FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jonathan Lethem
Jonathan Lethem

Lethem in 2007.
Born: February 19, 1964 (1964-02-19) (age 43)
Brooklyn, New York
Occupation: Novelist, essayist
Nationality: American
Writing period: 1989-present
Debut works: Gun, with Occasional Music (1994)
Influences: Lewis Carroll, Raymond Chandler, R. Crumb, Philip K. Dick, Charles Dickens, Paula Fox, Patricia Highsmith, Shirley Jackson, Franz Kafka
Website: jonathanlethem.com

Jonathan Allen Lethem (born February 19, 1964) is an American writer. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Lethem trained to be an artist before moving to California and devoting his time to writing. His first novel, Gun, with Occasional Music, a genre work that mixed elements of science fiction and detective fiction, was published in 1994. It was followed by three more science fiction novels. In 1999, Lethem published Motherless Brooklyn, a National Book Critics Circle Award-winning novel that achieved mainstream success. In 2003, he published The Fortress of Solitude, which became a New York Times Best Seller. Lethem is also a prolific essayist and short story writer. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 9. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Gun, with Occasional Music (1994) is a novel by Jonathan Lethem. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... Robert Crumb (born August 30, 1943 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an artist and illustrator who signs his work R. Crumb. Crumb was a founder of the underground comics movement, and is often regarded as the most prominant figure in that movement. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... Paula Fox (born April 22, 1923) is an American author of several childrens books and adult memoirs. ... 1962 publicity photo of Patricia Highsmith Patricia Highsmith (January 19, 1921 - February 4, 1995) was an American novelist who is known mainly for her psychological crime thrillers which have led to more than two dozen film adaptations. ... This article is about the author. ... “Kafka” redirects here. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Gun, with Occasional Music (1994) is a novel by Jonathan Lethem. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... Motherless Brooklyn is a Jonathan Lethem novel published in 1999. ... The National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) is an American association of approximately seven hundred book reviewers. ... The Fortress of Solitude is a 2003 Jonathan Lethem novel set in Brooklyn, spanning the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. ... The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Lethem was born in Brooklyn, New York to Richard Brown Lethem, an avant-garde painter, and Judith Lethem, a political activist. He was the eldest of three children; his brother, Blake, is an artist, and his sister, Mara, is a photographer and writer.[1] Jonathan was raised in a commune in the pre-gentrified Brooklyn neighborhood of Boerum Hill. Despite a pervasive feeling of racial tension, he later described his Bohemian childhood as “thrilling” and culturally wide-reaching;[1] he gained an encyclopedic knowledge of the music of Bob Dylan, saw Star Wars twenty-one times during its original theatrical release,[2] and read the complete works of the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. Lethem later called Dick’s work “as formative an influence as marijuana or punk rock—as equally responsible for beautifully fucking up my life, for bending it irreversibly along a course I still travel.”[3] For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... A Commune is a kind of intentional community where most resources are shared and there is little or no personal property. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Boerum Hill is a small segment of Brooklyn roughly bounded by State Street to the north, 3rd Avenue to the east, Court Street to the west, and Warren Street to the south. ... The term bohemian was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ...


His parents divorced when Jonathan was young, and when he was thirteen, Judith died from a cancerous brain tumor,[4] an experience he has said haunted him and heavily affected his writing. In 2007, he explained that "My books all have this giant, howling missing [center]—language has disappeared, or someone has vanished, or memory has gone."[1] Intending to become a visual artist like his father, Lethem attended The High School of Music & Art, where he painted in a style he describes as "glib, show-offy, usually cartoonish."[5] At Music & Art he produced his own zine, The Literary Exchange, that featured artwork and writing, created animated films, and wrote a 125-page unpublished novel, Heroes. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... A brain tumor is any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or... The High School of Music & Art in Manhattan, New York City was started in 1936 by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, an event he described as “the most hopeful accomplishment” of his administration[1]. In 1984 Music & Art and its sister school, the School of Performing Arts High School, were merged...


After graduating from high school, Lethem entered Bennington College in Vermont in 1982 as a prospective art student. At Bennington, Lethem experienced an “overwhelming....collision with the realities of class—my parents’ bohemian milieu had kept me from understanding, even a little, that we were poor....at Bennington that was all demolished by an encounter with the fact of real privilege.” [5] This, coupled with a growing realization that he was more interested in writing than art, led Lethem to drop out halfway through his sophomore year. He hitchhiked from Denver, Colorado to Berkeley, California in 1984, in what he called "one of the stupidest and most memorable things I've ever done."[6] He lived in California for twelve years, working as a clerk in used bookstores and writing in his own time. Lethem published his first short story in 1989, and published several more in the early 1990s.[7] Bennington College is a liberal arts college located in Bennington, Vermont. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Hitch hike. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


First novels

Lethem’s first novel, Gun, with Occasional Music, is a merging of science fiction and the Chandleresque detective story which includes talking kangaroos, radical futuristic versions of the drug scene, and cryogenic prisons. The novel was published in 1994 by Harcourt Brace, in what Lethem later described as a "delirious" experience. "I'd pictured my first novels being published as paperback originals,” he recalled, "and instead a prestigious house was doing the book in cloth....I was in heaven."[5] The novel was released to little initial fanfare, but an enthusiastic review in Newsweek, which declared Gun an "audaciously assured first novel," catapulted the book to wider commercial success.[8] Gun, with Occasional Music was a finalist for the 1994 Nebula Award, and placed first in the "Best First Novel" category of the 1995 Locus Magazine reader's poll. In the mid-1990s, film producer Alan J. Pakula optioned the novel's movie rights, which allowed Lethem to quit working in bookstores and devote his time to writing.[8] Gun, with Occasional Music (1994) is a novel by Jonathan Lethem. ... For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... This article is about the animal. ... Cryogenics is the study of very low temperatures or the production of the same, and is often confused with cryobiology, the study of the effect of low temperatures on organisms, or the study of cryopreservation. ... Harcourt Trade Publishers is a U.S. publishing firm with a long history of publishing fiction and nonfiction for children and adults. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... Alan Jay Pakula (April 7, 1928 - November 19, 1998) was an American film producer, writer and director noted for his contributions to the conspiracy thriller genre. ...


He followed Gun, with Occasional Music in 1995 with his second novel. Partially inspired by Lethem's experiences hitchhiking cross-country,[6] Amnesia Moon uses a road narrative to explore a multi-post-apocalyptic future landscape rife with perception tricks. After publishing many of his early stories in a 1996 collection (The Wall of the Sky, the Wall of the Eye), Lethem's third novel, As She Climbed Across the Table, was published in 1997. The novel takes as its starting point a physics researcher who falls in love with an artificially generated spatial anomaly called "Lack", for whom she spurns her previous partner. Her ex-partner's comic struggle with this rejection, and with the anomaly constitute the majority of the narrative. Amnesia Moon is a 1995 novel written by Jonathan Lethem. ... This article is about the film Road Trip. ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... The Wall of the Sky, the Wall of the Eye is a collection of seven short stories by Jonathan Lethem published in 1996. ... As She Climbed Across the Table is the third novel by the American novelist Jonathan Lethem, first published in 1997. ...


In 1996, Lethem moved from the San Francisco Bay Area back to Brooklyn.[6] His next book, published after his return to Brooklyn, was Girl in Landscape. In the novel, a young girl must endure puberty while also having to face a strange and new world populated by aliens known as Archbuilders. Girl in Landscape's plot and characters, including the figures of a young girl and a violently protective father figure, were "very strongly influenced" by the 1956 John Wayne Western The Searchers, a movie with which Lethem is "obsessed."[9] USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Puberty refers to the process of physical changes by which a childs body becomes an adult body capable of reproduction. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Searchers is a 1956 epic Western film directed by John Ford, which tells the story of Ethan Edwards, a bitter, middle-aged loner and Civil War veteran played by John Wayne, who spends years looking for his abducted niece. ...


Mainstream success and "genre bending"

The first novel Lethem began after returning to New York City was Motherless Brooklyn, a return to the detective theme, this time maintaining objective realism while exploring subjective alterity through Lionel Essrog, a protagonist with Tourette syndrome who is obsessed with language. Lethem later called Essrog "obviously the character I’ve written with whom I most identify," and explained that the novel "stands outside myself....It’s the only one which doesn’t need me, never did. It would have found someone to write it, by necessity."[5] Upon its publication in 1999, Motherless Brooklyn won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, The Macallan Gold Dagger for crime fiction, and the Salon Book Award, and was named book of the year by Esquire. In 1999, Edward Norton announced that he was planning to write, direct and star in a film adaptation of the novel;[10] as of December 2006, Norton was still working on the project.[11] Motherless Brooklyn is a Jonathan Lethem novel published in 1999. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... “Tourette” redirects here. ... The National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) is an American association of approximately seven hundred book reviewers. ... The Gold Dagger was an award given annually by the CWA for best crime novel of the year. ... Salon. ... This article is about the title. ... Edward Harrison Norton[1] (born August 18, 1969) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American film actor and director. ...


The mainstream success of Motherless Brooklyn made Lethem, according to The New York Times, "something of a hipster celebrity," and he was referred to several times as a "genre bender."[12] Critics cited Lethem's various novels, which were alternately hardboiled detective fiction, science fiction, and autobiographical. (Lethem credited his comfort in genre-mixing to his father's art, which "always combined observed and imagined reality on the same canvas, very naturally, very un-self-consciously.")[12] In Time magazine, Lev Grossman classed Lethem with a movement of authors similarly eager to blend literary and popular writing, including Michael Chabon (with whom Lethem is friends),[13] Margaret Atwood, and Susanna Clarke.[14] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Genre fiction is a term for fictional works (novels, short stories) written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre in order to appeal to the fans of that genre. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Lev Grossman is an American writer, notably the author of Codex. ... Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ... Susanna [Mary] Clarke (born November 1, 1959) is a British author best known for her debut novel Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004), a Hugo Award-winning alternate history fantasy. ...


In 2003, Lethem definitively described his opinion of his supposed "genre bending":

The fact is, I used to get very involved, six or seven years ago, and before that, in questions of taxonomy of genre, and in the idea—which is ultimately a political idea—that a given writer, perhaps me, could in some objective way alter or reorganize the boundaries between genres....Nowadays, I've come to feel that talking about categories, about 'high' and 'low', about genre and their boundaries and the blurring of those boundaries, all consists only of an elaborate way to avoid actually discussing what moves and interests me about books—my own, and others'. What I like are books in their homely actuality—the insides of the books, the mysterious movements of characters and situations and the emotions that accompany those movements. The play of sentences, their infinite variety.[15]

In the early 2000s, Lethem published a story collection, edited two anthologies, wrote magazine pieces, and published the 55-page novella This Shape We're In in 2000. This Shape We're In was one of the first offerings from McSweeney's Books, the publishing imprint that arose from Dave Eggers's McSweeney's Quarterly Concern. McSweeneys is a publishing house founded by editor Dave Eggers, author of You Shall Know Our Velocity, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius , How We Are Hungry and What Is the What. ... This article is about imprints in publishing. ... Dave Eggers at the 2005 Hay Festival Dave Eggers (born March 12, 1970) is an American writer, editor, and publisher. ... Timothy McSweeneys Quarterly Concern is a semi-quarterly literary journal published by the McSweeneys publishing house. ...


In November 2000, Lethem said that he was working on an uncharacteristically "big sprawling" novel, about a child who grows up to be a rock journalist.[7] The novel was published in 2003, as The Fortress of Solitude. The semi-autobiographical bildungsroman features dozens of characters in a variety of milieus, but centers on a tale of racial tensions and boyhood in Brooklyn during the late 1970s. The main characters are two friends of different backgrounds who grew up on the same block in Boerum Hill. It was named one of nine "Editor's Choice" books of the year by The New York Times and has been published in fifteen languages. The Fortress of Solitude is a 2003 Jonathan Lethem novel set in Brooklyn, spanning the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. ... A Bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of self-cultivation) is a novelistic form which concentrates on the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the protagonist usually from childhood to maturity. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Boerum Hill is a small segment of Brooklyn roughly bounded by State Street to the north, 3rd Avenue to the east, Court Street to the west, and Warren Street to the south. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


His second collection of short fiction, Men and Cartoons, was published in late 2004. In March 2005, The Disappointment Artist, his first collection of essays, was released. On September 20, 2005, Lethem was named one of the 2005 recipients of the MacArthur Fellowship, often referred to as the "genius grant." is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ...


Recent work

In September 2006, Lethem published "The Genius of Bob Dylan", a lengthy interview with Bob Dylan in Rolling Stone magazine; the interview contained Lethem's reflections on Dylan's artistic achievements, as well as revealing Dylan's dissatisfaction with contemporary recording techniques and his thoughts on his own status. This article is about the magazine. ...


After Motherless Brooklyn and The Fortress of Solitude, Lethem decided that "[i]t was time to leave Brooklyn in a literary sense anyway….I really needed to defy all that stuff about place and memory."[1] In 2007, he returned to the setting of California, where some of his earlier fiction took place, with You Don't Love Me Yet, a novel about an upstart rock band. The novel revolves around a woman in the band, Lucinda, who answers phones for her friend's complaint line and uses some of a caller's words as lyrics. According to Lethem, You Don't Love Me Yet was inspired by the years he spent as the lead singer in an upstart California band in the late 1980s and early 1990s, during what he called "the unformed posturing phase of life."[16] The novel received mixed reviews.[2] Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


In 2005, Lethem had announced that he was planning to revive the Marvel Comics character Omega the Unknown in a ten-issue series to be published in 2006.[17] After hearing of the project, Omega co-creator Steve Gerber expressed personal outrage over the use of the character without his participation, though he later discussed the project with Lethem and admitted that he had "misjudged" him.[18] In May 2006, Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada explained that the series had been delayed to 2007, saying that "winning the Macarthur Grant put additional and unexpected demands on [Lethem's] time."[19] In March 2007, Lethem reported that he had written six of ten planned issues;[20] the first issue was published in October 2007.[21] This article is about the comic book company. ... Omega the Unknown was both an American comic book published by Marvel Comics from 1976-1977 and the titular character of that comic book. ... Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ...


In early 2007, Lethem began work on a new, Philip K. Dick-influenced novel. In an April 2007 interview, he stated, "I'm very excited about [it]....it's kind of gonna be a big, dark, paranoiac novel about Manhattan. So not quite a return to Brooklyn, but one river away."[22] For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


Personal life

In 1987, Lethem married the writer and artist Shelley Jackson; they were divorced by 1997.[8] In 2000, he married Julia Rosenberg, a Canadian film executive, though they divorced two years later.[7] Lethem currently lives in Brooklyn and Berwick, Maine,[1] with his third wife, filmmaker Amy Barrett, and their child (b. 2007).[16][2] Shelley Jackson Shelley Jackson (born 1963) is a writer and artist known for her cross-genre experiments, including important contributions to electronic literature and hypertext. ... Berwick is a town located in York County, Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ...


Bibliography

Novels

Gun, with Occasional Music (1994) is a novel by Jonathan Lethem. ... Amnesia Moon is a 1995 novel written by Jonathan Lethem. ... As She Climbed Across the Table is the third novel by the American novelist Jonathan Lethem, first published in 1997. ... Motherless Brooklyn is a Jonathan Lethem novel published in 1999. ... The Fortress of Solitude is a 2003 Jonathan Lethem novel set in Brooklyn, spanning the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. ... Christopher Sorrentino (born May 20, 1963) is an American novelist and short story writer. ...

Novellas

  • This Shape We're In (2000)

Fiction collections

The Wall of the Sky, the Wall of the Eye is a collection of seven short stories by Jonathan Lethem published in 1996. ... Kafka Americana is a collection of short stories by Jonathan Lethem and Carter Scholz based on works by Franz Kafka. ...

Non-fiction collections

  • The Disappointment Artist (2005)

Comics

Omega the Unknown was both an American comic book published by Marvel Comics from 1976-1977 and the titular character of that comic book. ...

Miscellaneous

This article is about the magazine. ... “Harpers” redirects here. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d e McGlone, Jackie. "Brooklyn dodger", The Scotsman, 2007-05-26. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  2. ^ a b c Edemariam, Aida. "The borrower", The Guardian, 2007-06-02. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  3. ^ Lethem (2005). p. 77.
  4. ^ Lethem (2005). p. 36-37.
  5. ^ a b c d “Interview: Jonathan Lethem", Post Road Magazine, Fall/Winter 2002. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  6. ^ a b c Kelleghan, Fiona. "Private Hells and Radical Doubts: An Interview with Jonathan Lethem", Science Fiction Studies 25.2, July 1998. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  7. ^ a b c Houle, Zachary. "A Conversation With Jonathan Lethem", The SF Site, November 2000. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  8. ^ a b c Gaffney, Elizabeth. "Jonathan Lethem: Breaking the Barriers Between Genres", Publishers Weekly, 1998-03-30. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  9. ^ Lethem, Jonathan. "Breeding Hybrids in the Genre Garden", Locus Magazine, October 1997. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  10. ^ Fleming, Michael. "Norton birthing 'Motherless': New Line nurturing Lethem novel", Variety, 1999-10-13. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  11. ^ Chonin, Neva. "Behind The Veil" (reprint), San Francisco Chronicle, 2006-12-28. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  12. ^ a b Cardwell, Diane. "Untangling the Knots of a Brooklyn Boyhood" (fee required), The New York Times, 2003-09-16. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  13. ^ Henderson, Eleanor. "From Pittsburgh to Sitka: On Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Union" (book review), The Virginia Quarterly Review, Summer 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-28.
  14. ^ Grossman, Lev. "Pop Goes the Literature", Time, 2004-12-17. Retrieved on 2007-03-05. 
  15. ^ "Jonathan Lethem Interview", FailBetter.com, Summer/Fall 2003. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  16. ^ a b Gilbert, Megan. "A Hit Song of the Mind: Profile of Jonathan Lethem, Author, You Don't Love Me Yet", 2007-05-21. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  17. ^ Winters, Rebecca. "Meta-Hero Worship", Time, 2005-05-01. Retrieved on 2006-12-23.
  18. ^ Johnson, Rich. "Into the Unknown", Comic Book Resources, 2005-06-14. Retrieved on 2006-12-23.
  19. ^ Quesada, Joe. Joe Fridays: Week 51, Newsarama.com, 2006-05-19. Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  20. ^ Lethem at a reading at Boston College, 2007-03-20.
  21. ^ Marvel Comics Solicitations for October 2007, Newsarama.com, Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  22. ^ Kleffel, Rick. Jonathan Lethem (mp3 audio), The Agony Column Audio Interview Archive, 2007-04-16. Retrieved on 2007-09-07.

The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Science Fiction Studies is an academic journal founded in 1973 by R.D. Mullen. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginia Quarterly Review, is one of the more venerable literary periodicals in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lev Grossman is an American writer, notably the author of Codex. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation)#Education. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Reference

  • Lethem, Jonathan (2005). The Disappointment Artist. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-51217-1. 

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
A Boy from Brooklyn Grows Up (Gotham Gazette. November 28, 2005) (7791 words)
Jonathan Lethem: Well, you know, I was living in California when I first left college, and this was when I began to try to become a fiction writer, and I was 19, 20, 21, and at that point I don’t think I could’ve contended with the material of Brooklyn.
Jonathan Lethem: Well, one thing that I’ve felt is that a couple of times when people have spoken to me about the book, is that they will speak as though I’ve given them a window onto a time when you had to think about what streets you walked down.
Jonathan Lethem: Well, I had made a long practice by now, I mean I had really gotten away with, for quite a while, of being very obstinate about disappointing expectations, because none of the books have been like one another.
Jonathan Lethem (857 words)
Jonathan Lethem is an author of speculative fiction best known for his novels The Fortress of Solitude, Gun, With Occasional Music, Motherless Brooklyn, As She Climbed Across the Table, Girl in Landscape, and Amnesia Moon.
Lethem was poor about attending classes, feeling that his prior background cancelled out their necessity, and while still in his first semester he dropped out.
Lethem's brother, Blake, attained brief notoriety as a graffiti artist after painting a mural used as a backdrop for presidential candidate Howard Dean.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m