewmember is dead, with 8 missing. (Japan Today) (Xinhua) (Reuters)
  • The Pentagon confirms that 52 detainees of the Guantanamo camp have gone on hunger strike. (New York Times) (BBC) (Al-Jazeera)
  • Leaked excerpts from the United Nations' report into Zimbabwe's Operation Murambatsvina state that the operation has been a "disastrous venture" that has violated international law and created a grave humanitarian crisis. It further suggests that the act might qualify as a crime against humanity and urged Zimbabwe to prosecute those responsible. (Guardian).
  • The insolvent car-building company MG Rover has been bought by Nanjing Automobile for a reported 60 million pounds.

July 22 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... Sharm el-Sheikh is located on the coast of the Red Sea, at the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula. ... View of the Red Sea and Tiran Island from the Sheraton Sharm hotel Sharm el-Sheikh (شرم الشيخ, also transliterated as Sharm ash Shaykh), often known simply as Sharm, is a city situated on the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula, in Janub Sina, Egypt, on the coastal strip between the Red... Yang Amat Berhormat Dato Seri Abdullah bin Haji Ahmad Badawi (born November 26, 1939) is the current prime minister of Malaysia, succeeding Tun Mahathir bin Mohamad. ... Islam   listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Plane may refer to: Look up Plane in Wiktionary, the free dictionary An Aeroplane or airplane, a type of fixed-wing aircraft. ... The Reichstag building (April 2004) The Reichstag building in Berlin was constructed as the place where the Reichstag, the parliament of the German Empire, would convene. ... Bundeskanzleramt, Berlin, Germany The Bundeskanzleramt (federal chancellory) is the administrative body of the Chancellor of Germany. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ... Mohammad Javed Miandad Khan (born June 12, 1957), popularly called Javed Miandad, was born in Karachi, Pakistan. ... A crime boss refers to someone in charge of a criminal organization. ... Dawood Ibrahim Dawood Ibrahim (also known as Dawood Ebrahim and Sheikh Dawood Hassan) was born in India and is believed to currently reside in the city of Karachi, Pakistan. ... Terrorism refers to the use of violence for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological goal. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qā‘idah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to an international alliance of Islamist organizations. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist and Pashtun nationalist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... Windows Vista is Microsofts next version of its Windows operating system, designed to follow Windows XP. It was previously known by the codename Longhorn (for a full list, see Microsoft codenames); the name Vista was unveiled on July 22, 2005. ... In software engineering, development stage terminology expresses how far through the development sequence things have progressed and how much further development a product may require. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... Mumbai (Marathi: मुम़बई IPA: ), formerly known as Bombay (IPA: ), is the capital of the Indian state of Maharashtra and is the most populous Indian city with a 2005 estimated population of about 17 million. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... On July 22, 2005, in Mumbai, India, LeT militant and admitted Al-Qaida operative, Mohammed Afroze, was convicted of criminal conspiracy, conspiracy to disturb relations between friendly nations, and forging documents. ... Scrivener Dam, Canberra Australia, was engineered to withstand a once-in-5000-years flood event A dam is a barrier across flowing water that obstructs, directs or retards the flow, often creating a reservoir, lake or impoundment. ... Map of South Asia South Asia is a subregion of Asia comprising the modern states of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, . It covers about 4,480,000 km², or 10 percent of the continent, and is also known as the Indian subcontinent. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who believes the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Plainclothes often refers to a member of law enforcement, such as a detective or police officer, who, instead of wearing a uniform typically associated with the occupation, will wear ordinary clothes, in order to avoid detection or identification as a member of law enforcement. ... Stockwell tube station Stockwell tube station is a London Underground station in Stockwell, in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... St. ... Tulip Mosque in Ufa, Russia. ... This article is about the area of London, United Kingdom. ... Chiba Prefecture (千葉県 Chiba-ken) is located in the Greater Tokyo Area of Honshu Island, Japan. ... Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated as DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... Map of Cuba with the location of Guantanamo Bay indicated Guantanamo (Spanish spelling: Guantánamo) is a city in southeast Cuba, capital of the Guantánamo Province. ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Operation Murambatsvina (Shona for Operation Drive Out Trash), also referred to as Operation Restore Order, began as a crackdown against illegal trading and illegal housing, conducted by the government of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A humanitarian crisis, (or, in the language of history; humanitarian disaster) is a health or otherwise natural disaster which mortally threatens a very large number of people. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... MG Rover are the largest independent manufacturer of cars in the British motor industry. ...

July 21, 2005 (Thursday)

  • In Maharashtra, India, the state Assembly unanimously adopts a Bill amending the Bombay Police Act, 1951 which will ban dance bars across the state. (IndianExpress)
  • Kenyan legislators approve a constitution which critics say leaves too much power in the hands of the President. (BBC).
  • German President Horst Köhler agrees to dissolve parliament. He calls for earlier elections in mid-September 2005. BBC News. - see German federal election, 2005
  • After a blitz of detentions of suspected militants and Islamists, Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf calls for a holy war against preachers of hate and announces steps to curb militant Islamic schools and groups. (Reuters)
  • Tatarstan: On the feast day of the holy icon "Theotokos of Kazan", in the presence of the crowd of 10,000 pilgrims, Patriarch Alexius II and the President of Tatarstan place at the newly-restored Annunciation Cathedral of the Kazan Kremlin the holiest copy of the long-lost icon, which was presented to Russia by Pope John Paul II shortly before his death. (Asianews)
  • Conflict in Iraq: Algeria's two most senior diplomatic staff in Iraq are kidnapped from outside a restaurant in the western Mansour district. (BBC)
  • Parts of the London Underground are evacuated, as British police are investigating reports of three separate incidents involving minor explosions in Shepherd's Bush, Warren Street and Oval underground stations. There are also reports of an incident on the no. 26 bus in Hackney, East London. There are no reported casualties and police are not yet treating the incidents as "major". (BBC)
  • The People's Bank of China announces a 2 percent revaluation of its currency, the Renminbi (yuan), and says the yuan will no longer be pegged to the US dollar, instead trading within a narrow range against a market basket of currencies. (AP)
  • In Morocco, authorities detain five supporters of Western Saharan independence for their alleged part in violent demonstrations last May. (Al-Jazeera)
  • Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono orders the army to stop offensive against separatist rebels in Aceh after the acceptance of the new peace deal. (Channel News Asia) (Bloomberg)
  • In Mexico, police are looking for kidnapped soccer coach Omar Romano. (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Rwanda, gacaca court investigating the Rwandan genocide summons Thaddee Ntihinyurwa, head of the Catholic Church in the country, to testify. (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In China, a group of farmers in Shengyou village in Hebei province that demonstrated over seizure of an arable land for the power plant, win in a dispute. (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • Malaysian government also remove the ringgit's peg to US dollar. (Strait Times, Malaysia) (Channel News Asia) (Reuters)
  • African Development Bank elects Donald Kaberuka, former finance minister of Rwanda, as president. (AFDB) (Forbes)
  • In the Republic of Congo, trial of sixteen military and security officer begins. They are accused of killing 353. refugees who disappeared 1999 in the so-called Beach case. (World Peace Herald) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In China, dam collapses in Yunnan province. At least 15 dead and 23 injured. (Xinhua) (China Daily)
  • The Maccabiah games has finished.

July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Maharashtra (महाराष्ट्र) is Indias third largest state in terms of area and second largest in terms of population after Uttar Pradesh. ... ... A legislator is a person who writes and passes laws, especially someone who is a member of a legislature. ... List of the Heads of State of Kenya See also Kenya Heads of Government of Kenya Colonial Heads of Kenya lists of incumbents Categories: Kenya | Lists of office-holders ... Horst Köhler (   listen?, born 22 February 1943) is the President of Germany. ... The German federal election of 2005 will be held on 18 September 2005 to elect members to the Bundestag (lower house) of Germany, following the unsuccessful motion of confidence in Gerhard Schröder on 1 July . ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... See also Jewish History Jihad Mujahideen Crusade Knights Templars Knights Hospitaliers Jedi ... The Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: Респу́блика Татарста́н or Тата́рия; Tatar: Татарстан Республикасы/Tatarstan Respublikası) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... Our Lady of Kazan (16th century). ... For albums named Pilgrim, see Pilgrim (album). ... Alexius II with Vladimir Putin Patriarch Alexius II (born February 23, 1929) is the current Patriarch of Moscow and the head of the Russian Orthodox Church. ... Mintimer Şärip ulı Şäymiev [meen-tee-MEH-rr sha-REEP oo-le shay-MEE-yef] (Cyrillic: Минтимер Шәрип улы Шәймиев; also transliterated from Russian as Mintimer Sharipovich Shaimiev - Минтимер Шарипович Шаймиев) is the first president of Tatarstan, Russia. ... Kazan Kremlin (Tatar: kirman) is the chief historic citadel of Tatarstan, which was built on behest of Ivan the Terrible on the ruins of the former castle of Kazan khans. ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Mansour is a district in Iraq. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Four small explosions strike Londons transport system On 21 July 2005, four attempted bomb attacks disrupted part of Londons public transport system two weeks after the 7 July 2005 London bombings. ... Shepherds Bush is a London Underground station. ... Warren Street Warren Street tube station is a London Underground station. ... Oval tube station Interior of Oval tube station Oval tube station in Kennington is a station on the Northern Line of the London Underground between Stockwell and Kennington stations. ... The Peoples Bank of China (中国人民银行, pinyin: Zhōngguó Rénmín Yínháng ) (not to be confused with the Bank of China or the Central Bank of China) is the central bank of the Peoples Republic of China with the power to control monetary policy and regulate... 100 Renminbi Yuan issued in 1999 The renminbi (Simplified Chinese: 人民币; Traditional Chinese: 人民幣; pinyin: ; literally peoples currency) is the official currency in the mainland of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... National motto: none Official language Arabic and Spanish Capital and largest city Laâyoune - Moroccan translitteration (El Aaiún, al-uyÅ«n) President (in exile) Mohamed Abdelaziz Prime Minister (in exile) Abdelkader Taleb Oumar Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 83rd 266,000 km² Negligible Population  - Total  - Density Ranked 182nd 267,405... Dr Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (born September 9, 1949), Indonesian retired military general and stateman, is the sixth President of Indonesia, and the first to be elected directly by voters. ... Aceh (pronounced Ah-chay) is a special territory (daerah istimewa, or special area) of Indonesia, located on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Omar Romano is a Mexican soccer coach who was kidnapped in July of 2005. ... Gacaca courts are a new form of community justice that have been used in Rwanda in the wake of the Rwandan Genocide. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan genocide was the slaughter of roughly one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus during a timespan of 100 days in 1994. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Shengyou is a village south of the Dingzhou City in Hebei Province, China. ... Not to be confused with the unrelated province of Hubei Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: Hébĕi; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh), is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The ringgit (unofficially known as the Malaysian dollar), is the official monetary unit of Malaysia. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The African Development Bank (AfDB) is a development bank established in 1964 with the intention of promoting economic and social development in Africa. ... Scrivener Dam, Canberra Australia, was engineered to withstand a once-in-5000-years flood event A dam is a barrier across flowing water that obstructs, directs or retards the flow, often creating a reservoir, lake or impoundment. ... Yunnan (Simplified Chinese: 云南; Traditional Chinese: 雲南; pinyin: ) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the far southwestern corner of the country. ... The Maccabiah is a sport event which take place every four years in Israel participated by Jews sportsman from all over the world. ...

July 20, 2005 (Wednesday)

  • Police in Pakistan have detained about 200 suspected Islamist extremists in a series of raids on religious schools, mosques and other properties. (BBC)
  • In mainland China, authorities evacuate more than a million people from Fujian and Zhejiang provinces due to Typhoon Haitang. In Taiwan, death toll rises to 7 with one missing and 31 injured. The typhoon also causes significant agricultural damage (People's Daily) (Xinhua) (Taipei Times) (Channel News Asia) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Government of Thailand changes the new emergency laws, weakening two articles that would have, among other things, enforced curfews and censorship of personal communication. (Bangkok Post)
  • Saudi Arabian long-time ambassador to USA, prince Bandar bin Sultan, resigns for "personal reasons" (New York Times) (Al-JAzeera) (Bloomberg)
  • In Yemen, 8-13 people die during demonstrations against oil price increases (Al-Jazeera) (MENAFN) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Indonesian government confims first deaths connected to bird flu (Reuters)
  • In China, coal mine explosion in Shaanxi province kills 24-26 (Xinhua) (China Daily) (Reuters)
  • In Brazil, Delubio Soares, former treasurer for the ruling Worker's Party, admits in a parliamentary hearing that the party did not declare contributions worth $17 million (Bloomberg) (BBC)
  • Indian Army announces that it has unveiled a scam where contractors responsible for transportation of fuel to depots of its Northern Command had sold off the fuel and filled the tanks with water (Times of India) (NDTV)

July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Fujian (Chinese: 福建; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal System Pinyin: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of China. ... Zhejiang (Chinese: 浙江; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Che-chiang; Postal System Pinyin: Chehkiang or Chekiang) is a eastern coastal province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Typhoon Haitang Typhoon Haitang is the first Typhoon to hit Taiwan in 2005, on July 18, 2005. ... A curfew can be one of the following: An order by the government for certain persons to return home before a certain time. ... Censorship is the use of governmental power to control speech and other forms of human expression. ... The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a country on the Arabian Peninsula. ... His Royal Highness, Prince Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud (Arabic: صاحب السمو الملكي الأمير بندر بن سلطان بن عبدالعزيز آل سعود) (born March 2, 1949) is a highly influential Saudi politician and was Saudi ambassador to the United States from 1983 to 2005. ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... Coal is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground either by underground mining, open-pit mining or strip mining. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... The Workers Party is a name used by various political parties throughout the world. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short, (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... For the workstation, see SGI Fuel. ...

July 19, 2005 (Tuesday)

July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The British Army is the land armed forces of the United Kingdom. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Hizbul Mujahideen (created 1989) is a militant group active in Kashmir. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States. ... John G. Roberts, Jr. ... Justice Sandra Day OConnor Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1981. ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn [Nokhchiyn] Respublika, Russian: Чеченская Республика), informal Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno, Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Seal of the President of the Philippines The President is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The Senate (French: Sénat) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The Civil Marriage Act (full title: An Act respecting certain aspects of legal capacity for marriage for civil purposes) was introduced as Bill C-38 in the first session of the 38th Canadian Parliament on February 1, 2005. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneur général or Gouverneure générale) is the representative of the Canadian monarch. ... Her Excellency the Right Honourable Adrienne Louise Clarkson, CC, CMM, COM, CD (born February 10, 1939) is the current Governor General of Canada. ... Executive President Prime Minister The Union Ministries Legislative Parliament Rajya Sabha Chairman of the Rajya Sabha Lok Sabha Speaker of the House Judicial Supreme Court Chief Justice of the Supreme Court High Courts District Courts Constitution Fundamental Rights and Directive principles Regions States and territories Elections General Elections State Assembly... Dr. Manmohan Singh (Gurmukhi: ਮਨਮੋਹਨ ਸਿੰਘ, Devanagari: मनमोहन सिंह) is the fourteenth Prime Minister of India. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Censorship is the use of governmental power to control speech and other forms of human expression. ... Telephone tapping or Wire tapping/ Wiretapping (in US) describes the monitoring of telephone conversations by a third party, often by covert means. ... Wikinews has a related story: Afghan warlord convicted by British court of torture Zardad Khan (born c. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Fouad Siniora Fouad Siniora (alternative spellings: Fuad Siniora, Fouad Seniora) is the Prime Minister of Lebanon, a position he assumed on 19 July 2005, succeeding Najib Mikati. ... The Hezbollah flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God, for other designations or alternative spellings, see name part of this article) is a political and military party in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... General Michel Aoun in Ehden June 2005 Michel Aoun (born in 1935 in Beirut) is a Lebanese military commander and politician. ... Fire in San Bernardino, California Mountains (image taken from the International Space Station) A wildfire, also known as a forest fire, vegetation fire, grass fire, or bushfire (in Australasia), is an uncontrolled fire in wildland often caused by lightning; other common causes are human carelessness and arson. ...

July 18, 2005 (Monday)

July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... A secret police (sometimes political police) force is a police organization that operates in secret to enforce state security. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević   listen? (Serbian Cyrillic: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced ; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... Flag of the President of Serbia The President of Serbia is the head of state of the Republic of Serbia. ... Ivan Stambolić was a President of Serbia. ... The Federal Constitutional Court (in German: Bundesverfassungsgericht, BVerfG) is a special court established by the German Constitution, the Grundgesetz (Basic Law). ... A court is an official, public forum which a public power establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... Mamoun Darkazanli is a man suspected by Spain of having prior knowledge or participation with the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Duration: July 10 - 21, 2005 Highest winds: 155 mph (250 km/h) Total damages (in USD): Not available Total fatalities: 10 direct, 3 indirect Areas affected: Grenada, Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Yucatán Peninsula, northeastern Mexico, southernmost Texas Hurricane Emily was the fifth storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season and... The Yucatán Peninsula separates the Caribbean Sea from the Gulf of Mexico. ... Tourism in Mexico is a very large industry. ... Evacuation can have several meanings: In wilderness first aid, evacuation is the transport of a seriously injured person out of the wilderness to the nearest point an ambulance can reach to take them to the hospital, or to the nearest emergency room. ... The seafront of Torquay, a seaside resort in Devon, England. ... Satellite photo of Cancún Cancún is a coastal city in Mexicos easternmost state, Quintana Roo. ... Cozumel is an island off the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, opposite Playa del Carmen. ... The United Mexican States or Mexico (Estados Unidos Mexicanos or México) is a federal republic made up of 31 states (estados) and one Federal District, (Distrito Federal), which contains the capital, Mexico City. ... Other Mexican States Capital Chetumal Other major cities Cancún Cozumel list of municipalities Area 50,212 km² Ranked 19th Population (2000 census) 873,800 Ranked 29th Governor of Quintana Roo (2005-2011) Félix González Cantú (PRI) Federal Deputies (2) PRI = 2 Federal Senators PRI = 2 PAN = 1... Typhoon Haitang Typhoon Haitang is the first Typhoon to hit Taiwan in 2005, on July 18, 2005. ... This article is about the prefecture. ... Australian Aborigines are the indigenous peoples of Australia. ... Sir Ronald Wilson Sir Ronald Wilson, AC , KBE , CMG , QC , LL.M , LL.B ( 23 August 1922- 15 July 2005) was born on 23 August 1922 . ... Sky Kingdom is a six-acre spiritual commune located near the village of Kampung-Batu 13, Hulu-Besut district, Terengganu, Malaysia (some 400 km north of Kuala Lumpur and 20 km away from Jertih). ... The Parliament of Lebanon is the Lebanese national legislature. ... Amnesty (from the Greek amnestia, oblivion) is an act of grace by which the supreme power in a state restores those who may have been guilty of any offence against it to the position of innocent persons. ... The cross and symbol of the Lebanese Forces. ... Samir Geagea Samir Geagea (born October 25, 1952) is the formerly imprisoned leader of the Lebanese Forces (LF) militia. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... World map showing location of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Aceh (pronounced Ah-chay) is a special territory (daerah istimewa, or special area) of Indonesia, located on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra. ... Q: What is the first sign you may have contracted AIDS? A: A pounding sensation in the arse. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a think tank which describes itself as dedicated to increasing Americas understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. ... World map showing location of Asia Asia is the central and eastern part of the continent of Eurasia, defined by subtracting the European peninsula from Eurasia. ... Genetic fingerprinting, DNA testing and DNA profiling are techniques used to distinguish between individuals of the same species using only samples of their DNA. Its invention by Sir Alec Jeffreys at the University of Leicester was announced in 1985. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... A highway patrol is either a police agency created primarily for the purpose of overseeing traffic safety compliance on roads and highways, such as the California Highway Patrol, or a detail within an existing local or regional police agency that is primarily concerned with such duties, such as the HWP... General William Westmoreland William Childs Westmoreland (March 26, 1914 – July 18, 2005) was a U.S. Army General who commanded American military operations in the Vietnam War from 1964 to 1968 and who served as US Army Chief of Staff from 1968 to 1972. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population {{{2000Pop}}} (26th)  - Density 51. ...

July 17, 2005 (Sunday)

July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Right Honourable Sir Edward (Ted) Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Salisbury Cathedral from the Cathedral Yard High Street Market Great West Front of Salisbury Cathedral Salisbury (pronounced Solsbree or Sauls-bree) is a small cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Matthew Cooper is a reporter with TIME magazine, who, along with New York Times reporter Judith Miller was held in contempt of court and threatened with imprisonment for refusing to disclose secret sources in stories connecting the White House with the Valerie Plame exposure scandal. ... A grand jury is a type of common law jury; responsible for investigating alleged crimes, examining evidence, and issuing indictments. ... Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950 in Denver, Colorado) is an American political consultant, and (as of 2005) U.S. President George W. Bushs senior advisor, chief political strategist, and deputy chief of staff in charge of policy. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States. ... Valerie Plame with her husband Joseph C. Wilson, photographed after her CIA identity became public knowledge. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Firefighter in full turn out gear with a pickhead axe. ... Fire in San Bernardino, California Mountains (image taken from the International Space Station) A wildfire, also known as a forest fire, vegetation fire, grass fire, or bushfire (in Australasia), is an uncontrolled fire in wildland often caused by lightning; other common causes are human carelessness and arson. ... Places named Guadalajara: Guadalajara (capital of the state of Jalisco, Mexico) Guadalajara aka Chivas (Mexican Soccer League Team) Guadalajara (province in Castile-La Mancha, Spain) Guadalajara (capital of the above province) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Pakistans 610,000-member armed forces, the worlds 7th largest in 2005, are well trained and disciplined. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... An Israeli settlement refers to housing development for Israeli Jews in areas within the control of Israel (as a result of the 1967 Six Day War), but contested by Palestinians residing in those areas. ... Netzarim: Netzarim may relate to members of Nazarene Judaism, which is a religious sect. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Said Seyam (1975-2005), was a Hamas commander of the Ezzedeen-al-qassam Brigades in Khan Yunis. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Ezzedeen-al-Qassam brigades are the military wing of Palestinian militant (often referred to as terrorist) group Hamas. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The traditional definition of a sniper is an infantry soldier especially skilled in field craft and marksmanship who kills selected enemies from concealment with a rifle at large distances. ... An Israeli settlement refers to housing development for Israeli Jews in areas within the control of Israel (as a result of the 1967 Six Day War), but contested by Palestinians residing in those areas. ... Ganei Tal setttlement in Gaza Ganei Tal (×’× ×™ טל) is an Israeli settlement in the southern end of the Gaza Strip. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Mortar has several meanings: A mortar is a military weapon into which is dropped a mortar shell, which is then fired in a high ballistic trajectory. ... An Israeli settlement refers to housing development for Israeli Jews in areas within the control of Israel (as a result of the 1967 Six Day War), but contested by Palestinians residing in those areas. ... Neve Dekalim is an Israeli settlement in the Gaza Strip, founded in 1983, after the Israeli withdrawal from the Sinai Peninsula. ... Sheikh Izz ad-Din al-Qassam (Arabic: عزّ الدين القسّام) (1882-1935) was born in Latakia, Syria and immigrated to the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF) (Hebrew: חיל האוויר Heyl haAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... Beit Lahia (Arabic: بيت لاهية) is a Palestinian village of about 40,000 people in the northern Gaza Strip. ... A bystander is the term given to a person who gets inadvertently caught in crossfire. ... The Popular Resistance Committees (PRC) are a Palestinian militant network which operates in the Gaza Strip. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Condoleezza Condi Rice, (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... An emergency is a situation that poses an immediate threat to human life or serious damage to property. ... Narathiwat is a town in southern Thailand, capital of the Narathiwat province. ... Yala can refer to several things: Yala National Park, Sri Lanka Yala province, Thailand Amphoe Mueang Yala, capital of the province Yala Yala language, am African language spoken in the Niger-Congo area This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Mueang Pattani is a city in the far south of Thailand, near the boundary to Malaysia. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Ali Abdullah Saleh with Dick Cheney Field Marshal Ali Abdullah Salih (born March 21, 1942) is the current President of Yemen. ... Nawal el-Saadawi (Arabic Nawal al-Sa3dâwi) (born October 27, 1931) is an Egyptian feminist writer and activist. ... The Party of the Left. ... The Labor and Social Justice Party (German: Arbeit & soziale Gerechtigkeit – Die Wahlalternative or WASG) is a German political party founded in 2005 by activists disenchanted with the Social Democratic-Green government. ... The Sunni Council is a council of Sunni leaders and religious scholars in the United Kingdom. ... A fatwa (Arabic: ) plural fatāwa (Arabic: ) , is a legal pronouncement in Islam, issued by a religious law specialist on a specific issue. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who believes the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... ASNLF Flag The Free Aceh Movement (Indonesian: Gerakan Aceh Merdeka or simply GAM), also known as the Aceh Sumatra National Liberation Front (ASNLF), is an armed separatist group seeking independence for the Aceh region on Sumatra from Indonesia. ... Province Southern Finland Region Uusimaa District Helsinki City manager Jussi Pajunen Official languages Finnish, Swedish Area  - total  - land ranked 342nd 185. ... == T.R.U.C.E == Teachers Resisting Unhealthy Childrens Entertainment. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) Flag The Kurdistan Workers Party (Kurdish: Partiya Karkerên Kurdistan or PKK), is an organisation originally structured on revolutinary left wing (communist{Maoist}-socialist) ideology under the Kurd nationality (ethnic seperationist) using force and threat of force against both civilian and military targets for the purpose... Kusadasi (1995 pop. ... Taj Mahal is the name of a monument located in Agra, India. ...

July 16, 2005 (Saturday)

July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Equatair is an airline in Equatorial Guinea. ... Private Antonov AN-2 in the UK Antonov, aka Antonov Aeronautical Scientific/Technical Complex (Antonov ASTC) (Ukrainian: ) is a Ukraine-based (since 1952) aircraft manufacturing and services company (design office prefix An) with particular expertise in the field of very large aircraft construction. ... Citing the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, an aviation accident is defined as an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked, and in which any person... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A three-carbon alkane, propane is sometimes derived from other petroleum products during oil or natural gas processing. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad *See Bagdad, Tasmania for the Australian town of a similar name. ... Occupation zones in Iraq as of September 2003 The post-invasion period in Iraq followed the 2003 invasion of Iraq by a multinational coalition led by the United States, which overthrew the Baath Party government of Saddam Hussein. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... It has been suggested that Northern America be merged into this article or section. ... The Chinese Kuomintang chairmanship election of 2005 was held on July 16, 2005 in the Republic of China (Taiwan) between Ma Ying-jeou and Wang Jin-pyng. ... Dr. Ma Ying-Jeou, the Mayor of Taipei City Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九; Hanyu Pinyin: Mǎ Yīngjiǔ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu; Tongyong Pinyin: Ma Yingjiou) (born July 13, 1950) was elected mayor of Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China in 1998 and reelected in 2002. ... Dennis Hastert and Wang Jin-pyng in Washington, DC. Wang Jin-pyng (Chinese: 王金平, pinyin: Wáng Jīnpíng) (born March 17, 1941), Taiwanese politician, is the President of the Legislative Yuan and one of six vice chairmen of the Kuomintang. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Liberal democracy History of democracy Referenda Representative democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by ideology...

July 15, 2005 (Friday)

July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF) (Hebrew: חיל האוויר Heyl haAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Cable News Network (CNN) is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although the latter currently is not recognized in CNNs official history). ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national publicly funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian armed group Hamas. ... A chemist is a scientist who specializes in chemistry. ... Picture of Magdi Asdi el-Nashar. ... On Thursday, 7 July 2005, a series of four bomb explosions struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... A resignation occurs when a person holding a position gained by election or appointment steps down. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Luis Singson is a Governor in the Philippines. ... Joseph Estrada Joseph Estrada, original name Joseph Marcelo Ejército, and widely known as Erap (born April 19, 1937) is a popular film actor in the Philippines and was the 13th President of the Republic of the Philippines from June 30, 1998 to January 20, 2001. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants and children. ... Sir Samuel Roy Meadow (born 1933) is a prominent British paediatrician. ... Struck off means to be removed, usually from a position of power or responsibility or stature. ... The General Medical Council (the GMC) is the regulator of the medical profession in the United Kingdom. ... An expert witness is a witness, who by virtue of education, or profession, or experience, is believed to have special knowledge of his subject beyond that of the average person, sufficient that others may officially (and legally) rely upon his opinion. ... For the Canadian playwright please see Sally Clark (playwright) The British solicitor Sally Clark was convicted in November 1999 for the murder of her two children, Christopher in 1996, and Harry, early in 1998, both within a few weeks of their birth. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Rainbow arching over a paddock of cattle Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... A court is an official, public forum which a public power establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ...

July 14, 2005 (Thursday)

July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest federal court in the United States of America. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the Judicial Branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... William Rehnquist Chief Justice William Hubbs Rehnquist (born October 1, 1924) is an American jurist and former law clerk and Assistant Attorney General. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thyroid cancer is cancer of the thyroid gland. ... Completed tracheotomy: 1 - Vocal cords 2 - Thyroid cartilage 3 - Cricoid cartilage 4 - Tracheal cartileges 5 - Balloon cuff A tracheotomy or tracheostomy is a surgical procedure performed on the neck to open a direct airway through an incision in the trachea (the windpipe). ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1, 2005, and will last through November 30, 2005. ... This article is about the 2005 hurricane. ... Look up Flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... This article is about landslides of mud; a mudslide is also an alcoholic drink. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying hurricanes by the intensity of their sustained winds, developed in 1969 by civil engineer Herbert Saffir and National Hurricane Center director Bob Simpson. ... Moshav (plural as mashavim)is a type of collective agricultural community of individual farms pioneered by the labour Zionists during the second aliyah (wave of Jewish immigration during the 19th Century) The moshavs are similar to kibbutzim with an emphasis on community labour and were designed as part of the... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian armed group Hamas. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al-Fatah faction. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Netanya (Hebrew: נְתַנְיָה, Standard Hebrew NÉ™tanya) is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who believes the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... World map showing location of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... On Thursday 7 July 2005 a series of four bomb attacks struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... Leonid Nevzlin is the former CEO of the Russian oil company Yukos. ... Yukos logo Yukos Oil Company (ОАО НК ЮКОС) is a petroleum company in Russia which, until recently, was controlled by Russian billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky and a number of prominent Russian businessmen. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man) is a hired assassin, usually in the employ of organized crime. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... ... F-4 re-directs here; for alternate uses, see F4 The F-4 Phantom II (simply F-4 Phantom after 1990) is a two-place (tandem), supersonic, long-range, all-weather fighter-bomber built by McDonnell Douglas Corporation. ... The F-5 Freedom Fighter (or Tiger II) is a fighter aircraft, designed and built by Northrop in the USA, beginning in 1962. ... A fighter aircraft is a military aircraft designed primarily for attacking other aircraft, as opposed to a bomber, which is designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping bombs. ... Graham Capill (born 1959) is a former New Zealand politician. ... There are two groups that have used the name the Christian Heritage Party. Christian Heritage Party of Canada Christian Heritage New Zealand (formerly the Christian Heritage Party) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse or harm that involves sexual behavior. ... The World Games, first held in 1981, are an international multi-sport event, meant for sports that are not contested in the Olympic Games. ... Location of Duisburg Duisburgs inner harbour Duisburg is a German city in the western part of the Ruhr Area (Ruhrgebiet) in North Rhine-Westphalia. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Dr. Zaki Badawi (born 1922) is a prominent Islamic scholar, community activist, and promoter of interfaith-dialogue. ... The Chautauqua Institution is a non-profit adult education center and summer resort in Chautauqua, New York. ... Jacques Roche was a prominent journalist and poet of Haiti. ... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... Samukeliso Sithole, a male athlete from Zimbabwe was sentenced to a 3. ... An intersexual or intersex person (or animal of any unisexual species) is one who is born with genitalia and/or secondary sexual characteristics of indeterminate sex, or which combine features of both sexes. ... Isiolo is a town and Catholic diocese in central Kenya. ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ... Luigi Locati (July 23, 1928 - July 14, 2005) was an Italian Catholic missionary and bishop. ...

July 13, 2005 (Wednesday)

July 13th is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A National Hockey League labor dispute in the United States and Canada lasted between September 16, 2004 and July 13, 2005. ... A work stoppage is an event at which work at a place of employment has come to a halt, either through a strike action, where employees cease working (often backed up by a labor union), or through a lockout, where the employer bars the employees from entering the place of... It has been suggested that Northern America be merged into this article or section. ... Professional sports are sports in which the participants receive payment for playing, as opposed to amateur sports where they are not. ... For a time, WorldCom (WCOM) was the United States second largest long distance phone company (AT&T was the largest). ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Bernard John Ebbers Bernard John Ebbers, also known as Bernie Ebbers (born August 27, 1941 in Edmonton, Alberta), is a Canadian-born businessman. ... A prison is a place in which people are confined and deprived of a range of liberties. ... Conspiracy, in common usage, is the act of working in secret to obtain some goal, usually understood with negative connotations. ... SEC is a TLA which can refer to: In general context, an abbreviation for second. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the Judicial Branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... William Rehnquist Chief Justice William Hubbs Rehnquist (born October 1, 1924) is an American jurist and former law clerk and Assistant Attorney General. ... Thyroid cancer is cancer of the thyroid gland. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... STS-114 was the Return to Flight Space Shuttle mission which launched Space Shuttle Discovery at 10:39 EDT (14:39 UTC), July 26, 2005. ... Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-103) is a NASA Space Shuttle. ... Merritt Island and Kennedy Space Center The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is the NASA space vehicle launch facility (spaceport) at Cape Canaveral on Merritt Island in Florida, United States. ... Human spaceflight is space exploration with a human crew, and possibly passengers (in contrast to dog-manned space missions, which are remotely-controlled or robotic space probes). ... Shuttle debris falling over Texas, on Time cover The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster was the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-107) over Texas on February 1, 2003, during reentry into the Earths atmosphere. ... // Australia is a constitutional monarchy, a federation and a parliamentary democracy. ... The Australian Special Air Service or SAS is a special forces regiment styled around the original British SAS. It is based in Perth, Western Australia and forms part of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist and Pashtun nationalist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... The American Family Association (AFA) is a conservative, fundamentalist Christian non-profit organization founded in 1977 by Rev. ... Nike, Inc. ... Kmart is a retailing division of Sears Holdings Corporation. ... One of the Guys is an earnestly satirical and picaresque novel by Robert Clark Young, published in 1999, concerning the fantastical adventures of a man posing as a chaplain on a U.S. Navy ship which goes berserk and terrorizes a number of ports in the Far East before the... Robert Clark Young (born 1960) is an American author of novels, essays, and short stories. ... Osu Sukam is an ex-minister of Malaysia. ... The United Malays National Organisation (UMNO), Pertubuhan Kebangsaan Melayu Bersatu in Malay, is the largest political party in Malaysia and a founding member of the Barisan Nasional coalition, which has ruled the country uninterrupted since independence. ... Gambling (or betting) is any behavior involving risking money or valuables (making a wager or placing a stake) on the outcome of a game, contest, or other event in which the outcome of that activity depends partially or totally upon chance or upon ones ability to do something. ... Xinjiang (Chinese: æ–°ç–†; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsin1-chiang1; Postal Pinyin: Sinkiang; literal meaning: New Frontier; Uyghur: ), full name Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, is an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Categories: Pages needing attention | Stratovolcanoes | Subduction volcanoes | Volcanoes of Java | Mountains of Indonesia | Indonesia geography stubs ... This article is about volcanoes. ... Map of Java Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... Manila (Filipino: Maynila) is the capital city of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Ghotki is a city of southern Pakistan. ... Pakistan Railways is the national railroad of Pakistan. ... Lima is the capital and largest city in Peru. ... Medicine on the Web NLM (National Library of Medicine, contains resources for patients and healthcare professionals) Virtual Hospital (digital health sciences library by the University of Iowa) Online Medical Dictionary Collection of links to free medical resources Categories: Medicine | Health ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Spanish Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Dasliu is a luxury goods store, with departments in Brazil. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... Ishihara (right) in a typical election poster pose with local lawmaker Ichiro Akita (left). ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... Species Mammuthus columbi Columbian mammoth Mammuthus exilis Pygmy mammoth Mammuthus jeffersonii Jeffersonian mammoth Mammuthus meridionalis Mammuthus primigenius Wooly mammoth A mammoth (from Russian мамонт) is any of a number of an extinct genus of elephant, often with long curved tusks and, in northern species, a covering of long hair. ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. Like many large cities, San Joses downtown is expansive and encompasses much more area than shown in this view. ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... Anterior view of the femur The femur or thigh bone is the longest (length), largest (volume) and strongest (mechanical ability to resist deformity) bone of the human body. ... Pacific Walrus at Cape Peirce A tusk is an extremely long tooth of certain mammals that protrudes when the mouth is closed. ... Human male pelvis, viewed from front Human female pelvis, viewed from front The pelvis is the bony structure located at the base of the spine (properly known as the caudal end). ...

July 12, 2005 (Tuesday)

July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... St. ... On Thursday 7 July 2005 a series of four bomb attacks struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Leeds Coat Of Arms Map sources for Leeds at grid reference SE297338 Leeds is a city in the county of West Yorkshire, in the north of England. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in England, corresponding roughly to the core of the West Riding of the traditional county of Yorkshire. ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who believes the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... An Israeli settlement refers to housing development for Israeli Jews in areas within the control of Israel (as a result of the 1967 Six Day War), but contested by Palestinians residing in those areas. ... Netanya (Hebrew: נְתַנְיָה, Standard Hebrew NÉ™tanya) is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Albert II, Prince of Monaco, here pictured in an official portrait before his succession. ... Rainier III ruled Monaco from 1949 to 2005. ... Alexandre Coste on the cover of Paris Match Éric Alexandre Stéphane Coste (born August 24, 2003 in Paris), known as Alexandre Coste, is the son of Albert II, Prince of Monaco, and his former lover, Nicole Coste, a former flight attendant from Togo in west Africa. ... Duration: July 4 - 13, 2005 Highest winds: 150 mph (240 km/h) Total damages (in USD): $5-9 billion Total fatalities: 60 direct, 11 indirect Areas affected: Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, Ohio Valley region Hurricane Dennis was the fourth named tropical cyclone and the first hurricane... Sellapan Ramanathan (born July 3, 1924 in Singapore) is the sixth and current President of Singapore. ... Xinjiang (Chinese: æ–°ç–†; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsin1-chiang1; Postal Pinyin: Sinkiang; literal meaning: New Frontier; Uyghur: ), full name Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, is an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Barcelona within Barcelonès Population (2003) 1,582,738 Area 1004 Km2 Population density (2001) 15,764/Km2 Barcelona is the capital city of Catalonia, an autonomous community in northeastern Spain, and Spains second-largest city (after Madrid). ... European Court of Justice The ECJ should not be mistaken for the European Court of Human Rights, a Council of Europe institution. ... A vitamin is an organic molecule whose insufficiency in the diet can result in disease. ... Elias Murr is the outgoing Lebanese Defense Minister. ... Transports Schiocchet Excursions is a French bus company that runs a bus route from Moselle to Luxembourg. ... Carpooling is shared use of a car, in particular for commuting to work, often by people who each have a car but travel together to save costs. ... Washington, D.C., short for the District of Columbia (also known as the the District or, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. ... Scott McClellan (born 1968) is the current White House Press Secretary for President George W. Bush. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950 in Denver, Colorado) is an American political consultant, and (as of 2005) U.S. President George W. Bushs senior advisor, chief political strategist, and deputy chief of staff in charge of policy. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Valerie Plame with her husband Joseph C. Wilson, photographed after her CIA identity became public knowledge. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Procter & Gamble headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Gillette may refer to: Gillette, Wyoming The Gillette Company, founded by King C. Gillette. ... ... For a time, WorldCom (WCOM) was the United States second largest long distance phone company (AT&T was the largest). ... Bernard John Ebbers, also known as Bernie Ebbers, (born August 27, 1941) is a Canadian-born business man. ... The term federal court, when used by itself, can refer to: Any court of the national government in a country that has a federal system such as that of the United States (United States federal courts) or Mexico In some countries, a particular court, for example, the Federal Court of... San José is the capital and largest city of the nation of Costa Rica. ... General Khin Nyunt (born October 11, 1939 in Kyauktan, Burma) was the Prime Minister of Myanmar and the chief of intelligence of the Myanmar Army. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional or an authority person money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics or other rules in a variety of situations. ... Yangôn, formerly Rangoon, population 4,504,000 (2001), is the capital of Myanmar. ... Capital Vitoria-Gasteiz Official languages Basque and Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 14th  7 234 km²  1,4% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 7th  2 108 281  5,0%  291,44/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Basque  â€“ Spanish  Basque  euskal herritar, euskaldun  vasco/a, vascongado/a Statute of Autonomy... Oil power plant in Iraq A power station (also power plant) is a facility for the generation of electric power. ... Amorebieta-Etxano or Zornotza are two different names for the same town located in Bizkaia (Basque country). ... Cityscape of Bilbao, with the Guggenheim Museum on the bottom right Bilbao from satellite (NASA World Wind Landsat) Bilbao (Basque: Bilbo) is a city in northern Spain, the largest city in the Pais Vasco and the capital of the province of Vizcaya (Basque: Bizkaia). ... ETA can refer to: eta is a Basque word for and. Eta (letter) - from the Greek alphabet. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The World Food Programme (WFP) is an agency of the United Nations which distributes food commodities to support development projects, to long-term refugees and displaced persons and as emergency food assistance in situations of natural and man-made disasters. ... European Court of Justice The ECJ should not be mistaken for the European Court of Human Rights, a Council of Europe institution. ... Fishing from a Pier Fishing is a term applied to any activity which aims to capture fish or shellfish for subsistence, scientific, commercial or recreational purposes. ... A quota is a prescribed number or share of something. ... Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama, popularly known as Frank Bainimarama, (born 27 April 1954), is the Commander of the Fijian military, who served as Head of the Interim Military Government from 29 May to 13 July 2000, when he handed power over to the newly-appointed President Ratu Josefa Iloilo. ... Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice (and usually of the whole state). ... Amnesty (from the Greek amnestia, oblivion) is an act of grace by which the supreme power in a state restores those who may have been guilty of any offence against it to the position of innocent persons. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... British Airways is the largest airline of the United Kingdom. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925), is a British stateswoman and was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990, also Leader of the Opposition from 1975, and the only woman to date to hold those positions. ...

July 11, 2005 (Monday)

  • The Indonesian government asks TV stations to close down between 1 am and 5 am daily for six months in order to save energy after recent increases in the price of crude oil. Broadcasts of immensely-popular live European football matches which happen in the middle of the Indonesian night, are excluded from the shutdown. (BBC)
  • The General Synod of the Church of England adopts a resolution "that the process for removing the legal obstacles to the ordination of women to the episcopate should now be set in train"; and schedules debate on the best form of legislation to achieve this for its February 2006 session. (BBC)
  • The 17th Maccabi Games are officially begun with a ceremony in Israel. More than 7000 Jewish athletes will compete on various sporting events. (Ynet)
  • The body of a U.S. Navy SEAL has been found and recovered in Afghanistan, a senior defense official said Sunday. (CNN)
  • In Kyrgyzstan, acting president Kurmanbek Bakiev wins presidential elections with 89% support so far (IHT) (Reuters)
  • In China a mine explosion has killed 22 miners in Xinjiang province. 35 men were rescued while over 30 are still missing. (Xinhua) (China Daily) (Reuters)
  • The Roman Catholic Church defrocks six New York priests accused of sexual abuse, returning them to lay status. (IHT)
  • In the Netherlands, Mohammed Bouyeri, suspected killer of filmmaker Theo van Gogh, goes on trial (Expatica, Netherlands) (Reuters AlertNet) (Bloomberg)
  • In Bosnia and Herzegovina, tens of thousands of people gather in Potocari to commemorate the Srebrenica massacre and rebury 610 victims (Reuters) (BBC) (Al-Jazeera)
  • In the USA, doctor in Mayo Clinic says some drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease may cause addiction to gambling and sex (News-Medical.Net) (Forbes) (Scientific American)
  • Mexican police releases Joaquín Romero Aparicio, who was falsely suspected of being a drug lord Vicente Carrillo (El Universal) (Reuters)
  • According to United States Department of Labor, Enron agrees to $356.25 million settlement with employees whose retirement plans were ruined. They are likely to receive only 15-20% of that (Forbes) (Reuters)
  • In Russia, state prosecutors begin investigation for alleged fraud and abuse of official position against former prime minister Mikhail Kasyanov. He is potential future presidential candidate (Moscow Times) (RIA Novosti) (Bloomberg)
  • Sanjay Shah, man who has spent 13 months in Nairobi airport, goes through British citizenship ceremony (BBC)
  • In Trinidad and Tobago, bomb explosion injures 13-15 people (sources disagree) in the capital Port-of-Spain (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • Brazilian police detains opposition congressman and bishop João Batista Ramos da Silva of the Liberal Front Party and six others who had been transporting $2.6 million in cash in seven suitcases (MercoPress) (Bloomberg)
  • In Somalia, gunmen kill prominent peace activist Abdulkadir Yahya Ali (ReliefWeb) (Reuters AlertNet)

July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The General Synod is the governing body of the Church of England, a church within the Anglican Communion. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... In the Abrahamic religions, different sects and denominations take a variety of different positions on the issue of ordination of women. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... An athlete is a person possessing above average physical skills (strength, agility, and endurance) and thus seen suitable for physical activities, in particular, contests. ... SEALs in from the water. ... Kurmanbek Bakiyev, left, speaks to Ishenbai Kadyrbekov Kurmanbek Saliyevich Bakiyev (Курманбек Салиевич Бакиев) (born August 1, 1949 in Masadan in Kyrgyzstan. ... Kyrgyzstan held a presidential election on 10 July 2005. ... Mining accidents are dangerous and often deadly accidents which occur in the process of mining minerals from underneath the surface of the planet. ... Xinjiang (Chinese: æ–°ç–†; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsin1-chiang1; Postal Pinyin: Sinkiang; literal meaning: New Frontier; Uyghur: ), full name Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, is an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian body in the world. ... To defrock a priest is to deprive him of the right to exercise the functions of the priestly office. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse or harm that involves sexual behavior. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... Mohammed Bouyeri Mohammed Bouyeri (b. ... Theo van Gogh Theo van Gogh (July 23, 1957 – November 2, 2004) was a controversial Dutch film director, television producer, publicist and actor. ... The Srebrenica massacre was the July 1995 killing of a large number of Bosniak males, ranging in age from teenagers to the elderly, in the region of Srebrenica by a Bosnian Serb army under general Ratko Mladić including special forces Scorpions from Serbia. ... The Mayo Clinic is a world-renowned medical practice operated by the Mayo Foundation, a non-profit organization based in Rochester, Minnesota. ... Addiction is an uncontrollable compulsion to repeat a behavior regardless of its consequences. ... Gambling (or betting) is any behavior involving risking money or valuables (making a wager or placing a stake) on the outcome of a game, contest, or other event in which the outcome of that activity depends partially or totally upon chance or upon ones ability to do something. ... Look up Sex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A sex is one of two specimen categories of species that recombine their genetic material in order to reproduce, a process called genetic recombination. ... The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re-employment services, and some economic statistics. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ... Retirement is the status of a worker who has stopped working. ... Mikhail Mikhailovitch Kasyanov (Михаи́л Миха́йлович Касья́нов) (born 8 December 1957) was the Prime Minister of Russia from January 2000 to February 2004. ... Sanjay Shah is a former Keyan national. ... Nairobi skyline Nairobi is the capital of Kenya. ... Port-of-Spain, population 49,000 (metro: 300,000) (2000), is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago. ... ...

July 10, 2005 (Sunday)

  • Ten Afghan soldiers are decapitated by Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan. (Guardian)
  • Hurricane Dennis makes landfall in the United States, slamming into the Florida Panhandle with 120 mph winds.(CNN)
  • Italy announces that it will begin its withdrawal of troops from Iraq in September by pulling 300 of Italy's 3,000 soldiers out of the country. (Guardian)
  • Luxembourg says "yes" to the EU Constitution in a referendum. (wikinews)
  • Former rebel leader John Garang is sworn in as vice president of Sudan as part of the agreement ending the Second Sudanese Civil War. (Sudan Tribune), (Boston Globe)
  • In Azerbaijan, about 30,000 (other sources varying from 10,000 up to 50,000) opposition members demonstrated in the country's capital, calling for fair parliamentary elections. (Photos)
  • Karl Rove's lawyer, Robert Luskin, acknowledges that Rove was connected to the leak that led to the revelation of Valerie Plame's position as a CIA agent. Luskin confirmed that Rove had been interviewed by Cooper for the article. It is unclear, however, what passed between Cooper and Rove. "Rove did not mention her name to Cooper," Luskin said. "This was not an effort to encourage Time [magazine] to disclose her identity. What he was doing was discouraging Time from perpetuating some statements that had been made publicly and weren't true." Luskin had previously said that Rove "absolutely did not identify Valerie Plame." (Newsweek), (Washington Post), (Newsmax)
  • In Turkey, bomb in Cesme injures 22. Group called the Kurdish Liberation Hawks takes responsibility (Zaman Online) (Al-Jazeera) (Reuters)
  • The Maccabiah games has started.

July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Duration: July 4 - 13, 2005 Highest winds: 150 mph (240 km/h) Total damages (in USD): $5-9 billion Total fatalities: 60 direct, 11 indirect Areas affected: Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, Ohio Valley region Hurricane Dennis was the fourth named tropical cyclone and the first hurricane... The Florida Panhandle is the region of the state of Florida which includes the westernmost 16 counties in the state. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... John Garang, August 2004 Dr. John Garang de Mabior (June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005) was the vice president of Sudan and former leader of the rebel Sudan Peoples Liberation Army. ... The Second Sudanese Civil War started in 1983, although it is most accurately a continuation of the First Sudanese Civil War of 1955 to 1972. ... Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950 in Denver, Colorado) is an American political consultant, and (as of 2005) U.S. President George W. Bushs senior advisor, chief political strategist, and deputy chief of staff in charge of policy. ... Robert D. Luskin (born January 21, 1950) is an attorney and partner in the law firm of Patton Boggs LLP, specializing in White-collar crime and federal and state government investigations. ... Valerie Plame with her husband Joseph C. Wilson, photographed after her CIA identity became public knowledge. ... Cesme is a small village on the west coast of Turkey. ... The Maccabiah is a sport event which take place every four years in Israel participated by Jews sportsman from all over the world. ...

July 9, 2005 (Saturday)

July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This article is about the city in England. ... A bill is a law introduced within a legislature to be read as part of procedure to become a law. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... The Minnesota State Legislature is the legislative branch of government in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... Hamid Karzai, (Pushtu: حامد کرزي Dari: حامد کرزی) (born December 24, 1957) is the current and first democratically elected President of Afghanistan (since December 7, 2004). ... Osama bin Laden Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born March 10, 1957) (Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden (Arabic: ), is usually considered to be the figurehead of al-Qaeda, a Sunni Islamist terrorist network that has been involved in attacks against civilians and military targets... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Porter Goss Porter Johnston Goss (born November 26, 1938) is an American politician and the current Director of the Central Intelligence Agency . ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Documentary film is a broad category of cinematic expression united by the intent to remain factual or non-fictional. ... The Yugoslav wars were a series of violent conflicts in the territory of the former Yugoslavia that took place between 1991-2001. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Sava Center is a congress, cultural and business center in Belgrade, having the largest audience hall in Serbia and Montenegro and entire former Yugoslavia. ... Belgrade (Serbian, Београд, Beograd   listen? also known in Hungarian as Nándorfehérvár), is the capital of Serbia since 1404, Serbia and Montenegro (2003–Present) and Yugoslavia (1918–2003). ... Official G8 2005 Portrait. ... The Gleneagles Hotel is a luxury hotel in Perthshire, Scotland. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Main languages English Scots Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... Aid is assistance, often financial, provided to developing countries by developed countries. ... Poverty is the state of being without, often associated with need, hardship and lack of resources across a wide range of circumstances. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ...

July 8, 2005 (Friday)

  • Following general elections in May, Ethiopia releases the first round of official results for 307 of 527 parliamentary seats. The ruling EPRDF has won 139 seats, while opposition parties CUD and UEDF won 93 and 42, respectively. Smaller parties and independent candidates won the remaining 33 seats. CUD and UEDF announced plans to form a coalition government. (BBC News)
  • Hurricane Dennis, the first hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, approaches Cuba. It is heading towards the Gulf Coast of the United States, with landfall expected on Sunday or Monday. (NOAA) (Wikinews)
  • In the Bulacan province of the Philippines, medical authorities report the country's first case of avian influenza. (Channel News Asia) (Reuters AlertNet) (Science Daily)
  • Also in the Philippines, resigned ministers, other politicians and businessmen call president Gloria Arroyo to resign as well and hand the reins of the country over to to vice president Noli de Castro. (Channel News Asia) (ABS-CBN) (Reuters)
  • Florida Governor Jeb Bush closes the inquiry into the case of Terri Schiavo, having been informed by prosecutors that there is no evidence of any crime leading to her 1990 collapse. (Reuters)
  • File-swapping service iMesh confirms that it has entered into a licensing agreement with music giant Sony/BMG. The deal is widely considered a reaction to a recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court threatening liability for file swapping software providers.

July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Ethiopia held general elections on May 15, 2005, for seats in both its national and in four local parliaments. ... The Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Democratic Front, or EPRDF, is the ruling political party of Ethiopia. ... The Coalition for Unity and Democracy (or CDU) is a coalition of four existing political parties of Ethiopia which combined to compete for seats in the Ethiopian General Elections held on May 15, 2005. ... The United Ethiopian Democratic Forces (or UEDF) is a coalition of several existing political parties of Ethiopia which combined to compete for seats in the Ethiopian General Elections held on May 15, 2005. ... Duration: July 4 - 13, 2005 Highest winds: 150 mph (240 km/h) Total damages (in USD): $5-9 billion Total fatalities: 60 direct, 11 indirect Areas affected: Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, Ohio Valley region Hurricane Dennis was the fourth named tropical cyclone and the first hurricane... This article is about weather phenomena. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1, 2005, and will last through November 30, 2005. ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red. ... Bulacan is a province of the Philippines located in the Central Luzon region. ... Influenza A virus, the virus that causes Avian flu. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Noli de Castro, Jr. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953), a Republican, is the forty-third and current Governor of Florida. ... Terri Schiavo before her 1990 collapse. ... iMesh is a file sharing service that uses the FastTrack protocol, founded by Israeli company iMesh. ... Sony Corporation (Japanese katakana: ソニー) (TYO: 6758), (NYSE: SNE) is a global consumer electronics corporation based in Tokyo, Japan. ... Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in Gütersloh, Germany. ... Holding Producers of technology who promote the ease of infringing on copyrights can be sued for inducing copyright infringement committed by their users. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...

July 7, 2005 (Thursday)

  • London bombings: Four explosions are reported on the London Underground and bus system, leading to the entire transport network being shut down. A previously unheard-of splinter group of al-Qaeda has claimed responsibility, though their involvement has not yet been verified. The attacks have left at least 50 people dead and roughly 700 others injured. (BBC (1)) (BBC (2)) (Wikinews)
  • Malta becomes the 12th European Union member to ratify the EU constitution and the first to do so unanimously. (di-ve)
  • In the Philippines, president Gloria Arroyo asks all the members of her cabinet to resign. (Channel News Asia)
  • The United States raises the terror level from code yellow to code orange for mass transit systems in response to the London bombings. (Guardian) (EmergencyEmail) (CNN) (Wikinews)
  • Egypt confirms its most senior envoy to Iraq, Ihab al-Sherif, has been killed after being kidnapped last week. A group related to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi has claimed responsibility. (CNN) (Guardian)
  • Researchers halt a study in Africa after results indicate that circumcised men are 70% less likely to contract AIDS. The study will be presented at the Third International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis and Treatment later this month. Meanwhile, others argue that ritual circumcision increases the risk of infection because of poor sanitary conditions. (Advocate) (AllAfrica)
  • The Brazilian congress announces a referendum on banning firearms sales. (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Turkey, a land mine placed on the tracks derails a freight train. There are no reports of casualties. (NTV-MSNBC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Hungary, a hoaxed bomb threat forces evacuation of three shopping malls. (Pestiside.Hu) (Reuters)
  • In Mexico, the city of Nuevo Laredo chooses Omar Pimentel as the new chief of police. When gangsters assassinated the previous chief a month ago, Mexican federal police occupied the city and arrested the whole police force for investigation. (El Universal) (BBC)

July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... On Thursday 7 July 2005 a series of four bomb attacks struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Slight modifications to the famous London Underground roundel indicate the name of each station on platform and some outdoor signs. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe is a proposed constitutional treaty for the European Union. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... In the United States, the Homeland Security Advisory System is a color-coded terrorism threat advisory scale. ... Skytrain Bangkok. ... On Thursday 7 July 2005 a series of four bomb attacks struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Ihab al-Sherif (died July 2005) was the Egyptian envoy to Iraq. ... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous. ... Circumcision is the removal of some or all of the prepuce (foreskin). ... Q: What is the first sign you may have contracted AIDS? A: A pounding sensation in the arse. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The phrase Gun politics refers to the views of different people within a particular country as to what degree of control (increased gun rights vs. ... Some firearms A firearm is a kinetic energy mechanical device that fires either a single or multiple projectiles propelled at high velocity by the gases produced by action of the rapid confined burning of a propellant. ... A landmine is a type of mine which is placed onto or into the ground and explodes when triggered by a vehicle or person. ... Cargo is a term used to denotes goods or produce being transported generally for commercial gain, usually on a ship, plane, train or lorry. ... There are various types of trains designed for particular purposes, see rail transport operations. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... A bomb threat is a form of terrorism -- a threat to detonate an explosive. ... The Mall, an out-of-town shopping centre at Patchway, near Bristol, England. ... Nuevo Laredo is a city in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. ...

July 6, 2005 (Wednesday)

  • 24 confirmed dead after more than 300 heavily-armed UN troops, assisted by Haitian National Police carry out a major pre-dawn military raid in Cite Soleil, one of the poorest comunities in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in what eyewitnesses claim was not a firefight, but a slaughter, using machine guns, tanks, 83-CC grenades and tear gas. Eyewitnesses reported that when people fled to escape the tear gas, UN troops shot them from behind. U.N. military commander, Lieutenant General Augusto Heleno claimed that the operation was a success. Heleno claims that the victims were "outlaws", UN Colonel Morano suggests that ballistics tests be done on the dead. Medicine Without Borders (the single hospital that serves Cite Soleil) records show an influx of civilian casualties, starting at 11:00 a.m July 6: twenty-six live victims -- 20 of them women or children -- from Cite Soleil suffering mostly from gunshot wounds.[1]; [2]; [3]; [4] (video link, requires RealPlayer)
  • New York Times reporter Judith Miller is jailed for refusing to divulge her source in an investigation around the leak of a CIA operative's name. (CNN) (New York Times)
  • The European Parliament rejects the proposed Directive on the patentability of computer-implemented inventions by a 648-14 vote with 18 abstentions, ending four years of intense debate and lobbying. (BBC) (Forbes) (Bloomberg) (Businessweek)
  • The International Olympic Committee names London, United Kingdom as the site of the 2012 Summer Olympics. (BBC) (ABC) (CNN) (Wikinews)
  • In India, the opposition Bharatiya Janata Party calls for a nationwide strike in protest of the Tuesday attack on the Ayodhya site. The police are on high alert in case of religious violence. (Newindpress) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC) (Bloomberg)
  • In Bolivia, the senate decides to call for early elections. There will also be a referendum on regional autonomy next July. (Bloomberg) (BBC)
  • In Burundi, the former Hutu rebel group Forces for the Defence of Democracy wins 58% of the vote in parliamentary elections. (News24) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Prince Albert II of Monaco admits publicly that he is a father of an illegitimate son by Nicole Coste (BBC)
  • In Egypt, Cairo court postpones the trial of presidential candidate Ayman Nour until September 25, allowing him to contest the election (Egypt election) (BBC)
  • In Chile, court strips Augusto Pinochet of presidential immunity from prosecution in the investigation of disappearance of political opponents in so-called Operation Colombo (IHT) (BBC) (Bloomberg)
  • In China, explosion in a Zhengde shopping mall in Liaoyang County of Liaoning Province injures 47. According to local police, it was a case of attempted revenge (Xinhua) (China Daily) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Burma/Myanmar releases 249 dissidents from jail. Aung San Suu Kyi remains in house arrest (Democratic Voice of Burma) (Channel News Asia)
  • In Nigeria, treason charges against 53 football players are dropped and chaged to charges of membership of illegal organization. They are member of pro-Biafra group MASSOB (BBC) (Reuters SA)
  • In Niger, thousands of people flee to Nigeria to escape crop failure and famine. Government says it cannot afford any food aid (AllAfrica) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Somalia, interim president Abdullah Yusuf states that he going to march towards Mogadishu from Jowhar, collecting support and militia as he goes (BBC)
  • In India 1000 demonstrators protesting attack in Ayodhya clash with riot police in New Delhi. No group has claimed responsibility for the attack. There are small protests in other cities as well but police state that disturbances are minor compared to clashes in previous years. Congress president Sonia Gandhi warns that opposition should not "politicize" the incident (Newindpress) (WebIndia123) (Reuters India) (BBC)
  • George W. Bush collides with a police officer while riding a bike. Bush suffers minor scrapes and the officer's ankle is injured. (Yahoo! News)

July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Categories: Caribbean geography stubs | Capitals in North America | Haiti ... See also the town of Battle, East Sussex, England Generally, a battle is an instance of combat between two or more parties wherein each group will seek to defeat the others. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Judith Miller (born 1948 in New York City) is a journalist for the New York Times. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The European Union (EU) Directive on the patentability of computer-implemented inventions (2002/0047/COD) was a proposal for an EU law which aimed to harmonise EU national patent laws and practices, which involved the granting of patents for computer-implemented inventions provided they meet certain criteria. ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ... The International Olympic Committee is an organisation based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organise this sports event every four years. ... St. ... The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, will be held in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Ayodhya (अयोध्या) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Hutu is the name given to one of the three ethnic groups occupying Burundi and Rwanda. ... The National Council for the Defense of Democracy–Forces for the Defense of Democracy (NCDD–FDD) was the most significant rebel group active in the Burundi Civil War and became a major political party in Burundi. ... Albert II, Prince of Monaco, here pictured in an official portrait before his succession. ... Illegitimacy was a term in common usage for the condition of being born of parents who are not validly married to one another; the legal term is bastardy. ... Nicole Coste on the cover of Paris Match Nicole Coste, (born December 6, 1971) is a former Air France flight attendant from Togo. ... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; romanized: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... Ayman Nour is an Egyptian politician, a member of that countrys Parliament and chairman of the al-Ghad party (Tomorrow Party). He became famous around the world following his imprisonment by the Egyptian government of President Hosni Mubarak on charges of corruption. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... ... The Mall, an out-of-town shopping centre at Patchway, near Bristol, England. ... A dissident, broadly defined, is a person who actively opposes an established opinion, policy, or structure. ... Aung San Suu Kyi Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (ေအာင္ဆန္းစုက္ရည္; born June 19, 1945 in Rangoon, Burma, now known as Yangon, Myanmar) is a nonviolent pro-democracy activist in Burma. ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... National motto: none Official language Igbo, English Capital Enugu Largest city Port Harcourt Head of State Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu Chief of General Staff (VP) Philip Effiong Area ?- Total ?- % water Population;- Total 13,500,000 (1967) Currency Biafran pound (BIAP) Created May 30, 1967 Dissolved January 15, 1970 National anthem Land... A famine is a phenomenon in which a large percentage of the population of a region or country are undernourished and death by starvation becomes increasingly common. ... Mogadishu A Mogadishu boy straddles the remains of a US Black Hawk helicopter during the 1992-1995 UN peacekeeping operation Mogadishu (Somali: Muqdisho) is a city in eastern Africa, on the Indian Ocean. ... Jauhar (sometimes written jowhar) was originally the voluntary death on a funeral pyre of the queen or the royal women of defeated Rajput cities or forts in order to avoid capture. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Ayodhya (अयोध्या) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... Riot control are the measures to control a riot or to break up an unwanted demonstration (usually of protestors). ... This article is about the city which is the capital of India. ... Sonia Gandhi Sonia Gandhi (सोनिया गाँधी) (born December 9, 1946), is an Italian-born Indian politician, the president of the Indian National Congress (Congress Party) and the widow of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States. ...

July 5, 2005 (Tuesday)

  • Kansas City Southern Railway names Francisco Javier Rión as the new CEO, succeeding interim CEO Vicente Corta Fernandez, for its subsidiary Grupo Transportación Ferroviaria Mexicana. Before joining TFM, Rión was president of Bombardier's Rail Control Solutions Division in London, England, from 2001 to 2005, president and managing director of Bombardier's Mexican division from 1995 to 2001, and general director of Dina Autobuses/Consorción-Grupo Dina from 1991 to 1995. (Business Journal of Kansas City) (KCS)
  • The Al Jazeera Network states it will be expanding by broadcasting English language content into the United States by March of 2006. (CNN)
  • The United Church of Christ becomes the first mainline U.S. Christian denomination to officially support same-sex marriages by passing a resolution calling for member churches to consider wedding policies "that do not discriminate against couples based on gender." It also asks churches to consider supporting legislation granting equal marriage rights to gay and lesbian couples and to work against laws banning gay marriage. (San Jose Mercury News) (BBC) (Turkish Weekly) (United Church of Christ) (AP)
  • Scientists uncover evidence that humans lived in the Americas 45,000 years ago, 30,000 years earlier than previously thought. (BBC)
  • Elections in Albania: Vote tallying in the 2005 Albanian general election continues. Voter turnout was over 50% and results are expected later in the day. International observers, including OSCE, have expressed reservations about the voting process. Three people have been killed during the election. (Euro-Reporters) (Reuters) (Guardian Unlimited)
  • In Indonesia, an earthquake ranking from 6.0-6.7 on the Richter scale hits Sumatra. No reports on any damage have yet been released. (Channel News Asia) (Malaysian Star) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In India, militants attack and try to storm a makeshift temple of Ram in Ayodhya, Uttar Pradesh; most of them die in a firefight with the security forces. There are differing reports about the number of attackers and how many were killed. The temple site is a source of dispute between Muslims and Hindus. (Newindpress) (Rediff) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Germany, Sven Jaschan, suspected creator of Sasser worm, goes on trial. (BBC)
  • In Brazil, secretary general Silvio Pereira of the ruling Worker's Party resigns for the duration of the parliamentary inquiry into vote-buying. (BBC)
  • In Iraq, gunmen attack envoys from Pakistan and Bahrain. The attacks come three days after Egypt's top envoy was ambushed in the street and injured. The attempted kidnappings are meant to discourage other nations from having ties with Iraq. (LA Times)
  • The government of Indonesia announced the extension of its immunization campaign against polio. The second round in this campaign was originally scheduled to end yesterday. (Bloomberg)
  • In Germany, workmen remove the unofficial Berlin Wall memorial in Berlin, after the original builders refuse to obey a court order to do so. (Deutsche Welle) (IHT)
  • In Peru, former president Alberto Fujimori receives new identity papers and may return to the country. Peru still wants him for charges of murder and corruption. (Reuters AlertNet)
  • In Austria, state procecutors investigate allegations that Iran's president-elect Mahmood Ahmadinejad would have been involved with the 1989 assassination of Kurdish leader Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou in Vienna. (IranMania) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In France, large forest fires rage in the French Riviera. Authorities evacuate thousands. (BBC)
  • Sudanese government and two rebels groups, including Sudan Liberation Movement and Justice and Equality Movement, sign a declaration of principles towards the peace talks. This ends three weeks of negotiations in the Nigerian capital Abuja. Talks are adjourned until August 24. (Reuters AlertNet) (Reuters) (BBC)

July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Kansas City Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark KCS) is a United States-based Class I railroad operating over 3,130 track miles in 10 central and southeastern states. ... Transportación Ferroviaria Mexicana (Mexican Rail Transportation) is the name of a company dedicated to freight transportation using rail in the North Eastern part of Mexico. ... Bombardier Inc. ... St. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ... In the United States, the Mainline churches are those Protestant denominations with moderate theologies which attempt to be open to new ideas and societal changes without abandoning what they consider to be the historical basis of the Christian faith. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... The expression pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact refers to interactions or claims of interactions between Native American peoples and peoples of other continents — Europe, Africa, Asia, or Oceania — before the historically recorded European discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. ... Elections in Albania gives information on election and election results in Albania. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... A tally (also see tally sticks) is an unofficial private observation of an election count carried out under Proportional Representation using the Single Transferable Vote. ... Albania will be holding its parliamentary elections in an undefined date between the 3rd of July and the 3rd of August 2005. ... Voter turnout is a measure of the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in any given election. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Sumatra (also spelled Sumatara and Sumatera) is the sixth largest island of the world (approximately 470,000 km²) and is the largest part of Indonesia. ... Ayodhya (अयोध्या) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... Uttar Pradesh (Hindi: उत्तर प्रदेश, Urdu: اتر پردیش), also popularly known by its acronym UP, is the fifth largest and the most populous state in India. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... A Hindu is an adherent of Hinduism, the predominant religious, philosophical and cultural system of Bharat (India). ... Sven Jaschan (born April 29, 1986) is the self-confessed author of the NetSky and Sasser computer worms. ... The Sasser worm is a computer worm that spreads on computers running the Microsoft operating systems Windows XP and Windows 2000. ... Brazilian Workers Party flag. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Berlin Wall on November 16, 1989 The Berlin Wall (German: Die Berliner Mauer) was a long barrier separating West Berlin from East Berlin and the surrounding territory of East Germany. ... Sculpture on the Discoveries Age and Portuguese Navigators in Lisbon, Portugal A memorial is an object served as a memory of something, usually a person (who has died) or an event. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Alberto Kenya Fujimori (アルベルト・ケンヤ・フジモリ Aruberuto Kenya Fujimori, born July 28, 1938), also known as Kenya Fujimori (藤森 謙也 Fujimori Kenya), was President of Peru from July 28, 1990 to November 17, 2000. ... Mahmoud Ahmadinejad Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (محمود احمدی‌نژاد; born 1956), also written Ahmadinezhad, is the President-elect of Iran and will become the sixth president on August 2, 2005. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Hungarian: Bécs) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... Fire in San Bernardino, California Mountains (image taken from the International Space Station) A wildfire, also known as a forest fire, vegetation fire, grass fire, or bushfire (in Australasia), is an uncontrolled fire in wildland often caused by lightning; other common causes are human carelessness and arson. ... The Promenade des Anglais in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... The Justice and Equality Movement is a rebel group involved in the Darfur conflict. ... Abuja, estimated population 1,078,700, is the capital of Nigeria in western Africa. ...

July 4, 2005 (Monday)

July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Institutional Revolutionary Party (Spanish: Partido Revolucionario Institucional or PRI) is a Mexican political party that wielded hegemonic power in the country – under a succession of names – for more than 70 years. ... Elections in Burundi gives information on election and election results in Burundi. ... The National Assembly is the name of either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... Hutu is the name given to one of the three ethnic groups occupying Burundi and Rwanda. ... The National Council for the Defense of Democracy–Forces for the Defense of Democracy (NCDD–FDD) was the most significant rebel group active in the Burundi Civil War and became a major political party in Burundi. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... Illustration of the Deep Impact space probe after impactor separation (artists conception) Deep Impact is a NASA space probe designed to study the composition of the interior of the comet Tempel 1. ... Comet Hale-Bopp, showing a white dust tail and blue gas tail (February 1997) A comet is a small body in the solar system that orbits the sun and (at least occasionally) exhibits a coma (or atmosphere) and/or a tail -- both due primarily to the effects of solar radiation... Comet 9P/Tempel 1 taken by the Deep Impact impactor Tempel 1 is a periodic comet (formally designated 9P/Tempel 1). ... Karla Homolka Karla Leanne Homolka, also known as Karla Leanne Teale, born May 4, 1970 in Port Credit, Ontario, Canada, was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 12 years in prison for her role in abetting her husband, serial killer, kidnapper, and rapist Paul Bernardo. ... Karla Homolka & Paul Bernardo on their wedding day Paul Kenneth Bernardo (he later assumed the name Paul Teale) (born August 27, 1964 in Scarborough, Ontario) is a Canadian serial killer, known for the murders he committed with his wife Karla Homolka. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Moshe Katsav (Courtesy: Israeli Knesset) Moshe Katsav (Hebrew מֹשֶׁה קַצָּב Mōšeh Qaṣṣāḇ), born December 5, 1945) is the current President of Israel (since 2000). ... Jack Ruby murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, in a very public manner. ... The Prime Minister of Israel is the elected head of the Israeli government. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Legitimacy is the popular acceptance of a governing regime or law. ... Illegitimacy was a term in common usage for the condition of being born of parents who are not validly married to one another; the legal term is bastardy. ... An astrological chart (or horoscope) - Y2K Chart — This particular chart is calculated for January 1, 2000 at 12:01:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time in New York City, New York, USA. (Longitude: 074W0023 - Latitude: 40N4251), using the tropical zodiac Astrology (from Greek: αστρολογία = άστρον, astron, star + λόγος, logos, word) is... Marina Bai (born 1965) is a Russian astrologer who sued NASA in July, 2005 for 300 million dollars. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... Illustration of the Deep Impact space probe after impactor separation (artists conception) Deep Impact is a NASA space probe designed to study the composition of the interior of the comet Tempel 1. ... Motorola T2288 mobile phone A mobile phone is a portable electronic device which behaves as a normal telephone whilst being able to move over a wide area (compare cordless phone which acts as a telephone only within a limited range). ... Sky Kingdom is a six-acre spiritual commune located near the village of Kampung-Batu 13, Hulu-Besut district, Terengganu, Malaysia (some 400 km north of Kuala Lumpur and 20 km away from Jertih). ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Jack Ruby murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, in a very public manner. ... Pernod Ricard is a French company producing alcoholic beverages. ... Allied Domecq PLC is a company that operates spirits, wine, and quick service restaurant businesses. ... Dunkin Donuts is an international doughnut purveyor founded in 1950 in Quincy, Massachusetts by William Rosenberg. ...

July 3, 2005 (Sunday)

July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Country: Switzerland Residence: Oberwil, SUI Height: 185 cm (61) Weight: 80 kg (177 lbs. ... Country: United States Residence: Boca Raton, Florida, USA Height: 6 ft 2 in (187 cm) Weight: 190 lb (86 kg) Plays: Right Turned pro: 2000 Highest singles ranking: 1 (11/3/2003) Singles titles: 17 Career prize money: $8,305,251 Grand Slam Record Titles: 1 Australian Open SF (2003... Steve Fossett (born April 22, 1944, Tennessee) is a United States millionaire and adventurer. ... World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... The Vickers Vimy was a British heavy bomber aircraft of the World War I era. ... Transatlantic flight is any flight of an aircraft, whether airplane, balloon or other device, which involves crossing the Atlantic Ocean -- with a starting point in North America or South America and ending in Europe or Africa, or vice versa. ... Statue of Alcock and Brown at London (Heathrow) Airport British aviators Alcock and Brown (Captain John Alcock and Lieutenant Arthur Whitten Brown) made the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1919. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Clifden (An Clochán in Irish) is a town on the coast of County Galway, Ireland. ... Connemara (Irish Conamara), which derives from Conmaicne Mara, (meaning: descendants of Conmhac, of the sea) is a district in the west of Ireland (County Galway). ... The Canadian city of St. ... Ihab al-Sherif (died July 2005) was the Egyptian envoy to Iraq. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... The Arab world The Arab world comprises twenty-three countries stretching from Morocco in the west to Oman in the east. ... Albania will be holding its parliamentary elections in an undefined date between the 3rd of July and the 3rd of August 2005. ... The Institutional Revolutionary Party (Spanish: Partido Revolucionario Institucional or PRI) is a Mexican political party that wielded hegemonic power in the country – under a succession of names – for more than 70 years. ... The United Mexican States, or Mexico, is a federal republic, comprising 31 states. ... PriÅ¡tina (Приштина) (Serbian) or Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian indefinite/definite form) is the capital city of Kosovo, a landlocked province of Serbia located at 42°40′ N 21°10′ E. It is estimated that the current population of PriÅ¡tina is as high as 500,000. ... Kosova (Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova, Serbian: Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija), in English most often called just Kosovo, is a province of Serbia. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Peacekeeping, as defined by the United Nations, is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... Ibrahim Rugova Ibrahim Rugova (b. ... Bajram Kosumi (born March 20, 1960) is the Prime Minister of Kosovo as of March 23, 2005 and the deputy chairman of the Alliance for the Future of Kosovo. ... Elections in Mauritius gives information on election and election results in Mauritius. ... Paul Berenger Paul Raymond Bérenger (born March 26, 1945) is a Mauritian politician of French ancestry and former Prime Minister of Mauritius from 2003 to July 5, 2005. ... The Mauritian Militant Movement (Mouvement militant mauricien, MMM) is the ruling political party of Mauritius. ... Navin Ramgoolam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... Mayor Datuk Ruslin Hasan District Kuala Lumpur District Area  - Total (City) 243. ... This article is about volcanoes. ... Landsat photo of Iwo Jima, circa 2000 Iwo Jima  listen? (Japanese 硫黄島 Iōtō, or Iōjima, meaning sulfur island) is a volcanic island in Japan, part of the Volcano Islands (also known as the Ogasawara Islands), approximately 650 miles (1046 km) south of Tokyo (24. ... A Microchip is, properly, an integrated circuit. ... Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. ... State nickname: The First State Other U.S. States Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Governor Ruth Ann Minner Official languages None Area 6,452 km² (49th)  - Land 5,068 km²  - Water 1,387 km² (21. ... Antitrust or competition laws, legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) (founded 1968) is a U.S.-based multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ...

July 2, 2005 (Saturday)

July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... In mathematics, the Conway groups Co1, Co2, and Co3 are three sporadic groups discovered by John Horton Conway. ... MSNBC logo MSNBC (word origin: grammatical blend of MSN and NBC) is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States. ... Lawrence ODonnell is a senior MSNBC political analyst who regularly appears on The McLaughlin Group. ... Matthew Cooper is a reporter with TIME magazine, who, along with New York Times reporter Judith Miller was held in contempt of court and threatened with imprisonment for refusing to disclose secret sources in stories connecting the White House with the Valerie Plame exposure scandal. ... Valerie Plame with her husband Joseph C. Wilson, photographed after her CIA identity became public knowledge. ... Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950 in Denver, Colorado) is an American political consultant, and (as of 2005) U.S. President George W. Bushs senior advisor, chief political strategist, and deputy chief of staff in charge of policy. ... Executive President Prime Minister The Union Ministries Legislative Parliament Rajya Sabha Chairman of the Rajya Sabha Lok Sabha Speaker of the House Judicial Supreme Court Chief Justice of the Supreme Court High Courts District Courts Constitution Fundamental Rights and Directive principles Regions States and territories Elections General Elections State Assembly... Dr. Manmohan Singh (Gurmukhi: ਮਨਮੋਹਨ ਸਿੰਘ, Devanagari: मनमोहन सिंह) is the fourteenth Prime Minister of India. ... The proposed canal The Sethusamudram Shipping Canal Project proposes linking the Palk Bay and the Gulf of Mannar between India and Sri Lanka by creating a shipping canal through the shallow sea sometimes called Setu Samudram, and through the island chain of Ramas Bridge. ... A Long Island fisherman cleans his nets A fisherman in central Chile A fisherman is a person who engages in the activity of fishing. ... Environmentalism is activism aimed at improving the environment, particularly nature. ... The Live 8 poster Live 8 was a series of concerts that took place in July 2005, in the G8 nations and South Africa. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... Poverty is the state of being without, often associated with need, hardship and lack of resources across a wide range of circumstances. ... Q: What is the first sign you may have contracted AIDS? A: A pounding sensation in the arse. ... G8 countries. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... U2 at Live Aid (Wembley Stadium, London) Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985. ... Bushrangers were criminals who used the Australian bush as a refuge to hide from the authorities between committing their robberies, roughly analogous to the British-American highwayman. Their targets often included small-town banks or coach services. ... Ned Kelly the day before his execution Edward Ned Kelly (approx 1854-5 [DOB uncertain] – November 11, 1880) is Australias most famous bushranger, and, to some, a folk hero for his defiance of the colonial authorities. ... Glenrowan is a small town located in the Benalla Local Government Area of Victoria, Australia. ... A heritage site is a location where a landmark of natural or cultural importance is legally protected. ... David Zabriskie, a professional cyclist, is the third American ever to wear the maillot jaune or yellow leaders jersey in the Tour de France bicycle race behind Greg Lemond and Lance Armstrong. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... Armstrong on the cover of Sports Illustrated shortly before the 2005 Tour de France. ...

July 1, 2005 (Friday)

July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Samir Sumaidaie is a Sunni Muslim and was born in Baghdad. ... Al Anbar is a province in the nation of Iraq. ... A denomination in the Christian sense is an identifiable religious body, organization under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ... The General Synod is the governing body of the Church of England, a church within the Anglican Communion. ... Atlanta is the capital and largest city of Georgia, a state of the United States of America. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... The word schism, from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ... The Bali Bombing occurred on October 12, 2002 in the town of Kuta on the Indonesian island of Bali, killing 202 people and injuring a further 209. ... Map of Indonesia showing Jakarta Jakarta (also Djakarta or DKI Jakarta, formerly known as Batavia) is the capital and the largest city of Indonesia, located on the northwest coast of the island of Java, at 6°11′ S 106°50′ E. It has an area of 650 km² and a... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest federal court in the United States of America. ... Justice Sandra Day OConnor Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1981. ... Australian Senate chamber Entrance to the Senate The Australian Senate is the upper of the two houses of the Parliament of Australia. ... Legislative elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ... John Howard John Winston Howard (born July 26, 1939), is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia, coming to office on March 11, 1996 and winning re-election in 1998, 2001 and 2004. ... Parliament House, Canberra The Parliament of Australia is the legislative branch of Australia. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... The Minnesota State Legislature is the legislative branch of government in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), also known as cot death and crib death, is the term for the sudden and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant aged one month to one year. ... Sir Samuel Roy Meadow (born 1933) is a prominent British paediatrician. ... The General Medical Council (the GMC) is the regulator of the medical profession in the United Kingdom. ... The Lancet is a British medical journal, published weekly by the Lancet Publishing Group. ... The scapegoat was a goat that was driven off into the wilderness as part of the ceremonies of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, in Judaism during the times of the Temple in Jerusalem. ... The Bundestag (Federal Diet) is the parliament of Germany. ... A Motion of Confidence is a motion of support proposed by a government in a parliament or other assembly of elected representatives to give members of parliament (or other such assembly) a chance to register their confidence for a government. ... Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944), a German politician, has been serving as Chancellor of Germany since 1998. ... The German federal election of 2005 will be held on 18 September 2005 to elect members to the Bundestag (lower house) of Germany, following the unsuccessful motion of confidence in Gerhard Schröder on 1 July . ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... Location within Italy Flag of Genoa Christopher Columbus monument in Piazza Aquaverde Genoa (Italian Genova, Genoese Zena, French Gênes) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. ... The Department of Anti-terrorism Strategic Studies (Italian: Dipartimento Studi Strategici Antiterrorismo, DSSA) is an Italian organization set up in 2004. ... The 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks (also known as 11/3, 3/11, M-11 and 11-M) were a series of coordinated terrorist bombings against the commuter train system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004, which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,800. ... }|135px|City of Toronto, Ontario Official Flag]]|Coat Image=[[Image:{{{Coat Image}}}|135px|City of Toronto, Ontario Coat of Arms]]}} {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Diversity Our Strength {{Canadian City/Location Image is:{{{Location Image Type}}}|[[Image:{{{Location Image}}}|thumbnail|250px|City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada location. ... Tulip Mosque in Ufa, Russia. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Daewoo, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab, and Vauxhall. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt by virtue of law. ... The Romanian leu (plural: lei; ISO 4217 code RON) is the national currency of Romania. ... ISO 4217 is an international standard describing three letter codes to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ...

Past events by month

2005: January February March April May June
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 11 - September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack occurs in United States; more than 3,000 killed in New York City and The Pentagon in Washington, D.C. as a result. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: October 2 - Bankruptcy of Swissair. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


News collections and sources

  • Wikipedia:News collections and sources.
  • Wikipedia:News sources - This has much of the same material organized in a hierarchical manner to help encourage NPOV in our news reporting.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cassel: Civil Liberties Watch - July 2005 Archives (4036 words)
July 4, 2002, the first since 9/11, the nation was on "orange alert." I knew security would be "tight," because the news was full of it.
Her childhood was filled with July 4's on the mall-from the time she was a infant, up to the prior year when we all (grandkids, husband, friends) watched the fireworks from the federal courthouse where she was working at the time.
On Friday, July 1, I was preparing to debate issues related to Bush’s judicial nominees with an employee of a well-known conservative “think tank.” The audience was a group of 400 high school students in Washington, DC for a week.
7 July 2005 London bombings - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6864 words)
The 7 July 2005 London bombings were a series of coordinated bomb blasts that struck London's public transport system during the morning rush hour.
On 12 July the BBC reported that Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke, Metropolitan Police counter-terrorism chief, had said that the property of one of the bombers had been found at both the Aldgate and Edgware Road blasts.
By 25 July there were still disruptions to the Piccadilly Line (which was not running between Arnos Grove and Hyde Park Corner in either direction), the Hammersmith and City Line (which was only running a shuttle service between Hammersmith and Paddington) and the Circle Line (which was suspended in its entirety).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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