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Encyclopedia > Jon Stanhope

For the 18th century British politician, see John Stanhope. John Stanhope (5 January 1704 – 4 December 1748), British politician, was the third son of Philip Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Chesterfield and Elizabeth Saville. ...

Jon Stanhope
Jon Stanhope

Incumbent
Assumed office 
2001
Preceded by Gary Humphries

Born 29 April 1951
Gundagai, New South Wales
Political party Australian Labor Party

Jonathon Donald Stanhope (born 29 April 1951) is the current Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory, representing the Australian Labor Party. Image File history File links JonStanhope2006. ... The Chief Minister for the Australian Capital Territory is the head of government of the Australian Capital Territory. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gary Humphries Gary Humphries (born July 6, 1958) is a member of the Australian Senate from the Australian Capital Territory. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Gundagai is a town located along the Murrumbidgee River and Muniong and Yambla Mountain ranges, 390 km south-west of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... The Australian Labor Party (ALP) is Australias oldest political party. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Capital Canberra Government Const. ... The Australian Labor Party (ALP) is Australias oldest political party. ...


Stanhope was born in Gundagai, New South Wales but moved to Canberra to study at the Australian National University. After graduating in law, he became a legal officer for the public service and a staffer for a number of senior ALP figures, including leader Kim Beazley. Gundagai is a town located along the Murrumbidgee River and Muniong and Yambla Mountain ranges, 390 km south-west of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... The Australian National University, or ANU, is a public university located in Canberra, the national capital of Australia. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ...


In 1998 Stanhope was elected to the ACT Legislative Assembly and immediately became party leader. Stanhope played a major role in the downfall of Kate Carnell's Liberal government, concentrating heavily on her involvement in the Bruce Stadium affair. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... The ACT Legislative Assembly building, as seen from the front The Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly (or, more formally and fully, the Legislative Assembly for the Australian Capital Territory) is the unicameral legislature of the Australian Capital Territory. ... About Introduction Kate Carnell (born 1955) was the Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory from 1995 to 2000. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... About Introduction Kate Carnell (born 1955) was the Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory from 1995 to 2000. ...


Stanhope was elected ACT Chief Minister in 2001 when Labor won 8 of the 17 seats in the Assembly, but failed to win a ninth which would have secured a majority government for the first time in ACT history. 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Canberra was hit by bushfires in January 2003. Four people died and 500 houses were destroyed. Stanhope had made headlines in the week before the bushfires hit Canberra when he personally jumped from a helicopter into a dam to save the pilot of another helicopter which had crashed into the water. Stanhope was lauded from some sectors of the community for his support of those involved in managing the bushfire.[citation needed] In May 2004 Stanhope discovered that a phone call to him from an Emergency Services worker on the day before the firestorm had been diverted to a message bank, although no message was left, however this did not prevent a debate on his professionalism. Some sectors of the community questioned whether Emergency Services had given reasonable and adequate warning of the fire and done all that could have been done to prepare for the fire, others argued in the media that Stanhope should have taken a more active role. Stanhope faced a no-confidence motion in the Assembly from the Liberal opposition, which if passed meant he would have been forced to resign as Chief Minister. Instead, the motion was downgraded to a censure motion by the combined vote of the ALP and The Greens and passed in the Assembly, meaning Stanhope kept his job, and was subsequently reelected to form a majority government. The coronial inquest into the bushfire was released in mid-December 2006, and found significant bureaucratic failings contributed to the devastation, although it also highlighted shortcomings at a political level. [1] In February 2007 Stanhope faced another no-confidence motion from the Liberal opposition which was defeated in the Assembly. The debate provided him with the opportunity to correct some of the inaccurate assumptions in the coroner's report concerning the warning he had received and given and the coroner's misunderstanding of the Westminster system of government and of the ministerial arrangements in the ACT.[citation needed] 2003 Canberra bushfires The Canberra bushfires of 2003 were the worst fires in Canberras history and caused severe damage to the outskirts of the Australian capital city. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, or a no-confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... Censure is a process by which a formal reprimand is issued to an individual by an authoritative body. ... Déi Gréng ( Luxembourgish) are the Green party in Luxembourg. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


The ACT was the first jurisdiction in Australia to introduce a Human Rights Act, in 2004. Opponents predicted the Act would cause a flood of litigation, or transfer power away from the ACT Legislative Assembly. These predictions have not eventuated. The Act's main influence has been on policy development, ensuring legislative changes comply with the requirements of the Act. A Human Rights Act is a piece of shit what a pile of wank legislation that sets out individual rights and freedoms under law. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At the 2004 ACT election, the Stanhope-led ALP won sufficient seats to form a majority government, the first such government in the Territory's history.


On 14 October 2005, Stanhope took the controversial step of publishing the confidential draft of the Federal Anti-Terrorism Bill 2005 on his website [2], so that the community had a chance to consider and debate the proposed legislation. This action was both praised and vilified, despite the inevitability of the legislation becoming public once passed - without any opportunity for public debate. Citing concerns about rights, he later refused to sign a revised version of the legislation, becoming the only state or territory leader to do so. While he had said there was "a strong justification for a range of new laws” three weeks earlier, he did not suggest such new laws should be draconian and limit human rights.[citation needed] October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federal Anti-Terrorism Bill 2005 is draft legislation prepared by the Liberal Party of Australia–National Party of Australia coalition Government. ...


In June 2006 Stanhope came under fire over the 2006-07 ACT Budget which was crafted to address ongoing budget defecits. The budget included massive rate rises, across the board fee hikes, a change in the ACT's emergency services management which led to a senior public servant who did not stay within his budget resigning, and the proposed closure of 38 schools and colleges. On 13 December 2006 after a six-month consultation period, Stanhope's Education Minister Andrew Barr announced that 23 schools with declining enrollments or poor educational outcomes would close. He also announced that a further three new schools would open at some stage in the future, one, a new $54 million P-10 school to be built on the site of the current Kambah High School. The consultation process and announcement has raised controversy within some unnamed sectors in the ACT community. Some unnamed sectors of the community and and some media commentators are claimed to have claimed that the process was neither genuine or lawful. In addition Minister Barr announced a $750 transition fee would be payable to students whose schools closed. In calling for submissions on school closures submissions were asked to justify why a particular school should stay open, without providing specific criteria to address. When the decision was made specific reasons were not provided as to why some schools were kept open and some scheduled for closure. Many arguments against closure did not focus on the educational outcomes achieved by the schools but on side issues such as the effect on property values of nearby houses or the effect on nearby shops. Campaigners against the ALP government providing greater educational funding have threatened legal action and standing candidates against the ALP at the next ACT election, scheduled for 2008. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The 2006-07 Australian Capital Territory budget for the financial year 2006-2007 was presented to the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly by Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory Jon Stanhope on June 6, 2006. ...


The ratings agency Standard & Poor's reaffirmed, although with qualification, the ACT's AAA credit rating in the wake of the Budget, despite the ongoing budget deficits. However, the decision to close the schools prompted outcry in one Australian newspaper, with the Sydney-based Daily Telegraph labelling him "Stanhope-less" and an "economic vandal" on the front page of a special ACT edition. Soon after the budget the ACT's Civil Unions Act was overturned by the Howard government - despite the objections of the ACT Government and its federal senators.[citation needed] Publications Standard & Poors publishes a weekly (48 times a year) stock market analysis newsletter called The Outlook, which is issued both in print and online to subscribers. ... The Daily Telegraph is a tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... The Civil Unions Act 2006 (ACT) was an act of the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly which established civil unions for same-sex, opposite-sex or transgender couples that allowed for equal legal recongnition with marriage under territory law. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939), Australian politician, is the Prime Minister of Australia. ...


External links

Preceded by
Wayne Berry
Opposition Leader of the Australian Capital Territory
19982001
Succeeded by
Gary Humphries
Preceded by
Gary Humphries
Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory
2001–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent


A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... Wayne Berry is an Australian politician who he was a MLA for the Australian Labour Party in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). ... The Leader of the Opposition of the Australian Capital Territory is an official role usually occupied by the leader of the second largest party or coalition in the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gary Humphries Gary Humphries (born July 6, 1958) is a member of the Australian Senate from the Australian Capital Territory. ... Gary Humphries Gary Humphries (born July 6, 1958) is a member of the Australian Senate from the Australian Capital Territory. ... The Chief Minister for the Australian Capital Territory is the head of government of the Australian Capital Territory. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Chief Ministers of the Australian Capital Territory
Follett | Kaine | Carnell | Humphries | Stanhope
Current Premiers and Chief Ministers of the States and territories of Australia
ACT NSW NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA
Jon Stanhope Morris Iemma Clare Martin Peter Beattie Mike Rann Paul Lennon Steve Bracks Alan Carpenter

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jon Stanhope - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (500 words)
Stanhope was born in Gundagai, New South Wales but moved to Canberra to study at the Australian National University.
Stanhope played a major role in the downfall of Kate Carnell's Liberal government, concentrating heavily on her involvement in the Bruce Stadium affair.
Stanhope was elected ACT Chief Minister in 2001 when Labor won 8 of the 17 seats in the Assembly, and came within 300 votes of winning a 9th, which would have granted majority government for the first time in ACT history.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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