FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Jonah" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jonah
The Prophet Jonah, as depicted by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel
The Prophet Jonah, as depicted by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel

According to the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh/Old Testament) and Qur'an, Jonah (Hebrew: יוֹנָה, Standard Yona Tiberian jon'ɔh ; Arabic: يونس, Yunus or يونان, Yunaan ; Latin Ionas ; "Dove") was a prophet who was swallowed by a great fish. The name Jonah has several meanings: Jonah, a prophet described in the Book of Jonah in the Hebrew Bible. ... Image File history File links Sistine Chapel detail of the prophet Jonah. ... Image File history File links Sistine Chapel detail of the prophet Jonah. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Arabic redirects here. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ...

Contents

The Story of Jonah

In the Old Testament of the Bible, Jonah is mentioned twice, first in 2 Kings 14:25 (as a prophet in the time of King Jeroboam II) and later in the Book of Jonah. He was the son of Amittai (meaning 'My Faithfulness'), from the Galilean village of Gath-hepher near Nazareth. God orders Jonah to prophesy to the city of Nineveh. Not wanting to, Jonah tries to avoid God's command by going to Joppa and sailing to Tarshish. A huge storm arises and the sailors, realizing this is no ordinary storm, cast lots and learn that Jonah is to blame. Jonah admits this and states that if he is thrown overboard the storm will cease. The sailors try to get the ship to the shore but in failing feel forced to throw him overboard, at which point the sea calms. Jonah is miraculously saved by being swallowed by a large fish. In chapter two, while in the great fish, Jonah prays to God and asks forgiveness. As a result, God commands the fish to vomit Jonah out. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... The Books of Kings (also known as [The Book of] Kings in Hebrew: Sefer Melachim מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... Jeroboam II was the son and successor of Jehoash, and the fourteenth king of Israel, over which he ruled for forty-one years (2 Kings 14:23). ... In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Jonah is the fifth book in a series of books called the Minor Prophets (itself a subsection of the Nevi’im or Prophets). ... Amittai (Hebrew: אֲמִתַּי, IPA English: æmɪtaɪ), a biblical character, was the father of Jonah the prophet. ... Hebrew נָצְרַת (Natzrat) (Standard) Náẓərat Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Name Meaning Ancient word in Hebrew Government City District North Population 64,800[1] (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... Joppa is a Biblical name for the Israeli city of Yafo, otherwise known as Jaffa, now a part of Tel Aviv-Yafo. ... Tarshish occurs in the Hebrew Bible with these meanings: One of the sons of Javan. ...


God again orders Jonah to visit Nineveh and prophesy to its inhabitants. This time he goes there and walks through the city crying, "In forty days Nineveh shall be destroyed." The Ninevites believe his word and appoint a public fast, ranging from the King (who puts on sackcloth and sits in ashes) to the humblest person. God has compassion and spares the city for the time being.


Embittered by this, Jonah questions the need for his journey, stating that since God is merciful it was inevitable that God would yield to the Ninevites' entreaties. He then leaves the city and makes himself a shelter, waiting to see whether or not the city will be destroyed.


God causes a plant (in Hebrew a kikayon) to grow over Jonah's shelter to give him some shade from the sun. Later, a worm bites the plant's root and it withers. Jonah, now being exposed to the full force of the sun, becomes faint and desires that God take him out of the world. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


But God says to him, "Are you really so very angry about the little plant?...You were upset about this little plant, something for which you have not worked nor did you do anything to make it grow. It grew up overnight and died the next day. Should I not be even more concerned about Nineveh, this enormous city? There are more than one hundred twenty thousand people in it who do not know right from wrong, as well as many animals!" (Jonah 4:9-11 NET)


Jonah in Christianity

Coptic icon of Jonah the Prophet

Jesus made reference to Jonah when He was asked for a miraculous sign by the Pharisees and teachers of the Law. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Coptic is an adjective referring to the original inhabitants of Egypt, the Copts. ... For the followers of the Vilna Gaon, see Perushim. ...

But he [Jesus] answered them, "An evil and adulterous generation asks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of the prophet Jonah. For just as Jonah was in the belly of the huge fish for three days and three nights, so the Son of Man will be in the heart of the earth for three days and three nights. The people of Nineveh will stand up at the judgement with this generation and condemn it, because they repented when Jonah preached to them – and now, something greater than Jonah is here!"

Matthew 12:39-41 NET


Jonah is regarded as a saint by a number of Christian denominations. He is commemorated as a prophet in the Calendar of Saints of the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran Church on September 22. On the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar his feast day is September 21. He is commemorated with the other minor prophets in the Calendar of saints of the Armenian Apostolic Church on July 31. The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which details the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by the Lutheran Church. ... LCMS redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... The Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar describes and dictates the rhythm of the life of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... A minor prophet is a book in Minor Prophets section of the Hebrew Bible also known to Christians as the Old Testament. ... // 1 Third Day of the Fast of the Nativity 2 Fourth Day of the Fast of the Nativity 3 Fifth Day of the Fast of the Nativity 4 Sixth Day of the Fast of the Nativity 5 Eve of the Nativity and Theophany of our Lord Jesus Christ 6 Feast... Official standard of Karekin II Catholicos of Armenia The Armenian Apostolic Church (Armenian: Õ€Õ¡Õµ Ô±Õ¼Õ¡Ö„Õ¥Õ¬Õ¡Õ¯Õ¡Õ¶ Եկեղեցի, Hay Arakelagan Yegeghetzi), sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church or the Gregorian Church, is the worlds oldest national church[1] [2] and one of the most ancient Christian communities [3]. // Baptism of Tiridates III. The earliest... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Jonah in Islam

Like many important Biblical characters, Jonah is also important in Islam as a prophet who is faithful to God (Allah) and delivers His messages. He is known to Muslims by his Arabic name, Yunus. Sura 10 (equivalent to chapter 10) of the Qur'an is named "Sura Yunus" after him, although he only receives one reference, in verse 98. The full story of Prophet Jonah is recounted in Sura 37, verses 139-149: For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Sura Yunus (Arabic: سورة يونس ) (Jonah) is the 10th sura of the Quran. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

  • 37:139 So also was Jonah among those sent (by Us).
  • 37:140 When he ran away (like a slave from captivity) to the ship (fully) laden,
  • 37:141 He (agreed to) cast lots, and he was condemned:
  • 37:142 Then the big Fish did swallow him, and he had done acts worthy of blame.
  • 37:143 Had it not been that he (repented and) glorified God,
  • 37:144 He would certainly have remained inside the Fish till the Day of Resurrection.
  • 37:145 But We cast him forth on the naked shore in a state of sickness,
  • 37:146 And We caused to grow, over him, a spreading plant of the gourd kind.
  • 37:147 And We sent him (on a mission) to a hundred thousand (men) or more.
  • 37:148 And they believed; so We permitted them to enjoy (their life) for a while.
  • 37:149 Now ask them their opinion: Is it that thy Lord has (only) daughters, and they have sons?

Note that in verse 139 God is referred to as 'Us' and in verses 145-8 refers to Himself as 'We'. This is not a reference to the Trinity but an Arabic signifier of respect. This article is about the Christian Trinity. ...


According to the Qur'an, when, 10 years after receiving revelation, Muhammad went to the city of Ta'if to see if its leaders would allow him to preach his message from there rather than Makkah he was cast from the city by the urchins and children. He took shelter in the garden of Utbah and Shaybah, two members of the Quraysh tribe. They sent their servant, Addas, to serve him grapes for, although they were displeased at his Prophethood, their tribal bond - important in Jahili culture - took precedence. The Prophet asked Addas where he was from and the servant replied Niniwah. "The town of Yunus, son of Matta," the Prophet replied. Addas was shocked because he knew that the pagan Arabs had no knowledge of Yunus. He then asked how Muhammad knew of this man. "We are brothers," the Prophet replied. "Yunus was a Prophet of Allah and I, too, am a Prophet of Allah." Addas immediately accepted Islam and kissed the hands and feet of the Prophet.[citation needed] Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ...


Jonah in Judaism

The book of Jonah (Yonah יונה) is one of the 12 minor prophets included in the Jewish Bible. According to tradition Jonah was the boy brought back to life by Elijah the prophet, and hence shares many of his characteristics (particularly his desire for 'strict judgment'). The book of Jonah is read every year on Yom Kippur as the Haftorah at mincha. Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Yom Kippur (Hebrew:יוֹם כִּפּוּר ) is a Jewish holiday, known in English as the Day of Atonement. ... The haftarah (haftara, haphtara, haphtarah; plural haftarot, haftaros, haphtarot, haphtaros) is a text selected from the books of Neviim (The Prophets) that is read publicly in the synagogue after the reading of the Torah on each Sabbath, as well as on Jewish festivals and fast days. ... Jewish services are the prayers recited as part of observance of Judaism. ...


See also Jonah in Rabbinic Literature. Jonah in rabbinic literature. ...


Jonah in The Bahá'í Faith

Although the Bahá'í Faith generally views Jonah as a prophet,[1] there is a passage in the Qur'an which may support his being a Manifestation of God because the term 'apostle' is generally associated with Manifestations of God.[2] This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Baháí Faith refers to what are commonly called prophets as Manifestations of God, or simply Manifestations (mazhar) who are directly linked with the concept of Progressive revelation. ...


The Person of Jonah

The greatest detail on his personal history is to be found in the Book of Jonah, traditionally ascribed to Jonah himself (although this is not stated in Scripture). In the book, Jonah is a reluctant and non-compassionate prophet. This story contains a twofold characterization of Jonah: first as a reluctant prophet of doom to the heathen city of Nineveh, and second as a "Son of man" type. The character of Jonah, who wants Nineveh destroyed, is contrasted with that of God, who is compassionate towards Jews and Gentiles, humans and animals. In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Jonah is the fifth book in a series of books called the Minor Prophets (itself a subsection of the Nevi’im or Prophets). ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Son of man (disambiguation). ... The word gentile is an anglicised version of the Latin word gentilis, meaning of or belonging to a clan or tribe. ... This article is about modern humans. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ...


The Fish

Depiction of Jonah and the "great fish" on the south doorway of the Gothic-era Dom St. Peter in Worms, Germany
Depiction of Jonah and the "great fish" on the south doorway of the Gothic-era Dom St. Peter in Worms, Germany

Though it is often called a whale today, the Hebrew, as throughout scripture, refers to no species in particular, simply sufficing with "great fish" or "big fish" (whales are today classified as mammals and not fish, but no such distinction was made in antiquity). While some Bible scholars suggest the size and habits of the White Shark correspond better to the representations given of Jonah's being swallowed, normally an adult human is too large to be swallowed whole.[3] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 556 × 600 pixels Full resolution (838 × 904 pixel, file size: 308 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jonah ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 556 × 600 pixels Full resolution (838 × 904 pixel, file size: 308 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jonah ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Worms Cathedral East facade The spacious Cathedral of St. ... Wormser Dom Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Carcharodon carcharias (Linnaeus, 1758) The Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias), also known as White Pointer, White Shark or Amaletz, is an exceptionally large lamniform shark found in coastal surface waters in all major oceans. ...


In Jonah 2:1 (1:17 in English translation), the original Hebrew text reads dag gadol (דג גדול), which literally means "great fish." The Septuagint translates this phrase into Greek as ketos megas (κητος μεγας). The term ketos alone means "huge fish," and in Greek mythology the term was closely associated with sea monsters, including sea serpents. (See the Theoi Project "Ketea" for more information regarding Greek mythology and the Ketos.) Jerome later translated this phrase as piscis granda in his Latin Vulgate. He translated ketos, however, as cetus in Matthew 12:40. Hebrew redirects here. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerome (disambiguation). ...


At some point cetus became synonymous with "whale" (the study of whales is now called cetology). In his 1534 translation, William Tyndale translated the phrase in Jonah 2:1 as "greate fyshe" and he translated the word ketos (Greek) or cetus (Latin) in Matthew 12:40 as "whale". Tyndale's translation was, of course, later incorporated into the Authorized Version of 1611. Since then, the "great fish" in Jonah 2 has been most often interpreted as a whale. Cetology (from Greek: κητος, cetus, whale; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of marine mammal science that studies the approximately eighty species of whales, dolphins, and porpoise in the scientific order Cetacea. ... William Tyndale (sometimes spelled Tyndale,Tindall or Tyndall) (ca. ...


There is anecdotal evidence that the throats of many large whales, as well as possibly the whale shark, could accommodate passage of an adult human.[3] The story of Jonah mentions weeds wrapped around Jonah's head, perhaps to shield his face with seaweed against the acid.[3] Whales are the largest species of exclusively aquatic placental mammals, members of the order Cetacea, which also includes dolphins and porpoises. ...


However, doubts have been cast that any existing whale or fish would be able to repeat the feat described, either due to size of mouth, narrowness of throat, or because it diverges so wildly from these animals' normal eating habits. The largest whales - baleen whales, a group which includes the blue whale - eat plankton and "it is commonly said that this species would be choked if it attempted to swallow a herring."[4] The sperm whale, on the other hand, has "a small mouth... Its food is torn to pieces before being swallowed," according to Dr. C. H. Townsend, a former Acting Director of the American Museum of Natural History and the New York Aquarium. He further states that "there is no evidence that such a feat would be possible." As for the whale shark, Dr. E. W. Gudger, an Honorary Associate in Ichthyology at the American Museum of Natural History, noted that "while the mouth is cavernous, the throat itself is only four inches wide and has a sharp elbow or bend behind the opening. This gullet would not permit the passage of a man's arm." In another publication he also noted that "the whale shark is not the fish that swallowed Jonah."[5][6] Diversity Around 15 species; see list of cetaceans or below. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Blue Whale range Subspecies B. m. ... For the SpongeBob SquarePants character, see Plankton (SpongeBob SquarePants). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Sperm whale range (in blue) The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is the largest of all toothed whales and is the largest toothed animal alive, measuring up to 18 m (60 ft) long. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Entrance to the territory of the New York Aquarium from ocean. ... Binomial name (Smith, 1828) Range of whale shark The whale shark, Rhincodon typus, is a slow filter feeding shark that is the largest living fish species. ... Ichthyology (from Greek: ἰχθυ, ikhthu, fish; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. ...


One may argue[attribution needed] that applying contemporary taxonomy from a literalist perspective does little to further our understanding of this story, written in a time when such knowledge did not yet exist (and as such was less relevant than in our time) and all large sea creatures had the same symbolism so that a generic term could easily suffice. Taxonomy, sometimes alpha taxonomy, is the science of finding, describing and naming organisms, thus giving rise to taxa. ...


Jonah, Jason and Gilgamesh

The story of the hero Jason in Greek mythology shares several similarities with the story of Jonah which have been noted by Joseph Campbell and more recent authors such as Gildas Hamel.[7] Drawing on the Book of Jonah and Greco-Roman sources — including Greek vases and the accounts of Apollonius of Rhodes, Valerius Flaccus and Orphic Argonautica — Hamel identifies a number of shared motifs, including the names of the heroes, the presence of a dove, the idea of "fleeing" like the wind and causing a storm, the attitude of the sailors, the presence of a sea-monster or dragon threatening the hero or swallowing him, and the form and the word used for the "gourd" (kikayon). The Greek rendering of the name Jonah was Jonas, which differs from Jason only in the order of sounds. This may suggest that the Greeks confused accounts of Jonah with those of their own hero, but Hamel argues that the Hebrew author was reacting to and adapting this mythological material to communicate his own, quite different message. This article is about the hero from Greek mythology. ... For other uses, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ... Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ... Gaius Valerius Flaccus (late 1st century AD) was a Roman poet, who flourished under the emperors Vespasian and Titus. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Campbell also attempted to draw parallels with the epic of Gilgamesh, in which Gilgamesh obtains a plant from the bottom of the sea.[8] Similarities of the accounts, however, are minor.[citation needed] In the Book of Jonah a worm (in Hebrew tola'ath, "maggot") bites the plant's root causing it to wither, while in the epic of Gilgamesh the plant is eaten by a serpent. The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from Babylonia and is among the earliest known literary works. ... For other uses, see Gilgamesh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Worm (disambiguation). ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ H.M. Balyuzi, Baha'u'llah - The King of Glory, p. 182
  2. ^ The Qur'an (Rodwell tr), Sura 37 - The Ranks
  3. ^ a b c [1]
  4. ^ Lydekker's New Natural History, Vol, III, p. 6
  5. ^ The Scientific Monthly, March, 1940, p. 227
  6. ^ "Essays of an Atheist," Woolsey Teller. Copyright 1945, The Truth Seeker Company, Inc., found online here.
  7. ^ "Taking the Argo to Nineveh: Jonah and Jason in a Mediterranean context," Judaism Summer, 1995; reproduced online here.
  8. ^ Campbell, Joseph. The Hero With A Thousand Faces. Princeton University Press, pp 90-95. ISBN 0-586-08571-8. 

For other uses, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ...

External links

Prophets of Judaism & Christianity in the Hebrew Bible
Abraham · Isaac · Jacob · Moses (rl) · Aaron · Miriam · Eldad · Medad · The seventy elders of Israel · Joshua · Phinehas

Deborah · Samuel · Saul · Saul's men · David · Jeduthun · Solomon | Gad · Nathan · Ahiyah · Elijah · Elisha | Isaiah (rl) · Jeremiah · Ezekiel

Hosea · Joel · Amos · Obadiah · Jonah (rl) · Micah · Nahum · Habakkuk · Zephaniah · Haggai · Zechariah · Malachi

Shemaiah · Iddo · Azariah · Hanani · Jehu · Micaiah · Jahaziel · Eliezer · Zechariah ben Jehoiada · Oded · Huldah · Uriah

Judaism:
Sarah (rl) · Rachel· Rebecca · Joseph · Eli · Elkanah · Hannah (mother of Samuel) · Abigail · Amoz (father of Isaiah) · Beeri (father of Hosea) · Hilkiah (father of Jeremiah) · Shallum (uncle of Jeremiah) · Hanamel (cousin of Jeremiah) · Buzi · Mordecai · Esther · (Baruch)
Christianity:
Abel · Enoch (ancestor of Noah) · Daniel (rl)
Non-Jewish: Kenan · Noah (rl) · Eber · Bithiah · Beor · Balaam · Balak · Job · Eliphaz · Bildad · Zophar · Elihu
v  d  e
Prophets of Islam in the Qur'an
Adam Idris Nuh Hud Saleh Ibrahim Lut Ismail Is'haq Yaqub Yusuf Ayub
آدم إدريس نوح هود صالح إبراهيم لوط إسماعيل اسحاق يعقوب يوسف أيوب
Adam Enoch Noah Eber Shelah Abraham Lot Ishmael Isaac Jacob Joseph Job

Shoaib Musa Harun Dhul-Kifl Daud Sulayman Ilyas Al-Yasa Yunus Zakariya Yahya Isa Muhammad
شعيب موسى هارون ذو الكفل داود سليمان إلياس إليسع يونس زكريا يحيى عيسى محمد
Jethro Moses Aaron Ezekiel David Solomon Elijah Elisha Jonah Zechariah John Jesus Paraclete
v  d  e
This entry incorporates text from the public domain Easton's Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897.


This article incorporates text from the 1901–1906 Jewish Encyclopedia article "Jonah" by Emil G. Hirsch, Karl Budde, and Solomon Schechter, a publication now in the public domain. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Of all Biblical personages Moses has been chosen most frequently as the subject of later legends; and his life has been recounted in full detail in the poetic haggadah. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Miriam (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; meaning either wished for child, bitter or rebellious, but it might be derived originally from an Egyptian name, myr beloved or mr love[1]) was the sister of Moses and Aaron, and the daughter of Amram and Jochebed. ... Eldad ha-Dani or Eldad HaDani or Eldad ben Mahli ha-Dani (Hebrew: אלדד הדני) was a merchant and traveler of the ninth century. ... . ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... Phinehas or Pinhas - פִּינְחָס, Standard Hebrew Pinəḥas, Tiberian Hebrew Pînəħās is a name shared by two characters in the Hebrew Bible. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For information on the name Deborah, see Debbie For information on the nurse of Rebeccah, mentioned in Genesis, see Deborah (Genesis) Deborah or Dvora (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Bee) was a prophetess and the fourth Judge and only female Judge of pre-monarchic Israel in the Old Testament (Tanakh). ... Samuel or Shmuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל, Standard Tiberian ) is an important leader of ancient Israel in the Book(s) of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. ... Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; asked for) is identified in the Books of Samuel, 1 Chronicles and the Quran as the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... Jeduthun - lauder; praising - the name of two men in the Bible. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Gad was a seer or more commonly understood, a prophet in the Bible. ... Nathan the Prophet was a court prophet who lived in the time of King David and his wife Bathsheba. ... Ahijah HaShiloni, also known as Ahijah the Shilonite, was a prophet of Shiloh (1 Kings 11:29; 14:2). ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Isaiah in rabbinic literature. ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... See also Hoshea, who has the same name in Biblical Hebrew. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Book of Joel. ... Amos (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Burden) is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible, and putative author of the speeches reported in the Book of Amos. ... This article is about people named Obadiah in the Old Testament. ... Jonah in rabbinic literature. ... Micah the titular prophet of the Book of Micah, also called The Morasthite He is not the same as another prophet , Micaiah son of Imlah. ... Nahum (נחום) was a minor prophet whose prophecy is recorded in the Hebrew Bible. ... Habakkuk or Havakuk (חֲבַקּוּק, Standard Hebrew Ḥavaqquq, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥăḇaqqûq) was a prophet in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Zephaniah or Tzfanya (צְפַנְיָה Concealed of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew Ẓəfanya, Tiberian Hebrew ṢəpÌ„anyāh) is the name of several people in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Haggai (×—Ö·×’Ö¼Ö·×™, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew Ḥaggay) was one of the twelve minor prophets and the author of the Book of Haggai. ... Zechariah as depicted on Michelangelos ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Zechariah or Zecharya (זְכַרְיָה Renowned/Remembered of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) was a person in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... For the Northern Irish singer songwriter, see Malachi Cush. ... Image File history File links Christian_cross. ... Shemaiah was a prophet in the reign of Rehoboam (I Kings 12:22-24). ... Iddo (עדו also יעדו) was a minor biblical prophet, who appears to have lived during the reigns of King Solomon and his heirs, Rehoboam and Abijah in the Kingdom of Judah. ... Azariah, meaning God[s] help[ed] in Hebrew, is the name of several people in the Hebrew Bible, including the following: Azariah in the Books of Kings 2 Kings 15:1-12 he is the king of Judah [1], (also known as Uzziah of Judah in rabbinical scholarship). ... Hanani was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Jehu was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Micah or Micha (מִיכָה, Standard Hebrew Miḫa, Tiberian Hebrew Mîḵāh) is the name of several people in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Jahaziel or Chaziel the Levite was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Eliezer (אֱלִיעֶזֶר / אֱלִיעָזֶר Help/Court of my God, Standard Hebrew Eliʿézer / Eliʿázer, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔlîʿézer / ʾĔlîʿāzer) was Moses and Zipporahs second son. ... Zechariah Ben Jehoida was the son or grandson of Jehoiada, the high priest in the times of Ahaziah and Jehoash (Joash). ... In the Bible, there were two prophets called Oded. ... Huldah was a prophetess mentioned briefly in the Second Book of Kings, Chapter 22. ... Uriah or Urijah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; (My) light/flame of/is the ) was the name of several men in the Hebrew Bible. ... Engraving of Sarah by Hans Collaert from c. ... Sarah in rabbinic literature // Sarah was the niece of Abraham, being the daughter of his brother Haran. ... This article is about the Biblical character. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ) is the wife of Isaac. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... Eli (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Ascent) was, according to the Books of Samuel, the name of a priest of Shiloh, and one of the last Israelite Judges before the rule of kings in ancient Israel. ... Elkanah was, according to the Books of Samuel, the husband of Hannah, and the father of her children including her first - either Samuel or Saul depending on whether it is those who take the Bible at face value or textual scholars (respectively) that are to be trusted[1]. Elkanah is... Hannah (or Chana) (Hebrew: ×—× ×” - Grace [of God]) was a wife of Elkanah and the mother of the prophet Samuel as recorded in the Book of Samuel. ... Abigail (אֲבִיגַיִל / אֲבִיגָיִל her Fathers joy or, fountain of joy ;leader of/is dance/, Standard Hebrew Avigáyil, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḇîḡáyil / ʾĂḇîḡāyil), once Abigal (Samuel 2 3:3), is a female character in the Bible. ... Categories: Hebrew Bible/Tanakh-related stubs | Hebrew Bible/Tanakh people ... Beeri, is the father of the prophet Hosea. ... Hilkiah was a Hebrew Priest at the time of King Josiah. ... Shallum (retribution) was the name of several people of the Old Testament. ... Buzi (my contempt) was the father of the prophet Ezekiel. ... Mordecai or Mordechai (מָרְדֳּכַי, Standard Hebrew Mordoḫay, Tiberian Hebrew Mordŏḵay - the son of Jair, of the tribe of Benjamin, is one of the main personalities in the Book of Esther in the Hebrew Bible. ... Esther (1865), by John Everett Millais Esther (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), born Hadassah, was a woman in the Hebrew Bible, the queen of Ahasuerus (commonly identified with either Xerxes I or Artaxerxes II), and heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. ... Baruch ben Neriah was a Jewish aristocrat and scribe of the sixth century BCE. He was the disciple, secretary, and devoted friend of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah. ... In the Book of Genesis, Abel (Hebrew הֶבֶל / הָבֶל, Standard Hebrew Hével / Hável, Tiberian Hebrew Héḇel / Hāḇel; Arabic هابيل HābÄ«l) was the second son of Adam. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... This article is about the Biblical figure called Daniel. ... Daniel in rabbinic literature // According to rabbinical tradition Daniel was of royal descent; and his fate, together with that of his three friends, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, was foretold by the prophet Isaiah to King Hezekiah in these words, and they shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king... Kenan or Qenan (Cainan seems to be an improper rendering of this word; it is separate from the word transliterated Cainan later in the Torah; the rendering Cainan is based off the Greek renderings, Kaïvav as found in Luke 3:36, 37) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; possession; smith) was a... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Noah in rabbinic literature. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... Edwin Longs 1886 painting of Batya finding the baby Moses Bithiah, in Hebrew Batya (בִּתְיָה, literally daughter of God), is the name given to a character in the account of the Hebrew Exodus from Egypt in Rabbinic Midrash, as she is not named in the text. ... Beor is the father of Balaam and is considered a prophet by Judaism because the Talmud says in Baba Bathra 15b Seven prophets prophesied to the heathen, namely, Balaam and his father, Job, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, Zophar the Naamathite, and Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite... Balaam (Hebrew בִּלְעָם, Standard Hebrew BilÊ»am, Tiberian Hebrew Bilʻām; could mean glutton or foreigner, but this etymology is uncertain), is a prophet in the Bible, his story occurring in the Book of Numbers. ... Balak was king of Moab around 1200 BC. Revelations 2:12 - 2:14 says about Balak: 12 `And to the messenger of the assembly in Pergamos write: These things saith he who is having the sharp two-edged sword: 13 I have known thy works, and where thou dost dwell... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... one of Jobs friends, probably a descendant of Eliphaz, son of Esau (Job 4:1). ... Bildad the Shuhite was one of Jobs three friends. ... In the Book of Job, Zophar or Tzófar (צוֹפַר Chirping; rising early, Standard Hebrew Ẓófar, Tiberian Hebrew ṢôpÌ„ar) is one of the friends of Job who visits to comfort him during his illness. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Adam is the first Prophet of Islam and mentioned in the Quran as the husband of Eve (Hawwa). ... Idris (Arabic: إدريس ) is a Prophet in Islam. ... Nuh is a prophet in the Quran. ... Hud (Arabic هود) is a prophet in the Quran. ... Saleh (Arabic: صالح) is a prophet of Islam and is mentioned in the Quran. ... For information on the racehorse, see Ibrahim (horse) (Arabic: ), the biblical patriarch Abraham, is an important prophet in Islam, son of Azar, and the father of the Prophet Ismail (Ishmael), his firstborn son, who is considered the Father of the Arabs. ... Lut (circa 1781 BC - 1638 BC?[1] [2]), (Arabic: لوط ) was a prophet mentioned in the Quran and known as Lot in the Bible. ... In Islam, Ishmael is known as the first-born son of Abraham (Ibrahim in Arabic) from Hagar, and as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Yaqub (in Syriac: ܝܰܥܩܽܘܒ) is a common Syriac and Arabic name. ... This is a sub-article to Joseph (Hebrew Bible). ... In Islam, Job is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Image File history File links Mosque. ... For other uses, see Adam (disambiguation). ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... Shelah or Shela (שֵׁלָה Petition, Standard Hebrew Å ela, Tiberian Hebrew Å Ä“lāh) is the name of two persons in the Bible: The son of Arpachshad, and thus the grandson of Shem. ... Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... According to the Bible and the Quran, Lot (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: لوط, ; Hidden, covered[1]) was the nephew of the patriarch, Abraham or Abram. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... Shoaib (Arabic: ‎ ; also ShuÊ•ayb, ShuÊ•aib, Shuaib, literally Who Shows the Right Path), is traditionally associated with the biblical figure Jethro. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harun (Arabic: هارون ) was a prophet of Islam mentioned in the Quran. ... Dhul-Kifl (Arabic ذو الكفل ) is considered by Muslims to be either a prophet of Islam or simply a righteous man mentioned in the Quran. ... In Islam, David is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Sulayman (Süleyman, Sulaiman, Suleyman, Suleiman) (Arabic: سليمان) is a prophet in the Quran, which assumes that he is King Solomon of the Bible. ... Ilyas is a prophet in the Quran. ... Al-Yasa is a prophet in the Quran. ... Yunus (Jonah) is one of the prophets of Islam whose story is recounted in the Quran. ... Zakariya (Arabic: زكريا), the New Testament priest Zechariah or Zacharias, is one of the prophets mentioned in the Quran. ... Yahya (يحيى) (traditionally associated with the biblical figure John the Baptist) is a Jewish prophet of Islam mentioned in the Quran. ... Islam holds Jesus (Arabic: `Īsā) to have been a messenger and a prophet of God. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Jethro (Hebrew: יִתְרוֹ, Standard Yitro Tiberian ; His Excellence/Posterity) is a figure from the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... St. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up Paraclete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Eastons Bible Dictionary generally refers to the Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, by Matthew George Easton M.A., D.D. (1823-1894), published three years after Eastons death in 1897 by Thomas Nelson. ... The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... Emil Gustav Hirsch (1851-1923), born in Luxembourg as a son of the rabbi and philosopher Samuel Hirsch, married the daughter of Rabbi David Einhorn, and became a major Reform movement rabbi in the United States. ... Solomon Schechter (1847-1915) was a Romanian Jewish rabbi, academic scholar, and educator, most famous for his roles as founder and President of the United Synagogue of America, President of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and architect of the American Conservative Jewish movement. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jonah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (872 words)
The Prophet Jonah, as depicted by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel
Jonah (יוֹנָה "Dove", Standard Hebrew Yona, Latin Ionas, Tiberian Hebrew, and Arabic يونس Yunus or Yunis in Islamic Qura'anic terms) was a person in the Biblical Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh, the son of Amittai ("True"), from the Galilean village of Gath-hepher, near Nazareth.
Structurally, Cassandra and Jonah are exact opposites: A woman whose predictions are true but are not believed, and a man whose prophecies are believed and therefore do not come to pass.
Book of Jonah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2414 words)
The story of Jonah is set against the historical background of Ancient Israel in the eighth-7th centuries BCE and the religious and social issues of the late sixth to fourth centuries BCE.
The Jonah mentioned in II Kings 14:25 lived during the reign of Jeroboam II (786-746 BCE) and was from the city of Gath-hepher.
Jonah, whose name literally means "dove," is introduced to the reader in the very first verse.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m