FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Jonathan Dayton
Jonathan Dayton
Jonathan Dayton

In office
March 4, 1799 – March 3, 1805
Preceded by Richard Stockton
Succeeded by Aaron Kitchell

In office
December 7, 1795March 4, 1797
May 15, 1797 – March 4, 1799
Preceded by Frederick Muhlenberg
Succeeded by Theodore Sedgwick

In office
May 25, 1787 – September 17, 1787

In office
November 5, 1787 – October 21, 1788

Born October 16, 1760
Elizabethtown, New Jersey
Died October 9, 1824
Elizabethtown, New Jersey
Political party Federalist Party
Spouse Susan Williamson
Religion Presbyterianism

Jonathan Dayton (October 16, 1760October 9, 1824) was an American politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. He was the youngest person to sign the United States Constitution and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, serving as the third Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, and later the U.S. Senate. Arrested in 1807 for treason in connection with Aaron Burr's conspiracy, Dayton was never tried but his political career never recovered. The city of Dayton, Ohio is named for him. Image File history File links Jonathan_Dayton. ... New Jersey ratified the Constitution on December 18, 1787. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Stockton (1764-1828) was a respected lawyer that representated New Jersey in the U.S. Senate and later served in the House of Representatives. ... Aaron Kitchell (July 10, 1744 - June 25, 1820) was a blacksmith and politician from Hanover, New Jersey. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the House... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Speaker Muhlenberg Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750 – June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... For the Bon Jovi album, see New Jersey (album) Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For the Bon Jovi album, see New Jersey (album) Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... The men in this list actually met in the Continental Congress. ... The Congress of the Confederation or the United States in Congress Assembled was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of the United States from March 1, 1781 to March 4, 1789. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the Bon Jovi album, see New Jersey (album) Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... For the Bon Jovi album, see New Jersey (album) Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... The Federalist Party was an American political party during the First Party System, in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... Presbyterianism is a form of Protestant Christianity, primarily in the Reformed branch of Western Christianity, as well as a particular form of church government. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States politics is dominated by the two major parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... For the Bon Jovi album, see New Jersey (album) Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of the United States of America Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the House... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Traitor redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Gem City Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio County Montgomery Founded April 1, 1796 Incorporated 1805  - Mayor Rhine L. McLin Area    - City 146. ...


Dayton was born in Elizabethtown (now Elizabeth) in New Jersey. He was the son of Elias Dayton, a merchant who was prominent in local politics. He graduated in 1776 from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). During the Revolutionary War Dayton served in the 3rd New Jersey Regiment and attained the rank of captain by the age of 19. Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... Elias Dayton (May 1, 1737 – October 22, 1807), father of Jonathan Dayton, was born in Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Dutch Republic, Spain, American Indians Kingdom of Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the... The 3rd New Jersey Regiment was raised on January 1, 1776 at Elizabethtown, New Jersey for service with the Continental Army. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines) and a rank in the United States Navy between...


After the war, Dayton studied law and established a practice, dividing his time between land speculation, law, and politics. After serving as a delegate to the Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention (of which he was the youngest member, at the age of 26[1]), he became a prominent Federalist legislator. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1789, he did not take his seat, but was elected and took his seat in 1791. He served as speaker for the Fourth and Fifth Congress. Like most Federalists, he supported the fiscal policies of Alexander Hamilton, and suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion. He supported the Louisiana Purchase and opposed the repeal of the Judiciary Act of 1801. Speculation is the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, commodities, futures, currencies, collectibles, real estate, or any valuable thing to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income - dividends, rent etc. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to these two girls that i know. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier and poltiical theorists. ... The Whiskey Rebellion, lesser known as the Whiskey Insurrection, was a popular uprising that had its beginnings in 1791 and culminated in an insurrection in 1794 in the locality of Washington, Pennsylvania, in the Monongahela Valley. ... The Louisiana Purchase. ... ...


Dayton married Susan Williamson and they had two daughters, but the date of their marriage is unknown.


Dayton met with Aaron Burr in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and became involved in a "conspiracy" in which Burr later had been accused of intending to conquer parts of what is now the western United States. (This was never proven.) An illness prevented Dayton from accompanying Burr's aborted 1806 expedition, but in 1807 Dayton was arrested for treason. He was released and never brought to trial but his national political career never recovered. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ...


After resuming his political career in New Jersey, he died in 1824 in his hometown and was interred in a vault in St. John's Episcopal churchyard in Elizabeth, New Jersey. 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The city of Dayton, Ohio was named after him because he owned 250,000 acres (1,000 km²) of land in Ohio and because he supported the building of the Miami Canal without hesitation. However, Jonathan Dayton never set foot in the city. In 1825, the Ohio Legislature approved funding to construct an Ohio water works system. ...


He is also the namesake of Jonathan Dayton High School in Springfield, New Jersey. Jonathan Dayton High School‎ Jonathan Dayton High School is an American four-year comprehensive public high school in Springfield Township, in Union County, New Jersey, as part of the Springfield Public Schools. ...


Political career

Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to these two girls that i know. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

External link

Preceded by
Richard Stockton
United States Senator (Class 2) from New Jersey
1799–1805
Served alongside: James Schureman, Aaron Ogden, John Condit
Succeeded by
Aaron Kitchell
Preceded by
Frederick Muhlenberg
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
December 7, 1795March 4, 1797;
May 15, 1797March 4, 1799
Succeeded by
Theodore Sedgwick

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Richard Stockton (1764-1828) was a respected lawyer that representated New Jersey in the U.S. Senate and later served in the House of Representatives. ... New Jersey ratified the Constitution on December 18, 1787. ... James Schureman (February 12, 1756– January 22, 1824) was an American merchant and statesman from New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Aaron Ogden Aaron Ogden (December 3, 1756-April 19, 1839) was a United States Senator and Governor of New Jersey. ... CONDIT, John, (father of Silas Condit), a Representative and a Senator from New Jersey; born in Orange, N.J., July 8, 1755; attended the public schools; studied medicine; served as a surgeon in the Revolutionary War; one of the founders and a trustee of the Orange Academy in 1785; member... Aaron Kitchell (July 10, 1744 - June 25, 1820) was a blacksmith and politician from Hanover, New Jersey. ... Speaker Muhlenberg Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750 – June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the House... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the House... Image File history File links House_large_seal. ... Speaker Muhlenberg Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750 – June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Jonathan Trumbull Jr. ... Speaker Muhlenberg Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750 – June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Sen. ... Joseph Bradley Varnum Joseph Bradley Varnum (January 29, 1751–September 21, 1821) was a U.S. politician of the Democratic-Republican Party from the state of Massachusetts. ... Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was a leading American statesman and orator who represented Kentucky in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... Langdon Cheves (pronounced chivis), (September 17, 1776–June 25, 1857), was an American politician and a president of the Second Bank of the United States. ... Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was a leading American statesman and orator who represented Kentucky in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... John W. 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Notes and references

  1. ^ Abeka United States History: Heritage of Freedom, page 126

  Results from FactBites:
 
Colonial Hall: Biography of Jonathan Dayton (200 words)
Colonel Elias Dayton was a distinguished patriot and soldier of New Jersey in the war of independence, and his son, Jonathan Dayton, was one of the ablest civilians of that State, after independence had been achieved.
Dayton was in 1788 elected a member of the national house of representatives.
Dayton was an accomplished lawyer, a firm friend to the constitution, and one of its ablest defenders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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