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Encyclopedia > Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins University

Motto Veritas vos liberabit
(The truth shall make you free)
Established 1876
Type Private
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $2.8 billion [1]
President William R. Brody
Undergraduates 4,417
Postgraduates 1,608
Location Flag of the United States Baltimore, MD, USA
Campus Urban, 140 acres (0.57 km²)
Colors Gold and Sable             (Academic)
Mascot Blue Jay
Athletics NCAA Division III Centennial Conference
Division I Lacrosse
Nobel laureates 32[2]
Website www.jhu.edu

The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 438 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (531 × 727 pixel, file size: 251 KB, MIME type: image/png) This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “USD” redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Dr. William R. Brody is the current President of Johns Hopkins University, a position which he has held since 1996. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a passerine bird and member of the crow family Corvidae native to North America. ... jhubluejay File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Centennial Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Maryland and Pennsylvania. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Baltimore redirects here. ...


Johns Hopkins offers its main undergraduate and graduate programs at the Homewood campus in Baltimore and maintains full-time campuses in greater Maryland, Washington, D.C., Italy, and China. Johns Hopkins was the first university in the United States to emphasize research applying the German university model developed by Alexander von Humboldt and Friedrich Schleiermacher. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An 1859 portrait of Alexander von Humboldt by the artist Julius Schrader, showing Mount Chimborazo in the background. ... Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher (November 21, 1768 - February 12, 1834) was a theologian and philosopher. ...

Contents

General information

Gilman Hall
Gilman Hall

The Johns Hopkins University is named for Johns Hopkins, who left $7 million in his 1867 incorporation papers and 1873 will for the foundation of the university and Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the time, this was the largest philanthropic bequest in U.S. history, the equivalent of over $131 million in the year 2006. Hopkins is no stranger to significant monetary gifts; in 2001, Sidney Kimmel, founder and chairman of Jones Apparel Group, donated $150 million for cancer research. Though Kimmel’s gift is the largest single gift in the university’s history, alumnus Michael Bloomberg's confirmed personal donations total over $200 million. Bloomberg, whose first donation of $5 was given in 1964, the year he graduated with a degree in electrical engineering, is the largest individual benefactor in the university's history.[3] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the person. ... The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a teaching hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ...


The university opened on February 22, 1876, with the stated goal of "The encouragement of research... and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell."[4] The university's first president was Daniel Coit Gilman. Its motto in Latin is Veritas vos liberabit – "The truth shall make you free." The undergraduate student population at Hopkins was all male until 1970 although many graduate programs were integrated earlier. is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Daniel Coit Gilman Daniel Coit Gilman (July 6, 1831-October 13, 1908) was an American educator. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Johns Hopkins was the first American research university,[5] and the first American university to teach through seminars, instead of solely through lectures.[6] The university was the first in America to offer an undergraduate major (as opposed to a purely liberal arts curriculum) and the first American university to grant doctoral degrees.[7] Johns Hopkins was a model for most large research universities in the United States, particularly the University of Chicago.[8] In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Curriculum has many different conceptions. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ...


Research

The opportunity to be involved in important research is one of the distinguishing characteristics of an undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins. About 80 percent of the university's undergraduates engage in some form of independent research during their four years, most often alongside top researchers in their fields.[9] Johns Hopkins receives more federal research grants than any other university in the United States.[10] The university is affiliated with 32 Nobel laureates. It boasts a wide spectrum in terms of its academic strengths, particularly in art history, biological and natural sciences, biomedical engineering, creative writing, English, history, economics, international studies, medicine, neuroscience, political theory, public health, public policy, and the Romance languages. The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family, comprising all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ...


Johns Hopkins is one of fourteen founding members of the Association of American Universities (AAU) and a member of the Consortium on Financing Higher Education (COFHE). The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... COFHE is an acronym for The Consortium on Financing Higher Education. ...


The Johns Hopkins University performed $1.44 billion in science, medical and engineering research in fiscal year 2005, making it the leading U.S. academic institution in total R&D spending for the 27th year in a row, according to a new National Science Foundation ranking.[11] The university also ranked first on the NSF's separate list of federally funded research and development, spending $1.277 billion in FY2005 on research supported by such agencies as the National Institutes of Health, NASA, the NSF and the Department of Defense.[12] In FY2002, Johns Hopkins became the first university to cross the $1 billion threshold on either list, recording $1.14 billion in total research and $1.023 billion in federally sponsored research that year.


Origin of the name

The peculiar first name of philanthropist Johns Hopkins is the surname of his great-grandmother, Margaret Johns, who married Gerard Hopkins. They named their son Johns Hopkins, and his name was passed on to his grandson, the university's founder (1795-1873). This article is about the person. ...

Milton Eisenhower, a president of JHU, was once invited to speak to a convention in Pittsburgh. Making a common mistake, the emcee introduced him as "President of John Hopkins." Eisenhower retorted that he was "glad to be here in Pittburgh."[13] Image File history File links Jhstamp. ... Image File history File links Jhstamp. ... A USPS Truck at Night A U.S. Post Office sign The United States Postal Service (USPS) is the United States government organization responsible for providing postal service in the United States and is generally referred to as the post office. ... The 78¢ Alice Paul self-adhesive stamp was the last in the Great Americans series. ... Milton Stover Eisenhower (September 15, 1899 - May 2, 1985) served as president of three major American universities. ... “Pittsburgh” redirects here. ... A Master of Ceremonies or MC is the host of a staged event or other performance. ...


In a commencement address to the undergraduate Class of 2001, university president William R. Brody had the following to say about the name:[14]: "In 1888, just 12 years after the university was founded, Mark Twain wrote about this university in a letter to a friend. He said: Dr. William R. Brody is the current President of Johns Hopkins University, a position which he has held since 1996. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...

A few months ago I was told that the Johns Hopkins University had given me a degree. I naturally supposed this constituted me a Member of the Faculty, and so I started in to help as I could there. I told them I believed they were perfectly competent to run a college as far as the higher branches of education are concerned, but what they needed was a little help here and there from a practical commercial man. I said the public is sensitive to little things, and they wouldn't have full confidence in a college that didn't know how to spell the name 'John'.
More than a century later, we continue to bestow our diplomas only upon individuals of outstanding capabilities and great talent. And we continue to spell Johns with an 's'."

Divisions of the Johns Hopkins University

Other Hopkins Campuses The Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is one of nine academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University, in the United States. ... The G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded engineering school in the United States. ... The Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School is one of the academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University School of Education is one of the nine academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded medical school and biomedical research institute in the United States. ... Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded nursing school and research institute in the United States. ... The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was founded in 1916 by William H. Welch and John D. Rockefeller. ... The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), based in Washington, D.C., is a graduate school devoted to the study of international affairs, economics, diplomacy, and policy research and education. ... Peabody Institute, c. ... The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), located in Laurel, Maryland, is a not-for-profit, university-affiliated research center employing 4,000 people. ...

  • Bayview Medical Center
  • Bologna Center
  • Charles S. Singleton Center at the Villa Spelman
  • Downtown Center in Baltimore
  • Johns Hopkins Singapore
  • Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies
  • Washington, D.C. Area Campuses

The Bologna Center of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University, is an academic and research center located in Bologna, Italy. ...

Rankings

Johns Hopkins is particularly regarded for its hospital and schools of medicine, public health, and international studies. The Johns Hopkins Hospital was ranked as the top hospital in the United States for the seventeenth year in a row by the U.S. News and World Report annual ranking of American hospitals.[15] For medical research, U.S. News ranked the School of Medicine second nationally and School of Public Health first nationally for 2007,[16] and, in an August 2005 study,[17] the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) was ranked as the top master's program in international relations. The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a teaching hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded medical school and biomedical research institute in the United States. ... The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is part of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. It was the first institution of its kind in the world. ... Categories: University stubs ...


At the collegiate level, in its annual National Universities ranking U.S. News placed The Johns Hopkins University 14th (tied with Brown University and Northwestern University) for 2008,[18] up from 16th in 2007. Hopkins ranked 8th in that publication's peer assessment this year, and is also one of a select group of universities to have been ranked one of the top 10 in the nation overall.[19] Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... For other uses, see Northwestern. ...


Meanwhile, comprehensively, the 2007 Academic Ranking of World Universities, popularized by The Economist and produced by Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Institute of Higher Education, ranked Johns Hopkins 19th amongst universities globally in terms of quality of scientific research leading towards numerous awards.[20] Further, in the annual rankings by the The Times Higher Education Supplement, based on a subjective peer review by scholars, Hopkins placed 23rd internationally[3]. Finally, in its 2006 evaluation of universities on the dual basis of distinction in research and international diversity, Newsweek ranked the Johns Hopkins University 24th worldwide [21]. // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences

Located at the university’s Homewood campus at the Charles Village neighborhood in northern Baltimore, the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences is one of nine divisions of the Johns Hopkins University. Directly descended from the original Johns Hopkins University, which was founded as the nation’s first research university in 1876, the Krieger School is the core institution of the university and offers undergraduate and graduate programs.[22] With over 60 undergraduate majors and minors and over 40 full-time and part-time graduate programs, the Krieger School’s educational offerings also summer programs available to high school students, undergraduate students from any college or university, and a post-baccalaureate pre-medical program.[23] Among these academic programs, the Krieger School’s Astronomy, Biology, Creative Writing, English, German, History, and History of Art departments are among the top-ranked in the nation.[24] In addition, not only are faculty members expected to spend as much time researching as teaching, but also, there are numerous research opportunities for both undergraduate and graduate students, ranging from the university-sponsored Woodrow Wilson Undergraduate Research Program to the nationwide Fulbright Hays Program for graduate students.[25] The most recent enrollment figures available number that the Krieger School has 2,790 undergraduate students, 32 post-baccalaureate students, 924 full-time graduate students, and 1,379 part-time graduate students.[26] The Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is one of nine academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University, in the United States. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Humanities

Hopkins students find areas of study in the humanities at Hopkins that either were not available in secondary school or were encountered only at an elementary or introductory level. Courses are offered in philosophy, classical Latin and Greek, history of art, creative writing, comparative literature, Near Eastern studies, film and media studies, and history of science and technology, as well as in the more familiar areas of English and American literature, history, and modern foreign languages. A departmental major allows the student to study a specific discipline in depth and generally leads to advanced study beyond the baccalaureate degree. Students should plan on a fairly broad program in the humanities for the first two years. As their interests begin to focus on some specialty, students normally devote the last two years to intensive study in their major or concentration. The humanities faculty is made up of eminent scholars, helpful both as teachers and advisers. Advanced courses are usually small, permitting the development of good teacher-student relationships. For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ...


Natural Sciences

For the student considering a career in the sciences, Johns Hopkins has much to offer at the undergraduate level. The departments of Biology, Biophysics, Chemistry, Cognitive Science, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy offer programs leading to bachelor’s degrees. All programs offer a sound foundation in the sciences and mathematics and require course work in the humanities and social sciences. Some require a degree of proficiency in a modern foreign language. Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... Biophysics (also biological physics) is an interdisciplinary science that applies the theories and methods of physics, to questions of biology. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Mathematics Bogomolny, Alexander: Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles. ...


Research has always played an important role in the development of scientific ideas and in technological advancement. Most of the faculty members in the natural sciences are actively engaged in research, most often with graduate students. Undergraduates are also encouraged to undertake research under the direction of faculty members. While many of the programs and activities of the science departments are geared to preparation for graduate studies, the breadth and flexibility of the basic programs assure the student of an able preparation for any career in the sciences or related fields as an undergraduate.


Social & Behavioral Sciences

The Hopkins student interested in the social or behavioral sciences will find a variety of programs available in anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychological and brain sciences, and sociology. As in most of the other academic areas at Johns Hopkins, the departments are oriented toward research and the curricula are primarily designed to lead to graduate study. Programs in the social and behavioral sciences are useful as preparation for advanced study in law, medicine, government, business, and urban problems. Independent work is encouraged. A program in the social and behavioral sciences should cover the basic courses in related areas during the first two years. Courses in mathematics, statistics, and computer science will also be helpful, as most department programs have quantitative applications. Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... History studies time in human terms. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ...


The Krieger School's degree-granting departments, programs, and centers include:

Notably, the French department was recognized as a "Center of Excellence" in the study of French culture and language by the government of France, one of only six in the United States. The Writing Seminars department, a program in creative writing, was ranked second-best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... Biophysics (also biological physics) is an interdisciplinary science that applies the theories and methods of physics, to questions of biology. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth Sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... Planetary science, also known as planetology or planetary astronomy, is the science of planets, or planetary systems, and the solar system. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... Film theory seeks to develop concise, systematic concepts that apply to the study of film/cinema as art. ... Media Studies is the academic study of the constitution and effects of media. ... The Romance languages, also called Romanic languages, are a subfamily of the Italic languages, specifically the descendants of the Vulgar Latin dialects spoken by the common people evolving in different areas after the break-up of the Roman Empire. ... History studies time in human terms. ... This article is an overview of the history of art worldwide. ... Science is a body of empirical, theoretical, and practical knowledge about the natural world, produced by a global community of researchers making use of a body of techniques known as scientific methods, emphasizing the observation, experimentation and scientific explanation of real world phenomena. ... The wheel was invented circa 4000 BC, and has become one of the worlds most famous, and most useful technologies. ... The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ... International relations (IR) is an academic and public policy field, a branch of political science, dealing with the foreign policy of states within the international system, including the roles of international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Latin American Studies (sometimes abbreviated LAS) is an academic discipline which studies the history and experience of peoples and cultures in the Americas. ... Near Eastern Sudies is the study of ancient cultures of the Ancient Near East such as ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria-Palestine, Persia and Anatolia. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... Psychology (from Greek: Literally knowledge of the soul (mind)) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering

Engineering Quad
Engineering Quad

Engineering at Johns Hopkins was originally created in 1913 as an educational program that included exposure to liberal arts and scientific inquiry.[27] In 1919, the engineering department became a separate school, known as the School of Engineering. By 1937, over 1,000 students had graduated with engineering degrees. By 1946 the school had six departments. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 286 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 286 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1961, the School of Engineering changed its name to the School of Engineering Sciences and, in 1979, was renamed the G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering. The school's named benefactor is George William Carlyle Whiting, co-founder of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Company. The G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded engineering school in the United States. ...


The Whiting School contains nine departments:

Notably, the Department of Biomedical Engineering is recognized as one of the best in the country. Also, the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering was ranked as one of the top 5 programs nationally by US News and World Report [37] in recent years(2005 No.3, 2006 No.2). Applied mathematics is a branch of mathematics that concerns itself with the mathematical techniques typically used in the application of mathematical knowledge to other domains. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering that deals with the application of physical science (e. ... Molecular engineering is any means of manufacturing molecules. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Computer engineering (also called electronic and computer engineering) is a discipline that combines elements of both electrical engineering and computer science. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Environmental engineering[1][2] is the application of science and engineering principles to improve the environment (air, water, and/or land resources), to provide healthy water, air, and land for human habitation and for other organisms, and to remediate polluted sites. ... The Materials Science Tetrahedron, which often also includes Characterization at the center Materials science or Materials Engineering is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering. ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Professional schools

In addition to the graduate programs at the Homewood campus, Johns Hopkins has several internationally respected graduate professional schools:

The university also offers education abroad through centers in Germany, Singapore, and Italy. The university operates the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, which specializes in research for the U.S. Department of Defense, NASA and other Government agencies. The Space Telescope Science Institute is located on the Homewood campus and controls, analyzes, and collects data from the Hubble Space Telescope. The recently opened Information Security Institute [29] is the newest addition to the graduate programs affiliated with Johns Hopkins. The Institute is the "university's focal point for research and education in information security, assurance and privacy." JHUISI is the only Institute in the Whiting School with an academic degree program, offering the Master of Science in Security Informatics (MSSI). The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded medical school and biomedical research institute in the United States. ... The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a teaching hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was founded in 1916 by William H. Welch and John D. Rockefeller. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), based in Washington, D.C., is a graduate school devoted to the study of international affairs, economics, diplomacy, and policy research and education. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Aerial photograph of Dupont Circle. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... This article is about negotiations. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... “Nanking” redirects here. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Peabody Institute, c. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Washington Monument dominates the center of the neighborhood Mount Vernon is a neighborhood located just to the north of downtown Baltimore, Maryland. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded nursing school and research institute in the United States. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School is one of the academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University School of Education is one of the nine academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), located in Laurel, Maryland, is a not-for-profit, university-affiliated research center employing 4,000 people. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is an organization founded by NASA to manage and direct research done with the Hubble Space Telescope. ... The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a telescope in orbit around the Earth, named after astronomer Edwin Hubble. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Security is everyone’s responsibility. ...


Homewood campus

The original main university campus was in downtown Baltimore City. However, this location did not permit room for growth and the trustees began to look for a place to move. Eventually, they would relocate to the estate of Charles Carroll of Carrollton and Homewood House, a wedding gift from Charles to his son Charles Jr. Charles Carroll (1737-1832) Charles Carroll of Carrollton (September 19, 1737 – November 14, 1832) was a lawyer and politician from Maryland who was a delegate to the Continental Congress and later a United States Senator. ... The Homewood House is a historical museum located on the Johns Hopkins University campus in Baltimore, Maryland. ...


The park-like main campus of Johns Hopkins, Homewood, is set on 140 acres (0.57 km²) in the northern part of Baltimore. The architecture was modeled after the Georgian-inspired Federalist style of Homewood House. Most newer buildings resemble this style, being built of red brick with white marble trim, but lack the details. Homewood House was later used for administrative offices but now is preserved as a museum. The Homewood campus is the main academic and administrative center of the Johns Hopkins University. ... Central Pavilion, Tontine Crescent, 1793-1794, by Charles Bulfinch Federal style architecture occurred in the United States between 1780 and 1830, particularly from 1785 to 1815. ... The Homewood House is a historical museum located on the Johns Hopkins University campus in Baltimore, Maryland. ...


As a part of the donation, Hopkins was required to donate part of the land for art. As a result, the Baltimore Museum of Art, which is not part of the university, is situated next to the University's campus, just southeast of Shriver Hall. The Baltimore Museum of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, was founded in 1914. ...


The Decker Gardens, bordered by the Greenhouse, Nichols House and the Johns Hopkins Club, were originally known as the Botanical Gardens and were used by members of the Department of Biology to grow plants for research. By the early 1950s, the gardens no longer served an educational purpose, and in 1958, when Nichols House was built as the president's residence, they were completely re-landscaped with aesthetic criteria in mind. In 1976, the gardens were done over again, and named for trustee Alonzo G. Decker, Jr. and members of his family in appreciation for their generosity to Hopkins. The Nichols House is a house located on the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins Club is a private club located on the grounds of The Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus at 3400 North Charles Street in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The statue in the middle of the pool, the Sea Urchin, was sculpted by Edward Berge. It stood in Mount Vernon Place, near the Washington Monument, for 34 years before being replaced by a 7'10" copy, which fit in better with its monumental surroundings. Frank R. Huber, the man who left the city the money to make the copy, asked that the original be given to Paul M. Higinbotham, who donated it to the university. North of the campus, also on Charles Street, we find the Evergreen House, one Hopkins' museums. The Washington Monument at dusk For other Washington Monuments, see Washington Monuments (world). ... The Evergreen House is a historical museum located near the Johns Hopkins University campus in Baltimore, Maryland. ...


Students & Admissions

Johns Hopkins University Facts
Class of 2011 Applicants 14,848
Class of 2011 Students 1,216
Class of 2011 Accepted 24%
Middle 50% SAT 2010-2290
Middle 50% ACT 30-34
Undergraduates 4,478
Student:Faculty Ratio 10:1
Majors Available 49
Minors Available 39
Faculty with Terminal Degrees 92%
Classes taught by Faculty 96%

[30]


A total of 14,848 high school seniors applied for regular admission to the Johns Hopkins Class of 2011, an increase of 7 percent over the total for the Class of 2010 and of 30 percent over the Class of 2009.[31] Regular decision admission was offered to 3,145 students; those who enroll will join the 443 who were admitted early. The target class size is 1,205, with 800 enrolled in Arts and Sciences and 405 in Engineering.[32] The highest number of acceptances went out to, in order, applicants from New York, California, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The total of admits includes 325 who identified themselves as African-American, 302 Hispanic and 21 Native American.[33]


Students residing in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. territories of Guam and Puerto Rico, and 57 countries were offered admission this year. The total number of non-U.S. citizens admitted was 189.[34] Once again, Baltimore students are well-represented in the admitted class, with 31 students selected for the Baltimore Scholars Program. The admittance rate was a strikingly low 24 percent. Just two years ago, the rate was 35 percent.[35]


Johns Hopkins accepted 27 percent of 13,869 applicants for entrance into the fall 2006 freshman class. Undergraduate students matriculate from all 50 states and more than 50 countries. Within six years of graduation, 85 percent of Hopkins students earn graduate degrees, the highest percentage in the nation.


The number of applicants has increased by 156 percent from 2002, one of the largest increases in the U.S. [citation needed] In 2006 the pool of admitted students closely resembled that of 2005. The average SAT score remained constant at 1440, while average high school GPA has increased by only 0.02 points, to 3.85.[36] Approximately 48 percent of undergraduates receive financial aid at Johns Hopkins University. The average need-based financial aid package for freshmen totals $29,472 for the Class of 2010. Further, the total grants and scholarships awarded to students in 2004-2005 was $41,570,000. [37]


There are multiple scholarships available for students including, but not limited to the Baltimore Scholars Program, Bloomberg Scholarship, Hodson-Gilliam Success Scholarship, Hodson Trust Scholarship, ROTC (Army) Scholarship, Trustee Scholarship, Charles R. Westgate Scholarship, and the Woodrow Wilson Undergraduate Research Fellowship.[38]


Student life

The blueprints for a new programming board called The Hopkins Organization for Programming ("The HOP") were drawn on up during the summer and fall of 2006.


Johns Hopkins currently supports 12 fraternities and four sororities sponsored by the Inter-Fraternity Council and Panhellenic society, including the fraternities Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon ("SigEp"), Sigma Alpha Epsilon ("S.A.E."), Delta Sigma Pi, Lambda Phi Epsilon, Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Delta Phi ("Wawa"), Alpha Epsilon Pi, Phi Kappa Psi ("Phi Psi"), Phi Gamma Delta ("Fiji"), and Pi Kappa Alpha ("Pike"), and the sororities Alpha Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Phi Mu. Approximately 1/5 of male undergraduates and 1/5 of female undergraduates belong to the Greek system. Most of the fraternities maintain houses off campus; the sororities tend not to do so. As at many American universities, it is a widely believed rumor that the sororities are not permitted to have houses because of a state "Brothel Law" prohibiting the cohabitation of more than eight women. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter even reported the existence of such a law in 2001.[39] Snopes.com reports that such laws do not exist.[40] Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... ΔΣΠ (Delta Sigma Pi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity in the United States of America. ... ΛΦΕ (Lambda Phi Epsilon, also LPhiE or Lambdas) is a nationally recognized Asian-Interest fraternity based in the United States. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The Urban Legends Reference Pages (also known as snopes. ...


In addition Charles Village, the region of North Baltimore surrounding the university, has undergone several restoration projects, and the university has gradually bought the property around the school for additional student housing and dormitories. The Charles Village Project, scheduled for completion in 2008, will bring new commercial spaces to the neighborhood. The project includes Charles Commons, a new, modern residence hall that includes a Barnes & Noble and a Starbucks.[41] A Chipotle Mexican Grill and Starbucks have moved in, and the university itself has installed a new Einstein Bros. Bagels[42] franchise in Wolman Hall. Guilford Avenue rowhouses Charles Village is a neighborhood located in the north-central area of Baltimore, Maryland, USA. It is a middle-class area with many single-family homes that is in proximity to many of Baltimores urban amenities. ... A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ... For other meanings of the name Starbuck, see Starbuck. ... Chipotle Mexican Grill (NYSE: CMG) is a Denver, Colorado-based chain of Fresh Mex restaurants specializing in San Francisco burritos and tacos. ... Einstein Bros. ...


Hopkins has also invested heavily in improving campus life for its students with creation in 2001 of an arts complex, the Mattin Center; and a three-story sports facility, the O'Connor Recreation Center. The large on-campus dining facilities at Homewood were renovated in the summer of 2006, and the caterer was switched from Sodexho to Aramark. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Aramark Corporation (NYSE: RMK) is a professional services organization, providing food services, facilities management, hospitality services, and uniforms and career apparel to health care institutions, universities and school districts, stadiums and arenas, businesses, prisons, senior living facilities, parks and resorts, correctional institutions, conference centers, convention centers, and public safety professionals...


Hopkins has also advertised the "Collegetown" atmosphere it shares with neighboring institutions, including Loyola College, UMBC, Goucher College, and Towson University, as well as the proximity of downtown Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Loyola College in Maryland, formerly Loyola College, is a private, coeducational university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, affiliated with the Society of Jesus and the Roman Catholic Church. ... The University of Maryland, Baltimore County is part of the University System of Maryland and located in southern Baltimore County, Maryland near the towns of Catonsville and Arbutus. ... “Goucher” redirects here. ... Towson University, formerly Maryland State Normal School (1866-1935), Maryland State Teachers College at Towson (1935-1963), Towson State College (1963-1976), Towson State University (1976-1997), is a public university located in Towson in Baltimore County, Maryland. ... The Inner Harbor is a historic seaport, tourist attraction, and iconic landmark of the City of Baltimore. ...


Student publications

Homewood House. Acquired by The Johns Hopkins University in 1902, Homewood stands today as one of the nation's best surviving examples of Federal Period architecture
Homewood House. Acquired by The Johns Hopkins University in 1902, Homewood stands today as one of the nation's best surviving examples of Federal Period architecture

Hopkins has many publications that are produced entirely by students. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter, founded in 1896, is the oldest continuously published college newspaper in the nation, and is published weekly.[38] The Hopkins Donkey is a political newspaper with a Democratic perspective on international, national and state-wide political topics. The Carrollton Record is a political newspaper with an American conservative perspective on campus and city-wide politics.[39] Zeniada and j.mag are literary magazines. Frame of Reference is an annual magazine that focuses on film and film culture.[40]. The New Diplomat is the multi-disciplinary international relations journal. Foundations is the undergraduate history journal. Américas is the Latin American Studies journal. Argot is the undergraduate anthropology journal.[41] Image File history File links JHU-H.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links JHU-H.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The News-Letter offices are situated within the neo-Italianate designed Gatehouse, located on the corner of Wyman and Art Museum Drive. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ...


The Black & Blue Jay is among the nation's oldest humor magazines. It was founded in 1920.[43] According to The Johns Hopkins News-Letter, it was the magazine's name which led the News-Letter to first use the moniker Blue Jays to refer to a Hopkins athletic team in 1923.[44] While the magazine enjoyed popularity among students, it received repeated opposition from the university administration, reportedly for its vulgar sense of humor. In October 1934, Dean Edward R. Berry removed financial support for the magazine; without funding, the magazine continued under the name The Blue Jay until Berry threatened to expel the editors in 1939. The magazine had a revival in 1984, and has published intermittently since then.[45] 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


Medical institutions campus

This urban campus is in the East Baltimore neighborhood and is home to the School of Medicine, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the School of Nursing. It comprises several city blocks spreading from the original Johns Hopkins Hospital building and its trademark dome. The School of Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University is associated with clinical practice at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was founded in 1916 by William H. Welch and John D. Rockefeller. ... The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a teaching hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is a highly regarded medical school and biomedical research institute in the United States. ...


Library system

Peabody Library at the Peabody Conservatory Division of Hopkins
Peabody Library at the Peabody Conservatory Division of Hopkins

The Johns Hopkins University Library system houses more than 3.6 million volumes.[46] It includes ten main divisions: the Sheridan Libraries at Homewood, the Medical Institutions Libraries, the School of Nursing Library, Abraham M. Lilienfeld Library at the Bloomberg School, the Peabody Institute Library, the Carey Business School and School of Education libraries, the School of Advanced International Studies Libraries (Sydney R. and Elsa W. Mason Library and Bologna Center Library), the R.E. Gibson Library at the Applied Physics Laboratory Library and other minor satellite locations, as well as the archives. Image File history File links JHU-B.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links JHU-B.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...


The Milton S. Eisenhower Library (called "MSE" by students), located on the Homewood campus, is the main library. It houses over 2.6 million volumes and over 20,000 journal subscriptions. The Eisenhower Library is a member of the university's Sheridan Libraries encompassing collections at the Albert D. Hutzler Reading Room (called "The Hut" by students) in Gilman Hall, the John Work Garrett Library at Evergreen House, and the George Peabody Library at Mount Vernon Place. Together these collections provide the major research library resources for the university, serving Johns Hopkins academic programs worldwide. The library was named for Milton S. Eisenhower, former president of the university and brother of former U.S. president Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Milton S. Eisenhower Library (called MSE by students), is the Johns Hopkins University principal research library and the largest in a network of libraries at Johns Hopkins. ... Homewood is the name of some places in the United States of America: Homewood, Alabama Homewood, California Homewood, Illinois Homewood, Pennsylvania Homewood is also the name of the main campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and may also sometimes refer to the surrounding neighborhood; the name comes... Milton Stover Eisenhower (September 15, 1899 - May 2, 1985) served as president of three major American universities. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...


Only two of the MSE library's six stories are above ground; the rest are beneath, though architects designed the building so that every level has windows and natural light. The design accords with a bit of traditional campus lore which says no structure on campus can be taller than Gilman Hall, the oldest academic building. There is no written rule regarding building height, however, and the library's design was chosen for architectural and aesthetic reasons when it was finally built in the 1960s.


The Peabody Institute Library was begun with the June 16, 1852 donation from George Peabody. George Peabody was born in South Danvers (now Peabody) in 1795 and by the year of 1851 had risen in the business world to become an investment banker in London. Danvers Mechanic Institute's decision to name George Peabody as an honorary member. Proud of their native son, the Danvers Mechanic Institute named George Peabody an honorary member on January 5, 1852. This subscription based institute, located in South Danvers , was both library and lyceum. Though the committee selected to inform Peabody of this honor waited until after Danvers was informed of the donation, it is possible his awareness of this institution influenced Peabody in deciding the type of institution he wished to create. The Peabody Institute Library is the main public library for the town of Peabody, Massachusetts. ... George Peabody (February 18, 1795 – November 4, 1869) was an entrepreneur and philanthropist who founded the Peabody Institute. ...


The 'Green Campus' at Hopkins

The Johns Hopkins University was named in 2007 as a university making significant commitments to sustainability[citation needed]. As a major formal step towards sustainability, the University hired its first Manager of Energy and Environmental Stewardship in the spring of 2006[citation needed]. Soon after, the University launched a Sustainability Initiative to coordinate sustainability activities and to develop new programs that will help to reduce the University’s environmental impact[citation needed]. The Sustainable Development Institute gave Johns Hopkins a C+ for their environmental efforts. [47]


Climate Change & Energy

The new Manager of Energy and Environmental Stewardship began work in spring 2006 to upgrade inefficient appliances and lighting on campus. Energy retrofits in certain buildings have resulted in energy conservation of over 50 percent.[48] Carbon emissions are currently being inventoried and electric vehicles are used for some campus transportation needs. Another portion of transportation needs on the main campus are being met by a partnership with Flexcar, which has four vehicles stationed on-site. The University intends to secure a percentage of green electricity by working with wind power developers and with a local dairy farm that converts food and farm wastes into green electricity through anaerobic digestion. Plans are being developed to install solar thermal panels on the recreation center to provide heating and hot water needs.[48] Flexcar is a for-profit car sharing company, the oldest and second-largest (behind Boston-based Zipcar) in the United States. ...


Food & Recycling

Johns Hopkins recently switched its dining services providers from Sodexho to Aramark, citing improved environmental services as an influential reason for the change. Dining services managers prioritize the purchasing of locally sourced produce and seafood, and organic food is being integrated into the menu.[48] In addition, the smaller cafés around campus sell exclusively organic, shade-grown coffees. There is currently a small pilot composting program on the undergraduate campus.[48]


Green Buildings

The University is currently pursuing LEED certification for several new and existing buildings and typically considers the feasibility of LEED programs for all new projects that involve upgrades of existing buildings or new construction. For minor renovations, the University uses LEED principals as guideposts.[48] Retrofits include a green roof deck, experimentation with waterless urinals and low-flow shower heads, and upgraded fluorescent lighting that has reduced lighting load on one campus by over 40 percent. Similar lighting retrofits are underway at all other campuses. In 2004, one campus completed a water conservation retrofit that annually saves over eight million gallons of water.[48]


Campus developments

The Johns Hopkins University, working with Collegetown Development Alliance, a joint venture team comprised of Struever Brothers, Eccles & Rouse and Capstone Development recently teamed up to develop a mixed use project featuring student housing, a central dining facility and a major campus bookstore.


The site, called Charles Commons and completed in September 2006, is located at 33rd Street between Charles and St. Paul Streets. The approximate 350,000 sq. ft development includes housing for approximately 618 students, with supporting amenity spaces; a central dining facility and specialty dining area with seating capacity of approximately 330; an approximately 29,000 sq. ft. bookstore run by Barnes and Noble College Division which includes the traditional offerings of a college bookstore (textbooks, school supplies, dorm product, etc.) as well as a cafe that serves Starbucks coffee, an extensive assortment of general books, and convenience products. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Decker Quadrangle development comprehends the last large building site on the contiguous Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University, making it the most important project on campus since the development of the two original quadrangles. In this first phase, the project will include a visitors and admissions center, a computational sciences building, and an underground parking structure, creating a new quadrangle, south of Garland Hall, named in honor of Alonso G. and Virginia G. Decker. Importantly, the project will establish a new public entrance for the campus and recognize the potential for future growth of campus activities sited across Wyman Park Drive.


Recently, the university announced a $73 million renovation of Gilman Hall, the academic centerpiece of the Homewood Campus. The renovation will include updating all classrooms in the building, as well as a full replacement of the infrastructure of the building. Gilman hall, superficially renovated in the 1980s will now include a movie theater and a large atrium, with a glass roof. The atrium will have a sky-walk from the entrance of the building to the Hutzler Undergraduate Reading Room and will contain the university's premier archaeological collection. The project is slated for completion for the 2010-2011 academic year.[49]

Mason Hall (2007), the Visitor's Center & Admissions Office at Johns Hopkins University
Mason Hall (2007), the Visitor's Center & Admissions Office at Johns Hopkins University

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Athletics

Johns Hopkins Men's Lacrosse Team
Johns Hopkins Men's Lacrosse Team

Athletic teams at Johns Hopkins are called the Blue Jays. The university's athletic colors are Columbia blue and black. (Sable and gold are used for academic robes.) Hopkins celebrates Homecoming in the spring to coincide with the height of the lacrosse season. Outside of the Men's and Women's Division I lacrosse teams, Hopkins participates in the NCAA's Division III and the Centennial Conference. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Columbia blue is a light blue tertiary color. ... For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Centennial Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Maryland and Pennsylvania. ...


The school's most prominent sports team is its Division I men's lacrosse team, which has won 44 national titles - nine NCAA Division I (2007, 2005, 1987, 1985, 1984, 1980, 1979, 1978, 1974), 29 USILA, and six ILA titles. Hopkins' primary national lacrosse rivals are Princeton University, Syracuse University, and the University of Virginia; its primary intrastate rivals are Loyola College, Towson University, the United States Naval Academy, and the University of Maryland. Maryland is considered their most prominent rival in college lacrosse, the schools having met 103 times, with two of those meetings being in playoffs. The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private nonsectarian research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Loyola College in Maryland, formerly Loyola College, is a private, coeducational university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, affiliated with the Society of Jesus and the Roman Catholic Church. ... Towson University, formerly Maryland State Normal School (1866-1935), Maryland State Teachers College at Towson (1935-1963), Towson State College (1963-1976), Towson State University (1976-1997), is a public university located in Towson in Baltimore County, Maryland. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ...


The women's lacrosse team is also building into a top ten-level team, ranking number 8 in the 2007 IWLCA Poll for Division I. The team's only losses in 2007 were to Princeton University, Georgetown University, the University of Maryland, the University of Pennsylvania, Vanderbilt University, Duke University, and Northwestern University (twice). Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... For other uses, see Northwestern. ...


The Lacrosse Museum and National Hall of Fame, governed by US Lacrosse, is located on the Homewood campus and is adjacent to Homewood Field. Past Johns Hopkins lacrosse teams have represented the United States in international competition. At the 1928 Amsterdam and 1932 Los Angeles Summer Olympics lacrosse demonstration events Hopkins played for the US and team members received Olympic Medals. Hopkins is the only US college team to have members awarded Olympic Gold Medals. They have also gone to Melbourne, Australia to win the 1974 World Lacrosse Championship. The Lacrosse Foundation Hall of Fame Museum, located in Baltimore, Maryland on the campus of Johns Hopkins University, showcases the history of the game of Lacrosse, from its Native American origins to its present day modern form. ... US Lacrosse was founded on January 1, 1998, as the national governing body of mens and womens lacrosse in the United States. ... Homewood Field on the campus of Johns Hopkins University, USA, was built in 1906 and has a capacity of 8,500 people. ... Lacrosse was a demonstration sport at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. ... The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central... The International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) World Championship began as a four-team invitational tournament that coincided with Canadas centennial lacrosse celebration in 1967. ...


Hopkins is also a powerhouse in Division III Athletics. The 2006-2007 saw Hopkins winning the Centennial Conference titles in Baseball, Men's and Women's Soccer, Men's and Women's Tennis and Men's Basketball. Hopkins also has an acclaimed fencing team, which has ranked in the top three of Division III teams in the past few years and in 2007 defeated University of North Carolina, a Division I team, for the first time. The Swimming team also has ranked in the top two of Division III for the last 10 years. The Water Polo team has been number one in Division III for several of the past years, playing a full schedule against Division I opponents. Hopkins also has a century-old rivalry with McDaniel College (formerly Western Maryland College), playing the Green Terrors 83 times in football since the first game in 1894. This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... The University of North Carolina is a sixteen-university system which comprises all public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... McDaniel College is liberal arts college in Westminster, Maryland, located 30 miles northwest of Baltimore, with a branch college in Budapest, Hungary. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Presidents of Johns Hopkins

Gilman Hall, as seen from the Upper Quadrangle in the winter
Gilman Hall, as seen from the Upper Quadrangle in the winter

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixel Image in higher resolution (2354 × 1560 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixel Image in higher resolution (2354 × 1560 pixel, file size: 2. ... Daniel Coit Gilman Daniel Coit Gilman (July 6, 1831-October 13, 1908) was an American educator. ... Ira Remsen (February 10, 1846 - March 4, 1927) was a chemist who, along with Constantin Fahlberg discovered the artificial sweetener saccharin. ... Frank Goodnow was the third president of the Johns Hopkins University. ... Joseph Sweetman Ames (1864-1943) was a physics professor at Johns Hopkins University, provost of the university from 1926 until 1929, and university president from 1929 until 1935. ... Isaiah Bowman (26 December 1878, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada – 6 January 1950, Baltimore) was an American geographer. ... Detlev Wulf Bronk (1897-1975) was President of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland from 1949 to 1953 and President of the National Academy of Sciences from 1950 to 1962. ... Lowell Reed was 7th president of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Milton Stover Eisenhower (September 15, 1899 - May 2, 1985) served as president of three major American universities. ... Lincoln Gordon was the 9th President of the Johns Hopkins University. ... Milton Stover Eisenhower (September 15, 1899 - May 2, 1985) served as president of three major American universities. ... Steven Muller was the president of John Hopkins University, serving from 1972-1990. ... William C. Richardson was President of The Johns Hopkins University from July 1990 - July 1995. ... Daniel Nathans (October 30, 1928 - November 16, 1999) was a U.S. microbiologist. ... Dr. William R. Brody is the current President of Johns Hopkins University, a position which he has held since 1996. ...

Notable alumni, professors, and staff

See: List of Johns Hopkins University people

// Woodrow Wilson, Nobel Prize-winning U.S. President Peter Agre - Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2003 Richard Axel - Nobel Prize in Medicine, 2004 Joseph Erlanger - Nobel Prize in Medicine, 1944 Andrew Fire - Nobel Prize in Medicine, 2006 Robert Fogel - Nobel Prize in Economics, 1993 Herbert Spencer Gasser - Nobel Prize in Physiology...

Affiliates

  • The Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, located on the Homewood Campus, is a nationally renowned center for the study of public policy. The Institute forms partnerships with other programs at Johns Hopkins to offer concentrations, specializations, certificates, and dual degrees related to public policy.
  • The Johns Hopkins University Press is a publishing house and division of Johns Hopkins University that engages in publishing journals and books. It was founded in 1878 and holds the distinction of being the oldest continuously running university press in the United States.

The Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies (JHIPS) is a leading public policy school affiliated to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University Press is a publishing house and division of Johns Hopkins University that engages in academic publishing. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

The university in popular culture

In non-fiction

Johns Hopkins defeated Duke University in the 2005 and 2007 Division I National Lacrosse Championship Finals
Johns Hopkins defeated Duke University in the 2005 and 2007 Division I National Lacrosse Championship Finals

For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... SOMETHING THE LORD MADE is a moving story of men who defy the rules and start a medical revolution. ... Alfred Blalock (1899-1964) circa 1944 Alfred Blalock (April 5, 1899 – September 15, 1964) was a 20th century American innovator in the field of medical science most noted for his research on the medical condition of shock and the development of the Blalock-Taussig Shunt, surgical relief of the cyanosis... Vivien Theodore Thomas Vivien Thomas autobiography, Partners of the Heart: Vivien Thomas and His Work With Alfred Blalock Vivien Theodore Thomas (August 29, 1910 – November 26, 1985) was an African-American surgical technician who helped develop the procedures used to treat blue baby syndrome in the 1940s. ... Image File history File links Hopkins_lax. ... Image File history File links Hopkins_lax. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ...

In fiction

  • In the television series NCIS (TV series), Special Agent Timothy McGee graduated from MIT and has a BS in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins, revealed in the Episode 'Sub Rosa.'
  • In the television series Grey's Anatomy, the character Dr. Preston Burke is a graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and was first in his class. Dr. Erica Hahn, the cardiac surgeon who performed Denny Duquette's heart transplant, graduated from Hopkins, ranking second only to Dr. Burke.
  • In the movie The Prince and Me, the character Paige Morgan is accepted into the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
  • In the television series The Simpsons, Dr. Julius Hibbert is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
  • In the television series House, the character Dr. Eric Foreman is a graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Gregory House attended Johns Hopkins for undergraduate and medical school, but was thrown out of the medical school for cheating.
  • In the season two finale of Nip/Tuck (2003), Christian Troy and Sean McNamara visit Johns Hopkins to find out more about Ava Moore.
  • In the television series Judging Amy, the character Kyle McCarty had attended Johns Hopkins medical school before being expelled.
  • In the Tom Clancy novels, Jack Ryan's wife, Cathy Ryan, is a doctor at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute. In real life, Clancy created the Tom Clancy Professorship at Wilmer on April 8, 2005.
  • In the movie The Rock (1995), Dr. Stanley Goodspeed receives his M.A. and Ph.D from Johns Hopkins.
  • In the science fiction movie The Island (2005), the retinal scans of Lincoln Six Echo are sent to Johns Hopkins for analysis.
  • In the television series "Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman" during the Great American Medicine Show episode, Dr. Eli says he graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1848, even though the university was not founded until 1876.
  • In the American television show Commander in Chief, President Allen asks about the results of a recent "John" Hopkins study in episode 18.
  • In an episode of the science-fiction television series Stargate Atlantis, the character Dr. Beckett comments on an applicant to the Atlantis mission as being much more qualified in medicine than he. The applicant was from Johns Hopkins (mispronounced as John Hopkins).
  • In the movie "Outbreak" (1995), Major Salt, the character played by Cuba Gooding Jr., received his master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
  • In the movie "Getting In", a college graduate ends up sixth on the waiting list for the Johns Hopkins Medical School and attempts to dissuade six people in front from attending.
  • In the Babylon 5 universe, JHU was where the gene for human telepathy was discovered.
  • Dr. Hanibal Lecter from the Lecter Trilogy by Thomas Harris attends Johns Hopkins University after leaving Europe for America.
  • On the HBO drama The Wire, Baltimore Police Major Howard Colvin looks into a retirement job as deputy director of campus security for JHU.
  • In the 1990 novel Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, Dr. Lewis Dodgson of Biosyn Corporation is said to have been expelled from Johns Hopkins as a graduate student for planning human gene therapy without permission from the Food and Drug Administration.

For a number of other affiliated fictional characters, see List of Johns Hopkins University people#Fictional associations. NCIS is a CBS network show about a team of special agents from the Naval Criminal Investigative Service of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Prince and Me is a 2004 motion picture, directed by Martha Coolidge, and starring Julia Stiles, Luke Mably, and Ben Miller, with Miranda Richardson, James Fox, and Alberta Watson. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Julius M. Hibbert, M.D., is a fictional doctor and physician on the TV series The Simpsons. ... House, originally titled as House, M.D., is a critically-acclaimed American medical drama television series created by David Shore and executive produced by Shore and film director Bryan Singer. ... Dr. Eric Foreman Dr. Eric Foreman is a fictional character, portrayed by Omar Epps, on the American medical drama House. ... House, M.D. (commonly promoted as just House) is an American television series produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. ... Nip/Tuck is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American television medical drama series created by Ryan Murphy for FX Networks. ... Judging Amy is an American television drama that aired from September 19, 1999 until May 3, 2005 on CBS. The show stars Amy Brenneman of NYPD Blue and Tyne Daly of Cagney & Lacey. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... The Rock (1996) is an action movie that primarily takes place on Alcatraz Island, and the San Francisco Bay area. ... The Island is a 2005 science fiction film directed by Michael Bay and starring Ewan McGregor and Scarlett Johansson. ... Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman was an American multi-Emmy Award winning dramatic television series created by Beth Sullivan, that ran on CBS for six seasons (1993-1998). ... It has been suggested that List of characters in Commander in Chief be merged into this article or section. ... Stargate Atlantis is an American-Canadian science fiction television program, part of the Stargate franchise owned by MGM. Developed by longtime SG-1 producers Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper, it is a spin-off from the television series Stargate SG-1. ... Outbreak (1995) is a suspense film starring Dustin Hoffman, Rene Russo, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Spacey. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Hannibal Lecter, MD, is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... The Wire is an American television drama set and produced in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Howard Bunny Colvin, played by Robert Wisdom, is a fictional character on the HBO drama The Wire, and was a Major for the Baltimore Police Department before his retirement. ... See also: 1989 in literature, other events of 1990, 1991 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Jurassic Park is a techno-thriller novel written by Michael Crichton that was published in 1990. ... Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... The following is a list of characters from Michael Crichtons novels Jurassic Park and The Lost World. ... Biosyn is a fictional genetics company from the novels Jurassic Park and its sequel The Lost World. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gene therapy is the insertion of genes into an individuals cells and tissues to treat a disease, and hereditary diseases in which a defective mutant allele is replaced with a functional one. ... “FDA” redirects here. ... // Woodrow Wilson, Nobel Prize-winning U.S. President Peter Agre - Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2003 Richard Axel - Nobel Prize in Medicine, 2004 Joseph Erlanger - Nobel Prize in Medicine, 1944 Andrew Fire - Nobel Prize in Medicine, 2006 Robert Fogel - Nobel Prize in Economics, 1993 Herbert Spencer Gasser - Nobel Prize in Physiology...


In film

Nicole Mary Kidman AC (born June 20, 1967), is an Australian [1] actress. ... The Invasion, previously known as Invasion and The Visiting, is a 2007 science fiction film based on a screenplay by Dave Kajganich, originally meant to be based on the 1956 film Invasion of the Body Snatchers. ... The Curve is a 1998 thriller starring Matthew Lillard, Keri Russell, and Michael Vartan. ... Red Dragon is a 2002 thriller film, based on the novel of the same name written by Thomas Harris featuring the brilliant psychiatrist and serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter. ... The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway Brooklyn, New York City, is the second largest art museum in the City and one of the largest in the United States. ... The Baltimore Museum of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, was founded in 1914. ... SOMETHING THE LORD MADE is a moving story of men who defy the rules and start a medical revolution. ...

Photographs

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Maryland Hall I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links JHU-C.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixel Image in higher resolution (2354 × 1560 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links JHU-G.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 157 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Gilman Hall I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

References

  1. ^ Yale Endowment's Performance: A+. WSJ.com (2007).
  2. ^ jhu.edu (2007). Nobel Prize Winners.
  3. ^ Noon, Chris (February 3, 2006). NYC Mayor Bloomberg's Anonymous Gift to University. Forbes.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  4. ^ A Brief History of JHU. The Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  5. ^ On Campus: Johns Hopkins University. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  6. ^ Book Rags - JHU. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  7. ^ Johns Hopkins Magazine. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  8. ^ "Following the lead of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, fifteen American institutions came to define the American research university..."
    Arizona State University president Michael Crow (November 2002). Inaugural Address: "A New American University". Arizona State University. Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  9. ^ Johns Hopkins News Release - JHU. Johns Hopkins University (2001). Retrieved on 2007-1-01.
  10. ^ Johns Hopkins Magazine- JHU. Johns Hopkins University (2004). Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  11. ^ Johns Hopkins Gazette - JHU. National Science Foundation (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  12. ^ Johns Hopkins Gazette - JHU. National Science Foundation (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  13. ^ Laura Vozzella (2006-12-15). Cheesecake on the Tart Side. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved on 2007-01-10.: "University spokesman Dennis O'Shea checked with Ross Jones, who was Eisenhower's assistant. And Jones confirmed it... Ross told O'Shea: 'I remember him telling me about it first thing after he got back. He was tickled with himself for picking up on it so quickly with that response. And then it became a legend! He would love the fact that it still has legs.'"
  14. ^ [email protected] Commencement 2001. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
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  16. ^ America's Best Graduate Schools 2007: Top Medical Schools. Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  17. ^ a b U.S. News and World Report has also consistently ranked the school of public health #1 in the nation for many years. "What do you consider the top five terminal masters [sic] programs in international relations for students looking to pursue a policy career? [65% of respondents included Johns Hopkins.]" (p. 26)
    Peterson, Susan; Michael J. Tierney, Daniel Maliniak (August 2005). Teaching and Research Practices, Views on the Discipline, and Policy Attitudes of International Relations Faculty at U.S. Colleges and Universities (PDF).
    The study's results also appeared in Foreign Policy (Nov/Dec 2005).
  18. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007: National Universities: Top Schools. U.S. News and World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-16.
  19. ^ [In sidebar] "Johns Hopkins...Last year...Tie for 13th"
    Shapira, Ian (2006-08-21). Ivy Rankings? Rah, Rah, Sis-Boom-Blah. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  20. ^ Top 500 World Universities. Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-09-12.
  21. ^ The Complete List: The Top 100 Global Universities. Newsweek (2006). Retrieved on 2006-08-16.
  22. ^ Krieger School of Arts & Sciences. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  23. ^ Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Summer Programs. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  24. ^ Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Division. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  25. ^ Krieger School of Arts & Sciences - Funding. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  26. ^ Krieger School of Arts & Sciences - Funding. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  27. ^ Johns Hopkins University Catalog. Johns Hopkins University (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  28. ^ Johns Hopkins Launches New Schools of Business, Education. Johns Hopkins University Office of News and Information (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  29. ^ Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute.
  30. ^ Johns Hopkins University Fast Facts. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-09-24.
  31. ^ Johns Hopkins University Gazette. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  32. ^ Johns Hopkins University Gazette. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  33. ^ Johns Hopkins University Gazette. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  34. ^ Johns Hopkins University Gazette. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  35. ^ Johns Hopkins University Gazette. Johns Hopkins University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  36. ^ Mitrano, Erica. "Class of '10 Follows Competitive Trend", The Johns Hopkins News-Letter, 2006-05-05. Retrieved on 2006-11-22. 
  37. ^ "Hopkins Admissions", Johns Hopkins University, 2007-03-05. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  38. ^ "Hopkins Admissions", Johns Hopkins University, 2007-03-05. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  39. ^ Saxe, Lindsay. "A Strange Law Exists in Maryland", Johns Hopkins News-Letter, 2001-09-14. Retrieved on 2006-11-22. 
  40. ^ Mikkelson, Barbara (2003-10-07). House of the Writhing Son. Snopes.com. Retrieved on 2006-11-22.
  41. ^ Charles Commons. Retrieved on 2006-08-07.
  42. ^ [2]
  43. ^ “With the publication of the first of The Black and Blue Jay in November 1920“
    Sean DiGiovanna; Wendell O'Brien & Charlene Mendoza. Records of The Black and Blue Jay/The Blue Jay. The Ferdinand Hamburger Archives, The Milton S. Eisenhower Library. Retrieved on 2006-08-07.
  44. ^ Kwon, Yong (1997-09-25). Where did they get that darn Blue Jay?. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter. Retrieved on 2006-08-07.
  45. ^ Krut-Landau, Raphael (2006-11-02). The Black and Blue Jay returns to campus with a vengeance. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter.
  46. ^ American Library Association Fact Sheet. ALA (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  47. ^ Ng, Kensing. "Hopkins earns C+ in Sustainability", The Johns Hopkins Newsletter, 2007-02-01. Retrieved on 2007-05-02. 
  48. ^ a b c d e f 2007 National Sustainability Report. Endowments Institute of America (2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  49. ^ Johns Hopkins to Renovate Gilman Hall. Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved on 2007-04-14.
  50. ^ The Hedgecock Laboratory - Article. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  51. ^ Invasion Movie - Invasion Trailer - Nicole Kidman - Daniel Craig - Visiting Movie. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.

Forbes magazine is an American business and financial magazine founded in 1917 by B.C. Forbes. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sun is the newspaper of record for Baltimore, Maryland, with a daily press run of 247,193 copies and a Sunday run of 418,670 copies (9/30/05 Audit Bureau of Circulations report). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The News-Letter offices are situated within the neo-Italianate designed Gatehouse, located on the corner of Wyman and Art Museum Drive. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Johns Hopkins University Main Website
  • The University’s divisions
    • Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences
    • G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering
    • Carey Business School
    • School of Education
    • School of Medicine
    • School of Nursing
    • Bloomberg School of Public Health
    • Peabody Institute
    • Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
    • Applied Physics Laboratory (a non-academic division of the university)
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine Website
  • Johns Hopkins University Library Website
  • Johns Hopkins Athletics Website
  • The Johns Hopkins News-Letter Website
  • Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth
  • JhuWiki
  • IWLCA
  • Educational Perspectives - The Center for Social Concern at Johns Hopkins University
  • Maps and aerial photos for 39°19′48″N 76°37′14″W / 39.330049, -76.620669Coordinates: 39°19′48″N 76°37′14″W / 39.330049, -76.620669
    • Maps from WikiMapia, Google Maps, Live Search Maps, Yahoo! Maps, or MapQuest
    • Topographic maps from TopoZone or TerraServer-USA
  • Photographs taken in and around the University: flickr

  Results from FactBites:
 
Johns Hopkins University - baltimoresun.com (1078 words)
Hopkins was founded in 1876 as the first research university in the United States, and it still maintains that commitment to scholarly exploration.
Hopkins attracts a significant minority and international population, and students thrive on the opportunity to learn about different cultures and make friends with people from around the world.
The university is the namesake of investor and philanthropist Johns Hopkins, who, in 1867, left $7 million for the incorporation of a university and a hospital.
Johns Hopkins University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2707 words)
Johns Hopkins is notable as the the first university in the United States to put an emphasis on research, founded on the German university model.
Johns Hopkins is one of fourteen founding members of the Association of American Universities (AAU) and a member of the Consortium On Financing Higher Education (COFHE).
Hopkins' primary national lacrosse rivals are Princeton University, Syracuse University, and the University of Virginia, and its primary intrastate rivals are the University of Maryland, Loyola College, Towson University, and the United States Naval Academy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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