FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Juanita Brooks

Juanita Brooks (1898) is famous for the integrity with which see researched and wrote about the Mountain Meadows Massacre. Her work is seen by many as the authoritative work on that event. She was a lifelong member-in-good-standing of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.


Brooks was born in Bunkerville, Nevada, in 1898. She was raised in Bunkerville and in 1919 married Ernest Pulsipher, who died of cancer little more than a year later, leaving her with an infant son. She acquired a bachelor's degree from BYU and a master's degree from Columbia University. Settling in St. George, Utah, she became an instructor of English and dean of women at Dixie College. In 1933 she resigned from the college to marry widower Will Brooks and become the stepmother to his four sons. Within five years the couple added a daughter and three sons to their family.


Brooks wrote two books that made her famous: The Mountain Meadows Massacre (1950) and John Doyle Lee: Zealot, Pioneer Builder, Scapegoat (1961). Though they were full of difficult issues for her fellow Latter-day Saints, they became accepted for their integrity, impeccable research, and deep compassion.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Juanita Brooks at AllExperts (473 words)
Juanita Leone Leavitt Pulsipher Brooks (1898 -1989) was an American historian and author, specializing in the American West and Mormon history.
Brooks was born in Bunkerville, Nevada, in 1898.
Brooks is particularly well known for two books on Mormon history: "The Mountain Meadows Massacre" (1950) and "John Doyle Lee: Zealot, Pioneer Builder, Scapegoat" (1961).
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