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Encyclopedia > Joseph of Aramathea

Joseph of Arimathea, according to the Gospels, was the man who donated his own prepared tomb for the burial of Jesus after his crucifixion. A native of Arimathea, he was apparently a man of wealth, and a member of the Sanhedrin (which is the way bouleutes, literally "senator", is interpreted in Matthew 27:57 and Luke 23:50). Joseph was an "honourable counsellor, who waited (or "was searching" which is not the same thing) for the kingdom of God" (Mark, 15:43). As soon as he heard the news of Jesus' death, he "went in boldly" (literally "having summoned courage, he went") "unto Pilate, and craved the body of Jesus." For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... The neutrality and accuracy of this article are disputed. ... Religious depictions of the crucifixion of Jesus typically show him supported by nails through the palms. ... Sanhedrin is the name -etymologically a corruption of the Greek word syn(h)edrion, seats together, i. ... The Gospel of Matthew is one of the four Gospels of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... The Gospel of Mark is the second in the familiar sequence of the New Testament Gospels, as they were established by Jerome and appear in many but not all early manuscripts of complete gospels, and as they are commonly printed. ... Pontius Pilate (Latin Pontius Pilatus) was the governor of the small Roman province of Judea from 26 until 36? AD although Tacitus believed him to be the procurator of that province. ...


Pilate, who was reassured by a centurion that the death had really taken place, allowed Joseph's request. Joseph immediately purchased fine linen (Mark 15:46) and proceeded to Golgotha to take the body down from the cross. There, assisted by Nicodemus, he took the body and wrapped it in the fine linen, sprinkling it with the myrrh and aloes which Nicodemus had brought (John 19:39). The body was then conveyed to a new tomb that had been hewn for Joseph himself out of a rock in his garden nearby. There they laid it, in the presence of Mary Magdalene, Mary, the mother of Jesus, and other women, and rolled a great stone to the entrance, and departed (Luke 23:53, 55). Calvary (Golgotha) was the hill outside Jerusalem on which Jesus was crucified. ... Nicodemus was a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, who showed favor to Jesus. ... Myrrh is a red-brown resinous material, the dried sap of the Commiphora myrrha tree, indigenous to Somalia. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the sequence of the canon as printed in the New Testament, and scholars agree it was the fourth to be written. ... Mary Magdalene is described as a follower of Jesus both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha. ... In Christianity and Islam, Mary (Judæo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Arabic: Maryem, مريم) is the mother of Jesus and the betrothed of Joseph. ...


This was done speedily, "for the Sabbath was drawing on". Thus was fulfilled Isaiah's prediction that the grave of the Messiah would be with a rich man (Isaiah 53:9). Isaiah (Hebrew ישׁעיהו Yeshayahu or Yəša‘ăyāhû) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, known to Christianity as the Old Testament. ...


The skeptical tradition, which reads the various fulfillments of prophecies in the life of Jesus as inventions designed for that purpose, reads Joseph of Arimathea as a meme created to fulfill this prophecy in Isaiah. With this in mind, it is worth quoting the passage from Isaiah, chapter 53, the "man of sorrows" passage, because so much of the meaningfulness of Joseph of Arimathea hinges upon these prophetic words: The name meme (pronounced in IPA; from the Greek word for memory, as well as its derivative, mimeme) refers to a unit of information—stored in a brain or an inanimate storage base (such as a book or a computer)—that replicates itself onto other brains or stores of information. ...

He was assigned a grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death, though he had done no violence, nor was any deceit in his mouth.

The Greek Septuagint text is not quite the same: The Septuagint (LXX) is the name commonly given to the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) produced in the third century BC. The Septuagint bible includes additional books beyond those used in todays Jewish Tanakh. ...

And I will give the wicked for his burial, and the rich for his death; for he practised no iniquity, nor craft with his mouth.

In the Qumran community's Great Isaiah Scroll, dated at ca 100 BC the words are not identical to the Masoretic text: Qumran (Khirbet Qumran) is located on a dry plateau on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in Israel. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 105 BC 104 BC 103 BC 102 BC 101 BC - 100 BC - 99 BC 98 BC 97 BC 96 BC 95... The Masoretic Text (MT) is the Hebrew text of the Tanakh approved for general use in Judaism. ...

And they gave wicked ones his grave and [a scribbled word, probably accusative sign "eth"] rich ones in his death although he worked no violence neither deceit in his mouth.

Is the "Man of Sorrows" assigned a shameful grave with the rich and wicked? Or are the wicked and rich given his grave? The question cannot be resolved simply from the three parallel surviving manuscript traditions. Among the passages in the Hebrew Bible that have been identified by Christians as prefigurations of the Messiah, the Man of Sorrows of Isaiah 53 is paramount. ...


It was Joseph of Arimathea who, according to legend, was given responsibility over the Holy Grail, the cup into which the blood of Jesus flowed during his Crucifixion. In Christian mythology, the Holy Grail was the dish, plate, cup or vessel that caught Jesus blood during his crucifixion. ... Religious depictions of the crucifixion of Jesus typically show him supported by nails through the palms. ...


Arimathea

Arimathea itself is not otherwise documented, though it was "a city of Judea" according to Luke (xxiii, 51). Arimathea is usually identified with Ramatha, where David came to Samuel (1 Samuel chapter 19), although some scholars prefer to identify it with the town of Ramleh. The fortunate appearance of this man coming from Arimathea, a place that was all but lost in the myth of history, would have been deeply impressive to the 1st century listeners of the story of the Crucifixion. To find a parallel resonance in the English-speaking tradition, it would be somewhat as if a helper in need turned up who was from Camelot. Michelangelos David This page is about the Biblical king David. ... For other people with the name Samuel see Sam In the Old Testament, Samuel or Shmuel (שְׁמוּאֵל Name/Heard of God, Standard Hebrew Šəmuʾel, Tiberian Hebrew Šəmûʾēl) is a leader of ancient Israel. ... The Books of Samuel, also referred to as [The Book of] Samuel ( Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל), are (two) books in the Hebrew Bible ( Judaisms Tanakh and originally written in Hebrew) and the Old Testament of Christianity. ... (1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century - other centuries) The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 99. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Camelot is the name of the stronghold of the legendary King Arthur, from which he fought many of the battles that made up his life. ...


The Catholic Encyclopedia asserts that "the additional details which are found concerning him in the apocryphal Acta Pilati, are unworthy of credence." (For details on this source for the expanded Joseph of Arimathea legend, see Acts of Pilate.) The Acts of Pilate, also known as the Gospel of Nicodemus, is a book of the New Testament apocrypha. ... The Acts of Pilate, also known as the Gospel of Nicodemus, is a book of the New Testament apocrypha. ...


"Likewise fabulous is the legend" continues the Catholic Encyclopedia that Joseph of Arimathea was the uncle of Mary, the mother of Jesus, and a merchant involved in the tin trade with Britain who took Jesus to England at some time in his life. After the Crucifixion, around the year AD 63, he was said to have returned to England as one of the first Christian missionaries to visit the country. He carried the Holy Grail with him, concealing it somewhere in the vicinity of Glastonbury Tor for safekeeping when he established the first church in the British Isles, which developed into Glastonbury Abbey. When Joseph set his walking staff on the ground to sleep, it miraculously took root, leafed out, and blossomed as the "Glastonbury thorn". There is little historical substance for any of this legend, but its retelling did encourage the pilgrimage trade at Glastonbury until the Abbey was dissolved in 1539, at the English Reformation. In Christianity and Islam, Mary (Judæo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Arabic: Maryem, مريم) is the mother of Jesus and the betrothed of Joseph. ... Merchants function as professional traders, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves. ... General Name, Symbol, Number tin, Sn, 50 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14 (IVA), 5, p Density, Hardness 7310 kg/m3, 1. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Religious depictions of the crucifixion of Jesus typically show him supported by nails through the palms. ... For other uses, see number 63. ... The term Christian means belonging to Christ and is derived from the Greek noun Χριστός Khristós which means anointed one, which is itself a translation of the Hebrew word Moshiach (Hebrew: משיח, also written Messiah), (and in Arabic it is pronounced Maseeh مسيح). ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ... In Christian mythology, the Holy Grail was the dish, plate, cup or vessel that caught Jesus blood during his crucifixion. ... Glastonbury Tor, circa 1907 Glastonbury Tor is a high teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, with its only standing architectural feature the roofless St Michaels Tower of the former church. ... Glastonbury Abbey in Glastonbury, Somerset, England, now presents itself as traditionally the oldest above-ground Christian church in the world situated in the mystical land of Avalon by dating the founding of the community of monks at 63 A.D., the legendary visit of Joseph of Arimathea who also brought... Glastonbury Abbey in Glastonbury, Somerset, England, now presents itself as traditionally the oldest above-ground Christian church in the world situated in the mystical land of Avalon by dating the founding of the community of monks at 63 A.D., the legendary visit of Joseph of Arimathea who also brought... A pilgrimage is a journey by a religious person to a place that is sacred according to his or her religion. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1536 and 1540, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic institutions in England and arrogated them to himself, as the new... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


The Eastern Orthodox Church celebrates the feast of Joseph of Arimathea on July 31, and the Roman Catholic Church on March 17. The Eastern Orthodox Church, also called the Orthodox Church, is a Christian body whose adherents are largely based in Eastern Europe and the Middle East, with a growing presence in the western world. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious denomination of Christianity with over one billion members. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Chalice of the First Sacrament (4329 words)
Joseph [of Arimathea], who was his uncle, collected in it the blood which flowed from the wounds of the Savior of the World.
When Joseph was defeated and there was a famine, he prayed to God, his creator, that He would lend him, by His favor, that Grail of which I tell you and in which he had collected the blood.
Joseph of Arimathea brought the Cup to Glastonbury where it remained until the 16th century when the seven Monks of Glastonbury in the Dissolution escaped with it and left it in the safe keeping of the Cistercian Monks of Strata, Florida.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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