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Encyclopedia > Johnson City, Tennessee
Johnson City, Tennessee
Location of Johnson City, Tennessee
Location of Johnson City, Tennessee
Coordinates: 36°20′7″N 82°22′22″W / 36.33528, -82.37278
Country United States
State Tennessee
Counties Washington, Carter, Sullivan
Area
 - Total 39.6 sq mi (102.5 km²)
 - Land 39.3 sq mi (101.7 km²)
 - Water 0.3 sq mi (0.8 km²)
Elevation 1,634 ft (498 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 55,469
 - Density 1,412.4/sq mi (545.3/km²)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 423
FIPS code 47-38320GR2
GNIS feature ID 1328579GR3

Johnson City is a city in Washington County, Tennessee; however a small part of the city is located within Sullivan County, Tennessee, to the northeast and Carter County, Tennessee, to the southeast. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 55,469. Image File history File links Adapted from Wikipedias TN county maps by Seth Ilys. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... List of Tennessee counties: Anderson County Bedford County Benton County Bledsoe County Blount County Bradley County Campbell County Cannon County Carroll County Carter County Cheatham County Chester County Clairborne County Clay County Cocke County Coffee County Crockett County Cumberland County Davidson County Decatur County DeKalb County Dickson County Dyer County... Washington County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Carter County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area Code 423 is an area code in Tennessee that covers the cities of two separate and disconnected portions of East Tennessee. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Carter County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ...

Contents

History

Founded in 1856 by Henry Johnson as a railroad station called "Johnson's Depot," Johnson City became a major rail hub for the southeast, as three railway lines crossed in the downtown area. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Johnson City served as headquarters for the narrow gauge East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (the ET&WNC, nicknamed "Tweetsie") and the standard gauge Clinchfield Railroad. Both rail systems featured excursion trips through scenic portions of the Blue Ridge Mountains and were engineering marvels of railway construction. The Southern Railway (now Norfolk Southern) also passes through the city. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street Station in 1865. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ... The East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (ET&WNC), affectionately called the Tweetsie in reference to the sound of its steam whistles, was a primarily narrow gauge railroad established in 1866 for the purpose of the serving the mines at Cranberry, North Carolina. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894. ... Norfolk Southern Headquarters Norfolk, Virginia. ...


During the Civil War, before it was formally incorporated in 1869, the name of the town was briefly changed to Haynesville in honor of Confederate Senator Landon Carter Haynes. Henry Johnson's name was quickly restored following the war, with Johnson elected as the city's first Mayor on January 3, 1870. The town grew rapidly from 1870 until 1890 as railroad and mining interests flourished. However, the national depression of 1893, which caused many railway failures and a resulting financial panic, halted Johnson City's boom town momentum in its tracks. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Panic of 1893 was a serious decline in the economy of the United States that began in 1893 and was precipitated in part by a run on the gold supply. ...


In 1901, the Mountain Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (now the U.S. Veterans Affairs Medical Center and National Cemetery, Mountain Home, Tennessee[1][2] was created by an Act of the US Congress introduced by Walter P. Brownlow. Construction on this 450 acre campus, designed to serve disabled Civil War veterans, was completed in 1903 at a cost of $3 million. Prior to building of this facility, the assessed value of the entire town was listed at $750,000. The East Tennessee State Normal School was authorized in 1911 and the new college campus located directly across from the National Soldiers Home. Johnson City again entered a rapid growth phase becoming the fifth largest city in Tennessee by 1930. Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for administering programs of veterans benefits for veterans, their families, and survivors. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... From 1896 until 1910, Walter P. Brownlow served Tennessees First Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... East Tennessee State University (abbreviated ETSU) was founded on October 2, 1911. ...


Johnson City along with neighboring Bristol, Tennessee was noted as a hotbed for old-time music and hosted noteworthy Columbia Records recording sessions in 1928 known as the Johnson City Sessions. Native son "Fiddlin' Charlie" Bowman became a national recording star via these sessions. State Street separates Virginia (left) and Tennessee (right). ... West Virginia fiddler Edden Hammons, accompanied by his son James on the banjo Old-time music is a form of North American folk music, with roots in the folk musics of many countries, including England, Scotland and Ireland, as well as the continent of Africa. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... The Johnson City sessions were a series of recording auditions conducted in Johnson City, Tennessee, in 1928 and 1929 by Frank Buckley Walker, head of the Columbia Records “hillbilly” recordings division, as part of a search for native Appalachian-Blue Ridge Mountains musical talent. ...


During the 1920s, Johnson City's ties to Appalachian Mountains bootlegging activity gave the city the nickname of "Little Chicago" . Stories persist that the town was one of several distribution centers for Chicago gang boss Al Capone during Prohibition. Capone had a well organized distribution network within the southern United States for alcohol smuggling that shipped his products from the mountain distillers to northern cities. Capone was, by local accounts, a part-time resident of Montrose Court, a luxury apartment complex now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The annual "Little Chicago Blues Festival" is held commemorating the legends surrounding the Prohibition-era speakeasies and railroad glory days of Johnson City. As a young Johnson City newspaper publisher during the late 1930s, U.S. naval records cite that former U.S. Congressman Jimmy Quillen was also a resident of Montrose Court. The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Rum-running is the business of smuggling or transporting of alcoholic beverages illegally, usually to circumvent taxation or prohibition. ... “Capone” redirects here. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... James Henry Jimmy Quillen (January 11, 1916–November 2, 2003) was a Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1963 to 1997 [Selective Service System and U.S. Navy official records both cite Quillens date of birth as January 11, 1915]. Quillen was born in Scott County, Virginia, near...


The city is featured in a song and video by Travis Tritt called "Modern Day Bonnie and Clyde," although the line "rollin' north on 95," is fictionalized, as Interstate 81 and Interstate 26 intersect near Johnson City. As well, the lyrics, "We met at a truck stop, Johnson City Tennessee" are fictionalized as no truck stops exist within the boundaries of the City of Johnson City. The city is also mentioned in a song by Old Crow Medicine Show called "Wagon Wheel", in the lyric "Walkin' to the south out of Roanoke, I caught a trucker out of Philly had a nice long toke. But he’s a heading west from the Cumberland Gap, to Johnson City, Tennessee." [2]. However, the song gets the geography wrong, as Johnson City is southeast of the Cumberland Gap. Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 95 Interstate 95 (I-95) is the main highway on the East Coast of the United States,[1] paralleling the Atlantic Ocean from Maine to Florida and serving some of the best-known cities in the country including Boston, New York City, and... Interstate 81 (abbreviated I-81) is an interstate highway in the eastern part of the United States. ... Interstate 26 (abbreviated I-26) is an east-west main route of the Interstate Highway System in the Southeastern United States. ... Old Crow Medicine Show is an old-time musical group based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Blue and Gold Wagon Wheel, now known simply as the Wagon Wheel, is awarded to the winner of the annual college football game between the University of Akron and Kent State University. ...


A milestone was achieved in 2003 when Interstate 26 was extended from Asheville, North Carolina to Johnson City completing a 20-year half-billion dollar construction project through the Blue Ridge Mountains. Not to be confused with Ashville. ...


Since 2000, the city has hosted a free music and arts festival every June, called the "Blue Plum Festival." [3] In 2007, over 60,000 people were reported to have attended the weekend festival.


The music video for Aerosmith's song "Rag Doll" was also partially filmed in the city on Hamilton Street, and in Freedom Hall Civic Center. This article is about the band Aerosmith. ...


The city is also considered the hometown of football coaching legend Steve Spurrier. Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ...


Government

Johnson City is run by a five person commission. The offices as of April 2007 are as follows:

  • Mayor: Dr. Phil Roe
  • Vice Mayor: Jane Myron
  • Commissioner: Dr. Jeff Banyas
  • Commissioner: Stephen Darden
  • Commissioner: Marcy Walker
  • City Manager: Peter Peterson

The next election will occur in 2009.


Geography

Johnson City is located at 36°20′7″N, 82°22′22″W (36.335399, -82.372760)GR1. Johnson City shares a contiguous southeastern border with Elizabethton, Tennessee. Elizabethton is the county seat of Carter County, Tennessee. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 102.5 km² (39.6 mi²). 101.7 km² (39.3 mi²) of it is land and 0.8 km² (0.3 mi²) of it (0.78%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 55,469 people, 23,720 households, and 14,018 families residing in the city. The population density was 545.4/km² (1,412.4/mi²). There were 25,730 housing units at an average density of 253.0/km² (655.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.09% White, 6.40% African American, 0.26% Native American, 1.22% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.89% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 23,720 households out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 33.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.82. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 19.8% under the age of 18, 13.7% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $30,835, and the median income for a family was $40,977. Males had a median income of $31,326 versus $22,150 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,364. About 11.4% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.9% of those under age 18 and 12.7% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Education

Colleges and universities

East Tennessee State University, a public institution with an enrollment of over 12,000 students, is located in Johnson City. The university, which is under the authority of the Tennessee Board of Regents, includes a medical school, the James H. Quillen College of Medicine and a College of Pharmacy. ETSU also has a lab school called University School, where students teach younger children in grades K-12. East Tennessee State University (abbreviated ETSU) was founded on October 2, 1911. ... The Tennessee Board of Regents as currently constituted is authorized by an act of the Tennessee General Assembly passed in 1972. ... The East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen College of Medicine is in Johnson City, Tennessee. ...


Milligan College (a Christian liberal arts college) and Emmanuel School of Religion (a graduate seminary) are located nearby. Milligan College is a church-related liberal arts college founded in 1866 located in Milligan College, Tennessee. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Emmanuel School of Religion is a graduate theological seminary located near Johnson City, Tennessee. ... For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ...


Notable residents

Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... Science Hill High School is a public high school (grades 8-12) in Johnson City, Tennessee with an enrollment of approximately 2600 students. ... Connie Saylor (born June 3, 1940 - died February 4, 1993 [1]) was a journeyman NASCAR racecar driver. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Mike Potter is a NASCAR veteran. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Timothy Busfield as Danny Concannon in an episode of The West Wing Timothy Busfield (born June 12, 1957, in East Lansing, Michigan), is an American actor and director best known for his Emmy-winning role as Eliot Weston on the television series thirtysomething and his recurring role as Danny Concannon... East Tennessee State University (abbreviated ETSU) was founded on October 2, 1911. ... Kenny Chesney (born Kenneth Arnold Chesney, March 26, 1968 in Knoxville, Tennessee[1] ) is an American country music singer-songwriter. ... // Johnny Miller (born April 29, 1947) is an American former PGA Tour golfer who was born in San Francisco, California. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Mike Brown can refer to the following people: Michael E. Brown the astronomer. ... AMA Logo The American Motorcyclist Association is a U.S. organization of more than 280,000 motorcyclists that organizes numerous motorcycling activities and campaigns for motorcyclists legal rights. ... C+C Music Factory was a dance music production group (lead by Robert Clivillés and David Cole) distinguished for having seven #1 Dance/Club Play hits in the early to mid 1990s, as well as several pop crossover hits, one of which Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now... C+C Music Factory was a dance/pop music group distinguished for having seven #1 Dance/Club Play hits in the early to mid 1990s, as well as several pop crossover hits, one of which Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now) reached #1 on Billboards Hot 100 Singles... Matthew Charles Czuchry , born May 20, 1977 in Manchester, New Hampshire, USA is an American actor. ... Science Hill High School is a public high school (grades 8-12) in Johnson City, Tennessee with an enrollment of approximately 2600 students. ... Science Hill High School is a public high school (grades 8-12) in Johnson City, Tennessee with an enrollment of approximately 2600 students. ... East Tennessee State University (abbreviated ETSU) was founded on October 2, 1911. ... Aubrayo Franklin (born August 27, 1980) is a National Football League defensive tackle for the Baltimore Ravens. ... This article is about the Wrestler, David Cash. ... Brad Teague is a veteran of the NASCAR Busch Series and the Nextel Cup Series. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Del Harris Delmer W. Harris (June 18, 1937, Plainfield (or Orleans), Indiana) is a former NBA head coach and current assistant coach of the Dallas Mavericks under head coach Avery Johnson. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Milligan College is a church-related liberal arts college founded in 1866 located in Milligan College, Tennessee. ... Raymond Leo Flynn (born July 22, 1939) also known as Ray Flynn was the Mayor of Boston from 1984 to 1993, and later the American ambassador to the Vatican (1993 - 1997) under President Bill Clinton. ... Samuel Cole Williams (1864-1947) was a noted 19th and 20th century Tennessee jurist, historian, educator, and businessman. ... Emory University School of Law is a top-tier U.S. law school, part of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Robert Love Taylor (July 31, 1850–March 31, 1912) was a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1879 to 1881, Governor of Tennessee from 1887 to 1891 and from 1897 to 1899, and subsequently a United States Senator from that state from 1907 until his death. ... Alfred Alexander Taylor (August 6, 1848 _ November 25, 1931) was Governor of Tennessee from 1921 to 1923. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Jake Grove(Born:Janauary 22,1980) is a National Football League center for the Oakland Raiders. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... The Dave Rimington Trophy is awarded to the player considered to be the best center in college football. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970...

Points of interest

East Tennessee State University (abbreviated ETSU) was founded on October 2, 1911. ... The East Tennessee State University Arboretum is an arboretum located across the East Tennessee State University campus, Johnson City, Tennessee. ... Milligan College is a church-related liberal arts college founded in 1866 located in Milligan College, Tennessee. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

See also

Washington County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... In Tennessee, the name Tri-Cities refers to the region surrounding the cities of Kingsport, Johnson City, and Bristol. ... Jonesborough is a town located in Washington County, Tennessee. ... The State of Franklin The State of Franklin was an autonomous, secessionist territory of the United States created, not long after the end of the American Revolution, from territory that had been ceded by North Carolina to the federal government. ... The Johnson City Cardinals are a rookie league team based out of Johnson City, Tennessee. ... The Appalachian League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the Virginia and Tennessee region. ... The Johnson City sessions were a series of recording auditions conducted in Johnson City, Tennessee, in 1928 and 1929 by Frank Buckley Walker, head of the Columbia Records “hillbilly” recordings division, as part of a search for native Appalachian-Blue Ridge Mountains musical talent. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States. ...

Television Stations

WJHL-TV CBS, News Channel 11 WJHL-TV (News Channel 11) is the CBS television affiliate in Johnson City, Tennessee, serving the greater Tri-Cities region of Tennessee and Virginia, and neighboring western North Carolina, southeastern Kentucky and the southwestern corner of West Virginia from a transmitter located atop Holston Mountain. ...


External links

Coordinates: 36.335399° N 82.37276° W The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


References

  • Greater Johnson City, by Ray Stahl, 1986.
  • A History of Johnson City, Tennessee and its Environs, by Samuel Cole Williams, 1940.
  • History of Washington County, Tennessee, by Joyce and Gene Cox, Editors, 2001.
  • Fiddlin' Charlie Bowman, by Bob L. Cox, University of Tennessee Press, 2007.
  • The Railroads of Johnson City, by Johnny Graybeal, Tar Heel Press, 2007.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Johnson City: Weather and Much More from Answers.com (1367 words)
A city of northeast Tennessee east-northeast of Knoxville.
Johnson City is a city in Washington County, Tennessee; however a small part of the city is located within Sullivan County, Tennessee, to the northeast and Carter County, Tennessee, to the southeast.
Johnson City along with neighboring Bristol, Tennessee was noted as a hotbed for old-time music (precursor to country music) and hosted noteworthy Columbia Records recording sessions in 1928 known as the "Johnson City Sessions." Native son "Fiddlin' Charlie" Bowman became a national recording star via these sessions.
Henry Johnson - Founder of Johnson City, Tennessee (906 words)
Henry Johnson's last camping place was a little cleared spot in the woods by the newly-built branch of railroad that reached the tremendous distance from Chattanooga to Bristol, and with a name as long as the road--East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad Company.
It is reported that he was a man of strong independent will and fearless action, and on one occasion, as the culmination of a dispute he had with railroad officials, he dumped all the freight and express out of the depot wareroom onto the ground until the railroad came to terms.
A portion of General Burnside's Union army passed through Johnson City during the latter part of the war, and engaged a detachment of the enemy near Watauga, five miles east of the city--then known as "Carter's Depot." It is said that firing of the cannon could be heard all the way to Henry Johnson's Depot.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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