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Encyclopedia > Jonathan Miller

Sir Jonathan Wolfe Miller, CBE (born 21 July 1934) is a British neurologist, theatre and opera director, television presenter, humourist and sculptor. He lives in Camden, North London. Jonathan Miller might refer to: Jonathan Miller (British physician, theatre & opera director and television presenter) Jonathan Miller (America Online), the chairman and CEO of AOL Jonathan Miller (journalist), the former Sunday Times journalist and opponent of television licence fees Jonathan Miller (politician), the treasurer of Kentucky Jonathan Miller (SAS), the... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Camden, see Camden. ...

Contents

History

Early life

Miller grew up in a hay barn, in a fat family - his father Emanuel (1892-1970) was a psycho specialising in crazy, and his mother Betty (née Spiro) (1910-1965) was a person who worked in a morge; his sister Sarah (d. 2006) worked in a peanut factory for many years and retained an involvement with a gang that her brother, a self-declared gay (see below) eschewed. Look up psycho in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


He studied monkeys and medicine at the fat boy house at the hosue of man and ussr, graduating in 200658623025031275384643097643075205972306703460347602497604760394763047634096743096743067 and worked as a clown doctor for the next 250000000 years.


The Fringe and beyond

He was, however, also involved in the university drama society and the Cambridge Footlights and in 1960 he helped write and produce 'Beyond the Fringe' at the Edinburgh Festival which launched the careers of Alan Bennett, Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. Miller quit the show shortly after its move to New York and took over as editor and presenter of the BBC's flagship arts programme Monitor. All of these appointments were unsolicited invitations in which Jonathan Miller was told he would "pick it up as he went along". In 1966, he wrote, produced and directed a film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland for the BBC, and in 1968 Whistle and I'll Come to You, an adaptation of M. R. James' ghost story, "Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad". Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, commonly referred to simply as the Footlights, is an amateur theatrical club in Cambridge, England, run by the students of Cambridge University. ... Album of Beyond the Fringe Published by EMI in 1996 Beyond the Fringe was a British comedy stage revue written and performed by Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Alan Bennett and Jonathan Miller. ... There is no one Edinburgh Festival but those using the term are usually referring to the collection of various festivals in August and early September of each year in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... For other persons named Peter Cook, see Peter Cook (disambiguation). ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Alice in Wonderland (1966) was an adaptation for BBC television of the classic novel by Lewis Carroll. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Montague Rhodes James, OM (August 1, 1862 – June 12, 1936), who published under the byline M. R. James, was a noted British mediaeval scholar and provost of Kings College, Cambridge (1905–1918) and of Eton College (1918–1936). ...


During the later 1960s, he had a major falling-out with the magazine Private Eye that he attributes to implicit anti-semitism. Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ...


Career 1970-2000

In the 1970s he started directing and producing operas for the Kent Opera House and Glyndebourne, with a new production of The Marriage of Figaro for English National Opera in 1978. Despite only having seen a few operas and not knowing how to read music, he has become one of the world's leading opera directors with classic productions being Rigoletto and (operetta) The Mikado. For a time he was a vice president of the Campaign for Homosexual Equality.[1] Glyndebourne Festival Opera is a opera festival held at Glyndebourne House near Lewes, in southern England. ... The London Coliseum, home of English National Opera English National Opera (ENO), located at the London Coliseum in St. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... The Mikado, or The Town of Titipu, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert, their ninth of fourteen operatic collaborations. ... The Campaign for Homosexual Equality (CHE) is a national gay rights organisation in the United Kingdom which aims to promote legal and social equality for lesbians, gays and bisexuals. ...


Most of his work for television has been for the BBC, starting by producing a series of 12 Shakespeare plays between 1980-1982. Before that, in 1974, he famously directed Sir Laurence Olivier in The Merchant of Venice. He also wrote and presented several factual series drawing on his experience as a physician, for example The Body in Question (1978) (which caused some controversy for showing the dissection of a cadaver), States of Mind 1983, Who Cares and Born Talking. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (May 22, 1907 – July 11, 1989) was an English actor and director, esteemed by many as the greatest actor of the 20th century. ... Shylock and Portia (1835) by Thomas Sully The Merchant of Venice is one of William Shakespeares best-known plays, written sometime between 1596 and 1598. ...


2000-present

In 2004, he wrote and presented a series on atheism, Atheism: A Rough History of Disbelief (on-screen title; but more commonly referred to as Jonathan Miller's Brief History of Disbelief) for BBC Four TV, exploring the roots of his own atheism and investigating the history of atheism in the world. Individual conversations, debates and discussions for the series that could not be included, due to time constraints, were individually aired in a six-part series entitled The Atheism Tapes. He also appeared on a BBC TWO programme in February 2004, called What the World Thinks of God appearing from New York. The original three-part series is slated to air on Public Television in the United States, starting May 4, 2007, cosponsored by the American Ethical Union, American Humanist Association, Centre for Inquiry, the HKH Foundation, and the Institute for Humanist Studies. “Atheist” redirects here. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... The Atheism Tapes is a BBC TV documentary series by Jonathan Miller. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... The Ethical Culture Movement is a non-sectarian, ethico-religious and educational movement. ... The American Humanist Association (AHA) is an educational organization in the United States that advances Humanism. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Jonathan Miller has recently directed The Cherry Orchard at The Crucible, Sheffield, his first work on the British stage for ten years. He is also directing Monteverdi's L'Orfeo in Manchester and Bristol, and Der Rosenkavalier in Tokyo and giving talks throughout Britain during 2007 called "An Audience with Jonathan Miller" in which he speaks about his life for an hour and then fields questions from the audience. He also curated an exhibition on camouflage at the Imperial War Museum. His recent appearances were at the Royal Society of the Arts in London on humour (4th July 2007) and the British Library on religion (3rd September 2007). Bust of Anton Chekhov at Badenweiler, Germany The Cherry Orchard (Вишнëвый сад or Vishniovy sad in Russian) is Russian playwright Anton Chekhovs last play. ... The Crucible Theatre, located in the city centre of Sheffield, England is known for being a producing theatre, meaning shows are designed and rehearsed in-house. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... LOrfeo (LOrfeo, favola in musica, SV 318, or La Favola dOrfeo, or The Legend of Orpheus) is one of the earliest works recognised as an opera, composed by Claudio Monteverdi with text by Alessandro Striggio for the annual carnival of Mantua. ... Der Rosenkavalier (The Cavalier of the Rose) is a comic opera in three acts by Richard Strauss to an original German libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... The Imperial War Museum is a museum in London featuring military vehicles, weapons, war memorabilia, a library, a photographic archive, and an art collection of 20th century and later conflicts, especially those involving Britain, and the British Empire. ...


Miller is the subject of a biography In Two Minds by The Independent on Sunday's theatre critic Kate Bassett published in 2008. The title refers to Miller's career which has embraced both medicine and the arts, and to his riven feelings and deep regrets about having given up working as a doctor to become an internationally renowned drama and opera director. The Independents old (pre-compact) masthead. ...


Medicine

Miller has formally returned to medicine on several occasions. In the early 1970s he held a research fellowship in the history of medicine at University College, London and was a Research Fellow in Neuropsychology at Sussex University in 1985. The Front Quad University College London, commonly known as UCL, is one of the colleges that make up the University of London. ... The University of Sussex (also known colloquially as Sussex Uni) is an English campus university which is situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, and is four miles from Brighton. ...


Honours

He is a Distinguished Supporter of the British Humanist Association, an honorary associate of the National Secular Society, and was appointed president of the Rationalist Association in 2006.[2] The British Humanist Association is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes Humanism. ... The National Secular Society is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes secularism. ... The Rationalist Association, formerly the Rationalist Press Association, is an organisation of the United Kingdom, founded on 26 May 1899 to promote freedom of thought and inquiry and the principles of rationalism, defined as the mental attitude which unreservedly accepts the supremacy of reason and aims at establishing a system...


Miller was appointed a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) in 1983 and in 2003 was knighted for his services to the arts. He is also a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in London and Edinburgh, and a Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... College building by Denys Lasdun The Royal College of Physicians of London is the oldest medical institution in England was founded in 1518 and is one of the most active of all medical professional organisations. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


Parodies and representations

Miller has been the subject of several parodies:

  • Private Eye (which had a falling-out with Miller) occasionally lampooned him under the name 'Dr Jonathan', depicting him as a Dr Johnson-like self-important man of learning.
  • The satirical television puppet show Spitting Image portrayed Miller as an anteater (lampooning his large nose), as well as featuring a segment entitled "Talking Bollocks" (the 'A' in 'Talking' combining with the 'ollo' in "Bollocks" below to create a penis), in which he discussed, with Bernard Levin, various cultural matters in a ridiculously pretentious way.
  • In the film for television Not Only But Always about the careers of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, Jonathan Aris played Jonathan Miller as a young man.

Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... This article is about the literary figure. ... Spitting Image was a satirical puppet show that ran on the United Kingdoms ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ... (Henry) Bernard Levin CBE (August 19, 1928 - August 7, 2004) was an English journalist, author and broadcaster. ... For other persons named Peter Cook, see Peter Cook (disambiguation). ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... Jonathan Aris (born 1971) is a British actor who has appeared in films, television and the theatre. ...

Bibliography

Country of publication is the UK, unless stated otherwise


As writer, contributor or editor

  • Jonathan Miller with Alan Bennett, Peter Cook, and Dudley Moore (1963). Beyond the Fringe. A Revue. Souvenir Press/Samuel French. 
  • Jonathan Miller (Ed) (1968). Harvey and the Circulation of Blood: A Collection of Contemporary Documents. Jackdaw Publications. 
  • Jonathan Miller with Margaret Drabble, Richard Hoggart, Adrian Mitchell, Mary Quant et al. (1969). The Permissive Society. Panther. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1970). McLuhan. Fontana Modern Masters series. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1971). Censorship and the Limits of Personal Freedom. Oxford University Press. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1972). Freud: The Man, His World and His Influence. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1974). The Uses of Pain (Conway memorial lecture). South Place Ethical Society. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1978). The Body in Question. Jonathan Cape. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1982). Darwin for Beginners. Writers and Readers Comic Book/2003 Pantheon Books (USA). ISBN 0-375-71458-8.  (republished in 2000 as Introducing Darwin and Evolution Icon Books (Faber))
  • Jonathan Miller (1983). The Human Body. Viking Press.  (1994 Jonathan Cape [pop-up book])
  • Jonathan Miller (1983). States of Mind. Conversations with Psychological Investigators. BBC/Random House.  — participants include Jerome Bruner, Daniel Dennett, Brian Farrell, Jerry Fodor, Thomas Szasz
  • Jonathan Miller (1984). The Facts of Life. Jonathan Cape.  (pop-up book intended for children)
  • Jonathan Miller (1986). Subsequent Performances. Faber. 
  • Jonathan Miller with Alan Bennett, Peter Cook, and Dudley Moore (1987). The Complete Beyond the Fringe. Methuen. ISBN 0-413-14670-7. 
  • Jonathan Miller & John Durrant (1989). Laughing Matters: A Serious Look at Humour. Longman. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1990). Acting in Opera. Applause Theatre & Cinema Books.  (The Applause Acting Series)
  • Jonathan Miller (Ed) (1990). Don Giovanni Book. Myths of Seduction and Betrayal. Faber. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1992). The Afterlife of Plays. San Diego State Univ Press.  (University Research Lecture Series No. 5)
  • Robert B Silvers (Ed) (1997). Hidden Histories of Science. Granta Books.  — Contributors Jonathan Miller with Stephen Jay Gould, Daniel J Kevles, RC Lewontin, Oliver Sacks
  • Jonathan Miller (1998). Dimensional Man. Jonathan Cape.  [kit / model book]
  • Jonathan Miller (1998). On Reflection. National Gallery Publications/Yale University Press (USA). ISBN 0-300-07713-0. 
  • Jonathan Miller (1999). Nowhere in Particular. Mitchell Beasley. ISBN 1-84000-150-X.  [collection of his photographs]
  • Robert B. Silvers (Ed) (2000). Doing It : Five Performing Arts. New York Review of Books (USA). ISBN 0-940322-75-7.  — Essays by Jonathan Miller Geoffrey O'Brien, Charles Rosen, Tom Stoppard and Garry Wills
  • BBC. Great Composers of the World.  Jonathan Miller appears on the Puccini and Bach DVDs of this BBC series. In the Bach episode, Jonathan Miller discusses his affection for the famous Erbarme Dich aria of St Matthew's Passion.
  • PBS. Vermeer: Master of Light.  Jonathan Miller appears in this one-hour program on the painter
  • BBC. Alice in Wonderland DVD.  Jonathan Miller has a director's commentary track.
  • BBC. Whistle and I'll come to you.  DVD

Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... For other persons named Peter Cook, see Peter Cook (disambiguation). ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... Margaret Drabble (born June 5, 1939) is an English novelist. ... Richard Hoggart (born September 24, 1918) is a British sociologist, widely known for his 1957 book The Uses of Literacy. ... Adrian Mitchell (born 1932) is a British poet and dramatist. ... Mary Quant OBE FCSD (born February 11, 1934 in Kent, England) is an English fashion designer, one of the many designers who took credit for inventing the miniskirt and hot pants. ... Jerome S. Bruner (b. ... Daniel Clement Dennett (born March 28, 1942 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a prominent American philosopher whose research centers on philosophy of mind, philosophy of science and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science. ... Brian Francis Farrell (born January 9, 1929) is an Irish author, journalist, academic & broadcaster. ... Jerry Alan Fodor (born 1935) is a philosopher at Rutgers University, New Jersey. ... Szasz redirects here. ... Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 – May 20, 2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. ... Oliver Sacks in 2005. ... Geoffrey G. OBrien is an American poet. ... Charles Rosen (born May 5, 1927) is an American pianist and music theorist. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. ...

Introduction or foreword contributed

  • Robert Lowell (1966). Old Glory, The: Endecott and the Red Cross; My Kinsman, Major Molineux; and Benito Cereno.  (directors note)
  • Various (1999). More Viz Crap Jokes. John Brown Publishing. ISBN 1-902212-16-9.  (introduction)
  • Julian Rothenstein (2000). The Paradox Box: Optical Illusions, Puzzling Pictures, Verbal Diversions. Redstons Press /Shambhala Publications (USA). 
  • Linda Scotson (2000). Doran: Child of Courage. Macmillan. 

Books about Miller

  • Kate Bassett (2007 forthcoming). In Two Minds. Methuen. 
  • Ronald Bergan (1990). Beyond the Fringe...and Beyond: A Critical Biography of Alan Bennett, Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller, Dudley Moore. Virgin Books. ISBN 1-85227-175-2. 
  • Michael Romain (Ed) (1992). A Profile of Jonathan Miller. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-40953-5. 

Miller and the satire boom

  • Humphrey Carpenter (2000). That Was Satire, That Was: Beyond the Fringe, the Establishment Club, "Private Eye" and "That Was the Week That Was". Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 0-575-06588-5. 
  • Robert Hewison (1983). Footlights! - A Hundred Years of Cambridge Comedy. Methuen. ISBN 0-413-51150-2. 
  • Roger Wilmut (1980). From Fringe to Flying Cirus - Celebrating a Unique Generation of Comedy 1960-1980. Eyre Methuen. ISBN 0-413-46950-6. 

References

  1. ^ http://www.gaymonitor.co.uk/chehistory2.htm
  2. ^ http://www.newhumanist.org.uk/weblog.php?id=P2119

See also

The National Secular Society is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes secularism. ... The Rationalist Press Association is an organisation of the United Kingdom, founded on 26 May 1899 to promote freedom of thought and inquiry and the principles of rationalism, defined as the mental attitude which unreservedly accepts the supremacy of reason and aims at establishing a system of philosophy and ethics...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Miller Samuel | Manhattan Real Estate Appraisers & Consultants (858 words)
Miller Samuel is to be acquired by Radar Logic Incorporated.
Jonathan Miller was the first interviewee for the series and also provides quarterly podcasts/videocasts on the real estate market.
Miller Samuel provides aggregate market data for the Trulia.com real estate search engine mash-up of property listings, closed sales and neighborhood information juxtaposed with Google maps.
Bright Lights Film Journal | Jonathan Miller's Alice in Wonderland (774 words)
Miller loves putting frames together like a painter, freezing all of them in time and giving the viewer enough material to contemplate their various meanings.
When the film begins, she's standing apathetically in front of one while her muttering nanny fusses over her appearance; in classic Miller fashion, the nanny is nearly incomprehensible for her few minutes of screen time, in which the film, just beginning, slows to a dead crawl.
The Caucus Party, in Miller's brave hands, metamorphoses from Carroll's gathering of animals on the banks of a pool of tears to a stateroom filled with bored-stiff Victorian aristocrats stuck in a bureaucratic routine from which they know they cannot escape.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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