FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Josiah Quincy

Josiah Quincy was the name of three men in Massachusetts history.


Josiah Quincy

Josiah Quincy II

Josiah Quincy II (February 23, 1744 - April 26, 1775) was a famous American lawyer. He was father of Josiah Quincy III, and son of the first Josiah Quincy (1709-1784). He was born in Boston on February 23, 1744. He was a descendant of Edmund Quincy, who emigrated to Massachusetts in 1633, and received in 1636 a grant of land at Mount Wollaston, or Merry Mount, afterwards a part of Braintree and now Quincy. He graduated at Harvard in 1763, and studied law in the office of Oxenbridge Thacher (d. 1765), to whose large practice he succeeded. February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births May 19 - Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen of George III of Great Britain (d. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births May 19 - Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen of George III of Great Britain (d. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... Mount Wollaston, once Merrymount, is nowadays a cemetery in Quincy, Massachusetts, USA. Mount Wollaston has a most unusual history. ... Harvard, see Harvard (disambiguation) Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1767 Quincy contributed to the Boston Gazette two bold papers, signed “Hyperion”, declaiming against British oppression; they were followed by a third in September 1768; and on February 12, 1770 he published in the Gazette a call to his countrymen "to break off all social intercourse with those whose commerce contaminates, whose luxuries poison, whose avarice is insatiable, and whose unnatural oppressions are not to be borne." After the Boston massacre (March 5, 1770) he and John Adams defended Captain Preston and the accused soldiers and secured their acquittal.i He used the signatures Mentor, Callisthenes, Marchmont Needham, Edward Sexby, &c., in later letters to the Boston Gazette. 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... In the Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


He travelled for his health in the South in 1773, and left in his journal an interesting account of his travels and of society in South Carolina; this journey was important in that it brought Southern patriots into closer relations with the popular leaders in Massachusetts. In May 1774 he published Observations on the Act of Parliament, commonly called The Boston Port Bill, with Thoughts on Civil Society and Standing Armies, in which he urged patriots and heroes to form a compact for oppositiona band for vengeance. In September 1774 he left for England, where he consulted with leading Whigs as to the political situation in America; on March 16, 1775 he started back, but he died on the 26th of April in sight of land. 1774 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in Leap years). ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


Josiah Quincy III

Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 - July 4, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. He was president of Harvard University from 1829 until 1845. He was born in Boston on February 4, 1772. He studied at Phillips Academy, Andover, graduated at Harvard in 1790, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1793, but was never a prominent advocate He became a leader of the Federalist party in Massachusetts; was an unsuccessful candidate for the national House of Representatives in 1800; served in the Massachusetts Senate in. 1804-5; and was a member in 1805-13 of the national House of Representatives, where he was one of the small, Federalist minority. He attempted to secure the exemption of fishing vessels from the Embargo Act, urged the strengthening of the American navy, and vigorously opposed the erection of Orleans Territory, Louisiana into a state in 1811, and stated as his deliberate opinion, that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States that compose it are free from their moral obligations to maintain it; and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some to prepare definitely for a separation,amicably if they can, violently if they must. This is probably the first assertion of the right of secession on the floor of Congress. Quincy left Congress because he saw that the Federalist opposition was useless, and thereafter was a member of the Massachusetts Senate until 1820; in 1821-22 he was a member and speaker of the state House of Representatives, from which he resigned to become judge of the municipal court of Boston. In 1823-28 he was mayor of Boston, and in his term Faneuil Hall Market House was built, the fire and police departments were reorganized, and the city's care of the poor was systematized. In 1829-1845 he was president of Harvard College, of which he had been an overseer since 1810, when the board was reorganized; he has been called " the great organizer of the university": he gave an elective (or " voluntary ") system an elaborate trial; introduced a system of marking (on the scale of 8) on which college rank and honors, formerly rather carelessly assigned, were based; first used courts of law to punish students who destroyed or injured college property; and helped to reform the finances of the university. During his term Dane Hall (for law) was dedicated, Gore Hall was built, and the Astronomical Observatory was equipped. His last years were spent principally on his farm in Quincy, where he died on July 1, 1864. February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... A politician is an individual involved in politics, sometimes this may include political scientists. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Harvard, see Harvard (disambiguation) Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...



Preceded by:
John Thornton Kirkland
President of Harvard University
1829–1846
Succeeded by:
Edward Everett


John Thornton Kirkland (1770 - 1840) served as President of Harvard University from 1810 to 1828. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... Edward Everett Edward Everett Edward Everett (April 11, 1794–January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
JOSIAH QUINCY - LoveToKnow Article on JOSIAH QUINCY (1748 words)
Quincy left Congress because he saw that the Federalist opposition was useless, and thereafter was a member of the Massachusetts Senate until 1820; in 182122 he was a member and speaker of the state House of Representatives, from which he resigned to become judge of the municipal court of Boston.
Josiah Quincy (1802-1882) had two sonsJOSIAH PHILLIPS (1829-1910), a lawyer, who wrote, besides some verse, The Protection of Majorities (1876) and Double Taxation in Massachusetts (1889); and SAMUEL MILLER (1833-1887), who practised law, wrote on legal subjects, served in the Union army during the Civil War, and was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers in 1865.
Quincy is served by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, the Quincy, Omaha and Kansas City, and the Wabash railways, and by lines of river steamers, which find an excellent harbour in Quincy Bay, an arm of the Mississippi.
Quincy, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (705 words)
Quincy was formed in 1792 and named for Colonel John Quincy, and was originally part of Braintree.
Quincy was first settled by English immigrants in 1625, as Mount Wollaston (with a most unusual history), subsequently became part of Braintree, Massachusetts, was officially incorporated as a separate town in 1792, and made a city in 1888.
Quincy was also an aviation pioneer; Dennison Field in the Squantum section of town dated from 1910, and was the site of some of the first aerial meets ever.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m