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Encyclopedia > Journey to the West
Journey to the West
Author Wú Chéng'ēn
Original title 西遊記
Translator many
Country China
Language Chinese
Publisher many
Publication date 1590s
Media type Print ()
ISBN ISBN
The four heroes of the story, left to right: Sūn Wùkōng, Xuánzàng, Zhū Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng.
The four heroes of the story, left to right: Sūn Wùkōng, Xuánzàng, Zhū Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng.
A block print of Journey to the West, Chinese, 16th century.
A block print of Journey to the West, Chinese, 16th century.

Journey to the West (Traditional Chinese: 西遊記; Simplified Chinese: 西游记; Hanyu Pinyin: Xīyóu-jì; Wade-Giles: Hsiyu-chi) is one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. Originally published anonymously in the 1590s during the Ming Dynasty, and even though no direct evidence of its authorship survives, it is ascribed to the scholar Wú Chéng'ēn since the 20th century. Wu Chengen (Traditional Chinese: 吳承恩; Simplified Chinese: 吴承恩; pinyin: Wú ChéngÄ“n) (1500? or 1506?-1582) , was a Chinese novelist and poet of the Ming Dynasty. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... “ISBN” redirects here. ... Download high resolution version (1440x592, 240 KB)Photograph of painting depicting a scene from the Chinese classic Journey to the West. ... Download high resolution version (1440x592, 240 KB)Photograph of painting depicting a scene from the Chinese classic Journey to the West. ... Image File history File links Evl53201b_pic. ... Image File history File links Evl53201b_pic. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... The Four Great Classical Novels (四大名著) of Chinese literature, not to be confused with the Four Books of Confucianism, in order of publication, are: Romance of the Three Kingdoms (三國演義) (1330) Water Margin (水滸傳) (also known as Outlaws of the Marsh) (1573?) Journey to the West (西遊記) (1590) Dream of the Red Chamber (紅樓夢)(1792... Chinese literature spans back thousands of years, from the earliest recorded dynastic court archives to the matured fictional novel arising in the medieval period to entertain the masses of literate Chinese. ... March 14 - Battle of Ivry - Henry IV of France again defeats the forces of the Catholic League under the Duc de Mayenne. ... Ming China under the Yongle Emperor Capital Nanjing (1368-1421) Beijing (1421-1644) Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1368-1398 Hongwu Emperor  - 1627-1644 Chongzhen Emperor History  - Established in Nanjing January 23, 1368  - Fall of Beijing 1644  - End of the Southern Ming April, 1662 Population  - 1393 est. ... Wu Chengen (Traditional Chinese: 吳承恩; Simplified Chinese: 吴承恩; pinyin: Wú ChéngÄ“n) (1500? or 1506?-1582) , was a Chinese novelist and poet of the Ming Dynasty. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


The tale is also often known simply as Monkey. This was one title used for a popular, abridged translation by Arthur Waley; as well as being the title of the Japanese TV series based on the story. The Waley translation has also been published as Adventures of the Monkey God; and Monkey: [A] Folk Novel of China; and The Adventures of Monkey. The novel is a fictionalized account of the legends around the Buddhist monk Xuánzàng's pilgrimage to India during the Táng dynasty in order to obtain Buddhist religious texts called sutras. The Bodhisattva Guānyīn, on instruction from the Buddha, gives this task to the monk and his three protectors in the form of disciples — namely Sūn Wùkōng, Zhū Bājiè and Shā Wùjìng — together with a dragon prince who acts as Xuánzàng's horse mount. These four characters have agreed to help Xuánzàng as an atonement for past sins. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Arthur David Waley (August 19, 1889 – June 27, 1966) was a noted English Orientalist and Sinologist. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... An illustration from Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland, depicting the fictional protagonist, Alice, playing a fantastical game of croquet. ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... A portrait of Xuanzang Xuanzang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsüan-tsang; CantoneseIPA: jyn4tsɔŋ1; CantoneseJyutping: jyun4zong1) was a famous Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveler and translator that brought up the interaction between China and India in the early Tang period. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... China under the Tang Dynasty (yellow) and its sphere of influence Capital Changan (618–904) Luoyang (904-907) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 618-626 Emperor Gaozu  - 684, 705-710 Emperor Zhongzong  - 684, 710-712 Emperor Ruizong  - 904-907 Emperor Ai History  - Li Yuan... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... Sutras may refer too: Sutra, a concept regarding Hinduism Sutras (album), an album by 1960s rock musician Donovan ... Lands Bhutan â€¢ China â€¢ Korea Japan â€¢ Tibet â€¢ Vietnam Taiwan â€¢ Mongolia Doctrine Bodhisattva â€¢ Bodhicitta Karuna â€¢ Prajna Sunyata â€¢ Buddha Nature Trikaya â€¢ Eternal Buddha Scriptures Prajnaparamita Sutra Avatamsaka Sutra Lotus Sutra Nirvana Sutra VimalakÄ«rti Sutra Lankavatara Sutra History 4th Buddhist Council Silk Road â€¢ Nagarjuna Asanga â€¢ Vasubandhu Bodhidharma      A statue of a Bodhisattva, Akasagarbha. ... Kuan Yin (觀音; Pinyin: Guān YÄ«n) is the bodhisattva of compassion as venerated by East Asian Buddhists, usually as a female. ... Media:Example. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Zhu Bajie Zhu Bajie (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chu Pa-chieh), also named Zhu Wuneng (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chu Wu-neng), is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... Sha Wujing Sha Wujing (沙悟凈 WG: Sha Wu-ching) is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ...


Some scholars propose that the book satirises the effete Chinese government at the time. Journey to the West has a strong background in Chinese folk religion, Chinese mythology and value systems; the pantheon of Taoist and Buddhist deities is still reflective of Chinese folk religious beliefs today. 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Clothed statues of Matsu / Mazu (Chinese goddess of the Sea) Chinese folk religion comprises the religion practiced in much of China for thousands of years which included ancestor veneration and drew heavily upon concepts and beings within Chinese mythology. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ...


Part of the novel's enduring popularity comes from the fact that it works on multiple levels: it is a first-rate adventure story, a dispenser of spiritual insight, and an extended allegory in which the group of pilgrims journeying toward India stands for the individual journeying toward enlightenment. Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Enlightenment (or brightening) broadly means the acquisition of new wisdom or understanding enabling clarity of perception. ...

Contents

Synopsis

The novel comprises 100 chapters. These can be divided into four very unequal parts. The first, which includes chapters 1–7, is really a self-contained prequel to the main body of the story. It deals entirely with the earlier exploits of Sūn Wùkōng, a monkey born from stone who learns the art of fighting and secrets of immortality, and through guile and force makes a name for himself as the Qítiān Dàshèng (Simplified Chinese: 齐天大圣; Traditional Chinese: 齊天大聖), or "Great Sage Equal to Heaven". His powers grow to match the forces of all of the Eastern (Taoist) deities, and the prologue culminates in Sūn's rebellion against Heaven, during a time when he garnered a post in the celestial bureaucracy. Hubris proves his downfall when the Buddha manages to trap him under a mountain for five hundred years. A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Media:Example. ...

18th century Chinese illustration of a scene from Journey to the West
18th century Chinese illustration of a scene from Journey to the West
An illustrated edition of the story
An illustrated edition of the story

Only following this introductory story is the nominal main character, Xuánzàng, introduced. Chapters 8–12 provide his early biography and the background to his great journey. Dismayed that "the land of the South knows only greed, hedonism, promiscuity, and sins", the Buddha instructs the Bodhisattva Guānyīn to search Táng China for someone to take the Buddhist sutras of "transcendence and persuasion for good will" back to the East. Part of the story here also relates to how Xuánzàng becomes a monk (as well as revealing his past life as the "Golden Cicada" and comes about being sent on this pilgrimage by the Emperor Táng Tàizōng, who previously escaped death with the help of an underworld official). Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Xyj-sunwukong. ... Image File history File links Xyj-sunwukong. ... Lands Bhutan â€¢ China â€¢ Korea Japan â€¢ Tibet â€¢ Vietnam Taiwan â€¢ Mongolia Doctrine Bodhisattva â€¢ Bodhicitta Karuna â€¢ Prajna Sunyata â€¢ Buddha Nature Trikaya â€¢ Eternal Buddha Scriptures Prajnaparamita Sutra Avatamsaka Sutra Lotus Sutra Nirvana Sutra VimalakÄ«rti Sutra Lankavatara Sutra History 4th Buddhist Council Silk Road â€¢ Nagarjuna Asanga â€¢ Vasubandhu Bodhidharma      A statue of a Bodhisattva, Akasagarbha. ... Kuan Yin (觀音; Pinyin: Guān YÄ«n) is the bodhisattva of compassion as venerated by East Asian Buddhists, usually as a female. ... China under the Tang Dynasty (yellow) and its sphere of influence Capital Changan (618–904) Luoyang (904-907) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 618-626 Emperor Gaozu  - 684, 705-710 Emperor Zhongzong  - 684, 710-712 Emperor Ruizong  - 904-907 Emperor Ai History  - Li Yuan... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the volcano in Indonesia, see Emperor of China (volcano). ... Emperor Taizong of Tang China (Chinese: , January 23, 599–July 10, 649), born LÄ­ ShìMín (Chinese: ), was the second emperor of the Tang Dynasty of China from 626 to 649. ...


The third and longest section of the work is chapters 13–99, an episodic adventure story which combines elements of the quest as well as the picaresque. The skeleton of the story is Xuánzàng's quest to bring back Buddhist scriptures from Vulture Peak in India, but the flesh is provided by the conflict between Xuánzàng's disciples and the various evils that beset him on the way. This article is about the word, for other meanings see Quest (disambiguation) A quest is a journey towards a goal with great meaning and is used in mythology and literature as a plot device. ... The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular style of novel that originated in Spain and flourished in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and has continued to influence modern literature. ...


The scenery of this section is, nominally, the sparsely populated lands along the Silk Road between China and India, including Xinjiang, Turkestan, and Afghanistan. The geography described in the book is, however, almost entirely fantastic; once Xuánzàng departs Cháng'ān, the Táng capital and crosses the frontier (somewhere in Gansu province), he finds himself in a wilderness of deep gorges and tall mountains, all inhabited by flesh-eating demons who regard him as a potential meal, with here and there a hidden monastery or royal city-state amid the wilds. The Silk Road Silk Route redirects here. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For an automobile manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, see Changan Motors. ... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


The episodic structure of this section is to some extent formulaic. Episodes consist of 1–4 chapters, and usually involve Xuánzàng being captured and his life threatened, while his disciples try to find an ingenious (and often violent) way of liberating him. Although some of Xuánzàng's predicaments are political and involve ordinary human beings, they more frequently consist of run-ins with various goblins and ogres—many of whom turn out to be the earthly manifestations of heavenly beings.


Chapters 13–22 do not follow this structure precisely, as they introduce Xuánzàng's disciples, who, inspired or goaded by Guānyīn, meet and agree to serve him along the way, in order to atone for their sins in their past lives. Kuan Yin (觀音; Pinyin: Guān YÄ«n) is the bodhisattva of compassion as venerated by East Asian Buddhists, usually as a female. ...

  • The first is Sūn Wùkōng (Simplified Chinese: 孙悟空; Traditional Chinese: 孫悟空), or Monkey, previously "Great Sage Equal to Heaven", trapped by Buddha for rebelling against Heaven. He appears right away in Chapter 13. The most intelligent and violent of the disciples, he is constantly reproved for his violence by Xuánzàng. Ultimately, he can only be controlled by a magic gold band that the Bodhisattva has placed around his head, which causes him excruciating pain when Xuánzàng says certain magic words.
  • The second, appearing in 19, is Zhū Bājiè (Simplified Chinese: 猪八戒; Traditional Chinese: 豬八戒), literally Eight-precepts Pig, sometimes translated as Pigsy or just Pig. He was previously Marshal Tīan Péng (Simplified Chinese: 天蓬元帅; Traditional Chinese: 天蓬元帥), commander of the Heavenly Naval forces, banished to the mortal realm for flirting with the Princess of the Moon Chang'e. He is characterized by his insatiable appetites for food and sex, and is constantly looking for a way out of his duties, but is always kept in line by Sūn Wùkōng.
  • The third, appearing in chapter 22, is the river-ogre Shā Wùjìng (Simplified Chinese: 沙悟净; Traditional Chinese: 沙悟淨), also translated as Friar Sand or Sandy. He was previously Great General who Folds the Curtain (Simplified Chinese: 卷帘大将; Traditional Chinese: 捲簾大將), banished to the mortal realm for dropping (and shattering) a crystal goblet of the Heavenly Queen Mother. He is a quiet but generally dependable character, who serves as the straight foil to the comic relief of Sūn and Zhū.
  • Possibly to be counted as a fourth disciple is the third prince of the Dragon-King, Yùlóng Sāntàizǐ (Simplified Chinese: 玉龙三太子; Traditional Chinese: 玉龍三太子), who was sentenced to death for setting fire to his father's great pearl. He was saved by Guānyīn from execution to stay and wait for his call of duty. He appears first in chapter 15, but has almost no speaking role, as throughout most of the story he appears in the transformed shape of a horse that Xuánzàng rides on.

Chapter 22, where Shā is introduced, also provides a geographical boundary, as the river of quicksand that the travelers cross brings them into a new "continent". Chapters 23–86 take place in the wilderness, and consist of 24 episodes of varying length, each characterized by a different magical monster or evil magician. There are impassably wide rivers, flaming mountains, a kingdom ruled by women, a lair of seductive spider-spirits, and many other fantastic scenarios. Throughout the journey, the four brave disciples have to fend off attacks on their master and teacher Xuánzàng from various monsters and calamities. This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Zhu Bajie Zhu Bajie (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chu Pa-chieh), also named Zhu Wuneng (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chu Wu-neng), is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... An image of the Moon Goddess, (Hokkien : Guek Niao), enshrined and worshipped at Thee Kong Thuah (Jade Emperor Temple), Penang, Malaysia. ... Sha Wujing Sha Wujing (沙悟凈 WG: Sha Wu-ching) is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ...


It is strongly suggested that most of these calamities are engineered by fate and/or the Buddha, as, while the monsters who attack are vast in power and many in number, no real harm ever comes to the four travelers. Some of the monsters turn out to be escaped heavenly animals belonging to bodisattvas or Taoist sages and spirits. Towards the end of the book there is a scene where the Buddha literally commands the fulfillment of the last disaster, because Xuánzàng is one short of the eighty-one disasters he needs to attain Buddhahood. Bodhi (Pali and Sanskrit. ...


In chapter 87, Xuánzàng finally reaches the borderlands of India, and chapters 87–99 present magical adventures in a somewhat more mundane (though still exotic) setting. At length, after a pilgrimage said to have taken fourteen years (the text actually only provides evidence for nine of those years, but presumably there was room to add additional episodes) they arrive at the half-real, half-legendary destination of Vulture Peak, where, in a scene simultaneously mystical and comic, Xuánzàng receives the scriptures from the living Buddha.


Chapter 100, the last of all, quickly describes the return journey to the Táng Empire, and the aftermath in which each traveler receives a reward in the form of posts in the bureaucracy of the heavens. Sūn Wùkōng and Xuánzàng achieve Buddhahood, Wùjìng becomes an arhat, the dragon is made a Naga, and Bājiè, whose good deeds have always been tempered by his greed, is promoted to an altar cleanser (i.e. eater of offerings at altars). Bodhi (Pali and Sanskrit. ... A Chinese Luohan statue from the Liao Dynasty in Hebei Province, China In the sramanic traditions of ancient India (most notably those of Mahavira and Gautama Buddha) arhat (Sanskrit) or arahant (Pali) signified a spiritual practitioner who had—to use an expression common in the tipitaka—laid down the burden... The word Naga can refer to several different things. ...


Historical context

Main article: Xuanzang
The Big Wild Goose Pagoda of Xī'ān, China
The Big Wild Goose Pagoda of Xī'ān, China

The classic story of the Journey to the West was based on real events. In real life, Xuanzang (born c. 602 - 664) was a monk at Jingtu Temple in late-Sui Dynasty and early-Tang Dynasty Chang'an. Motivated by the poor quality of Chinese translations of Buddhist scripture at the time, Xuanzang left Chang'an in 629, despite the border being closed at the time due to war with the Gokturks. Helped by sympathetic Buddhists, he travelled via Gansu and Qinghai to Kumul (Hami), thence following the Tian Shan mountains to Turfan. He then crossed what are today Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan, into Gandhara, reaching India in 630. Xuanzang travelled throughout the Indian subcontinent for the next thirteen years, visitng important Buddhist pilgrimage sites and studying at the ancient university at Nalanda. A portrait of Xuanzang Xuanzang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsüan-tsang; CantoneseIPA: jyn4tsɔŋ1; CantoneseJyutping: jyun4zong1) was a famous Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveler and translator that brought up the interaction between China and India in the early Tang period. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1839x544, 731 KB) Summary The Big Wild Goose Pagoda of Xian, Shaanxi, China. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1839x544, 731 KB) Summary The Big Wild Goose Pagoda of Xian, Shaanxi, China. ... A portrait of Xuanzang Xuanzang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsüan-tsang; CantoneseIPA: jyn4tsɔŋ1; CantoneseJyutping: jyun4zong1) was a famous Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveler and translator that brought up the interaction between China and India in the early Tang period. ... The Sui Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; 581-619[1]) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... China under the Tang Dynasty (yellow) and its sphere of influence Capital Changan (618–904) Luoyang (904-907) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 618-626 Emperor Gaozu  - 684, 705-710 Emperor Zhongzong  - 684, 710-712 Emperor Ruizong  - 904-907 Emperor Ai History  - Li Yuan... For an automobile manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, see Changan Motors. ... For an automobile manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, see Changan Motors. ... The Gokturks or Kokturks (Gök-Turks or Kök-Turks, with the meaning Celestial Turks), known as Tujue (突厥 tu2 jue2) in medieval Chinese sources, established the first known Turkic state around 552 under the leadership of Bumin/Tuman Khan/Khaghan (died 552) and his sons, and expanded... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Qinghai (Chinese: 青海; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-hai; Postal System Pinyin: Tsinghai; Tibetan: མཚོ་སྔོན་ mtsho-sngon; Mongolian: Köke Naγur; Manchu: Huhu Noor) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, named after the enormous Qinghai Lake. ... Kumul or Hami (Uyghur: قۇمۇل/K̢umul; Chinese: 哈密; Pinyin: Hāmì) is an oasis in Xinjiang (China); it is also the name of a modern city and the sourrounding district. ... The Tian Shan (Chinese: 天山; Pinyin: Tiān Shān; celestial mountains) mountain range is located in Central Asia, in the border region of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of western China. ... position in China Street of Turfan View of the Flaming mountains Emin minaret, Turfan Turfan (Uyghur: تۇرپان; Uyghur latin: Turpan; Modern Chinese 吐魯番, Pinyin: TÇ”lÇ”fán; ) is an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Gandhāra (Sanskrit: गन्धार, Persian; Gandara, Waihind) (Urdu: گندھارا) is the name of an ancient Indian Mahajanapada, currently in northern Pakistan (the North-West Frontier Province and parts of northern Punjab and Kashmir) and eastern Afghanistan. ... This article is about the ancient town and university. ...


Xuanzang left India in 643 and arrived back in Chang'an in 646 to a warm reception by Emperor Taizong of Tang. He joined Da Ci'en Monastery (Monastery of Great Maternal Grace), where he led the building of the Big Wild Goose Pagoda in order to store the scriptures and icons he had brought back from India. He recorded his journey in the book Journey to the West in the Great Tang Dynasty. With the support of the Emperor, he established an institute at Yuhua Gong (Palace of the Lustre of Jade) monastery dedicated to translating into Chinese the scriptures he had brought back. His translation and commentary work established him as the founder of the Dharma character school of Buddhism. Xuanzang died on March 7, 664. The Xingjiao Monastery was established in 669 to house his ashes. For an automobile manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, see Changan Motors. ... Emperor Taizong of Tang China (Chinese: , January 23, 599–July 10, 649), born LÄ­ ShìMín (Chinese: ), was the second emperor of the Tang Dynasty of China from 626 to 649. ... Big Wild Goose Pagoda, Xian, China The Big Goose Pagoda, or Big Wild Goose Pagoda (Chinese: 大雁塔; Pinyin: ), is located in southern Xian, China. ... The Great Tang Records on the Western Regions (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: Dà Táng XÄ«yù Jì; Wade-Giles: Ta Tang Hsiyü Chi) is a travelogue and recounts of Xuanzangs nineteen years journey through Changan to India between 626 and 645. ... Dharma-character school (Chinese: 法相宗 pinyin fa xiang zong) is the pejorative name for a stream of thought that represented the Indian Yogācāra system of thought in East Asia. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September, Synod of Whitby Births Deaths Xuanzang, famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ...


Popular stories of Xuánzàng's journey were in existence long before Journey to the West was written. In these versions, dating as far back as Southern Song, a monkey character was already a primary protagonist. Before the Yuan Dynasty and early Ming, elements of the Monkey story were already seen. Alternative meaning: Song Dynasty (420-479) The Song dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... The four successor Khanates of the Mongol Empire Capital Dadu Language(s) Mongolian Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1260-1294 Kublai Khan  - 1333-1370 Ukhaatu Khan History  - establishing the Yuan Dynasty 1271  - Fall of Dadu September 14, 1368 Population  - 1330 est. ...


Main characters

Tripitaka or Xuánzàng

An illustration of Xuanzang
An illustration of Xuanzang

Xuánzàng (or Táng-Sānzàng, meaning "Táng-dynasty monk" — Sānzàng or "Three Baskets", referring to the Tripitaka, was a traditional honorific for a Buddhist monk) is the Buddhist monk who set out to India to retrieve the Buddhist scriptures for China. He is called Tripitaka in many English versions of the story. Although he is helpless when it comes to defending himself, the bodhisattva Guānyīn helps by finding him powerful disciples (Sūn Wùkōng, Zhū Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng) who aid and protect him on his journey. In return, the disciples will receive enlightenment and forgiveness for their sins once the journey is done. Along the way, they help the local inhabitants by defeating various monsters. The fact that most of the monsters and demons are trying to obtain immortality by eating Xuánzàng's flesh, and are even attracted to him as he is depicted as quite handsome, provides much of the plot in the story. Image File history File links Xyj-tang_seng. ... Image File history File links Xyj-tang_seng. ... The fictional character Xuanzang (玄奘, WG: Hsüan-tsang), a central character of the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West, is partly modelled after the historical Tang dynasty Buddhist monk of the same name, whose life was the books inspiration; the real Xuanzang made a perilous journey on foot... The Tripitaka (Sanskrit त्रिपिटक, lit. ... There are a great variety of Buddhist texts. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Lands Bhutan â€¢ China â€¢ Korea Japan â€¢ Tibet â€¢ Vietnam Taiwan â€¢ Mongolia Doctrine Bodhisattva â€¢ Bodhicitta Karuna â€¢ Prajna Sunyata â€¢ Buddha Nature Trikaya â€¢ Eternal Buddha Scriptures Prajnaparamita Sutra Avatamsaka Sutra Lotus Sutra Nirvana Sutra VimalakÄ«rti Sutra Lankavatara Sutra History 4th Buddhist Council Silk Road â€¢ Nagarjuna Asanga â€¢ Vasubandhu Bodhidharma      A statue of a Bodhisattva, Akasagarbha. ...


Monkey or Sūn Wùkōng

An illustration of Sūn Wùkōng
An illustration of Sūn Wùkōng
Main article: Sun Wukong

Sūn Wùkōng is the name given to this character by his teacher, Patriarch Subodhi, and means "the one who has Achieved the Perfect Comprehension of the Extinction of both Emptiness and non-Emptiness"; he is called Monkey King or simply Monkey in English. Image File history File links Xyj-sun_wukong. ... Image File history File links Xyj-sun_wukong. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Subhuti (Chn: 須菩提) was one of the Buddha Shakyamunis Ten Major Disciples, a contemporary of such famous arhats as Sariputra, Mahakasyapa, Maudgalyayana, and Vimalakirti. ... Satori (æ‚Ÿ Japanese satori; Chinese: wù - from the verb Satoru) is a Japanese Buddhist term for enlightenment. ... Śūnyatā, शून्यता (Sanskrit), Suññatā (Pāli), stong pa nyid (Tibetan), Kuu, 空 (Japanese) qoÉ£usun (Mongolian), generally translated into English as Emptiness or Voidness, is a concept of central importance in the teaching of the Buddha, as a direct realization of Sunyata is required to achieve liberation from the cycle of... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


He was born out of a rock that had been dormant for ages in Bloom Mountains that was inhabited/weathered by the sun and moon until a monkey sprang forth. He first distinguished himself by bravely entering the Cave of Water Curtains (pinyin:Shuǐlián-dòng ) at the Mountains of Flowers and Fruits (Huāguǒ-shān); for this feat, his monkey tribe gave him the title of Měi-hóuwáng ("handsome monkey-king"). Later, he started making trouble in Heaven and defeated an army of 100,000 celestial soldiers, led by the Four Heavenly Kings, Erlang Shen, and Nezha. Eventually, the Jade Emperor appealed to Buddha, who subdued and trapped Wukong under a mountain. He was only saved when Xuanzang came by him on his pilgrimage and accepted him as a disciple. Known as Hua Guo Shan in Chinese, it is the birth place of the Sun WuKong. ... It has been suggested that Four Guardian Gods be merged into this article or section. ... Erlang Shen (二郎神), named Yang Jian (杨戬), is a Chinese God with a third true-seeing eye in the middle of his forehead. ... Nezha (哪吒) is a deity, the enfant terrible Trickster of Chinese mythology. ... The Jade Emperor (Chinese: ; pinyin: or 玉帝 Yù Dì), known informally by children and others as Heavenly Grandfather (天公 Tiān Gōng) and known formally as the Pure August Jade Emperor or August Personage of Jade (玉皇上帝 Yu Huang Shangdi or 玉皇大帝 Yu Huang Dadi), is the ruler of Heaven according to Chinese... Media:Example. ...


His primary weapon is the rúyì-jīngū-bàng ("will-following golden-banded staff"), which he can shrink down to the size of a needle and keep behind his ear, as well as expand it to gigantic proportions (hence the "will-following" part of the name). The staff, originally a pillar supporting the undersea palace of the East Sea Dragon King, weighs 13,500 pounds, which he pulled out of its support and swung with ease. The Dragon King, not wanting him to cause any trouble, also gave him a suit of golden armor. These gifts, combined with his devouring of the peaches of immortality and three jars of immortality pills while in Heaven, plus his ordeal in an eight-trigram furnace (which gave him a steel-hard body and fiery golden eyes), makes Wukong the strongest member by far of the pilgrimage. Besides these abilities, he can also pull hairs from his body and blow on them to transform them into whatever he wishes (usually clones of himself to gain a numerical advantage in battle). Although he has mastered seventy-two methods of transformations, it does not mean that he is restricted to seventy-two different forms. He can also do a jīndǒuyún ("cloud somersault"), enabling him to travel vast distances in a single leap. Wukong uses his talents to fight demons and play pranks. However, his behavior is checked by a band placed around his head by Guanyin, which cannot be removed by Wukong himself until the journey's end. Xuanzang can tighten this band by chanting the Tightening-Crown spell (taught to him by Guanyin) whenever he needs to chastise him. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Wukong's child-like playfulness is a huge contrast to his cunning mind. This, coupled with his acrobatic skills, makes him a likeable hero, though not necessarily a good role model. His antics present a lighter side in what proposes to be a long and dangerous trip into the unknown. Don Imus, The term role model was introduced by Robert K. Merton[1]. Merton says that individuals compare themselves with reference groups of people who occupy the social role to which the individual aspires. ...


Pigsy or Zhū Bājiè

An illustration of Zhū Bājiè
An illustration of Zhū Bājiè
Main article: Zhu Bajie

Zhū Bājiè ("Pig of the Eight Prohibitions") is also known as Zhū Wùnéng ("Pig Awakened to Power"), and given the name Pigsy or Pig in English. Image File history File links Xyj-zhu. ... Image File history File links Xyj-zhu. ... Zhu Bajie Zhu Bajie (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chu Pa-chieh), also named Zhu Wuneng (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chu Wu-neng), is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Once an immortal who was the Tiānpéng-yuánshuǎi ("Field Marshal Tianpeng") of 100,000 soldiers of the Milky Way, during a celebration of gods, he drank too much and attempted to flirt with Cháng'é, the beautiful moon goddess, resulting in his banishment into the mortal world. He was supposed to be reborn as a human, but ended up in the womb of a sow due to an error at the Reincarnation Wheel, which turned him into a half-man half-pig monster. Staying within Yúnzhan-dòng ("cloud-pathway cave"), he was commissioned by Guanyin to accompany Xuanzang to India and given the new name Zhu Wuneng. This article refers to the Milky Way galaxy, for the Milky Way as the hazy band of white light visible from Earths surface, see Milky Way (astronomy) For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... An image of the Moon Goddess, (Hokkien : Guek Niao), enshrined and worshipped at Thee Kong Thuah (Jade Emperor Temple), Penang, Malaysia. ...


However, Wuneng's desire for women led him to Gao Village, where he posed as a normal being and took a wife. Later, when the villagers discovered that he was a monster, Wuneng hid the girl away. At this point, Xuanzang and Wukong arrived at Gao Village and helped subdue him. Renamed Zhu Bajie by Xuanzang, he consequently joined the pilgrimage to the West.


His weapon of choice is the jiǔchǐdīngpá ("nine-tooth iron rake"). He is also capable of thirty-six transformations (as compared to Wukong's seventy-two), and can travel on clouds, but not as fast as Wukong. However, Bajie is noted for his fighting skills in the water, which he used to combat Sha Wujing, who later joined them on the journey.


Sandy or Shā Wùjìng

An illustration of Shā Wùjìng
An illustration of Shā Wùjìng
Main article: Sha Wujing

Shā Wùjìng (literally meaning "Sand Awakened to Purity"), given the name Friar Sand or Sandy in English, was once the Curtain Raising General, who stood in attendance by the imperial chariot in the Hall of Miraculous Mist. He was exiled to the mortal world and made to look like a monster because he accidentally smashed a crystal goblet belonging to the Heavenly Queen Mother during the Peach Banquet. The now-hideous immortal took up residence in the Flowing Sands River, terrorizing the surrounding villages and travelers trying to cross the river. However, he was subdued by Sūn Wùkōng and Zhū Bājiè when the Sānzàng party came across him. They consequently took him in to be a part of the pilgrimage to the West. Image File history File links Xyj-sha_seng. ... Image File history File links Xyj-sha_seng. ... Sha Wujing Sha Wujing (沙悟凈 WG: Sha Wu-ching) is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Shā Wùjìng's weapon is the yuèyáchǎn ("Crescent-Moon-Shovel" or "Monk's Spade"). Aside from that, he knows eighteen transformations and is highly effective in water combat. He is about as strong as Bājiè , and is much stronger than Wùkōng in water. However, Bājiè can beat Wujing in a test of endurance, and Wùkōng can beat him out of water. Monk Spade A monks spade (Chinese: 月牙鏟; pinyin: yuèyáchÇŽn; literally Moon-Tooth Spade) is a Chinese pole weapon consisting of a long pole with a flat spade-like blade on one end and a smaller crescent shaped blade on the other. ...


Shā Wùjìng is known to be the most obedient, logical, and polite of the three disciples, and always takes care of his master, seldom engaging in the bickeries of his fellow-disciples. Ever reliable, he carries the luggage for the travellers. Perhaps this is why he is sometimes seen as a minor character; the lack of any particular perks confers the lack of distinguishing and/or redeeming characteristics.


Wùjìng eventually becomes an Arhat at the end of the journey, giving him a higher level of exaltation than Bājiè, who is relegated to cleaning every altar at every Buddhist temple for eternity, but is still lower spiritually than Wùkōng or Sānzàng who are granted Buddhahood.


List of Demons

There are many demons in the story. They are listed below:

  • Black-Bear-Demon (pinyin: Hēixióngguǐ)
  • Yellow Wind Demon (Huángfēngguǐ)
  • Zhen Yuan Holy Man (He is not a demon, but an immortal, who got annoyed by those disciples who stole his previous immortal-fruits.)
  • White-Bone-Demon (pinyin: Báigǔjīng)
  • Yellow Robe Demon (pinyin: Huángpáoguǐ)
  • Gold-Horn and Silver-Horn (pinyin: Jīnjiǎo and Yínjiǎo)
  • Red-Boy a.k.a. Holy Baby King (pinyin: Hóng-hái'ér; Japanese: Kōgaiji)
  • Tiger Power, Deer Power and Goat (or Antelope) Power
  • Black River Dragon Demon (Hēi Shǔi Hé Yuan Lóng Guǐ)
  • Carp Demon (Li Yu Jīng)
  • Green-Ox-Demon (pinyin: Qīngniújīng)
  • Scorpion-Demon (pinyin: Xiēzijīng)
  • Six Ear Monkey Demon a.k.a Fake Sun Wukong
  • Ox-Demon-King (pinyin: Niúmówáng; Japanese: Gyūmaō)
  • Demon Woman (Luo Cha Nǚ)
  • Jade-Faced Princess (pinyin: Yùmiàn-gōngzhǔ; Japanese: Gyokumen-kōshū)
  • Boa Demon (Hong She Jīng)
  • Nine-Headed Bird Demon (Jiǔ Tou Fu Ma)
  • Seven-Spider-Demons (pinyin: Zhīzhū-jīng)
  • Hundred-Eyed Taoist (Bǎi Yan Mo Jun)
  • Green Lion Demon (pinyin: Qīngshījīng)
  • White-Elephant-Demon (pinyin: Báixiàngjīng)
  • Falcon Demon (Sun Jīng)
  • Biqiu Country Minister a.k.a Deer Demon
  • Gold-Nosed, White Mouse Demon (Lao Shu Jīng)
  • Dream-Demon

Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Bai Gu Jing (Traditional Chinese: 白骨精, means a white bone demon) is a dangerous demon from Journey to the West It first uses one of its many transformations to manifest itself as a innocent pretty girl who says she left her father and mother to search for food and that she... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Kougaiji is a character in the manga and anime Gensōmaden Saiyūki. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... This is a list of humans who appear in the fictional Dragon Ball manga and anime ( ), including the Dragon Ball Z movies ( ). Following some characters bios are external links that focus on that character. ... Gyumaoh is a fictional character in the manga and anime Saiyuki, the Ox-demon of Houtou castle. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Gyokuman Koushou is a fictional character in the manga and anime Saiyuki, one of the main enemies of Genjyo Sanzo and Sanzo-ikkou (Genjo Sanzos party) who wants to obtain the Heaven and Earth Scripture to revive her lover Gyumaoh. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ...

Notable English-language translations

  • Monkey: A Folk-Tale of China (1942), an abridged translation by Arthur Waley. For many years, the best translation available in English; it only translates thirty out of the hundred chapters. (Penguin reprint ISBN 0-14-044111-5)
  • Journey to the West, a complete translation by W.J.F. Jenner published by the Foreign Languages Press in Beijing 1955 (three volumes; 1982/1984 edition: ISBN 0-8351-1003-6, ISBN 0-8351-1193-8, ISBN 0-8351-1364-7)
  • The Journey to the West (19771983), a complete translation in four volumes by Anthony C. Yu.
    University of Chicago Press: HC ISBN 0-226-97145-7, ISBN 0-226-97146-5, ISBN 0-226-97147-3, ISBN 0-226-97148-1; PB ISBN 0-226-97150-3, ISBN 0-226-97151-1; ISBN 0-226-97153-8; ISBN 0-226-97154-6. This translation has good reviews, but is much more costly than Jenner's.

Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arthur David Waley (August 19, 1889 – June 27, 1966) was a noted English Orientalist and Sinologist. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...

Media adaptations

Comics, manga and anime

  • Alakazam the Great: One of the first anime films produced by Toei Animation, a retelling of first part of the story based on the characters designed by Osamu Tezuka.
  • American Born Chinese: An American graphic novel by Gene Yang. Nominated for the National Book Award (2006).
  • Doraemon: A special tells the story of Journey To The West casting the Doraemon characters as the characters of the legend.
  • Dragon Ball: Japanese manga and anime series loosely inspired by Journey to the West.
  • Eyeshield 21: Three of the players for the Shinryuji Nagas are referred to as the Saiyuki Trio based upon their appearances and personalities.
  • Excel Saga: Excel (dressed as monkey) starts a "discipleship" with a girl (dressed as Tripitaka).
  • Gensōmaden Saiyūki: manga and anime series inspired by the legend. Follow-up series include Saiyūki Reload and Saiyūki Reload Gunlock.
  • Havoc in Heaven (also known as Uproar in Heaven): Original animation from China.
  • InuYasha: The characters meet descendants of three of the main characters of the Journey of the West in one episode and main character, Kagome Higurashi, says a few lines about the whole book and story.
  • Kaleido Star: The cast performs Saiyuki on stage a few times in the beginning of the second half of the series.
  • Love Hina: The characters put on a play based on the story in anime episode 16.
  • Monkey Magic: An animated retelling of the legend.
  • Monkey Typhoon: A manga and anime series based on the Journey to the West saga, following a futuristic steampunk-retelling of the legend.
  • Naruto: Temari, a character from Naruto, is based on Princess Iron Fan from the legend. Enma is a summoned monkey who bears resemblance to Sun Wukong. He has the ability to transform into a staff similar to the rúyì-jīngū-bàng, which can alter its size at will.
  • Paprika: A standalone movie where the main character, Paprika/Chiba, has the antics/cunning duality of the Monkey-king; in one scene Paprika rides a cloud wielding a staff.
  • Patalliro Saiyuki: A shōnen-ai series in both anime and manga formats with the Patalliro cast playing out the Zaiyuji storyline with a yaoi twist.
  • Ranma 1/2: Pastiches of the characters appear throughout the manga and movies.
  • Shinzo: An anime loosely based on Journey to the West.
  • Starzinger: An animated science fiction version of the story.
  • The Monkey King: A gruesome manga inspired by the tale.
  • XIN: An American comic mini-series produced by Anarchy Studio.

Alakazam the Great is an anime film that is based on Journey to the West. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... Toei Animation Company, Limited ) (JASDAQ: 4816) is a Japanese animation studio owned by the Toei Company. ... This article is about the manga artist and animator. ... An American-born Chinese or ABC is a person born in the United States of Chinese ethnic descent. ... Original run April 2, 1979 – Present No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... maNga is a popular Turkish nu metal/rapcore band. ... Eyeshield 21 ) is a manga about American football written by Riichiro Inagaki and illustrated by Yusuke Murata. ... Serialized in Young King OURs Original run April 1997 – Present No. ... Gensōmaden Saiyūki (Japanese: 幻想魔伝最遊記, Demonic Account of an Extreme Journey), published in English as simply Saiyuki, is a popular manga series created by Kazuya Minekura and loosely based on the famous Chinese novel Xī Yóu Jì (Journey to... Saiyuki Reload ) is a manga series by Kazuya Minekura. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Saiyuki Reload. ... Havoc in Heaven (Chinese: 大闹天宫, Da nao tian gong), also known as Uproar in Heaven, is a Chinese animated feature film directed by Wan Laiming and produced by all four of the Wan brothers. ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Sunday Original run 1996 – (ongoing) No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kaleido Star ) is an anime series produced by Gonzo Digimation and licensed in the United States by ADV Films. ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Magazine Original run October 21, 1998 – October 31, 2001 No. ... Monkey Magic was a television cartoon series that aired in the 1990s about a monkey who uses his handy extending power staff and nimbus cloud to save the world from evil. ... Monkey Typhoon ) is an anime series produced by the Avex group and anime studio Studio Egg, which premiered between October 1, 2002 and September 30, 2003 on TV Tokyo. ... For the comic book, see Steampunk (comics). ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Shonen Jump BANZAI! Shonen Jump Weekly Comic Original run November 1999 – Ongoing No. ... Temari ) is a fictional character in the anime and manga series Naruto created by Masashi Kishimoto. ... Princess Iron Fan is a fictional character from the Chinese classic novel Journey to the West. ... In the anime and manga series, Naruto, summons are entities conjured up by the user to aid them in battle or to perform a technique that the summoner cannot perform as easily by themselves. ... This article is for the 2006 film Paprika Paprika, see Paprika (1991 film) Paprika ) is a Japanese animated science fiction film, based on Yasutaka Tsutsuis 1993 novel Paprika, about a female research psychologist involved in a project to develop a device that will permit therapists to help patients by... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cover of Selfish Love by Naduki Koujima. ... Ranma ½ Graphic Novel, Volume 1 English version, Second Edition Ranma ½ (らんま½, Japanese pronunciation: Ranma Nibun no Ichi) is a comedy anime and manga by Rumiko Takahashi (高橋 留美子) about a boy named Ranma Saotome (早乙女 乱馬) who was trained from early childhood... Shinzo, known as Mushrambo ) in Japan, is an anime based on an event where creatures known as Enterrans take over Earth and rename it in their own image: Enterra. ... Science Fiction Saiyuki Starzinger (Japanese: SF西遊記 スタージンガー) was an anime series aired in Japan from 1978 to 1979. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Monkey King ); aka Katsuya Teradas The Monkey King, is a dark fantasy manga series, written and illustrated in full color by Katsuya Terada. ... XIN is also the name of an animated Flash series produced by LiFe. ...

Film

A Chinese Odyssey: Pandoras Box (大話西遊) is a 1994 film, directed by Jeffrey Lau, and is one of actor Stephen Chows most famous movies. ... Stephen Chow (also Stephen Chiau) (traditional Chinese: 周星馳; simplified Chinese : 周星驰; often Romanized as Chow Sing Chi; pinyin : Zhōu XÄ«ngchí; jyutping : zau1 sing1 ci4) (born June 22, 1962) is a director and actor in many blockbuster movies in Hong Kong. ... A Chinese Tall Story (Chinese: 情癲大聖, Ching din dai sing) is a 2005 Hong Kong fantasy adventure film, written and directed by Jeffrey Lau. ... Nicholas Tse Ting-Fung (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: Pinyin: Xiè TíngfÄ“ng; Cantonese: ze6 ting4 fung1), born 29 August 1980 is a Hong Kong based singer and actor. ... Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ... The Shaw Studio (邵氏片場), owned by Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The cinema of Hong Kong is one of the three major threads in the history of Chinese language cinema, alongside the cinema of China, and the cinema of Taiwan. ... This article is on all of the Yue dialects. ... The Forbidden Kingdom is a film collaboration between Jackie Chan and Jet Li, with action choreography by Yuen Woo-ping. ... Chan Kong-Sang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Jackie Chan Sing Lung (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) or Jackie Chan SBS, (born on April 7, 1954) is a Chinese martial artist, action star, actor, director, screenwriter, film producer, singer and stunt performer. ... Jet Li (born Li Lianjie on April 26, 1963 in Beijing, China) is a Chinese martial artist, actor, Wushu champion, and international film star. ...

Games

Yuu Yuu Ki lit. ... “Computer and video games” redirects here. ... The Famicom Disk System, attached to a late-model AV Famicom The Family Computer Disk System (FCD) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... This article is about the video games for the Nintendo DS. For the anime series based on these video games, see Pokémon: Diamond and Pearl series. ... “Computer and video games” redirects here. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... Chimchar Hikozaru in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Monferno , Moukazaru in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Infernape , Goukazaru in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Classic pachinko machine Pachinko parlor at night Entrance to pachinko parlor in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... Koeis Current Company Logo Koei Co. ... Sonson in Marvel Vs. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Namco Ltd ) is a amusement company based in Japan, best known overseas for video games development. ... Kilik (Chinese: 齊力克 Pinyin: Qílìkè, Japanese: キリク Kiriku) is a fictional Chinese character designed for the Soul Series of fighting games. ... Soul Edge ) is the first installment in the Soul series of fighting games developed and published by Namco. ... Soul Calibur III ) is the sequel to Soul Calibur II and is the fourth overall installment in the Soul series of fighting games. ... Westward Journey is a MMORPG developed and run by NetEase. ... World of Warcraft. ... Suikoden II is the sequel to Konamis PlayStation computer role-playing game Suikoden. ... Whomp Em is a video game that was released on the NES in March of 1991. ...

Live action television

Journey to the West is a 1986 Chinese live action TV series made by CCTV adapting the majority of the literary classic Journey to the West. ... REDIRECT Television Broadcasts Limited ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... The Monkey King was a four hour miniseries produced by the SciFi Channel in 2001. ... SCI FI (originally Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... DVD of The Lost Empire The Lost Empire is a 2001 television mini-series produced by NBC. It is a contemporary take on the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... Saiyuuki (西遊記) is a 2006 Japanese historical TV drama based on the 16th Century Chinese story Journey to the West. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Shingo Katori (香取 慎吾 Katori Shingo) is a member of SMAP, a very popular idol group from the agency Johnny & Associates. ...

Stage

The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Each year, during a three-week fall Festival, the New York Musical Theatre Festival presents more than thirty new musicals at venues in New York Citys midtown theater district. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Damon Albarn, (IPA: []) (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer of rock band Blur. ... Jamie Hewlett is joint creator of Tank Girl and a member of Gorillaz. ... The Manchester International Festival is a festival of original new work due to take place in Manchester, United Kingdom in 2007. ...

External links

Wikisource
Chinese Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Journey to the West (in Chinese)
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Topics in Chinese mythology
v  d  e
General topics: Creation myth · Astrology · Dragons · Religion in China · Folk religion ·List of deities · I Ching
Important beings: Deities · Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors · Eight Immortals
Mythical creatures: List of mythical creatures
Mythical places: Xuanpu · Yaochi · Fusang · Queqiao · Penglai · Longmen · Diyu
Literary sources: Shan Hai Jing · Shui Jing Zhu · Ten Brothers · Hei'an Zhuan · Fengshen Yanyi
Journey to the West · Baishe Zhuan · Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio


Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Manhua (Traditional Chinese: 漫畫; Simplified Chinese: 漫画; Pinyin: ) is a general term for comics produced in China, often including Chinese translations of Japanese manga. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... In Chinese mythology, Pangu was given birth from chaos and created Earth and Sky. ... Chinese astrology is the divination of the future from the Chinese calendar, which is based on astronomy, and ancient Chinese philosophy. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Han Tu: The Chinese dragon is a mythical Chinese creature that also appears in other East Asian cultures, and is also sometimes called the Oriental (or Eastern) dragon. ... Chinese monk lighting incense in a temple in Beijing. ... Clothed statues of Matsu / Mazu (Chinese goddess of the Sea) Chinese folk religion comprises the religion practiced in much of China for thousands of years which included ancestor veneration and drew heavily upon concepts and beings within Chinese mythology. ... This list of deities aims to give information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... Alternative meaning: I Ching (monk) The I Ching (Traditional Chinese: 易經, pinyin y jīng; Cantonese IPA: jɪk6gɪŋ1; Cantonese Jyutping: jik6ging1; alternative romanizations include I Jing, Yi Ching, Yi King) is the oldest of the Chinese classic texts. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Eight Immortals crossing the sea, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... Fusang (扶桑) was described by a Buddhist missionary, Hoei-Shin (慧深) in 499 AD, as a place 20,000 Chinese miles to the east of China. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Horai. ... Traditional architecture in a Longmen home. ... Diyu (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ti-yü; Japanese: , jigoku, literally earth prison) is the realm of the dead or hell in Chinese mythology. ... Shanhaijing illustration of Nüwa Shanhaijing illustration of Nine-tailed Fox, companion of Xi Wangmu The Shan Hai Jing (Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan Hai Ching; literally Classic of the Mountains and Seas) is a Chinese classic text that is at least 2,000 years old. ... Translated into English it means Commentary on the Waterways Classic. Work on the ancient geography of what is now China. ... Ten Brothers (Chinese: 十兄弟) is a Chinese legend known to be written around the time of the construction of the Great Wall of China, most likely during the Ming Dynasty. ... Fengshen Yanyi (Traditional Chinese: 封神演義; Simplified Chinese: 封神演义) (translated as The Investiture of the Gods or The Creation of the Gods), also known as Fengshen Bang (Traditional Chinese: 封神榜; Simplified Chinese: 封神榜), is one of the major works of classical Chinese literature created in Ming dynasty. ... It has been suggested that Lady White Snake be merged into this article or section. ... Liaozhai Zhiyi (traditional characters: 聊齋誌異; simplified characters: 聊斋志异; Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio or Strange Tales of Liaozhai) is a collection of 431 supernatural tales written by Pu Songling (蒲松齡) during the early Qing Dynasty. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Journey to the West: Information from Answers.com (2947 words)
Journey to the West (Traditional Chinese: 西遊記; Simplified Chinese: 西游记; Hanyu Pinyin: Xī Yóu Jì; Wade-Giles: Hsi Yu Chi) is one of the Four Classical Novels of Chinese literature.
Throughout the journey, these four brave travelers have to fend off attacks on their master and teacher Xuánzàng from various monsters (spirits of the Earth who through meditation and training gained vast powers) and heavenly spirits (who tired of heaven and came down to the mortal realm to amuse themselves).
See Journey to the West (TV series) for a gallery of its portrayal of the various deities and characters that appear in the story.
Midnight Eye review: Journey to the West ('Saiyuki' - Taiji YABUSHITA, Daisaku SHIRAKAWA, Osamu TEZUKA - 1960) (1277 words)
Set way back in the distant past, Journey to the West begins with a pair of angels gazing down from their celestial golden cloud surveying events way down below on earth and immediately singling out the figure of solitary monkey wandering through a forest grove as a potential troublemaker.
Journey to the West cracks off at an incredibly fast pace and barely lets up for its entire duration, carrying the viewer through a dense, episodic-ridden plot, which, in keeping with the manga, only focuses on certain episodes within the original story.
Journey to the West was Tezuka's first experience in the world of animation, but it proved positive enough to inspire this legendary figure of the manga art form to found his own company in 1961.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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