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Encyclopedia > Johnny English
Johnny English

Johnny English film poster
Directed by Peter Howitt
Produced by Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Mark Huffam
Written by Neal Purvis
Robert Wade
William Davies
Starring Rowan Atkinson
John Malkovich
Ben Miller
Natalie Imbruglia
Cinematography Remi Adefarasin
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) July 11, 2003
Running time 88 min.
Language English
French
Budget $40 million[1]
IMDb profile

Johnny English is a British comic film parodying the James Bond secret agent genre, released in 2003. It starred Rowan Atkinson (who, two decades earlier, appeared in an unofficial James Bond film - Never Say Never Again) as the incompetent British spy of the title, with John Malkovich, Natalie Imbruglia and Ben Miller. The screenplay was written by Bond writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, with William Davies and the film is directed by Peter Howitt. The film was known by the tagline He knows no fear, he knows no danger, he knows nothing. The movie grossed a total of $160 million worldwide.[1] Download high resolution version (476x705, 46 KB)Johnny English movie poster This work is copyrighted. ... Peter Howitt (born May 5, 1957 in Manchester) is an English actor and film director. ... Tim Bevan is a succesful movie producer for Universal Studios. ... Eric Fellner (b. ... Neal Purvis (born September 9, 1961) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Robert Wade (born 1962) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Davies co-wrote the script for Twins William Davies (sometimes credited William Davis) is an American screenwriter and film producer. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ... Ben Miller (born 1966) is a British comedian, director and actor. ... Imbruglia redirects here. ... Remi Adefarasin (born, London) is a noted British cinematographer. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The United Kingdom has been influential in the technological, commercial and artistic development of cinema. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... This article is about the spy series. ... Secret Agent is a 1936 British film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on a novel by W. Somerset Maugham. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Never Say Never Again is a James Bond film, itself a remake of the 1965 film Thunderball. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ... Imbruglia redirects here. ... Ben Miller (born 1966) is a British comedian, director and actor. ... Neal Purvis (born September 9, 1961) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Robert Wade (born 1962) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Davies co-wrote the script for Twins William Davies (sometimes credited William Davis) is an American screenwriter and film producer. ... Peter Howitt (born May 5, 1957 in Manchester) is an English actor and film director. ...

Contents

Principal character's precursor

The character of Johnny English himself is based on a similar character called Richard Latham who was played by Atkinson in a series of British television advertisements for Barclaycard. The character of Bough (pronounced 'Boff') was retained from the advertisements though another actor, Henry Naylor, played the part in the advertisements. Some of the gags from the advertisements made it into the film, including English incorrectly identifying a waiter, and the ballpoint pen scene (Latham inadvertently 'shot' himself with a tranquilizer dart which fired from the gadget pen when Latham attempted to use it during a demonstration to a class of spy recruits, saying as he collapsed "take over for a Bough, will you moment?"). A television advertisement, advert or commercial is a form of advertising in which goods, services, organizations, thoughts, etc. ... Barclaycard logo Barclaycard is a global credit provider (credit cards and loans) owned by Barclays plc in the UK. The Barclaycard was the first credit card introduced in the UK, coming into service in 1966. ... Henry Naylor is a British comedy writer and performer, best known for his work with comedy partner Andy Parsons. ...


Plot

An explosion at the funeral of Agent One, Britain's top agent, wipes out every secret agent in the country—except one. When a plot to steal the Crown Jewels is revealed, Johnny English, an inept worker at British Intelligence (whose bungling was partially responsible for not only the agents' death, but Agent One himself, after giving Agent One incorrect information about his mission) is summoned as a last resort. Together with his assistant Bough (Ben Miller), he manages to discover the person behind the plot, the French prison entrepreneur Pascal Sauvage (John Malkovich), whose family once had a claim to the throne. Coronation Chair and Regalia of England The collective term Crown Jewels denotes the regalia and vestments worn by the sovereign of the United Kingdom during the coronation ceremony and at various other state functions. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6). ... Ben Miller (born 1966) is a British comedian, director and actor. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ...


Sauvage, believing that the crown should have gone to him instead of the Queen, has hatched an evil plan to become King of the United Kingdom: steal the Crown Jewels, have an impostor replace the Archbishop of Canterbury, and have him proclaim Sauvage as King. Meanwhile, English is strangely attracted to a mysterious woman, Lorna Campbell (Natalie Imbruglia), whom he meets at a big social event whilst guarding the centrepiece to the whole event—the Crown Jewels. He inevitably fails, and the Jewels, despite a desperate attempt on his part to retrieve them, are stolen. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary [1]; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, and their respective overseas territories and dependencies. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Imbruglia redirects here. ...


Meanwhile, English reports his suspicions to the head of MI7 named Pegasus (Tim Pigott-Smith), who naturally doesn't believe him. English and Bough infiltrate Sauvage's headquarters, behind the knowledge of the agency, via parachute. English initially lands on the wrong building, the nearby and identical London Hospital, and after a phenomenal error of judgment resulting in him holding several doctors and patients at gunpoint, English enters the headquarters through a back door. Both agents activate a DVD player, exposing Sauvage's sinister scheme. English, after accidentally injecting himself with muscle relaxant, meets Lorna again, who turns out to be an Interpol agent herself, also on Sauvage's tail. Along with Bough, they gatecrash a party held by Sauvage, and Bough and English are promptly dismissed by their superiors (partly due to one of the henchmen reporting English's antics to Sauvage, still a friend of English's unwitting boss, and partially due to the fact that the muscle relaxant's effects had not worn off completely, making English seem somewhat inebriated). Tim Pigott-Smith as Peter Creedy in V for Vendetta. ... The inside of a DVD player A DVD player is a device not only playing discs produced under the DVD Video standard but also playing discs under the standard of DVD Audio. ...


Sauvage concludes that English knows too much and has his henchmen enter Sandringham House and force the Queen to sign a letter of abdication renouncing her family's claim to the British throne. The Queen, at first, refused to sign even at gunpoint, but when the threat was turned to one of her Welsh Corgis, she signs, thus, leaving the post free for Sauvage. Sauvage is informed by British officials the day after that, as the closest surviving relative of the Queen, the position of monarch now belongs to him. Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... The Cardigans ears (left) are somewhat larger than the Pembrokes (right). ...


English returns to his flat in regret for himself. However, Lorna pays him a visit, saying that the mission which he was dismissed from was reassigned to her, and she persuades English to join her. They both travel to France and infiltrate Sauvage's chateau and overhear Sauvage's proposal of turning the United Kingdom into a giant prison once he is king. However, in a room where they are spying on Sauvage, English accidentally triggers a microphone, which causes Sauvage to hear their tactics and promptly call on guards to seize them. They decide to take the DVD, but due to English dropping it on a tray full of identical unlabeled disks, take the wrong one—a surveillance video of English dancing to ABBA in his bathroom. They are held hostage by Sauvage, however they manage to free themselves and return to England on the day of his coronation. DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Abba redirects here. ...


At Sauvage's coronation, English sneaks in with Lorna, emerges from his disguise as the English bishop in front of Sauvage and accuses him of treason. Oblivious to the fact that the idea of a fake Archbishop was scratched, English attempts to verify his claim by pulling at the Archbishop's face, believing it to be a mask. This fails predictably. Undeterred, he tries to expose the 'fake' Archbishop a second time. Whilst infiltrating Sauvage's headquarters earlier on in the film, when Sauvage's first plan was still in action, English spotted a tattoo on the lower back of the original wearer of the Archbishop mask: ' Jesus is coming... look busy '. English grabs the Archbishop, turns him round and, in front of everyone at Westminster Abbey and the millions of viewers, bares the Archbishop's tattoo-free rear end. Upon realizing that there is no tattoo there himself, English resorts to a final, last-ditch attempt. He radios to Bough to tell him to play the DVD they retrieved. Bough has the people running the event at gunpoint, and makes them play the DVD on the massive television screen in the Abbey, an act which results in half the world's population watching English, in a shower cap and underpants, dancing and miming along to 'Does your Mother Know', by ABBA. English is subsequently taken away, but breaks free from Sauvage's cronies once again and, swinging from a wire above Sauvage and the Archbishop, grabs the crown before it touches Sauvage's head. While he is trying to prevent the Archbishop from crowning Sauvage king, he falls onto the throne, knocking Sauvage onto the floor, and is inadvertently crowned himself; he then places Sauvage under arrest, reveals the schemes to the public, and abdicates in favour of the Queen. For other uses, see Tattoo (disambiguation). ... Abba redirects here. ...


After a grateful thanking from the Queen, English is asked if there is anything she can do for him. He requests to be knighted. The film ends with a romantic scene in an Aston Martin with Johnny and Lorna cut short by English leaning on the ejector button, propelling Lorna airborne, and into a swimming pool. Watching her is a man whose bizarre appearance matches the description Johnny invented for an imaginary assailant at the original jewel theft.


Elements of the film

The band bond guest starred in the film, performing in the Sauvage HQ. The film contained its own soundtrack, which included the opening theme song 'A Man For All Seasons' by Robbie Williams, "Does Your Mother Know" & "Thank You For The Music", both by ABBA. bond is an Australian/British string quartet that specialize in classical crossover music. ... For other people with the same name, see Robbie Williams (disambiguation). ... Does Your Mother Know is a 1979 hit song by the Swedish pop group ABBA, and was the second single to be released from their album Voulez-Vous. ... Thank You for the Music was the twenty-fifth and apparently final hit for ABBA when released in November 1983. ... Abba redirects here. ...

  • The denial of Sauvage's family's claim to the throne references the Jacobite succession. This is never mentioned explicitly (since the Jacobite line still bears real-life descendents), though Sauvage has a portrait of Bonny Prince Charlie in his office, and the Jacobite family (eg the Old Pretender) lived for a time in France before and after their failed invasions of England in the 18th century.
  • The total depopulating of the UK comically suggested here parallels that of Diego Garcia.
  • That Sauvage will be "England's first French king since 1066" (ie since William the Conqueror) as stated in Tarrant's radio broadcast is inaccurate—William was Norman-French not straight French. There have also been other French kings of England since 1066, most notably Henry II (ruled 1154–1189).
  • The suit Johnny English wears before he becomes agent one is extremely similar to the suit Atkinson wore in Mr. Bean.
  • Bough is apparently fluent in three languages—English, French, and C++.

The Jacobite Stuarts who claimed the thrones of England, Scotland, Ireland and France after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 were: James II and VII (February 6, 1685 – 16 September 1701). ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and is now commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... James Francis Edward Stuart, the Old Pretender Prince James Francis Edward Stuart or Stewart, the Old Pretender, (10 June 1688 – 1 January 1766) was the son of the deposed King James II of England and VII of Scots, and as such laid claim to the English and Scottish thrones (as... The Diego Garcia depopulation controversy pertains to the evacuation of the indigenous inhabitants of the island of Diego Garcia during the 1960s and 70s. ... William I of England (c. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... C++ (pronounced see plus plus, IPA: ) is a general-purpose programming language with high-level and low-level capabilities. ...

Parody elements

  • Agent One's throwing his coat onto the hatstand (and English's failed attempt to imitate it) is in imitation of James Bond's throwing his hat onto the hatstand.
  • The car chase with the car in grapples is a parody of more conventional car chases in Bond films.
  • Bough is a pun on "boff", an English truncation of "boffin". This, presumably, refers to Atkinson's Barclaycard television advertisements of the early- to mid-1990s, where he was accompanied by a comically wise, barclaycard-using sidekick of the same name.
  • English's organization is called MI7, a parody of MI5 and MI6. MI7 did exist, but in a different form. The head of MI7 here is named Pegasus.

A boffin in action: Dr Alexander Thorkel (Albert Dekker) from Dr. Cyclops (1940) In the slang of the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, boffins are scientists, engineers, and other people who are stereotypically seen as engaged in technical or scientific research. ... Barclaycard logo Barclaycard is a global credit provider (credit cards and loans) owned by Barclays plc in the UK. The Barclaycard was the first credit card introduced in the UK, coming into service in 1966. ... For other uses, see Sidekick (disambiguation). ... MI7, the British Military Intelligence Section 7 (now defunct) was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... MI-5 redirects here. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence Section 6), or the Secret Service, is the United Kingdom external security agency. ... For other uses, see Pegasus (disambiguation). ...

Factual comparisons

  • The news broadcast at the end of the film claims that high treason still carries the death penalty. In fact, since the coming into force of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, the United Kingdom abolished civil capital punishment completely.
  • Sauvage's face is seen being printed onto stamps and paper money, though this seems an unlikely compression of usual time if his coronation is happening less than a week after the Queen's abdication. The issuing of commemorative stamps in this short time, however, is more realistic.
  • Trevor McDonald's broadcast states that the identity of the agent who saved the Queen is being kept secret, whereas a copy of The Times being read in the post-credits sequence shows English's name and face—the latter is more likely, though the two are not entirely incompatible.
  • In real life the British Monarch cannot be forced to abdicate; this requires an act of Parliament.
  • Modern day British Monarchs have no significant power so therefore, Sauvage cannot carry out his plans without approval from the British Government.
  • The need for the Archbishop of Canterbury in a coronation is true, though the need for a bishop for each of England, Wales and Scotland is inaccurate.
  • The use of the music Zadok the Priest, and some of the coronation service text, are correct.
  • The footage of Concorde and the Red Arrows is documentary footage either from Concorde's anniversary, or from a royal jubilee.

Under English (and later, British) law, high treason is the crime of disloyalty to the Sovereign amounting to an intention to undermine their authority or the actual attempt to do so. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... Zadok the Priest being performed at the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne in 2005 Zadok the Priest is a coronation anthem composed by George Frideric Handel (1685–1759) using texts from the King James Bible. ... For other uses, see Concorde (disambiguation). ... Red Arrows Hawk at speed during a display The Red Arrows, officially known as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, is the aerobatics display team of the Royal Air Force, based at RAF Scampton, United Kingdom. ...

Elizabeth II

  • During the film, the Queen's face is never shown. She is always shown from behind, except for once when she signs the letter of abdication, where her dog's life is threatened, and then only her hand is seen.
  • The conferring of a knighthood, even in exceptional circumstances such as this, would usually occur in the birthday or new year honors list rather than immediately afterwards.

The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement, or service to the United Kingdom. ...

Filming locations

  • Some scenes were filmed at Canary Wharf in London— indeed, the film duplicates the single real tower into two identical ones (albeit on the real site) for the fictional London Hospital and Sauvage's headquarters.
  • The scenes set in Westminster Abbey were filmed in St. Albans Abbey (though this connection is solely implied through the dialogue— for this footage is never intercut with footage of the real abbey's exterior).
  • The exteriors in the first credits sequence scene is Burghley House or Hardwick Hall.
  • 'Sandringham' is Hughenden Manor.[2]
  • The exterior and interior of MI7's headquarters which English enters at the start is Freemasons' Hall, London, which is also used as Thames House (the MI5 headquarters) in Spooks.
  • The scenes where Johnny English drives into Dover, Kent along the A20 road (with Dover Castle in the background) and then enters the Port of Dover (with a "Dover Ferry Terminal" sign, Dover's Athol Terrace and the White Cliffs of Dover in the background) to catch a ferry to France, were all shot on location.
  • The exterior of Sauvage's French chateau is actually the castle atop St Michael's Mount in Cornwall.

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Burghley House Burghley House is a grand 16th-century English country house near the town of Stamford in Lincolnshire. ... Hardwick Hall, built 1590–1597 Hardwicks long gallery in the 1890s. ... Hughenden Valley (formerly called Hughenden or Hitchendon) is an extensive village in Buckinghamshire, England, just to the north of High Wycombe. ... MI7, the British Military Intelligence Section 7 (now defunct) was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... Freemasons Hall in Great Queen Street, London Freemasons Hall in London is the headquarters of the United Grand Lodge of England and a meeting place for the Masonic Lodges in the London area. ... Thames House is an office development in London on the bank of the River Thames adjacent to Lambeth Bridge. ... For the music band, see The Spooks. ... Arms of Dover Borough Council This article is about the English port. ... The A20 is a two-digit major road in south-east England, carrying traffic from London to Dover in Kent. ... Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ... The Port Of Dover is the cross-channel port situated in Dover, south-east England. ... The white cliffs of Dover The location and extent of the white cliffs of Dover. ... St. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ...

Sequel

There have been reports of a sequel to Johnny English.[3] Atkinson confirmed on Richard & Judy on 28th March 2007 that a script for a second film was being worked on.[citation needed] Richard & Judy is an afternoon magazine/talk-show in the UK presented by married couple Richard Madeley and Judy Finnigan. ... (Redirected from 28th March) March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Reception

The film was met with moderatly negative reviews. It scored a 33% positive rating of Rotten Tomatoes (Rotten). Most critics believed the film was prodictable in some sense and that the story wasn't worth anything, asside from jokes. Most positive reviews complemented the jokes as being funny, but not 'laugh out loud'.


Soundtrack

  1. "A Man For All Seasons" – Robbie Williams
  2. Theme from Johnny English
  3. Russian Affairs
  4. A Man of Sophistication
  5. "Kismet" – bond
  6. Truck Chase
  7. "The Only Ones" – Moloko
  8. Parachute Drop
  9. Pascal's Evil Plan
  10. "Theme from Johnny English (Salsa Version)" – bond
  11. Off the Case
  12. Cafe Conversation
  13. Into Pascal's Lair
  14. "Does Your Mother Know" – ABBA
  15. For England
  16. Riviera Hideaway
  17. Agent No. 1

For other people with the same name, see Robbie Williams (disambiguation). ... bond is an Australian/British string quartet that specialize in classical crossover music. ... Moloko is an electronic/pop group from Sheffield, England, consisting of Róisín Murphy and Mark Brydon. ... bond is an Australian/British string quartet that specialize in classical crossover music. ... Does Your Mother Know is a 1979 hit song by the Swedish pop group ABBA, and was the second single to be released from their album Voulez-Vous. ... Abba redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Johnny English (2003). Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-12-08.
  2. ^ Hughenden Manor. National Trust. Retrieved on 2007-12-08.
  3. ^ http://www.countingdown.com/movies/3033434

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Johnny English
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
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You can own the Johnny English DVD today, and enjoy the comedic romps of actor Rowan Atkinson as he saves the day while tripping his way through international intrigue, danger, beautiful women, and those bond-like spy gadgets.
The Johnny English DVD will show you the über-spy with the numeric moniker, not just a bumbling progeny that you would see in other spy spoofs.
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