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Encyclopedia > Joseph Howe

Joseph Howe, PC (December 13, 1804June 1, 1873) was a ship builder and born the son of John Howe and Mary Edes at Halifax, Nova Scotia. In retrospect he is seen to be one of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation, even though he actually opposed the union. Pre 1923 image, not subject to copyright. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John Howe, c. ... The City of Halifax (1841-1996) was the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, and the largest city in Atlantic Canada. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ...

Contents

Early life

The Howe family was of Puritan stock from Massachusetts. Having remained loyal to the crown during the American Revolution, the family of John Howe joined the flood of United Empire Loyalists out of the United States after the American revolutionaries succeeded in their claims of independence. On arrival at Halifax, John Howe was rewarded for his loyalty by appointment as Postmaster-General. Since he was in the printing business, John Howe was appointed also the King's Printer. Joseph Howe was born at Halifax, Nova Scotia, the son of John Howe and Mary Edes. His son, Joseph Howe, like many lads of that time, received only a limited formal education before beginning an apprenticeship at the age of 13. He served his apprenticeship at the printing shop that the senior Howe had established in 1781. They published a newspaper, the Halifax Journal. He married Catherine Ann Susan McNab on February 2, 1828. That same year he went into the printing business himself with the purchase of the Novascotian, a Halifax newspaper. Howe acted as its editor until 1841, turning the paper into the most influential in the province. Not only did he personally report the legislative assembly debates in its columns, he also published provincial literature and his own travel writings, using the paper as a means for educating the people of Nova Scotia and himself. This article is about the U.S. State. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... John Howe, c. ... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ...


Journalistic career

Howe purchased the Novascotian, a local Halifax newspaper, in 1828 and went into the printing business for himself. He remained its editor until 1841 turning the paper into the most influential in the province. Not only did he personally report the legislative assembly debates in its columns, he also published provincial literature and his own travel writings. He used the paper as a means for educating himself and the people of Nova Scotia. Howe's rise to fame was due to his early prominence as a newspaperman and defender of freedom of the press. The Novascotian was a newspaper published in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ...


His, at times, harsh editorial commentary and accusations of government corruption resulted in a libel charge in 1835. Howe defended himself against the charges without the help of a lawyer and was acquitted. Afterwards, his editorial writing became increasingly concerned with political issues. It was his involvement with the Novascotian that propelled Howe into the political arena. In order to promote his desire for responsible government, he assumed the editorships of both the Novascotian and the Morning Chronicle from 1844 to 1846, making them rallying points for liberal principles. Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ...


Political career

Statue erected to the memory of Joseph Howe outside the Legislature, downtown Halifax.
Statue erected to the memory of Joseph Howe outside the Legislature, downtown Halifax.

Eventually, he decided to run for office in order to effect the changes he championed in his newspaper. He was first elected in 1836, campaigning on a platform of support for responsible government. Howe initially proposed only an elected legislative council but he was quick to agree with the concept of a fully representative government. He was suspicious of formal political parties feeling that they were too restrictive. It was, however, largely his doing that members favouring Liberal principles were able to dominate assembly from 1836 to 1840. He formed a coalition with Conservative leader James William Johnston in 1840 hoping to further the cause of responsible government. He held the office of Speaker of the assembly in 1841 and collector of excise for Halifax in 1842. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (921 × 692 pixel, file size: 721 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Self made I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (921 × 692 pixel, file size: 721 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Self made I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms...


The coalition collapsed under various political conflicts, leading to Howe's resignation from the Council in 1843. The promotion of political ideas in his newspapers were rewarded with a seven-seat Liberal majority in the 1847 election. This led to the formation of the first responsible government in Canada in January 1848. While James Uniacke was officially the Premier, many regarded it as Joseph Howe's ministry. Howe assumed the post of Provincial Secretary, adapting existing institutions to the new system of government. He also began a campaign of railway construction, resigning as Provincial Secretary in 1853 to become Nova Scotia's first Chief Commissioner of Railways; as Commissioner he oversaw the initial construction of the Nova Scotia Railway. In addition, Howe was involved with recruiting American troops for the Crimean War. These activities left him with little time to campaign in the 1855 general election which he lost to Charles Tupper in Cumberland. This election also led to conflict with Catholic members of the Liberal party because Howe had ridiculed their religious doctrine. This resulted in a Liberal defeat in 1856. The Liberals did not return to power until 1860 at which time Howe became provincial secretary. When the Premier, William Young, was appointed as a judge later that year, Joseph Howe assumed the leadership of the party and therefore became Premier. He served as Premier until 1862 when he accepted the position of Imperial Fisheries Commissioner. Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Nova Scotia Railway was incorporated March 31, 1853 to build railway lines from Halifax, Nova Scotia to Pictou, Nova Scotia by way of Truro, Nova Scotia, from Halifax to Victoria Beach (near Digby, Nova Scotia by way of Windsor, Nova Scotia, and from Truro, Nova Scotia to the border... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ...


Confederation Debate

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Howe's duties as Commissioner prevented his attendance at the Charlottetown Conference. By the time he returned to Nova Scotia in November of 1864, the Québec Conference had taken place, and the Québec Resolutions widely disseminated. He had had no chance to influence their content. He led Nova Scotia's anti-Confederation movement believing the Québec Resolutions to be bad for the Province. Because he was still linked with the imperial fishery he expressed his initial opposition anonymously through the Botheration Letters, a series of twelve editorials that appeared in the Morning Chronicle between January and March of 1865. This was the extent of his participation in the union debate until March 1866. He learned that Charles Tupper planned to force the Confederation Resolution through the legislature. When he failed to prevent passage of the resolution Howe began a vigorous campaign for repeal by delegations to London and a publishing a variety of anti-Confederation papers and pamphlets. This strategy failed to prevent the Imperial Parliament enacting the British North America Act in 1867. Nova Scotians elected 18 out of 19 anti-Confederation candidates as members of the first Dominion Parliament. Joseph Howe led the anti-Confederates in the Canadian House of Commons where he made a speech about his opposition to confederation. Image File history File links Joehowe. ... Image File history File links Joehowe. ... Delegates of the Charlottetown Convention The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation. ... Delegates of the convention The Quebec Conference was the second meeting held in 1864 to discuss Canadian Confederation. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Anti-Confederation was the name used by several parties in what is now Atlantic Canada by movements opposed to Canadian confederation. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ...


Having failed to win repeal of Confederation in 1868 Howe recognized the futility of further protests. He refused to contemplate secession from the Canadian Confederation nor American annexation because of his loyalty to Britain. In 1869 he was persuaded to join the Canadian Cabinet as President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada after receiving a promise of "better terms" for Nova Scotia. In November of 1869, he became secretary of state for the provinces in which post he played a role in Manitoba's entry into Confederation. He resigned his Cabinet post to become lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia in 1873. He died in office only a few weeks after his appointment. He is buried in Camp Hill Cemetery in Halifax.but came back from the grave to eat your brains We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... The Cabinet of Canada plays an important role in the Canadian government in accordance with the Westminster System. ... In the Canadian cabinet the President of The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: President du Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is nominally in charge of the Privy Council Office. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard - Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Railway Promotion

In 1854, he resigned as the provincial secretary in order to head a bi-partisan railway commission. He never completed the whole project but did however succeeded in completing lines from Halifax to Windsor and Truro. The City of Halifax (1841-1996) was the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, and the largest city in Atlantic Canada. ... St. ... Motto: Begun In Faith, Continued In Determination Location of Truro, Nova Scotia Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality Colchester County Founded 1759 Government  - Mayor Mayor W.R. (Bills) Mills  - Governing Body Truro Town Council Area  - Town 37. ...


Trivia

  • A major road, an elementary school, and a government office building in Halifax are all named after Joseph Howe.
  • Though Howe supported the Temperance movement, his former Halifax home is ironically now The Old Triangle, a popular pub.

Mountain road with hairpin turns in the French Alps For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... This article is about The Old Triangle, the name of two Canadian pubs. ...

See also

The Right Honourable Clarence Decatur C.D. Howe, PC (January 15, 1886 - December 31, 1960) was a leading Canadian politician. ...

External links

  • Biography at the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online
  • Synopsis of federal political experience from the Library of Parliament
Political offices
Preceded by
William Young
Premier of Nova Scotia
1860-1863
Succeeded by
James W. Johnston
Preceded by
Adam Johnston Ferguson Blair
President of the Privy Council
1869
Succeeded by
Edward Kenny
Preceded by
Adams George Archibald
Secretary of State for the Provinces
1869-1873
Succeeded by
James Cox Aikins
Preceded by
Hector-Louis Langevin
Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs
1869-1873
Succeeded by
James Cox Aikins
Parliament of Canada
Preceded by
None
Member of Parliament for Hants
1867-1873
Succeeded by
Monson Henry Goudge
Government offices
Preceded by
Charles Hastings Doyle
Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia
1873
Succeeded by
Adams George Archibald

  Results from FactBites:
 
CBC Television | Joseph Howe (813 words)
Joseph Howe once claimed he brought democracy to Nova Scotia without a blow struck or a pane of glass broken.
Joseph Howe was elected to the legislature, served as Speaker, helped his party of Reformers win power and bring responsible government to Nova Scotia.
Howe argued for public, non-denominational schools, although it would be his political rival Charles Tupper who would fulfill that goal.
Joseph Howe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1038 words)
Joseph Howe, PC (December 13, 1804 – June 1, 1873) was born the son of John Howe and Mary Edes at Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Howe's rise to fame was due to his early prominence as a newspaperman and defender of freedom of the press.
Joseph Howe led the anti-Confederates in the Canadian House of Commons where he made a speech about his opposition to Confederation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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