FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Julian Lincoln Simon
Part of the Politics series on
Libertarianism

Factions
Agorism
Anarcho-capitalism
Geolibertarianism
Libertarian socialism
Left-libertarianism
Minarchism
Neolibertarianism
Paleolibertarianism
Politics is a process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy advocating that individuals should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they do not infringe on the same liberty of others. ... Agorism is a radical left-libertarian political philosophy popularized by Samuel Edward Konkin III, who defined an agorist as a conscious practitioner of counter-economics (peaceful black markets and grey markets). ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds along with other forms of libertarian individualism that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community. ... Libertarian socialism is any one of a group of political philosophies dedicated to the abolition of property by restoring direct control of production and resources to the working class. ... Historically, the term libertarianism was first coined by leftist followers of Mikhail Bakunin to describe their own, anti-statist version of socialism, as contrasted with the state socialism propounded by Karl Marx. ... In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal - only large enough to protect the liberty of each and every individual, without violating the liberty of any individuals itself, thus maximizing... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Murray Rothbard and Lew Rockwell, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ...


Influences
Anarchism
Austrian School
Chicago School
Classical liberalism
Objectivism
This article or section may contain inappropriate or misinterpreted citations. ... The Austrian School is a school of economic thought that rejects economists overreliance on methods used in natural science for the study of human action, and instead bases its formalism on a logic of action known as praxeology. ... The Chicago School of Economics is a school of thought in economics; it refers to the style of economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago after 1946. ... Classical liberalism (also called laissez-faire liberalism[1]) is a term used to describe the following: the philosophy developed by early liberals from the Age of Enlightenment until John Stuart Mill and revived in the 20th century by Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Ideas
Civil liberties
Free markets
Laissez-faire
Liberty
Individualism
Non-aggression
Private property
Self-ownership
Free trade
To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... The Statue of Liberty is a very popular icon of liberty. ... Methodological individualism is a philosophical orientation toward explaining broad society-wide developments as the accumulation of decisions by individuals. ... The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, anticoercion principle, or zero aggression principle) is a deontological ethical stance associated with the libertarian movement. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... Self-ownership is the condition where an individual has the exclusive moral or legal right to control his or her own body and life. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ...


Key issues
History
Parties
Economic views
Views of rights
Theories of law
Modern libertarians see themselves as having revived the original doctrine of liberalism, and often call themselves libertarians and classical liberals interchangeably. ... Many countries and subnational political entities have libertarian political parties. ... The Austrian School of economics and the Chicago School of economics are important foundations of the economic system favored by modern libertarians —capitalism, where the means of production are privately owned, economic and financial decisions are made privately rather than by state control, and goods and services are exchanged in... Libertarians and Objectivists limit what they define as rights to variations on the right to be left alone, and argue that other rights such as the right to a good education or the right to have free access to water are not legitimate rights and do not deserve the same... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ...

Politics Portal ·  v·d·e 

This article is about the economist Julian Simon. For the Spanish motorcycle racer, see Julián Simón. Julian Simon (born in Villacanas, Spain, April 3, 1987) is a professional moto racer, height 167 cm, weight 56 kg. ...


Julian Lincoln Simon (February 12, 1932February 8, 1998) was professor of business administration at the University of Maryland and a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. He wrote many books and articles, mostly on economic subjects. He is best known for his work on population, natural resources, and immigration. He was the primary proponent of the cornucopian belief in endless resources and unlimited population growth empowered by technological progress. His works are often cited by libertarians in support of their arguments. February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... A professor giving a lecture The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., USA. Founded in 1856, the University of Maryland is considered to be a Public Ivy... The Cato Institute is a large libertarian, non-profit public policy research foundation (think tank) headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and... Face-to-face trading interactions among on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor In the social sciences, economics is the study of human choice behavior and how it effects the production, distribution, and consumption of scarce resources. ... A cornucopian is someone who posits that there are few intractable natural limits to growth, and believes the planet can provide a practically limitless abundance of natural resources. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy advocating that individuals should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they do not infringe on the same liberty of others. ...

Contents

[edit]

Thought

His 1981 book The Ultimate Resource is a criticism of the conventional wisdom on population growth, raw-material scarcity and resource consumption. Simon argues that our notions of increasing resource-scarcity ignore the long-term declines in wage-adjusted raw material prices. Viewed economically, he argues, increasing wealth and technology make more resources available; although supplies may be limited physically they may be viewed as economically indefinite as old resources are recycled and new alternatives are developed by the market. Simon challenged the notion of a pending Malthusian catastrophe—that an increase in population has negative economic consequences; that population is a drain on natural resources; and that we stand at risk of running out of resources through over-consumption. Simon argues that population is the solution to resource scarcities and environmental problems, since people and markets innovate. His critique was praised by Nobel Laureate economists Friedrich Hayek & Milton Friedman, the latter in a 1998 foreword to The Ultimate Resource II, but has also attracted many critics, such as Paul R. Ehrlich and Albert Bartlett . Human population increase from 10,000 BC – 2000 AD. Population growth is change in population over time, and can be quantified as the change in the number of individuals in a population per unit time. ... A Malthusian catastrophe, sometimes known as a Malthusian check, Malthusian crisis, Malthusian dilemma, Malthusian disaster or Malthusian trap, is a return to subsistence-level conditions as a result of agricultural (or, in later formulations, economic) production being eventually outstripped by growth in population. ... Friedrich Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian economist and political philosopher, noted for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ... Milton Friedman Milton Friedman (born July 31, 1912) is an American economist, known for his work on macroeconomics, microeconomics, economic history, statistics, and for his advocacy of laissez-faire capitalism. ... Paul Ralph Ehrlich (born May 29, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a Stanford University professor and a renowned entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera (butterflies). ... Albert A. Bartlett is a retired Emeritus Professor of Physics University of Colorado, Boulder, USA. Professor Bartlett has lectured over 1,500 times on Arithmetic, Population, and Energy. He has famously stated that The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function. ...


His 1984 book The Resourceful Earth (co-edited by Herman Kahn), is a similar criticism of the conventional wisdom on population growth and resource consumption and a direct response to the Global 2000 report. Herman Kahn Herman Kahn (February 15, 1922 – July 7, 1983) was a military strategist and systems theorist employed at RAND Corporation, USA. // Background Born in Bayonne, New Jersey, Kahn grew up in the Bronx, then in Los Angeles following his parents divorce. ... Conventional wisdom is a term coined by the economist John Kenneth Galbraith, used to describe certain ideas or explanations that are generally accepted as true by the public. ...


Simon was skeptical, in 1994, of claims that human activity caused global environmental damage, notably in relation to CFCs, ozone depletion and climate change, the latter primarily because of the rapid switch from fears of global cooling and a new ice age (in the mid 1970s) to the later fears of global warming.[1] Simon also listed numerous claims about environmental damage and health dangers from pollution as "definitely disproven". These included claims about lead pollution & IQ, DDT, PCBs, malathion, Agent Orange, asbestos, and the chemical contamination at Love Canal (The Ultimate Resource 2, pp260-265). For other uses, see CFC (disambiguation). ... Global monthly average total ozone amount The term ozone depletion is used to describe two distinct but related observations: a slow, steady decline, of about 3% per decade, in the total amount of ozone in the earths stratosphere during the past twenty years and a much larger, but seasonal... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years Climate change refers to the variation in the Earths global climate or regional climates over time. ... Lead poisoning is a medical condition, also known as saturnism, plumbism or painters colic, caused by increased blood serum lead levels. ... For other uses, see DDT (disambiguation). ... Labelling transformers containing PCBs Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic compounds with 1 to 10 chlorine atoms are attached to biphenyl and a general structure of C12H10-xClx. ... Malathion is a organophosphate parasympathomimetic which binds irreversibly to cholinesterase. ... Vietnam. ... Fibrous asbestos on muscovite Asbestos Asbestos Asbestos (a misapplication of Latin: asbestos quicklime from Greek : a, not and sbestos, extinguishable) describes any of a group of minerals that can be fibrous, many of which are metamorphic and are hydrous magnesium silicates. ... Love Canal (1981) Love Canal is a neighborhood in Niagara Falls, New York, located at (43. ...

[edit]

Vision of the Future

Julian Simon believed in the long term-sustainability of humanity and claimed in a 1995 policy report for the Cato Institute "We have in our hands now—actually in our libraries—the technology to feed, clothe, and supply energy to an ever-growing population for the next 7 billion years. Most amazing is that most of this specific body of knowledge was developed within just the past two centuries or so, though it rests, of course, on basic knowledge that had accumulated for millennia. Indeed, the last necessary additions to this body of technology—nuclear fission and space travel—occurred decades ago."[2] A policy is a plan of action to guide decisions and actions. ... The Cato Institute is a large libertarian, non-profit public policy research foundation (think tank) headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and...


Julian Simon concluded his Cato Institute report: "Progress toward a more abundant material life does not come like manna from heaven, however. My message certainly is not one of complacency. The ultimate resource is people—especially skilled, spirited, and hopeful young people endowed with liberty—who will exert their wills and imaginations for their own benefit and inevitably benefit the rest of us as well." The Cato Institute is a large libertarian, non-profit public policy research foundation (think tank) headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and...

[edit]

Influence

Simon was one of the founders of free-market environmentalism. An article The Doomslayer profiling Julian Simon in Wired magazine inspired Bjørn Lomborg to write the book The Skeptical Environmentalist. Free market environmentalism is an ideology that argues the free market is the best tool to preserve the health and sustainability of the environment. ... Bjørn Lomborg Bjørn Lomborg (born January 6, 1965) is an Adjunct Professor at the Copenhagen Business School and a former director of the Environmental Assessment Institute in Copenhagen. ... The Skeptical Environmentalist: Measuring the Real State of the World (Danish: Verdens Sande Tilstand, literal translation: The Real State of the World) is a controversial book by political scientist Bjørn Lomborg, which argues that claims made about global warming, overpopulation, declining energy resources, deforestation, species loss, water shortages, and...


Simon was also the first to suggest that airlines should provide rewards for travelers to give up their seats on overbooked flights, rather than arbitrarily taking random passengers off the plane (a practice known as "bumping"). Although the airline industry initially laughed at him, his plan was later implemented with resounding success, as recounted by Milton Friedman in the foreword to The Ultimate Resource II. A Boeing 747-400 of Virgin Atlantic Airways, one of the UKs largest airlines. ... Overbooking is a term used to describe the sale of access to a service which exceeds the capacity of the service. ...


Although Simon's arguments about the beneficial nature of population growth were not generally accepted, they contributed to a shift in opinion in the literature on demographic economics from a strongly Malthusian negative view of population growth to a more neutral view. More recent theoretical developments, based on the ideas of the demographic dividend and demographic window have largely superseded the older debate in which Simon was a protagonist. The demographic dividend is a rise in the rate of economic growth due to a rising share of working age people in a population. ... Demographic Window is defined to be that period of time in a nations demographic evolution when the proportion of population of working age group is particularly prominent. ...


Simon wrote a memoir, A Life Against the Grain, which was published by his wife after his death.

[edit]

Wagers with rivals

[edit]

Paul R. Ehrlich

A wager between Julian Simon and Paul Ehrlich was made in 1980 over the price of metals a decade later; Simon had been challenging environmental scientists to the bet for some time. Ehrlich, John Harte and John Holdren selected a basket of five metals that they thought would rise in price with increasing scarcity and depletion. Paul Ralph Ehrlich (born May 29, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a Stanford University professor and a renowned entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera (butterflies). ... Julian L. Simon and Paul Ehrlich entered in a famous wager in 1980, betting on a mutually agreed upon measure of resource scarcity over the decade leading up to 1990. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... In economics and business, the price is the assigned numerical monetary value of a good, service or asset. ... Hot metal work from a blacksmith In chemistry, a metal (Greek: Metallon) is an element that readily forms positive ions (cations) and has metallic bonds. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ...


Simon won the bet, with all five metals dropping in price. Supporters of Ehrlich's position suggest that much of this price drop came because of an oil spike driving prices up in 1980 and a recession driving prices down in 1990, pointing out that the price of the basket of metals actually rose from 1950 to 1975. They also suggest that Ehrlich did not consider the prices of these metals to be critical indicators, and that Ehrlich took the bet with great reluctance. On the other hand, Ehrlich selected the metals to be used himself, and at the time of the bet called it an "astonishing offer" that he was accepting "before other greedy people jump in," hardly suggesting reluctance. Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Petroleum (from Greek petra – rock and elaion – oil or Latin oleum – oil ) or crude oil is a black, dark brown or greenish liquid found in porous rock formations in the earth. ... A recession is usually defined in macroeconomics as a fall of a countrys real Gross Domestic Product in two or more successive quarters of a year. ... This article is about the year. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ...


Simon's critics claim that none of the actual supplies of these metals increased during this time, but that prices declined during the period of the wager for a variety of reasons:

  • The price of tin went down because of an increased use of aluminium, a much more abundant, useful and inexpensive material.
  • Better mining technologies allowed for the discovery of vast nickel lodes, which ended the near monopoly that was enjoyed on the market.
  • Tungsten fell due to the rise of the use of ceramics in cookware.
  • The price of chrome fell due to better smelting techniques.
  • The price of copper began to fall due to the invention of fiber optic cable (which is derived from sand), which serves a number of the functions once reserved only for copper wire.

However, in all of these cases, better technology allowed for either more efficient use of existing resources, or replacement of those resources with something more abundant and less expensive, which is the point of Simon's theories. General Name, Symbol, Number tin, Sn, 50 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 5, p Appearance silvery lustrous gray Atomic mass 118. ... General Name, Symbol, Number aluminium, Al, 13 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 13, 3, p Appearance silvery Atomic mass 26. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nickel, Ni, 28 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 4, d Appearance lustrous, metallic Atomic mass 58. ... A lode is the metalliferous ore that fills a fissure in a rock or a vein of ore deposited between layers of rock. ... In economics, a monopoly (from the Latin word monopolium - Greek language monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a product or service. ... General Name, Symbol, Number tungsten, W, 74 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 6, 6, d Appearance grayish white, lustrous Atomic mass 183. ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικος (keramikos, potters earth, or pottery). The term covers inorganic non-metallic materials whose formation is due to the action of heat. ... cast-iron iron enamel stainless steel The cooking pan is a type of food preparation utensil commonly found in the kitchen which includes many more specific cooking vessels such as saucepans and frying pans (or fry pans). ... Chrome may refer to: Chrome is a song from Debbie Harrys debut solo album Koo Koo. ... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance metallic pinkish red Atomic mass 63. ... Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ... Patterns in the sand Sand is an example of a class of materials called granular matter. ...

[edit]

Proposed 2nd wager with Paul Ehrlich

In 1995, Simon issued a challenge for a second bet. Ehrlich declined, and proposed instead that they bet on a metric for human welfare. Ehrlich offered Simon a set of 15 metrics over 10 years, victor to be determined by scientists chosen by the president of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005. There was no meeting of minds, because Simon felt that too many of the metrics measured attributes of the world not directly related to human welfare, e.g. the amount of nitrous oxide in the atmosphere. [3] For such indirect, supposedly bad indicators to be considered "bad", they would ultimately have to have some measureable detrimental effect on actual human welfare. Ehrlich refused to leave out measures considered by Simon to be trival. 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The well-being or quality of life of a population is an important concern in economics and political science. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... This article is about nitrous oxide, or laughing gas. ... Layers of Atmosphere (NOAA) Air redirects here. ...


Simon summerized the bet with the following analogy:


"Let me characterize their [Ehrlich and Schneider's] offer as follows. I predict, and this is for real, that the average performances in the next Olympics will be better than those in the last Olympics. On average, the performances have gotten better, Olympics to Olympics, for a variety of reasons. What Ehrlich and others says is that they don't want to bet on athletic performances, they want to bet on the conditions of the track, or the weather, or the officials, or any other such indirect measure." [4]

[edit]

David South

The same year as his second challenge to Ehrlich, Simon also began a wager with David South, professor of the Auburn University School of Forestry. The Simon / South wager [5] concerned timber prices. Consistent with his cornucopian analysis of this issue in The Ultimate Resource, Simon wagered that at the end of a five-year term the consumer price of pine timber would have decreased; South wagered that it would increase. Before five years had elapsed, Simon saw that market and extra-market forces were driving up the price of timber, and he paid Professor South $1,000. Simon died before the agreed-upon date of the end of the bet, by which time timber prices had risen further. A cornucopian is someone who posits that there are few intractable natural limits to growth, and believes the planet can provide a practically limitless abundance of natural resources. ...


Simon's reasoning for his early exit out of the bet was due to "the far-reaching quantity and price effects of logging restrictions in the Pacific-northwest."[6] Julian believes this counted as government interference from Canada, which rendered the bet worthless from the standpoint of his economic principles. So while Julian technically lost the bet, since it only included the possibility of the South Carolina's government interfering with the price of timber, he did not believe the bet proved anything since import restrictions in Canada drove the prices of timber up worldwide.

[edit]

Criticism

Simon's ideas have come under criticism from environmentalists such as Garrett Hardin and Jared Diamond. Garrett Hardin Garrett James Hardin (April 21, 1915 – September 14, 2003) was a controversial ecologist from Dallas, Texas who was most known for his 1968 paper, The Tragedy of the commons. ... Jared Diamond Jared Mason Diamond (born 10 September 1937) is a Jewish-American nonfiction author, evolutionary biologist, physiologist, and biogeographer. ...

  • Diamond, in his book Collapse, suggested that some of Simon's claims are irrealistic or plainly erroneous: Simon suggested, in chapter 28 of his book The Ultimate Resource 2, that "We now have in our hands—really, in our libraries—the technology to feed, clothe, and supply energy to an ever-growing population for the next seven billion years." (the seven-billion-year figure is chosen as it is the predicted life of the solar system left). Diamond noted that calculations indicate that, at current population growth rates, there would be 10 people per square yard of land in 774 years, a mass of people equivalent to the planet's in 2,000 years, and equal to the universe' in 6,000 years. A similar criticism was made by Garrett Hardin, in his book The Ostrich Factor: Our Population Myopia. These criticisms both assumed exponential population growth, with the population doubling every 43 years. However such assumptions may not be realistic since birth rates are declining in many developed and developing countries. This decline has led United Nations organizations to predict that global population growth will actually level off somewhere between about 9 billion in 2050 and 11 billion in 2100.
  • Diamond and others[7] interpret statements by Simon in The Ultimate Resource (page 47), as suggesting that in the future it would be possible to produce "copper" by transmutation from other elements, a process currently too expensive, energy-intensive and slow to be feasible on the industrial scale. In fact Simon had orginally said not "copper" but "copper or its economic equivalent" (page 47, The Ultimate Resource) and later clarified this with the response "It takes much less copper now to pass a given message than a hundred years ago." (The Ultimate Resource 2, page 62, footnote)
[edit]

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed cover Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed is a 2005 English-language book by University of California, Los Angeles geography professor Jared M. Diamond, (ISBN 0143036556). ... Major features of the Solar System (not to scale): The Sun, the eight planets, the asteroid belt containing the dwarf planet Ceres, outermost there is the dwarf planet Pluto (the dwarf planet Eris not shown), and a comet. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the yard. ... Garrett Hardin Garrett James Hardin (April 21, 1915 – September 14, 2003) was a controversial ecologist from Dallas, Texas who was most known for his 1968 paper, The Tragedy of the commons. ... Normal vision. ... In mathematics, a quantity that grows exponentially is one whose growth rate is always proportional to its current size. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Transmutation is the conversion of one object into another. ...

Education

[edit]

Harvard redirects here. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Books

  • The Ultimate Resource (1981), ISBN 0-85520-563-6
  • The Ultimate Resource II (1996), ISBN 0-691-00381-5
  • The Resourceful Earth: A Response to "Global 2000" (1984), ISBN 0-631-13467-0, Julian Simon & Herman Kahn, eds
  • The Economic Consequences of Immigration into the United States
  • Effort, Opportunity, and Wealth: Some Economics of the Human Spirit
  • Good Mood: The New Psychology of Overcoming Depression ISBN 0-8126-9098-2 (Forewords by Albert Ellis and Kenneth Colby)
  • The Hoodwinking of a Nation ISBN 1-56000-434-7 (hard), ISBN 1-4128-0593-7 (soft)
  • A Life Against the Grain: The Autobiography of an Unconventional Economist ISBN 0-7658-0532-4
  • Scarcity or Abundance? A Debate on the Environment (1994), (with Norman Myers), ISBN 0-393-03590-5
  • The Philosophy and Practice of Resampling Statistics
  • Basic research methods in social sciences: The art of empirical investigation, ISBN 0-394-32049-2
  • Resampling: A Better Way to Teach (and Do) Statistics (with Peter C. Bruce)
  • The Science and Art of Thinking Well in Science, Business, the Arts, and Love
  • Economics of Population: Key Modern Writings, ISBN 1-85278-765-1
  • The State of Humanity, ISBN 1-55786-585-X
  • It's Getting Better All the Time : 100 Greatest Trends of the Last 100 Years by Stephen Moore, Julian Lincoln Simon ISBN 1-882577-97-3 manuscript finished posthumously by Stephen Moore
[edit]

Herman Kahn Herman Kahn (February 15, 1922 – July 7, 1983) was a military strategist and systems theorist employed at RAND Corporation, USA. // Background Born in Bayonne, New Jersey, Kahn grew up in the Bronx, then in Los Angeles following his parents divorce. ... Albert Ellis Albert Ellis (born September 27, 1913) is an American cognitive-behavioral therapist who in 1955 developed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, an approach to psychotherapy holding that inappropriate negative emotions arise not from events themselves, but rather from peoples irrational interpretations of these events (the ABC - Antecedent-Behavior...

References

  • Kenneth N. Gilpin. "Julian Simon, 65, Optimistic Economist, Dies." The New York Times. February 12, 1998. B11.
  • Julian L. Simon & Herman Kahn eds(1984) "The Resourceful Earth - A Response to Global 2000" Blackwell ISBN 0-631-13467-0
  • Albert A. Bartlett. Reflections on Sustainability, Population Growth, and the Environment (revised version).
[edit]

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...

Books critical of Julian Simon

  • Ehrlich, Paul R. Betrayal of Science and Reason: How Anti-Environmental Rhetoric Threatens Our Future, 1996. (ISBN 1-55963-483-9)
  • Grant, Lindsey. Elephants in the Volkswagen, 1992. (ISBN 0-7167-2268-2)
  • Hardin, Garrett. The Ostrich Factor: Our Population Myopia, 1998. (ISBN 0-19-512274-7)
[edit]

External links

[edit]

Critiques


  Results from FactBites:
 
Julian Lincoln Simon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1186 words)
Julian Lincoln Simon (February 12, 1932–February 8, 1998) was professor of business administration at the University of Maryland and a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute.
Simon was one of the founders of free-market environmentalism.
Simon was also the first to suggest that airlines should provide rewards for travelers to give up their seats on overbooked flights (a practice popularly known as "bumping"), rather than arbitrarily taking certain passengers off the plane.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m