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Encyclopedia > Josiah Bartlett
Josiah Bartlett


In office
1790 – 1794
Preceded by John Sullivan
Succeeded by John Taylor Gilman

Born November 21, 1729
Amesbury, Massachusetts
Died May 19, 1795
Kingston, New Hampshire
Political party Democratic-Republican

Josiah Bartlett (November 21, 1729May 19, 1795), was an American physician and statesman who, as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New Hampshire, signed the Declaration of Independence. He was later Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court of Judicature and Governor of the state. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... General John Sullivan John Sullivan (b. ... John Taylor Gilman (1753 - 1828) was a farmer, shipbuilder, and statesman from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1654 Incorporated 1668 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Thatcher W. Kezer III Area  - City  13. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Bold text Sanborn Seminary in 1910, Kingston, NH Kingston is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Doctor by Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... A delegate is an individual (or a member of a group called a delegation) who represents the interests of a larger organization (e. ... POOP HS;JHGF;JADHGJHASGHASJHGJSAHGJWJITHADHSGJHDASJLGFNKRA The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The New Hampshire Supreme Court is the supreme court of the U. S. state of New Hampshire and sole appellate court of the state. ...

Contents

Personal life

Josiah was born in Amesbury, Massachusetts to Stephen and Hannah-Mary (Webster) Bartlett. He was their fifth child and fourth son. He attended the common schools, but with uncommon success. By the age of sixteen, by study, he had also built a foundation in Latin and learned some Greek. In 1745 he began the study of medicine, working in the office of Dr. Ordway of Amesbury. Before he turned twenty-one, in 1750, he moved to Kingston, New Hampshire in Rockingham County, hung out his shingle and began his practice. Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1654 Incorporated 1668 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Thatcher W. Kezer III Area  - City  13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Bold text Sanborn Seminary in 1910, Kingston, NH Kingston is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ... Rockingham County is a county located in the state of New Hampshire. ...


Kingston at that time was a frontier settlement of only a few hundred families. If a man could stitch wounds, set bones, and treat fevers, he was welcome, even without formal educational credentials. Dr. Bartlett could, and as the only Doctor in this part of the county, his practice prospered. He purchased land and added a farm to his credit.


On January 15, 1754 he married Mary Bartlett of Newton, New Hampshire. She was his cousin, the daughter of his uncle, Joseph. They would remain a devoted couple until her death in July 14, 1789. Over the years they would have eleven children: Mary (1754), Lois (1756), Miriam (1758), Rhoda (1760), Hannah (who died as an infant in 1762), Levi (1763), Josiah (1765, died that same year), Josiah (1768), Ezra (1770), Sarah (1773), Hannah (1776, also died as an infant). All three of his sons and five of his grandsons would follow him as physicians. Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1749 Government  - Board of Selectmen Gary F. Nelson, Chairman John P. Ulcickas Robert S. Donovan, Jr. ...


Political career

Like many prominent men in small communities, Bartlett became active in the political affairs of Kingston, and in 1765 he was elected to the colonial assembly. In 1767 he became the colonel of his county's militia and Governor John Wentworth appointed him justice of the peace. As the Revolution neared, his Whig policies brought him into opposition with the Royal Governor, John Wentworth. 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... John Wentworth (1737-1820) was the British colonial governor of New Hampshire at the time of the American Revolution. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... The Radical Whigs were a group of British political commentators who played a relevant role in the American Revolution. ...


In 1774, Bartlett joined the Assembly's Committee of Correspondence and began his work with the revolutionary leaders of the other 12 colonies. Later that year, when Wentworth dismissed, or prorogued, the Assembly, Josiah was elected to its revolutionary (and illegal) successor, the Provincial Assembly. He also suffered the loss of his home by fire, alleged to have been set by opposition Tories. He moved his family out to the farmhouse and began rebuilding immediately. When the assembly appointed Bartlett and John Pickering as delegates to the Continental Congress, he was forced to decline because he had to attend to his family, but remained active in New Hampshire's affairs. In one of Governor Wentworth's last acts before being expelled from New Hampshire in 1775, he revoked Bartlett's commissions as Justice, Militia Colonel, and Assemblyman. Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... John Pickering (22 September 1737 - 11 April 1805) served as Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court and as Judge for the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire. ... POOP HS;JHGF;JADHGJHASGHASJHGJSAHGJWJITHADHSGJHDASJLGFNKRA The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ...


Continental Congress

Bartlett was selected as a delegate again in 1775, and attended that session as well as the meetings 1776. Indeed, for a time in late 1775 and early 1776 he was the only delegate attending from New Hampshire. Much of the work of the Congress was carried out in Committees. The most important of these had a delegate from each state, which meant that Bartlett served on all of them, including those of Safety, Secrecy, Munitions, Marine, and Civil Government. His attention to detail and hard work in these committees made him one of the most influential members in the Congress, even though he was seldom active in debates before the full congress. Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Eventually, after his continued letters home to the Assembly and Committee of Safety in New Hampshire, William Whipple and Matthew Thornton were added to the delegation in Philadelphia. When the question of declaring independence from Great Britain was officially brought up in 1776, as a representative of the northernmost colony Bartlett was the first to be asked, and answered in the affirmative. On August 2, 1776 when delegates signed the formal copy of the Declaration of Independence, his position made him the second to sign, just after John Hancock, the president of the Congress. William Whipple, Jr. ... Matthew Thornton Matthew Thornton (1714 – June 24, 1803), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Hampshire. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... For other persons named John Hancock, see John Hancock (disambiguation). ...


In 1777, he declined a return to the congress, citing fatigue due to earlier efforts. But when trouble threatened, he used his medical skills and accompanied John Stark's forces to the Battle of Bennington in August. General John Stark John Stark (August 28, 1728 - May 8, 1822) was a general who served in the American Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants Vermont militiamen/Green Mountain Boys Massachusetts New Hampshire Hessian mercenaries British Army troops Native Americans Commanders John Stark Friedrich Baum Strength 1500 1400 Casualties 40 killed 30 wounded 207 killed 700 captured The Battle of Bennington was a battle of the American Revolutionary War, taking place on August 16...


He was re-elected to Congress in 1778, and served on the committee that drafted the Articles of Confederation. But, after the articles were adopted, he returned to New Hampshire to attend to personal business. This was the last of his federal service, as he felt he had overlooked his family for too long. Indeed, while he was at the Congress in 1776, his wife Mary had managed the farm, seen to the completion of rebuilding their house, cared for nine children, and given birth to Hannah. 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ...


Later career

Although he remained in the state after 1778, in 1779 he returned to his role as a Judge, serving in the Court of common pleas. Then in 1782 he was appointed to the New Hampshire Supreme Court in spite of not being a lawyer. Indeed, some contemporary lawyers held the view that justice was never better than when the senior judges knew little legal history. 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The New Hampshire Supreme Court is the supreme court of the U. S. state of New Hampshire, and its sole appellate court seated in Concord. ...


In 1788, Bartlett was made the Chief Justice of the state's supreme court. That same year he was a delegate to the New Hampshire convention for adoption of the Constitution, serving part of the time as its Chairman. He argued forcefully for ratification, which finally took place on June 21, 1788. The legislature of the new State of New Hampshire, selected him to be a U. S. Senator, but he declined the office. 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the...


As Governor

In 1790 Josiah's lifetime of contribution received its highest recognitions. He secured legislation recognizing the New Hampshire Medical Society. He was also elected chief executive of New Hampshire by an overwhelming majority. He served in 1791 and 1792 as President. Then when the new State Constitution took effect in 1792 he continued, now as governor. He resigned in 1794 after four years because of declining health; he died the next year. Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Chief Executive may refer to: Chief Executive of Hong Kong Chief Executive of Macau Chief Executive Officer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


During his tenure, he oversaw the installation of a new state constitution, compilation of the laws and statutes in force, and provision for the early payment of the State's debt. He actively promoted agriculture and manufacturing, the improvement of roads, and saw the start of projects to build canals.


Medical career

Bartlett actively practiced medicine for 45 years. From a modern perspective, this alone would be a major accomplishment. He had no university training, and left school at the age of fourteen. In effect, he apprenticed with another doctor, and set up a practice at the age twenty. But, he was willing to consider what worked, and avoided some traditional therapies such as bleeding. His reputation was firmly secured in 1754.


The area around Kingston had an epidemic of a fever and canker called throat distemper around 1735. For adults it was a serious illness, but for children it was frequently fatal, especially among the very young. When the illness struck again in 1754, Dr. Bartlett simply tried doses of several available drugs, and discovered that Peruvian Bark would relieve symptoms long enough to allow recovery. Peruvian Bark is the bark of one of several Evergreen trees and was used from the early 17th century until the mid 19th century as a drug to treat chills and fevers, including those resulting from malaria. ...


Bartlett lived during a time when medical practice was progressing rapidly. His wide reading, steady hands, and conscientious work made him an effective and successful physician. He founded and was the first president of the New Hampshire Medical Society. In 1790 he delivered the commencement address at Dartmouth College when his son Ezra graduated. In part, the honor was due to his signing of the Declaration of Independence, and his new selection as President of New Hampshire. But, in part, it was a recognition of his medical career. He was awarded an honorary MD (Doctor of Medicine) the same day his son earned that degree. Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ...


Later life, death and legacy

He retired to his home in Kingston, and died there on May 19, 1795. He is buried next to his wife Mary in the Plains Cemetery, also at Kingston. A bronze statue of Bartlett stands in the town square of Amesbury, Massachusetts. His portrait hangs in the State House in Concord, New Hampshire, drawn from an original by Jonathan Trumbull. Bartlett, New Hampshire is named in his honor, and The Josiah Bartlett elementary school is a visible presence on its major roadway. is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1654 Incorporated 1668 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Thatcher W. Kezer III Area  - City  13. ... Location in Merrimack County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Merrimack County Incorporated 1733  - City Manager Thomas J. Aspell, Jr. ... John Trumbull, 1756–1843 John Trumbull (June 6, 1756 – November 10, 1843) was a famous American artist from the time of the American Revolutionary War. ... Bartlett is a town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 2,705 at the 2000 census. ...


In fiction

The fictional U.S. president on The West Wing, a popular NBC television drama series, is named "Josiah Bartlet". Despite the spelling difference, the character (played by Martin Sheen), who is also a former governor and Congressman from New Hampshire, is a fictional direct descendant of the New Hampshire signer of the Declaration of Independence. “The West Wing” redirects here. ... For the signatory of the Declaration of Independence, see Josiah Bartlett. ... Martin Sheen (né Ramón Estévez) (born August 3, 1940) is a three-time Emmy-winning and Golden Globe Award-winning Spanish American actor and perhaps best known for his role as Captain Willard in the film Apocalypse Now and, most recently, as President Josiah Bartlet on the acclaimed...


Further reading

  • "Papers of Josiah Bartlett"; 1979, Olympic Marketing Corporation; ISBN 0-87451-168-2.

External links

Preceded by
John Sullivan
Governor of New Hampshire
17901794
Succeeded by
John Taylor Gilman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Josiah Bartlett - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1670 words)
Josiah Bartlett (November 21, 1729–May 19, 1795), was an American physician and statesman who, as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New Hampshire, signed the Declaration of Independence.
Josiah was born in Amesbury, Massachusetts to Stephen and Hannah (Webster) Bartlett.
Bartlett, New Hampshire is named in his honor, and The Josiah Bartlett elementary school is a visible presence on its major roadway.
Mini Biographies of Scots and Scots Descendants - Bartlett, Josiah (473 words)
JOSIAH BARTLETT was born November 21, 1729 in Amesbury, Massachusetts.
Bartlett's medical practice flourished, in part due to the fact that in 1752 when drained by a fever, he was cured by a treatment of his own after that of the local physicians had failed.
Bartlett's political career began in 1765 with his appointment as a provincial legislator, an office which he filled annually until the revolution.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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