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Encyclopedia > Journey Back to Oz
Oz Portal

Journey Back To Oz is an official animated sequel to the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. It is loosely based on L. Frank Baum's novel, The Marvelous Land of Oz. Image File history File links Portal. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, and the creator with illustrator W. W. Denslow of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Daniel Defoes Robinson Crusoe; title page of 1719 newspaper edition A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... Title page of The Marvelous Land of Oz. ...


Produced in 1964 by the Filmation studio (and not released until 1971), it features the voice of Liza Minnelli as Dorothy (played in the previous 1939 film by her mother, Judy Garland). Other voices were by Milton Berle, Mickey Rooney, Paul Lynde, Herschel Bernardi. Danny Thomas, Margaret Hamilton (also from the 1939 film), and opera singer Risë Stevens. The songs are by Sammy Cahn and James Van Heusen. The arrangements and score are by Walter Scharf. The first Filmation logo. ... Liza Minnelli. ... Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969), born Frances Ethel Gumm, was an American film actress considered by many to be one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... Milton Berle This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Paul Lynde Paul Edward Lynde (June 13, 1926 – January 10, 1982) was an American comedian and actor. ... Herschel Bernardi (20 October 1923 New York City - 9 May 1986 Los Angeles, California) was an American film, Broadway and television actor. ... Danny Thomas (January 6, 1914 – February 6, 1991) was an American nightclub comedian and television and film actor of Lebanese Maronite descent. ... Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz (1939) Margaret Hamilton (December 9, 1902 – May 16, 1985) was an American film actress. ... Rise Stevens was the leading mezzo-soprano at New Yorks Metropolitan Opera for two decades Rise Stevens (born 1913, New York City) (first name properly spelled Risë and pronounced REE-sah) was an American mezzo-soprano who captured a wide popular audience at the height of her career (1940... Sammy Cahn (June 18, 1913 - January 15, 1993) was a songwriter and musician, playing the piano and violin. ... James Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 7, 1990), often credited as Jimmy Van Heusen, was an American composer. ... A film score is the background music in a film, generally specially written for the film and often used to heighten emotions provoked by the imagery on the screen or by the dialogue. ... Walter Scharf (1 August 1910 - 24 February 2003) was an American film composer. ...


Thanks to another twister, Dorothy is knocked unconscious and once again dreams herself into the land of Oz, where she meets new characters such as Pumpkinhead, Woodenhead Stallion, Mombi (another wicked witch who has now taken over the land of Oz), and killer elephants.


The Wizard was nowhere to be found, at least in the theatrical version of the film. A television version shown in 1974 featured live-action segments starring Bill Cosby as the Wizard. The Wizard of Oz (or simply The Wizard) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and further popularized by the classic 1939 movie. ... Bill Cosby William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ...


Plot

Dorothy is taken back to Oz with Toto. The first new character they meet is a talking signpost, which has three signs pointing in three different directions, and each sign says "Emerald City", so Dorothy and Toto are going to have to find it themselves. They then fall into some spooky woods where they meet Pumpkinhead, the unwilling servant of Mombi, the cousin of the Wicked Witch of the West. Toto chases a cat to a small cottage where Dorothy has the distinct displeasure of meeting Mombi's pet crow, and Mombi herself face-to-warty-face. Dorothy is pushed into a chair which comes to life, and hooks Dorothy's arms. Pumpkinhead sneaks into the house while Mombi is gone to get some more wood for the fire; she is brewing something big (and heavy): Green elephants. Pumpkinhead frees Dorothy, and they flee. After finding Dorothy gone, and knowing Pumpkinhead is responsible, Mombi flies out on her broom, and says their warning the Scarecrow won't help when her green elephants come crashing through the gate.


While heading to the Emerald City, they discover a horse upside-down on a pole. They get the horse off the pole, and he introduces himself as Woodenhead Stallion III (the third), and he explains how he ended up on the pole (he was a merry-go-round horse, who fell from the merry-go-round). Woodenhead takes them to the Emerald City, where Dorothy warns the Scarecrow about Mombi's green elephants. Unfortunately, Mombi happens to arrive moments later, and Toto and the Scarecrow are captured. Dorothy, Pumpkinhead and Woodenhead flee to Tinland, and try to convince the Tin Man to help them. However, after hearing that Mombi's army consists of green elephants, he turns chicken, and wimps out, suggesting they ask the Cowardly Lion.


The Lion puts on his best brave act, saying he'll snap of the elephants tusks and use them for toothpicks, but, like the Tin Man, the Lion turns chicken after hearing the elephants are magical, and suggests they go to find Glinda, the Good Witch of the North. Glinda appears at that very moment with her Glinda Bird on her arm. The bird uses it's Tattle Tail to see what's going on at the palace, and then she gives Dorothy a little silver box. She instructs Dorothy to open the box only in the Emerald City, and then only in case of a dire emergency. Dorothy repeats Glinda's warning, and then opens a hollow panel under Woodenhead's saddle where she hides the box, and they ride off. Glinda tells her Glinda Bird to keep them tuned in.


Mombi has been watching them through her crystal ball, and knows that their path will take them through the Ferocious Forest. Using her magic, Mombi brings the trees to life. Luckily, Glinda is also keeping a watchful eye on things, and she conjours up a golden hatchet, which she zaps to Pumpkinhead. One of the trees snatches the axe from Pumpkinhead, but ends up hitting one of the other trees, turning it to gold, and making it bloom. The tree with the axe ends up hitting the other trees, turning them gold too, and finally, ends up doing the same to himself. Woodenhead continues to carry Dorothy and Pumpkinhead back to the Emerald City.


When they arrive, Mombi's elephants surprise them, but, when Dorothy flips open Glinda's box, a large army of mice emerges from the tiny box, and scares the elephants off. Mombi sees the elephants in retreat, but doesn't see the mice chasing them. She brews a potion to shrink Toto to mouse-size so she can feed him to her cat. One of the magic mice scares Mombi, who throws the potion all over her pet crow, and a drop drips from the crows perch, landing on the cat. The magic mice are much larger than normal mice, and the tiny crow and cat are scared off.


Running outside, Mombi disguises herself as a rose with poisonous thorns. Unfortunately, the elephants trample all over her, killing her. The elepahts disappear, and the Scarecrow explains that when a witch dies, all her magic dies with her. That also means that Pumpkinhead loses the life Mombi gave him. However, he comes back to life when one of Dorothy's tears falls on his head, and Glinda tells Dorothy that there is a magic stronger than Mombi's, and her own. The strongest magic in all the world; faith and love.


The Scarecrow makes Woodenhead the head of the Oz cavalry, and knights Pumpkinhead. Now, all Dorothy wants is to go home to Kansas. The Scarecrow flips through the Constitution of Oz, and reads a section that states that a visitor to Oz may return the way they came if transportation is available. After Dorothy reveals she came by cyclone, Glinda asks for some leaves. Pumpkinhead gives her some of the leaves from his neck, and Glinda wakes her wand, and the leaves take on the path of a cyclone, which takes Dorothy and Toto home to Kansas.


External links

  • IMDB


The world of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Oz portal
The land | The characters | The books
The authors (Baum | Thompson | McGraw | Volkov) | The illustrators (Denslow | Neill)

The feature film adaptations

(1908: The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays | 1910: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz | The Land of Oz | 1914: The Patchwork Girl of Oz | The Magic Cloak of Oz | His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz | 1925: Wizard of Oz | 1939: The Wizard of Oz | 1964: Return to Oz | 1969: The Wonderful Land of Oz | 1971: Ayşecik ve Sihirli Cüceler Rüyalar Ülkesinde | 1972: Journey Back to Oz | 1975: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | 1976: The Wizard of Oz | 1978: The Wiz | 1981: The Marvelous Land of Oz | 1982: The Wizard of Oz | 1985: Return to Oz | 1986: Ozu no Mahōtsukai : 1987: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | Ozma of Oz | The Marvelous Land of Oz | The Emerald City of Oz | 1990: Supēsu Ozu no Bōken : 1996: The Wonderful Galaxy of Oz | 2005: The Muppets' Wizard of Oz | The Patchwork Girl of Oz) The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens book written in 1900 by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, and the creator with illustrator W. W. Denslow of one of the most popular books ever written in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was an American writer of childrens stories. ... Eloise Jarvis McGraw (1915 - November 30, 2000) was an author of childrens books. ... Alexander Melentyevich Volkov (Russian: ) (July 14, 1891 – July 3, 1977) was a Russian novelist and mathematician. ... Categories: Stub | Oz ... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays was an early attempt to bring L. Frank Baums Oz books to the screen. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... The Magic Cloak of Oz is a 1914 film directed by J. Farrell MacDonald. ... His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz is a 1914 film production, directed by J. Farrell MacDonald and written and produced by L. Frank Baum. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... For the novel, see The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; For other senses of this title, see The Wizard of Oz. ... Return to Oz (1964) was an animated television special produced by Rankin/Bass. ... The Wonderful Land of Oz is a 1969 film by Barry Mahon, based on the novel The Marvelous Land of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This feature length (115 minute) film is an adaption of the childrens novel written by L. Frank Baum. ... This short film was based on the novel by L. Frank Baum. ... For the New York area electronics stores, see Nobody Beats The Wiz. ... Ozu no Mahōtsukai is a 1982 anime feature film directed by Fumihiko Takayama, from a screenplay by Yoshimitsu Banno and Akira Miyazaki, produced by Banno and Katsumi Ueno for Toho Co. ... DVD cover For other uses, see Return to Oz (disambiguation) The 1985 film Return to Oz is a motion picture arguably created as an unofficial sequel to The Wizard of Oz. ... Oz no Mahōtsukai ) is an anime adaption of The Wizard of Oz which ran on the Japanese network TV Tokyo from October 6, 1986–September 28, 1987. ... Oz no Mahōtsukai ) is an anime adaption of The Wizard of Oz which ran on the Japanese network TV Tokyo from October 6, 1986–September 28, 1987. ... Promotional poster The Muppets Wizard of Oz, an original made-for-television movie, aired May 20, 2005 as a special Friday night edition of ABCs The Wonderful World of Disney. ...

Wicked
(The books | The musical)

  Results from FactBites:
 
tvdvdreviews.com -- Journey Back to Oz: Special Edition DVD Review (2428 words)
The works inspired by Oz range from the sublime (Geoff Ryman's flawless adult novel Was, Elton John's "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road," the current Broadway smash-hit Wicked) to the decidedly mediocre (the 1978 film version of The Wiz), to the horrendous (Disney's 1985 electroshock-therapy extravaganza, Return to Oz).
Back in the Emerald City, Pumpkinhead, Dorothy, and Woodenhead have several close scrapes (those pesky fighting trees are still growing all over Oz, dontcha know), and Dorothy ultimately opens the magic box from Glinda.
When Journey Back to Oz premiered on television in 1976, Bill Cosby was enlisted to play the role of the Wizard of Oz in a series of live-action introductions to each segment of the film.
Journey Back to Oz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1093 words)
Journey Back To Oz is an official animated sequel to the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz.
Dorothy is taken back to Oz with Toto.
However, he comes back to life when one of Dorothy's tears falls on his head, and Glinda tells Dorothy that there is a magic stronger than Mombi's, and her own.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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