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Encyclopedia > Joseph Pulitzer
Joseph Pulitzer
Joseph Pulitzer

Joseph Pulitzer (April 18, 1847October 29, 1911) was a Hungarian-American publisher best known for posthumously establishing the Pulitzer Prizes and (along with William Randolph Hearst) for originating yellow journalism. Joseph Pulitzer, from http://lcweb. ... Joseph Pulitzer, from http://lcweb. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Hungarian-American refers to American citizens of Hungarian descent. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ...


Pulitzer was born in Makó, Hungary, Pulitzer (IPA pronunciation: ['pulɪtˌsɚ(ə)]) sought a military career, but was turned down by the Austrian army for frail health and poor eyesight. He emigrated to the United States in 1864 to serve in the American Civil War. After the war he settled in St. Louis, Missouri, where in 1868 he began working for a German-language daily newspaper, the Westliche Post. He joined the Republican Party and was elected to the Missouri State Assembly in 1869. In 1872, Pulitzer purchased the Post for $3,000. Then, in 1879, he bought the St. Louis Dispatch for $2,700 and merged the two papers, which became the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which remains St. Louis' daily newspaper. It was at the Post-Dispatch that Pulitzer developed his role as a champion of the common man with exposès and a hard-hitting populist approach. Makó (Macău in Romanian) is a town in southeastern Hungary with a population of approximately 26,000. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The St. ...


In 1882 Pulitzer, by then a wealthy man, purchased the New York World, a newspaper that had been losing $40,000 a year, for $346,000 from Jay Gould. Pulitzer shifted its focus to human-interest stories, scandal, and sensationalism. In 1885, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, but resigned after a few months' service; it seemed that politics were not his cup of tea. In 1887, he recruited the famous investigative journalist Nellie Bly. In 1895 the World introduced the immensely popular The Yellow Kid comic by Richard F. Outcault, the first newspaper comic printed with color. Under Pulitzer's leadership circulation grew from 15,000 to 600,000, making it the largest newspaper in the country. The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. ... Jay Gould (1836-1892) Jason Gould (May 27, 1836 – December 2, 1892) was an American financier. ... Nellie Bly in 1890 Nellie Bly (born Elizabeth Jane Cochran, later Cochrane; lived May 5, 1864 – January 27, 1922) was a U.S. journalist, author, industrialist, and charity worker. ... The Yellow Kid Mickey Dugan, better known as The Yellow Kid, was the lead fictional character in Hogans Alley, one of the first comic strips and one of the very first to be printed in color. ... Richard Felton Outcault (January 14, 1863-September 25, 1928) was an American comic strip scriptwriter, sketcher and painter. ...


The editor of the rival New York Sun attacked Pulitzer in print, calling him in 1890 "The Jew who abandoned his religion". After the move, intended to alienate Pulitzer's Jewish readership, Pulitzer's already failing health deteriorated rapidly, and he left the newsroom, although he continued to actively manage the paper from his vacation retreat in Bar Harbor, Maine, and his New York mansion. The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ... Bar Harbor, Maine, it the name of two places in Maine Bar Harbor, census-designated place Bar Harbor a larger town This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In 1895, William Randolph Hearst purchased the rival New York Journal, which led to a circulation war. This competition with Hearst, particularly the coverage before and during the Spanish-American War, linked Pulitzer's name with yellow journalism. William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The New York Journal American was a newspaper purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1895 (at the time called the New York Morning Journal, then the New York Journal). ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba First Philippine Republic Spanish Empire Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (only 332 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ...


After the World exposed a fraudulent payment of $40 million by the United States to the French Panama Canal Company in 1909, Pulitzer was indicted for libeling Theodore Roosevelt and J. P. Morgan. The courts dismissed the indictments, in a victory for freedom of the press. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... J. P. Morgan John Pierpont Morgan I (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913) was an American financier and banker, who dominated corporate finance and industrial consolidation. ...


In 1892, Pulitzer offered Columbia University's president, Seth Low, money to set up the world's first school of journalism. The university initially turned down the money, evidently unimpressed by Pulitzer's unscrupulous character. In 1902, Columbia's new president Nicholas Murray Butler was more receptive to the plan for a school and prizes, but it would not be until after Pulitzer's death that this dream would be fulfilled. Pulitzer left the university $2 million in his will, which led to the creation in 1912 of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, but by then the first school of journalism had been created at the University of Missouri. Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism remains one of the most prestigious in the world. Columbia University is a private research university whose main campus lies in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... Seth Low, born in Brooklyn, New York, (January 18, 1850 - September 17, 1916) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 - December 7, 1947) was the co-winner with Jane Addams of the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious schools of journalism in the United States. ... The University of Missouri System is the designated public research and land-grant university system of the state of Missouri. ...


Joseph Pulitzer died aboard his yacht in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina in 1911. He is interred in the Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York. In 1917, the first Pulitzer Prizes were awarded, in accordance with Pulitzer's wishes. Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Located in The Bronx, Woodlawn Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in New York City. ... The Bronx is New York Citys northernmost borough. ... NY redirects here. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ...


In 1989 Pulitzer was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame. 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The St. ...


A perhaps somewhat-fictional version of Joseph Pulitzer is portrayed in the 1992 Disney film musical, Newsies. Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Newsies is a 1992 Disney live action film musical starring Christian Bale, David Moscow, and Bill Pullman. ...


References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Pulitzer Prizes -- History of the Pulitzer Prizes (0 words)
Pulitzer was the first to call for the training of journalists at the university level in a school of journalism.
Joseph Pulitzer was born in Mako, Hungary on April 10, 1847, the son of a wealthy grain merchant of Magyar-Jewish origin and a German mother who was a devout Roman Catholic.
Pulitzer's health was fractured further during this ordeal and in 1890, at the age of 43, he withdrew from the editorship of The World and never returned to its newsroom.
Joseph Pulitzer (448 words)
Joseph Pulitzer (April 10, 1847-October 29, 1911), born in Budapest, was an American newspaper man and journalist.
Pulitzer immigrated to the United States in 1864, where he served in the American Civil War.
Joseph Pulitzer died aboard his yacht in the harbor of Charleston, North Carolina[?] in 1911.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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