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Encyclopedia > Journey Into Space
Journey Into Space


The four main cast members of Journey Into Space: The World in Peril Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Genre Science fiction
Running time 30 minutes
Country Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Language(s) English
Home station BBC Light Programme
Starring Andrew Faulds
Guy Kingsley Poynter
Bruce Beeby
Don Sharp
David Williams
David Kossoff
Alfie Bass
David Jacobs
(plus others)
Creator(s) Charles Chilton
Producer(s) Charles Chilton
Air dates 21 September 195318 June 1958
No. of episodes Journey to the Moon – 18
The Red Planet – 20
The World in Peril – 20
Operation Luna – 13
The Return from Mars – 1
Audio format Monaural

Journey Into Space was a BBC Radio science fiction programme, written by BBC producer Charles Chilton. Three series were produced, which have been translated into 17 languages[1] and broadcast worldwide.[1] In the UK it was the last radio programme to attract a bigger evening audience than television.[2] Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Light Programme was a BBC radio station broadcasting mainstream light entertainment and music. ... Andrew Matthew William Faulds (1 March 1923 - 31 May 2000) was a British actor and politician. ... Donald Sharp (born 19 April 1922, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia) is a British film director. ... // David Williams is the name of: David Williams (didgeridoo), (born 1983) Aboriginal musician and artist David Williams (Son of Dork), a guitarist in the British band Son of Dork David Williams, Welsh musician with the New Wave/Rock band, The Dear & Departed D. J. Williams (1885–1970), Welsh nationalist leader... David Kossoff (November 24, 1919 - March 23, 2005) was a British actor. ... Alfie Bass as the Giant in The Goodies and the Beanstalk (VHS) Alfred Bass (April 8, 1921 – July 15, 1987) was a diminutive cockney-accented Jewish actor, born in Bethnal Green, London, England. ... David Jacobs (born 1926) is a British broadcaster, who became known as a disc jockey in the 1950s. ... Charles Chilton, MBE, (born 1917) is a BBC radio presenter, a writer and a producer. ... Charles Chilton, MBE, (born 1917) is a BBC radio presenter, a writer and a producer. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Label for 1. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... Charles Chilton, MBE, (born 1917) is a BBC radio presenter, a writer and a producer. ...


The first series was created in 1953, soon after Riders of the Range (a popular Western, also written by Chilton) ended its six seasons on the BBC Light Programme. Michael Standing, then Head of the BBC Variety Department, asked Chilton if he could write a sci-fi programme, and Journey to the Moon (later known as Operation Luna) was the result.[2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Light Programme was a BBC radio station broadcasting mainstream light entertainment and music. ...


Each half-hour episode would usually end with a dramatic cliffhanger (a popular plot device used to increase the audience's incentive to tune in to the next episode). For other uses, see Cliffhanger (disambiguation). ...


Chilton went on to write three best-selling novels based upon the radio series. From April 1956, the Express Weekly comic ran a full colour comic strip of Journey Into Space, with new stories written by Chilton (one story title was Planet of Fear), drawn first by Tacconi, and then by Bruce Cornwall and Terence Patrick.[3] Further details of this cartoon strip sequel are provided after our analysis of the Third radio series. A childrens comic of the late 1950s, Express Weekly featured among others Wulf the Briton drawn by Ron Embleton. ... A British comic is a periodical published in the United Kingdom that contains comic strips. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...


Fans of Journey Into Space include Colin Pillinger,[4] Kenny Everett,[5] John Major,[5] Stephen Hawking[5] and Miriam Margolyes.[5] Colin Pillinger (born May 9, 1943) is a planetary scientist at the Open University in the UK. He graduated with a BSc and a Ph. ... Kenny Everett (born Maurice Cole in Crosby, Merseyside, 25 December 1944, died 4 April 1995), was a popular English radio DJ and television entertainer. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA, (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist. ... Miriam Margolyes OBE (born May 18, 1941) is a British character actress. ...

Contents

The main cast

Captain Andrew
"Jet" Morgan
Doc Matthews Stephen "Mitch" Mitchell Lemuel
"Lemmy" Barnet
Journey to the Moon Andrew Faulds Guy Kingsley Poynter Bruce Beeby (episodes 2 to 6) David Kossoff
Don Sharp (episodes 7 to 18)
The Red Planet Bruce Beeby
The World in Peril Don Sharp Alfie Bass
Operation Luna David Williams
The Return from Mars John Pullen Ed Bishop Nigel Graham Anthony Hall

Andrew Matthew William Faulds (1 March 1923 - 31 May 2000) was a British actor and politician. ... David Kossoff (November 24, 1919 - March 23, 2005) was a British actor. ... Donald Sharp (born 19 April 1922, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia) is a British film director. ... Donald Sharp (born 19 April 1922, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia) is a British film director. ... Alfie Bass as the Giant in The Goodies and the Beanstalk (VHS) Alfred Bass (April 8, 1921 – July 15, 1987) was a diminutive cockney-accented Jewish actor, born in Bethnal Green, London, England. ... // David Williams is the name of: David Williams (didgeridoo), (born 1983) Aboriginal musician and artist David Williams (Son of Dork), a guitarist in the British band Son of Dork David Williams, Welsh musician with the New Wave/Rock band, The Dear & Departed D. J. Williams (1885–1970), Welsh nationalist leader... Ed Bishop (1932-2005), as he appeared in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey (where he played the Captain of the Aries 1B space-station-to-moon shuttle, in a role which first featured dialogue: the dialogue was later cut from his scenes). ... Anthony William Hall (1898-1947) claimed to be descended directly through the male line from Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn (from an illegitimate son, born before their marriage). ...

The original three series

Journey to the Moon / Operation Luna

Initially, the first series was simply known as Journey Into Space, with the subtitle A Tale of the Future added by the Radio Times, but within the BBC it became known as Journey to the Moon. The series was set in 1965 (the year in which Chilton believed humans would first walk on the Moon[6]), and was first broadcast in 1953–1954 on the BBC Light Programme, which later became BBC Radio 2. The series was originally intended to have 12 episodes (one source claims 8 episodes[1]), and 5.1 million people tuned in to the first episode, but the first four episodes (which took place on Earth) didn't prove very popular, and the audience soon shrank to less than 4 million. However, once the rocket set off for the Moon in episode 5, the audience reaction was much more favourable. The series was extended to 18 episodes, and by the time the final episode was broadcast, 8 million people were tuning in.[2] Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ... The Light Programme was a BBC radio station broadcasting mainstream light entertainment and music. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and is the most popular station in the UK. It broadcasts throughout the UK on FM radio between 88 and 91 MHz from its studios in Western House, adjacent to Broadcasting House in central London. ...


In 1958, Journey to the Moon was re-recorded for the BBC Transcription Services (retitled as Operation Luna), because the original recordings had been erased. The first four episodes of the original series were omitted, and episodes 12 and 13 were merged into a single episode.[2]


In addition to the main cast, other cast members in Journey to the Moon were:[2]

  • Wilfred Walter – Sir William Morgan
  • Robert Perceval – Mackenzie
  • Deryck Guyler – The Time-Traveller ("The Voice")
  • Mark Baker
  • Errol McKinnon
  • Jessica Dunning
  • David Jacobs
  • Duncan McIntyre
  • Wyndham Milligan

Other cast members in Operation Luna were:[2] Deryck Guyler (April 29, 1914 - October 7, 1999) was a versatile British actor, equally at home with comedy and classical/character roles, but best known for his portrayal of officious short-tempered middle-aged men in sitcoms such as Please, Sir and Sykes. ... Mark Baker can refer several people including: Mark Baker (Religious Prophet) Mark Baker (animator) Mark Baker (author) Mark Baker (basketball) - Dayton Jets head basketball coach and former Ohio State University player Mark M. Baker (attorney) Category: ... David Jacobs (born 1926) is a British broadcaster, who became known as a disc jockey in the 1950s. ...

  • John Cazabon – Earth Control
  • Alan Keith – London correspondent
  • Duncan McIntyre – Jet's great uncle, Hector
  • Deryck Guyler – The Time-Traveller ("The Voice")
  • David Jacobs – Miscellaneous characters

Chilton wrote episode 8 of Journey to the Moon in response to a challenge from a TV producer, who considered the success of the series to be "a fluke". The producer challenged Chilton to write an episode "that could not be played equally well on television", and Chilton succeeded – a large proportion of the episode takes place in total darkness.[6] During the episode, Jet reads to the rest of the crew by torchlight from The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells, the only fictional book carried on board the ship.[6] Deryck Guyler (April 29, 1914 - October 7, 1999) was a versatile British actor, equally at home with comedy and classical/character roles, but best known for his portrayal of officious short-tempered middle-aged men in sitcoms such as Please, Sir and Sykes. ... David Jacobs (born 1926) is a British broadcaster, who became known as a disc jockey in the 1950s. ... The First Men in the Moon is a 1901 science fiction novel by the British author H. G. Wells. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ...


Andrew Faulds' adopted uncle, Hector MacPherson, was an astronomer, and wrote a book called Practical Astronomy. Chilton bought a copy of the book, which first sparked his interest in astronomy, and later led him to write Journey Into Space. In episode 7 of Journey to the Moon, Jet's childhood flashback features his great uncle Hector, who was based on Hector MacPherson.[6]


The table below indicates the correspondence between the episodes of Journey to the Moon and Operation Luna.[2]

Journey to the Moon Operation Luna Brief plot summary
Episode First broadcast Episode First broadcast
1 21 Sep 1953 The year is 1965, and Jet's father (Sir William Morgan) launches his A.24 rocket from the Rocket Research Station at Poker Flats. But something goes wrong, and the rocket heads towards Las Vegas, out of control.
2 28 Sep 1953 The rocket hits Las Vegas, killing at least 35 people, and the Poker Flats site is shut down. Meanwhile, Jet is invited by Mitch to join his Operation Luna project – a rocket to reach the Moon.
3 5 Oct 1953 Jet is appointed the rocket's pilot, and he and Lemmy travel to Australia to meet Mitch at the secret Operation Luna base. On arrival, Mitch takes them to meet Smitty, the team's doctor, but he is found dead.
4 12 Oct 1953 Doc Matthews replaces Smitty (who died from a coronary), and Lemmy is to be the radio operator. Mitch spots a plane flying around the launch site, suspects spies are active, and advances the launch date.
5 19 Oct 1953 1 26 Mar 1958 The rocket "Luna" sets off for the Moon with Jet, Doc, Mitch and Lemmy aboard. Radio contact with Earth is lost. Lemmy hears odd 'music' on the radio, before contact is resumed, and a tiny meteor hits Luna.
6 26 Oct 1953 2 2 Apr 1958 Luna is turned round for the Moon landing, and Lemmy hears the 'music' again during the final approach. The crew narrate their first moonwalk by radio to Earth. While exploring a crater, Jet vanishes.
7 2 Nov 1953 3 9 Apr 1958 The crew experience strange things: Jet has visions of the past and the future; Lemmy is disturbed by the 'music' again; Doc sees a strange dome over a crater, and writes an odd diary entry without realising.
8 9 Nov 1953 4 16 Apr 1958 Luna loses power just before taking off – the crew are stuck on the Moon. A UFO is seen on the televiewer, and strange noises are heard. Power is suddenly restored, and the UFO has landed outside.
9 16 Nov 1953 5 23 Apr 1958 Mitch is inquisitive and enters the UFO, where he is temporarily possessed by an alien intelligence. Luna takes off and orbits the Moon; on the far side, the crew encounter a fleet of UFOs, which pursues them.
10 23 Nov 1953 6 30 Apr 1958 The UFOs accelerate Luna to an incredible speed, and the crew blacks out. On recovering, they find themselves out in deep space, with no sign of the Earth or Moon. In the distance, a planet is approaching.
11 30 Nov 1953 7 7 May 1958 The planet looks similar to Earth, and the crew land Luna on it. After studying the stars, Jet realises that they are on Earth, but they've travelled thousands of years through time.
12 7 Dec 1953 8 14 May 1958 Jet discovers a prehistoric stone knife near Luna, proving that they've travelled back in time. A UFO lands nearby, and a voice is heard over the radio: "Hello Luna!"
13 14 Dec 1953
14 21 Dec 1953 9 21 May 1958 The crew talk with 'the voice', which warns them that they are in great danger, and persuades them to enter the UFO, which then takes off. Eventually it lands again, in a city of domed buildings.
15 29 Dec 1953 10 28 May 1958 The crew learn more about 'the voice' and his people (they are a peaceful, scientific race). They enter a domed building, walk down a long dark tunnel, and emerge in a huge underground city.
16 5 Jan 1954 11 4 Jun 1958 'The voice' tells the crew about the native 'forest creatures' (destructive animals), and promises to help the crew get back to their own time. The crew realise the 'forest creatures' are prehistoric humans.
17 12 Jan 1954 12 11 Jun 1958 'The voice' is not pleased to learn that the crew are descended from the 'forest creatures', but reluctantly helps them. Luna takes off and is accelerated by the UFOs; the crew blacks out.
18 19 Jan 1954 13 18 Jun 1958 The crew return to the Moon in 1965, but with no memory of their adventure on prehistoric Earth. However, Doc's diary contains a detailed account, and there's also a prehistoric stone knife on board Luna...

More detailed information on the series can be found in the comprehensive booklet accompanying the CD boxset of Operation Luna. “UFO” redirects here. ...


The Red Planet

Journey Into Space featured on the cover of the Radio Times.
Journey Into Space featured on the cover of the Radio Times.

The second series, The Red Planet, followed the adventures of the crew in their first attempt to reach and explore Mars. Several new characters were introduced, the most notable of which were Frank Rogers and James Edward Whitaker, the two original crewmen of freighter #2. Chilton took the name Whitaker from a copy of Whitaker's Almanack which was sitting on his desk.[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ...


In addition to the main cast, other cast members in The Red Planet were:[7]

Sound control and special effects throughout the series were provided by Brian Willey and Joe Young. David Jacobs (born 1926) is a British broadcaster, who became known as a disc jockey in the 1950s. ... Miriam Karlin (born 23 June 1925 in London) is a British actress. ... Donald Sharp (born 19 April 1922, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia) is a British film director. ...


The most memorable catchphrase from this series was "Orders must be obeyed without question at all times", which was often repeated by many of the 'conditioned' characters, especially Whitaker. A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


During the first broadcast of this series, the Radio Times featured Journey Into Space on its cover, showing Andrew Faulds as Captain "Jet" Morgan. His spacesuit (which was used by several of the cast members for publicity photos) was a prototype being developed in Britain at the time.[7] Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ...


In the table of episodes below, the numbers marked with # refer to the numbered freighters of the Mars fleet.

Episode First broadcast Brief plot summary
1 6 Sep 1954 April 1971. Jet and Mitch travel from Earth to the Moon by rocket. The Mars fleet (the flagship Discovery, 8 freighters and 20 men) begins its journey. During an EVA, Mitch's safety line fails, leaving him adrift.
2 13 Sep 1954 Jet manages to rescue Mitch, using a miniature rocket unit. Frank tells Lemmy he's not getting on at all well with Whitaker, his shipmate. Whitaker starts behaving very strangely while Jet is questioning him.
3 20 Sep 1954 While Whitaker is in a strange deep sleep, both Frank and Lemmy have nightmares. Radar suddenly reveals a huge meteor swarm ahead of the fleet, blocking its path. A large meteor destroys #7.
4 27 Sep 1954 Control discovers very odd information about Whitaker (apparently born in 1893, disappeared in 1924, etc). The fleet changes course twice to avoid the meteor swarm, but both times it moves to block their path again.
5 4 Oct 1954 The fleet enters the swarm. Peterson reports an emergency on board #6 with Whitaker. On leaving the swarm, #6 is nowhere to be seen, and the swarm is now blocking radio contact with Control.
6 11 Oct 1954 A radio message (apparently from Control) orders the fleet to return home, but the message is later found to be a fake. #6 is sighted ahead of the fleet, and Discovery draws up alongside it.
7 18 Oct 1954 Whitaker is found badly injured in #6, but Peterson has vanished. Jet has a strange dream, and Whitaker dies, suddenly transforming into an old man. Recordings reveal Whitaker faked the radio message.
8 25 Oct 1954 Peterson's suicide recording is found, and radio contact with Control is restored. The fleet enters orbit round Mars, and Discovery lands at the North Pole, but a strange soporific noise troubles the crew.
9 1 Nov 1954 #1 lands alongside Discovery, and Jet and Mitch explore outside, but they soon get lost in a dense fog. They see a mysterious orange light, and a soporific noise causes them to lose consciousness.
10 8 Nov 1954 Doc and Frank rescue Jet and Mitch, and Jet says he dreamed of a ruined city in a valley. Discovery's crew begin the exploration of Mars in the land trucks, but #2 hears the soporific noise and crashes.
11 15 Nov 1954 During the night, Discovery's crew see a moving white light in the direction of #2. Once they reached the crashed freighter, there's no sign of its crew, and there are strange marks in the ground nearby.
12 22 Nov 1954 While #1's crew is occupying #2, a 'sphere' (spherical UFO) arrives and its crew (three humans) attempt to enter the freighter. Discovery's crew reach a valley which is identical to the one in Jet's earlier dream.
13 29 Nov 1954 Discovery's crew explore the valley's ruined city, but Lemmy vanishes, and experiences a hypnotic dream. He's later found with McClain (pilot of #2), who is now mysteriously able to breathe the Martian air.
14 6 Dec 1954 Doc realises that Whitaker and McClain had been 'conditioned' (hypnotised), allowing them to be controlled. Mitch becomes separated from the others, and meets a man who claims to be a dingo hunter in Australia.
15 13 Dec 1954 McClain, pretending to be Mitch, enters the land truck and tries to overpower Lemmy. Meanwhile, Mitch comes across a house inhabited by a man and woman who claim to be sheep farmers living in Australia in 1939.
16 20 Dec 1954 Jet, Doc and Lemmy discover the same house, and find Mitch inside it. But Mitch is now 'conditioned' to believe he's in Australia, and doesn't recognise the others. He refuses to rejoin them, and attacks Jet.
17 27 Dec 1954 A 'flying doctor' arrives in a sphere, and manages to capture Doc and Lemmy. He tries to 'condition' them using the soporific noise, but they manage to resist. Meanwhile, Jet escapes back to the land trucks.
18 3 Jan 1955 The sphere arrives at Lacus Solis (the Martian capital), and the flying doctor reveals the Martian plan to invade the Earth in 1986. Frank, flying in #1, hears the soporific noise and his freighter crashes.
19 10 Jan 1955 Doc and Lemmy overpower the flying doctor, and escape in the sphere with Mitch, who recovers from his 'conditioning'. Jet is contacted by Webster, a man trying to return to Earth, and learns more about the Martians.
20 17 Jan 1955 Jet, Lemmy and Webster try to rescue Frank, but they fail, and Webster is injured and dies. The crew return to Discovery at the North Pole, and take off for home, escaping a pursuing fleet of spheres.

More detailed information on the series can be found in the comprehensive booklet accompanying the CD boxset of The Red Planet. Astronaut Bruce McCandless on an untethered EVA Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is work done by an astronaut away from the Earth and outside of his or her spacecraft. ... Solis Lacus (85° W, 26° S) is a dark feature on Mars. ...


The World in Peril

Series 3 of Journey Into Space, The World in Peril, followed Jet Morgan and his crew's return to Mars in an attempt to avert the impending Martian invasion. The series consisted of twenty thirty minute episodes, and was broadcast each Monday at 7:30pm on The Light Programme from September 26, 1955 to 13 February 1956. Andrew Faulds and Guy Kingsley Poynter returned as Jet and Doc, whereas Mitch was once again played by Don Sharp. David Kossoff, who left to pursue a stage career, was replaced by Alfie Bass. Other parts were played by Pat Cambell, John Cazabon, David Jacobs, Miriam Karlin, Alan Tilvern, Fred Yule and The George Mitchell Choir. is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Andrew Matthew William Faulds (1 March 1923 - 31 May 2000) was a British actor and politician. ... Donald Sharp (born 19 April 1922, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia) is a British film director. ... David Kossoff (November 24, 1919 - March 23, 2005) was a British actor. ... Alfie Bass as the Giant in The Goodies and the Beanstalk (VHS) Alfred Bass (April 8, 1921 – July 15, 1987) was a diminutive cockney-accented Jewish actor, born in Bethnal Green, London, England. ... David Henry Jacobs (April 30, 1888 - June 6, 1976) was a British athlete, winner of gold medal in 4x100 m relay at the 1912 Summer Olympics. ...

Episode First broadcast Brief plot summary
1 26 Sep 1955 April 15th 1972. The Discovery and two freighters return to the moon from the disastrous Mars expedition. The crew are subjected to intense questioning about their experiences on Mars and Lemmy discovers that the Discovery is being readied for take off. Back on earth they visit an astronomical observer who has spotted suspicious objects in the heavens.
2 3 Oct 1955 Jet and Lemmy go to investigate the objects in an orbital rocket, but are sent to sleep for 24 hours by a strange noise. Video footage suggests the asteroids are actually spacecraft carriers. Jet discovers that a spaceship has crashed in the Lake District. Jet and Doc enter the ship.
3 10 Oct 1955 The crew and Lunar Controller try to locate the crew of the crashed ship. They interview Moore, a commercial traveller who may have had contact with the crew of the ship, who recounts his experience. The crew are ordered back to Mars and are driven to an airfield, but the car crashes when the crew tackle the 'Conditioned Type' driver.
4 17 Oct 1955 The crew fly to Australia, then on a ship to the moon. While preparing for the voyage to Mars, they spot unidentified objects on the lunar horizon. The take off is complicated by strange communication with control, suggesting the moon base has been infiltrated.
5 24 Oct 1955 The Discovery gets away safely, however they cannot establish contact with Moon control so Lemmy contacts earth. After ships from earth to the moon are lost, the crew concludes that the Moon has fallen under Martian control. While refuelling from freighter #1, Jet and Lemmy hear a strange wailing voice.
6 31 Oct 1955 The crew slow the ship down, discuss where on Mars to land and the objectives of the trip. They regain contact with the strange voice, discovering it is a very confused Frank Rogers, ex-crew man of Freighter #2.
7 7 Nov 1955 Thinking Frank may be there, the crew decide to land near the wreck of freighter #2, but Jet and Mitch discover it to be empty. From the Discovery Doc and Lemmy spot a fleet of Martian spheres approaching.
8 14 Nov 1955 Jet and Doc fail to make it back to Discovery, and the crew all pass out as the ships approach. They wake up in a dark room and figure that they must be on one of the moons of Mars. They discover an unconscious man in the room, that Jet is missing and a door in the floor opens.
9 21 Nov 1955 Jet is found under his bed and the unconscious man is found to be Frank Rogers. Doc tries to bring Frank out of his conditioned state, and he reveals that the invasion is under way. Jet and Lemmy go through the floor and are directed by the voice of Paddy Flynn.
10 28 Nov 1955 Frank regains some of his memory, revealing that the crew are aboard an asteroid ship. Jet and Lemmy meet Paddy face to face, and he reveals he is the rebel captain of the asteroid, working with Jack Evans. Paddy receives orders to join the invasion fleet.
11 5 Dec 1955 Paddy leaves the crew, who learn how to manipulate the video computer. As Mitch and Frank follow them along a circular corridor using the cameras, Jet, Lemmy and Doc hear a voice they assume to be a Martian ordering them back.
12 12 Dec 1955 Jet, Lemmy and Doc ignore the Martian's warnings to turn back, and Jet is knocked out after touching a door at the end of the corridor. The crew persuades Paddy to set the ship on course for Mars so they can warn Earth of the invasion, however he loses control and is injured.
13 19 Dec 1955 The asteroid is in chaos and the crew discover Asteroid 786/738 is on its way to sort it out. Mitch and Lemmy go to fetch a bed for Paddy, but become lost and enter the Martian's lair. They hear a familiar voice but can't place it. Paddy dies and Jet and Mitch discover Jack Evans is really the Lunar Controller, in league with the Martians from the start.
14 2 Jan 1956 The Lunar Controller tells Mitch and Lemmy that the invasion will be facilitated by a hypnotic television broadcast. Jet and Doc go on a search for the others, and follow conditioned crew members onto the asteroid surface. Wearing Martian suits they investigate a large sphere, but become stranded on the surface.
15 9 Jan 1956 While the Lunar Controller is away, Jet and Doc enter his quarters from the asteroid surface. Mitch and Lemmy explain what has happened to them, and they hatch a plan to imprison the Lunar Controller and escape
16 16 Jan 1956 The crew imprison the Lunar Controller, and gain his assistance by threatening to release him into space. Lemmy smashes up the computerised brain to stop messages being sent to the rest of the Martian fleet. Frank pilots the ship as they escape the asteroid and set course for Mars but they discover the Discovery to have been plundered.
17 23 Jan 1956 The head into orbit and transfer to Freighter #1 and attempt to contact Earth, but they cannot get their warning about the invasion through. They spot the asteroid invasion fleet approaching them from behind. Jet decides to use all remaining fuel to set on course for Earth in order to increase their chances of warning Earth of the invasion
18 30 Jan 1956 The asteroid fleet increases speed and overtakes Freighter #1. Jet records a warning to Earth to be transmitted on a loop. Attempts to hypnotise the crew fail, so the Martian contacts the crew using their voices. Freighter #1 crashes onto the surface of a large asteroid.
19 6 Feb 1956 Lemmy fails to contact Earth, but they are contacted by the Martian who tells them to enter the asteroid ship. The Martian reveals that he is the only one left of a race of giants and explains his reasons for the invasion. A crew from the asteroid, including ex-freighter man Harding, forcibly remove the crew from Freighter #1.
20 13 Feb 1956 The crew are shown to luxurious quarters aboard the asteroid and cruise to Earth as part of the invasion fleet. They are commanded to the Martian fleet where they are dismayed to discover that Earth has not followed their instruction to shut down all television channels. However upon returning to their quarters they discover the channels have been shut down. The Martian allows all those in his command to return to earth, although many choose to remain in the Martian's fleet and to establish a perfect civilisation in another galaxy, free from persecution, hunger, misgovernment and war.

The Express Weekly Journey into Space story is a sequel to this adventure. The Italian artist Ferninando Tacconi spent some time with Charles absorbing the atmosphere of the saga, and portrayed[in full colour] the radio actors likenesses to match the clever dialogue in the 35 episode first story(Planet of Fear) which was continued in a 32 episode story entitled Shadow Over Britain. Charles lost any enthusiasm when Tacconi ceased to illustrate the cartoon strip. Thereafter it became a contractual chore for him.The cartoon strip stories are thus:quite Planet of Fear 28.4.1956 to 29.12. 1956. Shadow Over Britain 5.1.1957 to 3.8.1957. Artists: Ferninando Tacconi(until 2.3.1957), Bruce Cornwell(until 6.4.1957) then Terrence Patrick. The quite marvelous saga reaches a rather tacky conclusion. The first Express Weekly annual[published 9.1956] contains a short-but interesting- Tacconi illustrated story in B & W, Jet Morgan and the Space Pirates. Express Weekly contained one further story - although this was NOT a Chilton story(The World Next Door 10.8.57 to 5.10.57.), and the 1957 annual contains another short story Jet Morgan and the Space Castaway. This is also of little interest.


Moral issues

Although Journey Into Space was primarily an entertaining science-fiction adventure, it often touched on deeper moral issues, many of which were very thought-provoking. A recurring theme throughout all three series was the lack of respect which humans often demonstrate towards the Earth and each other. At times, a non-human intelligence (such as the Time-Traveller or the Martian), being much older and more advanced than mankind, would rebuke the main characters for mankind's selfish and destructive tendencies.


In Operation Luna, a good example is the diary entry which Doc unintentionally writes while being influenced by the Time-Traveller on the Moon:

... We should never have come. Man has no right here, no right to carry the secrets of this planet back to Earth, back to terrestrial beings who can neither understand them nor appreciate them, and in consequence will only attempt to destroy them, rip them to pieces, tear them apart, as they have already begun to destroy their own planet ...

Another example is Mitch's speech while possessed by the Time-Traveller on the Moon:

... Why do you interrupt the peace of your sister planet? ... Already you are tearing your own planet to pieces, destroying it, and now you mean to do the same here ...

Later, when the crew are living on prehistoric Earth, they meet the Time-Traveller, whose race is being driven off the Earth by destructive animals known as the 'forest creatures'. The crew eventually realise that these creatures are actually prehistoric humans, and when the Time-Traveller learns of this connection between the creatures and the crew, he gains a better understanding of humanity's behaviour:

You have witnessed the basic force that drives the forest creatures – the uncontrollable desire to destroy things they do not understand; the incredible selfishness of their nature ... When one of them has a piece of food, does he share it with his companions? No, he goes away and hides, and gorges himself until he is sick, then buries any that's left over. And if one of his kind sees him with that food, he tries to get it away from him. Not part of it, all of it. And then they snarl and fight, and draw each other's blood, until one lies dead so that the other can keep more than he needs ... It takes a long time for such things to be driven out of a being's nature. A long, long time, probably longer than your kind have inhabited this planet.

Music

Van Phillips composed and conducted the music for all three series.[1] The music was initially recorded beforehand, and played from acetate discs during the recording sessions.[2] Later, an eight-piece orchestra was actually present in the studio, and played the music live.[8] Phillips liked the sound of the clavioline, and obtained one for use during Journey Into Space. He composed music especially for it, and it was "bolted onto the piano" in the studio.[8] The clavioline was an electronic keyboard instrument, a forerunner to the analog synthesizer. ...


In 1955, Decca released a 78rpm record of the Journey Into Space theme, performed by Frank Weir and his orchestra (catalogue number F.10435, and sheet music of a piano solo of the theme was also published. In 1978, the recording was included on the 33⅓rpm BBC compilation record BBC Space Themes (catalogue number REH 324), and in 2005, Vocalion/Dutton Laboratories included it on their digitally remastered compilation CD Presenting Frank Weir And His Saxophone (catalogue number CDLK 4266). It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ... Frank Weir (? 1911 - 12th May 1981) was a British male orchestra leader and jazz musician who reached no. ... 1921 Vocalion label Vocalion Records was a record label historically active in the United States and in the United Kingdom. ...


Excerpts of popular music were often used during the episodes, and sometimes played an important role in the plot. In episode 8 of Journey to the Moon, an excerpt from "Honeymoon on a Rocket Ship" by Hank Snow and The Rainbow Ranch Boys is heard by the crew on the ship's radio.[2] "When It's Night Time In Italy", by James Kendis and Lew Brown, was an important part of episodes 7 and 8 of The Red Planet.[7] Other popular music used in The Red Planet included:[7] Clarence Eugene Snow (May 9, 1914 – December 20, 1999), better known as Hank Snow, was a Hall of Fame country music singer and songwriter. ... Lew Brown (December 10, 1893 - February 5, 1958) was a lyricist for popular songs in the United States. ...

  • "Flat Foor Floogie", by Bulet Galliard, Leroy Stewart and Bud Green, performed by the Benny Goodman Orchestra
  • The theme tune to the Billy Cotton Band Show
  • "Somebody Stole My Gal", by Lee Wright
  • "Friends and Neighbours", by Marvin Scott and Malcolm Lockyer
  • "Selection of Hebrew Dances Part 2", by Ambrose and his orchestra
  • Banjo music by Billy Bell
  • Chopin Opus 34: No. 2: Valse brillante in A minor (played over the radio in the last episode of World in Peril)

The song The Green Hills of Earth, used in one of the episodes, was taken from Robert Heinlein's short story of the same name. Bud Green was born in Austria on November 19, 1897 and immigrated to America as an infant. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman, (May 30, 1909 - June 13, 1986) was a famous Jazz musician, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, and Swings Senior Statesman. Goodman was born in Chicago, the son of poor Jewish immigrants who lived on Chicagos Maxwell Street neighborhood. ... The Billy Cotton Band Show was a popular Sunday afternoon radio programme on the BBC Light Programme from 1949 to 1968. ... Malcolm Lockyer (5 October 1923 - 28 June 1976) was a film composer and conductor. ... Ambrose in 1927 Benjamin Baruch Ambrose (15 September 1896–11 June 1971) was an English bandleader and violinist. ... Frédéric François Chopin as portrayed by Eugène Delacroix in 1838. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Green Hills of Earth is a science fiction short story by Robert A. Heinlein. ...


Sound effects

A variety of sound effects were used in the episodes, and played a major role. In addition to basic sounds, such as feet walking along a corridor or tunnel, more advanced effects were created, such as the mysterious haunting 'music' which is heard over the rocket's radio in many episodes of Operation Luna.


The most distinctive effect was the dramatic rocket take-off, which was played at the beginning of each episode, and whenever necessary during the episodes. This was actually a recording of a jet aircraft at Heathrow airport.[8] Often, this would be followed by a slowly ascending tone (representing the rocket accelerating), which "was actually a recording of a thermionic valve played through an echo chamber down at the Physical Research Laboratory at Kingston".[8] Other sound effects were created at Battersea Power Station, and the sound made by the televiewer on board Luna was actually a naval ASDIC.[2] Jet aircraft are aircrafts with jet engines. ... “Heathrow” redirects here. ... Structure of a vacuum tube diode Structure of a vacuum tube triode In electronics, a vacuum tube, electron tube, or (outside North America) thermionic valve or just valve, is a device used to amplify, switch or modify a signal by controlling the movement of electrons in an evacuated space. ... This article is about the technological device. ... The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) is the national measurement standards laboratory for the United Kingdom, based at Bushy Park in Teddington in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... Battersea Power Station viewed from the north bank of the River Thames at Pimlico. ... This article is about underwater sound propagation. ...


The BBC had an echo chamber in the studio, which was greatly utilised during the episodes. Whenever the crew were in contact by radio with Earth control, or another distant location, the echo chamber would be applied to the voice of the remote character. Various sound effects were also created "live" in the studio. For example, in episode 8 of Journey to the Moon, the crew hear a mysterious tapping on the outside of the ship; this effect was created "by tapping the needle of the gramophone pickup head, and playing that through an echo chamber".[8]


Discovery of Transcription discs

The programmes were recorded in the studio on 15ips magnetic tape, and were later copied onto 33⅓rpm 16-inch coarse groove transcription discs for the BBC Transcription Services (except for Journey to the Moon episodes). The master tapes were erased three months after broadcast, in accordance with BBC policy at the time. The Transcription discs were sold overseas, and their fate is unknown, so for many years, it was believed that all the episodes had been lost forever.[9] Inches per second is a unit of speed or velocity. ... For other uses, see Revolutions per minute (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Childrens gramophone records be merged into this article or section. ...


However, in 1986, a set of mis-filed Transcription discs were found by Ted Kendall, a BBC recording engineer, which turned out to be copies of Operation Luna, The Red Planet and The World in Peril. The BBC no longer possessed a suitable turntable on which to play the discs, but Kendall eventually managed to obtain an EMT 927 turntable. To clean the discs, he soaked them in warm water containing Fairy Liquid, brushed them with a goats-hair brush, and dried them using kitchen towels.[9] Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Two bottles of Fairy. ...


Kendall then transferred the recordings to magnetic tape, removing "clicks" from the sound using a device which he designed and built, called the Mousetrap (or Front End). He removed more severe clicks after the transfer, by scraping the oxide off the magnetic tape in appropriate places.[9] The BBC took the opportunity to re-broadcast all three series on Radio 2 between 1989 and 1991,[citation needed] and abridged versions were released on audio cassette. Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1998, he digitally remastered the recordings for new abridged releases on audio cassette, and releases of the unabridged remastered recordings on CD began in 2004. The three series have also been broadcast on BBC 7. BBC Radio 7 is a digital radio station broadcasting comedy, drama, and childrens programming 24 hours a day. ...


The Return from Mars

As part of a special science fiction season, a 90-minute special (scripted by Chilton) was broadcast on Radio 4 on March 7, 1981, entitled The Return from Mars. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


Trivia

There is a slight Continuity Error in the The Return from Mars which incorrectly names the ship that the crew return to earth in as the Discovery even though in The World in Peril the crew return to earth in one of the freighters as the Discovery was lost on the surface of Mars.


BBC releases on audio cassette and CD

Series Format Abridged? Release date Released by ISBN Extras
Operation Luna 4 cassettes Yes 1989 BBC Enterprises Ltd 0-563-22632-3 None
6 cassettes Yes 1996 BBC Worldwide Ltd 0-563-38893-5 None
4 cassettes
7 CDs No 5 Jul 2004 BBC Audiobooks Ltd 0-563-52489-8 Journey Into Space... Again documentary
Excerpt from Journey to the Moon
The Red Planet 6 cassettes Yes 1991 BBC Enterprises Ltd 0-563-40992-4 None
4 cassettes
10 CDs No 3 Jan 2005 BBC Audiobooks Ltd 0-563-52494-4 Charles Chilton interview, Round Midnight
The World in Peril 6 cassettes
4 cassettes Yes 1998 BBC Worldwide Ltd 0-563-55762-1 None
CD Planned release 4 Oct 2006, cancelled 0-563-52499-5  
The Return from Mars  
2 cassettes No 2000 BBC Worldwide Ltd 0-563-55361-8 Journey Into Space... Again documentary

“ISBN” redirects here. ...

Trivia

  • David Kossoff asked Chilton if his character (the ship's radio operator) could be called Lemuel (a name he loved), and Chilton shortened the name to Lemmy. Chilton based Lemmy's character on himself, since he had been a radio operator in the RAF.[6]
  • Light-hearted pranks were often played on David Jacobs just before a recording session was about to begin. On one occasion, Andrew Faulds poured a jug of water inside his trousers, totally soaking him, and he "did the rest of the programme in a raincoat!"[2] On another occasion, some of the actors smeared mustard on his lip microphone, causing him some difficulties during the recording session![6]
  • Originally, Chilton had chosen John Glen to play Jet, but later decided to use Andrew Faulds instead, because Chilton's secretary fancied him![6]
  • David Jacobs' ability to play a wide variety of characters, each with their own distinctive voice, resulted in him playing 22 different characters during the course of Journey Into Space. He used to mark up his script using different colour pencils, to help him remember what each character was supposed to sound like. In episode 1 of The Red Planet, Jet is interviewed by a group of newspaper reporters, all of which were played by David.[6]

“RAF” redirects here. ... The Teahouse of the August Moon is a 1956 motion picture comedy satirising the US occupation of Japan following the end of World War II. John Patrick adapted the screenplay from his own Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning Broadway play of 1953. ... A perfomance at Opera House, Haymarket, predecessor of Her Majestys Theatre in circa 1808. ...

Other related series

Chilton followed Journey Into Space with two other radio series – Space Force in 1984 and Space Force II in 1985 – which were based on a similar theme. Indeed, Space Force had originally been intended as a new Journey Into Space serial, following on from The Return from Mars, until relatively late in the day, so its four central characters are clear 'doubles' for the Journey Into Space team. In the version that was actually recorded and transmitted, one character (Chipper Barnett) refers to his grandfather Lemmy... A BBC Radio science fiction serial written by Charles Chilton which ran for two years, a sequel to the 1950s serial Journey Into Space. ... This article is about the year. ... A BBC Radio science fiction serial written by Charles Chilton which ran for two years, a sequel to the 1950s serial Journey Into Space. ... This article is about the year. ...


External links

CD boxsets and Internet downloads

Informational booklets and audio clips The logo of Internet Archive The Internet Archive (IA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining an on-line library and archive of Web and multimedia resources. ... The logo of Internet Archive The Internet Archive (IA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining an on-line library and archive of Web and multimedia resources. ... The iTunes Store is an online business run by Apple Inc. ... The iTunes Store is an online business run by Apple Inc. ...

Other significant sites

References

  1. ^ a b c d Summary by Charles Chilton, Operation Luna audio cassette boxset, released by BBC Worldwide Ltd, 1996
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Fourteen-page booklet accompanying the 2004 release of the Operation Luna CD boxset by BBC Audiobooks
  3. ^ Info from The World in Peril audio cassette boxset, released by BBC Worldwide Ltd, 1998
  4. ^ BBC Inside Out - Man With A Mission. Retrieved on 2007-02-19.
  5. ^ a b c d Journey Into Space - 50 Amazing Facts. Retrieved on 2007-02-19.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Journey Into Space... Again, BBC Radio 4, 20 July 1999
  7. ^ a b c d e f 16-page booklet accompanying the 2005 release of The Red Planet CD boxset by BBC Audiobooks
  8. ^ a b c d e Interview with Charles Chilton, Round Midnight, BBC Radio 2, 1989
  9. ^ a b c Radio Days: Journey Into Restored Space. Archived from the original on 2006-01-11.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Journey Into Space - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (660 words)
Journey Into Space was a BBC Radio science fiction series written by BBC producer Charles Chilton.
The first episode of Series 1, Journey Into Space, was broadcast on September 21, 1953 on the Light Programme (which later became BBC Radio 2).
The series has been translated into 17 languages, broadcast world-wide, and in the UK it was the last radio series to attract a higher audience than that watching television.
Marking Time In Our Journey Into Space (860 words)
According to Jacques-Emil Blamont of France's national centre for space studies, the most juice that could possibly be got out of modern technology is 200 kilometres (125 miles) a second through airless space.
The European Space Agency's Planck mission, set for launch in 2007, bluntly proclaims its quest to be the origin of everything -- a search for the radiation that originated with the Big Bang and which could lead to enormous leaps in understanding, and thus exploration.
However in the short term (the next 100 years, say), and despite current daydreams about space tourism and orbiting hotels, the prospect of manned rocket travel to far-flung galaxies will remain a subject for fiction -- just as the landing on the Moon was until mankind took a certain giant step.
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