FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Johnny Cash
Johnny Cash
Johnny Cash in 1969
Johnny Cash in 1969
Background information
Also known as The Man in Black
Born February 26, 1932(1932-02-26)
Kingsland, Arkansas, U.S.
Died September 12, 2003 (aged 71)
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Genre(s) Country, rock and roll , Rock , folk, blues, gospel
Occupation(s) Musician, Singer-songwriter, Actor
Instrument(s) Vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica, mandolin
Years active 1955 - 2003
Label(s) Sun, Columbia, Mercury, American, House of Cash
Associated acts The Tennessee Three, The Highwaymen, Statler Brothers, Carter Family
Website JohnnyCash.com

Johnny Cash, born J. R. Cash, (26 February 1932 - 12 September 2003) was a Grammy Award-winning American country singer-songwriter. Cash is widely considered to be one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Johnny Cash is a single, released in 2007, by American country music artist Jason Aldean. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (652x767, 78 KB) [edit] Summary Credit: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Look Magazine Photograph Collection, card number lmc1998005787/PP [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kingsland is a city in Cleveland County, Arkansas, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nashville redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article is about the genre. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... The Tennessee Three was the backing band for renowned country music and rockabilly singer Johnny Cash, for over 40 years until Cashs semi-retirement in 1996. ... Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, and Waylon Jennings, on the cover of their album The Road Goes on Forever. ... The cover of the Statlers 1991 album All American Country The Statler Brothers are an American country music vocal group founded in 1955 in Virginia. ... Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ...


Cash was known for his deep, distinctive voice, the boom-chick-a-boom or "freight train" sound of his Tennessee Three backing band, his demeanor, and his dark clothing, which earned him the nickname "The Man in Black." He traditionally started his concerts with the introduction "Hello, I'm Johnny Cash." The Tennessee Three was the backing band for renowned country music and rockabilly singer Johnny Cash, for over 40 years until Cashs semi-retirement in 1996. ...


Much of Cash's music, especially that of his later career, echoed themes of sorrow, moral tribulation, and redemption. His signature songs include "I Walk the Line," "Folsom Prison Blues," "Ring of Fire," "Get Rhythm," "That Old Wheel" (a duet with Hank Williams Jr.), "Cocaine Blues," and "Man in Black". He also recorded several humorous songs, such as "One Piece at a Time," "The One on the Right Is on the Left," "Dirty Old Egg-Sucking Dog," "A Boy Named Sue," and a duet with June Carter called "Jackson"; and various railroad songs, such as "Rock Island Line" and "Orange Blossom Special". I Walk the Line is a song written by Johnny Cash and recorded in 1956. ... Folsom Prison Blues is an American country music song written by Johnny Cash in the early 1950s and originally recorded with his trio in 1956 for the Sun Records label. ... Ring of Fire is a country music song popularized by Johnny Cash and co-written by June Carter and Merle Kilgore. ... Get Rhythm is a song written and recorded by Johnny Cash. ... Hank Williams, Jr. ... Cocaine Blues is a song written by TJ Arnall, though it is a rework of a traditional song title Little Sadie. Johnny Cash famously peformed the song at his Folsom Prison concert, an event portrayed by Joaquin Phoenix in Walk The Line. ... Man in Black (or The Man in Black) was a protest song written and sung by and about Johnny Cash, originally released on his 1971 album of the same name. ... One Piece At A Time is a humorous song by Johnny Cash. ... The One on the Right is on the Left is a song by American singer Johnny Cash. ... A Boy Named Sue is a country song made famous by Johnny Cash. ... Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... Jackson is a song written by Jerry Leiber and Billy Edd Wheeler about a married couple who find that the fire has gone out of their relationship. ... Rock Island Line is an American blues/folk song, written and originally performed by Lead Belly in the 1930s. ... The original Orange Blossom Special was a passenger train operated by the Seaboard Air Line Railway. ...


He sold over 90 million albums in his nearly fifty-year career and came to occupy a "commanding position in music history".[1]

Contents

Biography

Heritage

Cash was of Scottish heritage, but he learned this only upon researching his ancestry. After a chance meeting with former Falkland laird, Major Michael Crichton-Stuart, he traced the Cash family tree to eleventh century Fife, Scotland.[2][3] Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... Falkland is a burgh in Fife, Scotland at the foot of the Lomond Hills. ... A lord is a male who has power and authority. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ...


He had believed in his younger days that he was mainly Irish and partially Native American (he had been told he was one-quarter Cherokee). Even after learning he had no Native American ancestry, Cash's empathy and compassion for Native Americans was unabated. These feelings were expressed in several of his songs, including "Apache Tears" and "The Ballad of Ira Hayes," and on his album, Bitter Tears. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This page contains special characters. ... The Ballad of Ira Hayes was written by folk singer Peter LaFarge. ...


Early life

Johnny Cash was born J.R. Cash in Kingsland, Arkansas, to Ray and Carrie Cash, and raised in Dyess, Arkansas. Kingsland is a city in Cleveland County, Arkansas, United States. ... Dyess is a town in Mississippi County, Arkansas, United States. ...


Cash was reportedly given the name "J.R." because his parents could not agree on a name, only on initials. When he enlisted in the United States Air Force, the military would not accept initials as his name, so he adopted John R. Cash as his legal name. In 1955, when signing with Sun Records, he took Johnny Cash as his stage name. His friends and in-laws generally called him John, while his blood relatives usually continued to call him J.R. USAF redirects here. ...


Cash was one of seven children: Reba Hancock, Jack, Joanne (Cash-Yates), Tommy, Roy, and Louise Cash Garrett. His younger brother, Tommy Cash, also became a successful country artist. Tommy Cash pictured with brother, Johnny Cash Tommy Cash is a brother of Johnny Cash. ...


By age five, J.R. was working in the cotton fields, singing along with his family as they worked. The family farm was flooded on at least one occasion, which later inspired him to write the song Five Feet High And Rising.[4] His family's economic and personal struggles during the Depression inspired many of his songs, especially those about other people facing similar difficulties. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Cash was very close to his brother Jack, who was two years older. In 1944, Jack was pulled into a whirling table saw in the mill where he worked, and cut almost in two. He suffered for over a week before he died.[4] Cash often spoke of the horrible guilt he felt over this incident. According to Cash: The Autobiography, his father was away that morning, but he and his mother, and Jack himself, all had premonitions or a sense of foreboding about that day, causing his mother to urge Jack to skip work and go fishing with his brother. Jack insisted on working, as the family needed the money. On his deathbed, Jack said he had visions of heaven and angels. Decades later, Cash spoke of looking forward to meeting his brother in heaven. He wrote that he had seen his brother many times in his dreams, and that Jack always looked two years older than whatever age Cash himself was at that moment. A table saw or sawbench is the most common piece of large woodworking equipment. ...


Cash's early memories were dominated by gospel music and radio. Taught by his mother and a childhood friend, Johnny began playing guitar and writing songs as a young boy. In high school he sang on a local radio station; decades later he released an album of traditional gospel songs, called My Mother's Hymn Book. He was also significantly influenced by traditional Irish music that he heard performed weekly by Dennis Day on the Jack Benny radio program.[5] Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Unearthed is an acclaimed box set by Johnny Cash released in 2003. ... Irish Music is the generic term for music that has been created in various genres on the entire island of Ireland, North and South of the border. ... Dennis Day (May 21, 1918 - June 22, 1988) Irish American singer who appeared for years on Jack Bennys radio and television shows. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ...


Cash enlisted in the United States Air Force. After basic training at Lackland Air Force Base and technical training at Brooks Air Force Base, both in San Antonio, Texas, Cash was assigned to a U.S. Air Force Security Service unit, assigned as a morse code decoder on Russian Army transmissions, at Landsberg, Germany. Lackland Air Force Base is a base of the United States Air Force located in the western area of San Antonio, Texas, USA. Lackland AFB is the only entry processing station for Air Force Basic Military Training (BMT). ... Brooks Air Force Base was a United States Air Force base located in San Antonio, Texas. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The USAFSS emblem. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... Landsberg am Lech is a town in the southwest of Bavaria, Germany, about 50 kilometers west of Munich and 35 kilometers south of Augsburg. ...


First marriage

While in Air Force training in 1950, Cash met Vivian Liberto. A month after his discharge, on August 7, 1954, they were married. They had four daughters: Rosanne (1955), Kathleen (1956), Cindy (1959), and Tara (1961). His constant touring and drug use put intense strain on his marriage, and they divorced in 1966. Vivian Liberto (April 23, 1934 – May 24, 2005) met Johnny Cash in 1950 at a roller skating rink in San Antonio, Texas three weeks before the Air Force deployed him to Germany. ... Rosanne Cash (born May 24, 1955) is an American singer and songwriter. ...


Career

Early career

In 1954, the couple moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where he sold appliances while studying to be a radio announcer. At night he played with guitarist Luther Perkins and bassist Marshall Grant. Perkins and Grant were known as the Tennessee Two. Cash worked up the courage to visit the Sun Records studio, hoping to get a recording contract. After auditioning for Sam Phillips, singing mostly gospel songs, Phillips told him to "go home and sin, then come back with a song I can sell." Cash eventually won over Phillips with new songs delivered in his early frenetic style. His first recordings at Sun, "Hey Porter" and "Cry Cry Cry," were released in 1955 and met with reasonable success on the country hit parade. For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Luther Monroe Perkins (January 8, 1928 – August 5, 1968) was an American country music guitarist renowned for his work with Johnny Cash and their boom-chicka rhythmic style. ... Marshall Grant (born May 1928) is best known as the bassist of the Tennessee Two, Johnny Cashs backing band, in which he played with Luther Perkins. ... The Tennessee Three was the backing band for renowned country music and rockabilly singer Johnny Cash, for over 40 years until Cashs semi-retirement in 1996. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... One of Johnny Cashs earliest songs. ... Cry Cry Cry is a song written and recorded by Johnny Cash. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Cash's next record, Folsom Prison Blues, made the country Top 5, and "I Walk the Line" became No. 1 on the country charts and entered the pop charts Top 20. Following "I Walk the Line" was "Home of the Blues," recorded in July 1957. That same year Cash became the first Sun artist to release a long-playing album. Although he was Sun's most consistently best-selling and prolific artist at that time, Cash felt constrained by his contract with the small label. Elvis Presley had already left Sun, and Phillips was focusing most of his attention and promotion on Jerry Lee Lewis. The following year Cash left the label to sign a lucrative offer with Columbia Records, where his single "Don't Take Your Guns to Town" became one of his biggest hits. I Walk the Line is a song written by Johnny Cash and recorded in 1956. ... Recorded after I Walk the Line, July 1, 1957 in Memphis, Tenessee by Johnny Cash. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


In the early 60s, Cash toured with the Carter Family, which by this time regularly included Mother Maybelle's daughters, Anita, June and Helen. June later recalled admiring Johnny from afar during these tours. Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ... Maybelle Carter (May 10, 1909 – October 23, 1978) was an American Country music musician. ... Ina Anita Carter (March 31, 1933 – July 29, 1999) was the youngest daughter of Ezra (Eck) Carter and Maybelle Carter (Mother Maybelle) and said to have the best voice of all the Carter Sisters. ... Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... Helen Myrl Carter Jones better known as Helen Carter (September 19, 1927-June 2, 1998). ...


Outlaw Image

As his career was taking off in the early 1960s, Cash started drinking heavily and became addicted to amphetamines and barbiturates. For a brief time, he shared an apartment in Nashville with Waylon Jennings, who was heavily addicted to amphetamines. Cash used the uppers to stay awake during tours. Friends joked about his "nervousness" and erratic behavior, many ignoring the warning signs of his worsening drug addiction. Amphetamine or Amfetamine(Alpha-Methyl-PHenEThylAMINE), also known as beta-phenyl-isopropylamine and benzedrine, is a prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. ... Barbituric acid, the basic structure of all barbiturates Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ...

Johnny Cash with guitar in 1958

Although in many ways spiraling out of control, Cash's frenetic creativity was still delivering hits. His rendition of "Ring of Fire" was a crossover hit, reaching No. 1 on the country charts and entering the Top 20 on the pop charts. The song was written by June Carter and Merle Kilgore. The song was originally performed by Carter's sister, but the signature mariachi-style horn arrangement was provided by Cash, who said that it had come to him in a dream. The song describes the personal hell Carter went through as she wrestled with her forbidden love for Cash (they were both married to other people at the time) and as she dealt with Cash's personal "ring of fire" (drug dependency and alcoholism)[citation needed]. Image File history File links The_one_and_only_johnny_cash. ... Image File history File links The_one_and_only_johnny_cash. ... Ring of Fire is a country music song popularized by Johnny Cash and co-written by June Carter and Merle Kilgore. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Wyatt Merle Kilgore (August 9, 1934 - February 6, 2005) was an American, singer, songwriter, and manager. ... This article is about the Mexican musical genre and ensemble. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ...


Cash sometimes spoke of his erratic, drug-induced behavior with some degree of bemused detachment.[citation needed] In June 1965, his truck caught fire due to an overheated wheel bearing, triggering a forest fire that burnt several hundred acres in Los Padres National Forest in California. When the judge asked Cash why he did it, Cash said, "I didn't do it, my truck did, and it's dead, so you can't question it."[4] The fire destroyed 508 acres (2.06 km²), burning the foliage off three mountains and killing 49 of the refuge's 53 endangered condors. Cash was unrepentant: "I don't care about your damn yellow buzzards." The federal government sued him and was awarded $125,127. Johnny eventually settled the case and paid $82,001. Cash said he was the only person ever sued by the government for starting a forest fire.[4] View into the Los Padres backcountry, Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California: everything in this picture is within the Los Padres National Forest Los Padres National Forest is a forest located in southern and central California, which includes most of the mountainous land along the California coast from Ventura to... In law there are two main meanings of the word settlement. ...


Although Cash carefully cultivated a romantic outlaw image, he never served a prison sentence. Despite landing in jail seven times for misdemeanors, each stay lasted only a single night. His most infamous run-in with the law occurred while on tour in 1965, when he was arrested by a narcotics squad in El Paso, Texas. The officers suspected that he was smuggling heroin from Mexico, but it was prescription narcotics and amphetamines that the singer had hidden inside his guitar case. Because they were prescription drugs rather than illegal narcotics, he received a suspended sentence. For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... A misdemeanor, or misdemeanour, in many common law legal systems, is a lesser criminal act. ... 19th century Heroin bottle This article is about the drug classification. ... El Paso redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... A suspended sentence is a legal construct. ...

Johnny Cash and his second wife, June
Johnny Cash and his second wife, June

Cash was also arrested on May 11, 1965, in Starkville, Mississippi, for trespassing late at night onto private property to pick flowers. (This incident gave the spark for the song "Starkville City Jail", which he spoke about on his live At San Quentin prison album.) Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (695x674, 118 KB) [edit] Summary Credit: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Look Magazine Photograph Collection, card number lmc1998005787/PP [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (695x674, 118 KB) [edit] Summary Credit: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Look Magazine Photograph Collection, card number lmc1998005787/PP [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Starkville is a city in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, United States. ... In law, trespass can be: the criminal act of going into somebody else’s land or property without permission; it is also a civil law tort that may be a valid cause of action to seek judicial relief and possibly damages through a lawsuit. ...


In the mid 1960s, Cash released a number of concept albums, including Ballads Of The True West (1965), an experimental double record mixing authentic frontier songs with Cash's spoken narration, and Bitter Tears (1964), with songs highlighting the plight of the Native Americans. His drug addiction was at its worst at this point, and his destructive behavior led to a divorce from his first wife and cancelled performances. In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian is a concept album released by country singer Johnny Cash in 1964 (see 1964 in music) on Columbia Records. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ...


In 1967, Cash's duet with Carter, "Jackson," won a Grammy Award. Jackson is a song written by Jerry Leiber and Billy Edd Wheeler about a married couple who find that the fire has gone out of their relationship. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Cash quit using drugs in 1968, after a spiritual epiphany in the Nickajack Cave. June, Maybelle, and Ezra Carter moved into Cash's mansion for a month to help him defeat his addiction. Cash proposed onstage to Carter at a concert at the London Gardens in London, Ontario on February 22, 1968; the couple married a week later in Franklin, Kentucky. June had agreed to marry Cash after he had 'cleaned up'. [6] Rediscovering his Christian faith, taking an "altar call" in Evangel Temple, a small church in the Nashville area, Cash chose this church over many larger celebrity churches in the Nashville area because he said that there he was treated like just another parishioner and not a celebrity. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Maybelle Carter (May 10, 1909 – October 23, 1978) was an American Country music musician. ... The London Ice House is an arena in London, Ontario. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franklin is a city located in Simpson County, Kentucky. ... An altar call is a practice in some evangelical churches in which those who wish to make a new spiritual commitment to Jesus Christ are invited to come forward publicly. ...


Folsom Prison Blues

Cash felt great compassion for prisoners. He began performing concerts at various prisons starting in the late 1950s.[4] These performances led to a pair of highly successful live albums, Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison (1968) and Johnny Cash at San Quentin (1969). At Folsom Prison is a live album by Johnny Cash, recorded on January 13, 1968 at Folsom State Prison in Folsom, California. ... At San Quentin is a recording of a live concert given by Johnny Cash to the inmates of San Quentin State Prison. ...


The Folsom Prison record was introduced by a rendition of his classic "Folsom Prison Blues," while the San Quentin record included the crossover hit single "A Boy Named Sue," a Shel Silverstein-penned novelty song that reached No. 1 on the country charts and No. 2 on the U.S. Top Ten pop charts. The AM versions of the latter contained a couple of profanities which were edited out. The modern CD versions are unedited and uncensored and thus also longer than the original vinyl albums, though they still retain the audience reaction overdubs of the originals. Categories: Buildings and structures stubs | US geography stubs | Prisons in California ... A Boy Named Sue is a country song made famous by Johnny Cash. ... Sheldon Alan Shel Silverstein (September 25, 1930 – May 10, 1999) was an American poet, songwriter, musician, composer, cartoonist, screenwriter and author of childrens books. ...


In addition to his performances at U.S. prisons, Cash also performed at the Österåker Prison in Sweden in 1972. The live album På Österåker ("At Österåker") was released in 1973. Between the songs, Cash can be heard speaking Swedish, which was greatly appreciated by the inmates. The ÖsterÃ¥ker Prison (Swedish: , commonly known as ÖsterÃ¥kersanstalten) is a prison located in ÖsterÃ¥ker Municipality, three miles north of Stockholm, Sweden. ... PÃ¥ ÖsterÃ¥ker is a live album by country singer Johnny Cash, recorded inside a Swedish prison and released on Columbia Records in 1973 (see 1973 in music). ...


"The Man in Black"

Cash advocated prison reform at his July 1972 meeting with United States President Richard Nixon.
Cash advocated prison reform at his July 1972 meeting with United States President Richard Nixon.

From 1969 to 1971, Cash starred in his own television show, The Johnny Cash Show, on the ABC network. The Statler Brothers opened up for him in every episode; the Carter Family and rockabilly legend Carl Perkins were also part of the regular show entourage. However, Cash also enjoyed booking more contemporary performers as guests; such notables included Neil Young, Louis Armstrong, James Taylor, Ray Charles, Eric Clapton (then leading Derek and the Dominos), and Bob Dylan. Image File history File links Johnny_Cash-Nixon. ... Image File history File links Johnny_Cash-Nixon. ... Prison reform is the attempt to improve conditions inside prisons, aiming at a more effective penal system. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Johnny Cash, 1969 The Johnny Cash Show was an American television music show presented by Johnny Cash; the series ran from 1969-1971 on ABC. It featured many folk/country musicians of the time, such as Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Merle Haggard, James Taylor and Tammy Wynette. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... The Statler Brothers are an American country music group founded in 1955 in Staunton, Virginia. ... For other persons named Carl Perkins, see Carl Perkins (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musician. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... For Ray Charles, the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... Derek and the Dominos were a blues-rock supergroup formed in the spring of 1970 by guitarist and singer Eric Clapton with Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon, who had all played with him in Delaney & Bonnie & Friends. ... This article is about the recording artist. ...


Cash had met with Dylan in the mid 1960s and became closer friends when they were neighbors in the late 1960s in Woodstock, New York. Cash was enthusiastic about reintroducing the reclusive Dylan to his audience. Cash sang a duet with Dylan on Dylan's country album Nashville Skyline and also wrote the album's Grammy-winning liner notes. Woodstock is a town in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... Nashville Skyline is an album by Bob Dylan, released in 1969. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Liner notes are the booklets which come inserted into the compact disc jewel case or any sound recording container. ...


Another artist who received a major career boost from The Johnny Cash Show was songwriter Kris Kristofferson, who was beginning to make a name for himself as a singer/songwriter. During a live performance of Kristofferson's "Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down," Cash refused to change the lyrics to suit network executives, singing the song with its references to marijuana intact: "On a Sunday morning sidewalk / I'm wishin', Lord, that I was stoned."[7] Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Sunday Mornin Comin Down is a song written by Kris Kristofferson that appeared on Kristoffersons first album. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ...


By the early 1970s, he had crystallized his public image as "The Man in Black." He regularly performed dressed all in black, wearing a long black knee-length coat. This outfit stood in contrast to the costumes worn by most of the major country acts in his day: rhinestone suit and cowboy boots. In 1971, Cash wrote the song "Man in Black" to help explain his dress code: "We're doing mighty fine I do suppose/In our streak of lightning cars and fancy clothes/But just so we're reminded of the ones who are held back/Up front there ought to be a man in black." A rhinestone or paste is a diamond simulant made from rock crystal, glass or acrylic. ... Cowboy boots are boots worn by cowboys. ...


He and his band had initially worn black shirts because that was the only matching color they had among their various outfits.[4] He wore other colors on stage early in his career, but he claimed to like wearing black both on and off stage. He stated that, political reasons aside, he simply liked black as his on-stage color.[4] To this day, the United States Navy's winter blue service uniform is referred to by sailors as "Johnny Cashes," as the uniform's shirt, tie, and trousers are solid black.[8] USN redirects here. ... 1917 recruiting poster for the United States Navy, featuring a woman wearing the most widely recognized uniform, the enlisted dress blues. ...


In the mid 1970s, Cash's popularity and number of hit songs began to decline, but his autobiography (the first of two), titled Man in Black, was published in 1975 and sold 1.3 million copies. A second, Cash: The Autobiography, appeared in 1997. His friendship with Billy Graham led to the production of a movie about the life of Jesus, The Gospel Road, which Cash co-wrote and narrated. The decade saw his religious conviction deepening, and he made many evangelical appearances. For other persons named Billy Graham, see Billy Graham (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ...


He also continued to appear on television, hosting an annual Christmas special on CBS throughout the 1970s. Later television appearances included a role in an episode of Columbo. He also appeared with his wife on an episode of Little House on the Prairie entitled "The Collection" and gave a performance as John Brown in the 1985 Civil War television mini-series North and South. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Columbo is an American crime fiction TV series, starring Peter Falk as Lieutenant Columbo, a homicide detective with the Los Angeles Police Department. ... Little House On The Prairie was an American one-hour dramatic television program that aired on the NBC network from September 11, 1974 to March 21, 1983. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For the novel, see North and South (trilogy). ...


He was friendly with every United States President starting with Richard Nixon. He was closest with Jimmy Carter, who became a very close friend.[4] He stated that he found all of them personally charming, noting that this was probably essential to getting oneself elected.[4] For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


When invited to perform at the White House for the first time in 1972, President Richard Nixon's office requested that he play "Okie from Muskogee" (a satirical Merle Haggard song about people who despised youthful drug users and war protesters) and "Welfare Cadillac" (a Guy Drake song that derides the integrity of welfare recipients). Cash declined to play either song and instead played a series of more left-leaning, politically-charged songs, including "The Ballad of Ira Hayes" (about a brave Native-American World War II veteran who was mistreated upon his return to Arizona), and his own compositions, "What is Truth?" and "Man in Black." Cash claimed that the reasons for denying Nixon's song choices were not knowing them and having fairly short notice to rehearse them, rather than any political reason.[4] Nixon redirects here. ... Okie from Muskogee is an American country music song performed by its co-writer, Merle Haggard. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Ira Hamilton Hayes (January 12, 1923 – January 24, 1955) was a Akimel O’odham, or Pima Indian, and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community. ...


Highwaymen

In 1980, Cash became the Country Music Hall of Fame's youngest living inductee at age forty-eight, but during the 1980s his records failed to make a major impact on the country charts, although he continued to tour successfully. In the mid 1980s, he recorded and toured with Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson as The Highwaymen, making two hit albums. Image File history File links Highwaymen. ... Image File history File links Highwaymen. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... “Supergroup” redirects here. ... Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, and Waylon Jennings, on the cover of their album The Road Goes on Forever. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, and Waylon Jennings, on the cover of their album The Road Goes on Forever. ...


During this period, Cash appeared as an actor in a number of television films. In 1981, he starred in The Pride of Jesse Hallam. Cash won fine reviews for his work in this film that called attention to adult illiteracy. In 1983, Cash also appeared as a heroic sheriff in Murder In Coweta County, which co-starred Andy Griffith as his nemesis. This film was based on a real-life Georgia murder case. Cash had tried for years to make the film, for which he won acclaim. World illiteracy rates by country Literacy is the ability to read and write. ... Not to be confused with Andy Griffiths. ...


Cash relapsed into addiction after being administered painkillers for a serious abdominal injury in 1983 caused by an unusual incident in which he was kicked and critically wounded by an ostrich he kept on his farm.[9]


At a hospital visit in 1988, this time to watch over Waylon Jennings (who was recovering from a heart attack), Jennings suggested that Cash have himself checked into the hospital for his own heart condition. Doctors recommended preventive heart surgery, and Cash underwent double bypass surgery in the same hospital. Both recovered, although Cash refused to use any prescription painkillers, fearing a relapse into dependency. Cash later claimed that during his operation, he had what is called a "near death experience". He said he had visions of Heaven that were so beautiful that he was angry when he woke up alive. Heart attack redirects here. ... Early in a coronary artery bypass surgery during vein harvesting from the legs (left of image) and the establishment of bypass (placement of the aortic cannula) (bottom of image). ... A near-death experience (NDE) is the perception reported by a person who nearly died or who was clinically dead and revived. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ...


Cash's recording career and his general relationship with the Nashville establishment were at an all-time low in the 1980s. He realized that his record label of nearly 30 years, Columbia, was growing indifferent to him and wasn't properly marketing him (he was "invisible" during that time, as he said in his autobiography). Cash recorded an intentionally awful song to protest, a self-parody. "Chicken in Black" was about Johnny's brain being transplanted into a chicken. Ironically, the song turned out to be a larger commercial success than any of his other recent material. Nevertheless, he was hoping to kill the relationship with the label before they did, and it was not long after "Chicken in Black" that Columbia and Cash parted ways.


In 1986, Cash returned to Sun Studios in Memphis to team up with Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins to create the album Class of '55. This was not the first time he had teamed up with Lewis and Perkins at Sun Studios. On December 4, 1956, Elvis Presley dropped in on Phillips to pay a social visit while Perkins was in the studio cutting new tracks, with Lewis backing him on piano. Cash was also in the studio and the four started an impromptu jam session. Phillips left the tapes running and the recordings, almost half of which were gospel songs, survived and have been released on CD under the title Million Dollar Quartet. Tracks also include Chuck Berry's "Brown Eyed Handsome Man", Pat Boone's "Don't Forbid Me", and Elvis doing an impersonation of Jackie Wilson (who was then with Billy Ward and the Dominoes) singing "Don't Be Cruel". Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... For other persons named Carl Perkins, see Carl Perkins (disambiguation). ... Class of 55 is a music album by Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and Carl Perkins released in 1986 through Chips Momans American Sound Studios and Smash Records. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elvis redirects here. ... For other uses, see Impromptu (disambiguation). ... A jam session is a musical act where musicians gather and play (or jam) without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... Million Dollar Quartet is the name given to recordings made on Tuesday December 4, 1956 in the Sun Record Studios in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Charles Eugene Patrick Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him a popular performer of the 1950s. ... For the British author, see Jacqueline Wilson. ...


In 1986, Cash published his only novel, Man in White, a book about Saul and his conversion to become the Apostle Paul. He also recorded Johnny Cash Reads The Complete New Testament in 1990. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


American Recordings

Johnny Cash sings a duet with a Navy lieutenant c.1987.
Johnny Cash sings a duet with a Navy lieutenant c.1987.

After Columbia Records dropped Cash from his recording contract, he had a short and unsuccessful stint with Mercury Records from 1987 to 1991 (see Johnny Cash discography). Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... The Johnny Cash discography chronicles the output of one of the most prolific recorded music artists of all time, country music singer Johnny Cash. ...


In 1991, Cash sang lead vocals on a cover version of "Man in Black" for the Christian punk band One Bad Pig's album I Scream Sunday. Christian punk is a form of Christian alternative music and a subgenre of punk rock with some degree of Christian lyrical content. ... One Bad Pig is a Christian punk band from Austin, Texas which formed in the mid-1980s. ...


His career was rejuvenated in the 1990s, leading to popularity among a younger audience not traditionally interested in country music. In 1993, he sang the vocal on U2's "The Wanderer" for their album Zooropa. Although he was no longer sought after by major labels, Cash was approached by producer Rick Rubin and offered a contract with Rubin's American Recordings label, better known for rap and hard rock. This article is about the Irish rock band. ... The Wanderer is the tenth and final track from U2s 1993 album, Zooropa. ... Zooropa is the eighth studio album by the Irish rock band U2. ... Frederick Jay Rick Rubin (born March 10, 1963 in Lido Beach, New York) is a Jewish American record producer and is currently the co-head of Columbia Records. ... American Recordings is a Los Angeles-based record label headed by record producer Rick Rubin. ... Hip hop music is a style of popular music. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ...


Under Rubin's supervision, he recorded the album American Recordings (1994) in his living room, accompanied only by his guitar. The album featured several covers of contemporary artists selected by Rubin and had much critical and commercial success, winning a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album. Cash wrote that his reception at the 1994 Glastonbury Festival was one of the highlights of his career. This was the beginning of a decade of music industry accolades and surprising commercial success. American Recordings is a Grammy Award-winning album by the country singer Johnny Cash. ... The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album was first awarded in 1987. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ...


Cash and his wife appeared on a number of episodes of the popular television series Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman starring Jane Seymour. The actress thought so highly of Cash that she later named one of her twin sons after him. He lent his voice for a cartoon cameo in an episode of The Simpsons, with his voice as that of a coyote that guides Homer on a spiritual quest. In 1996, Cash released a sequel to American Recordings, Unchained, and enlisted the accompaniment of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, which won a Grammy for Best Country Album. Cash, believing he did not explain enough of himself in his 1975 autobiography Man in Black, wrote another autobiography in 1997 entitled Cash: The Autobiography. Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman is multi-Emmy Award winning western/dramatic television series in the United States, created by Beth Sullivan. ... Jane Seymour, OBE (born Joyce Penelope Wilhelmina Frankenberg on February 15, 1951) is an English born actress best known as the Bond girl in the James Bond film Live and Let Die and as the star of the American television series Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman and its telefilm sequels. ... Since its first use in 1851, a cameo role or cameo appearance has been a brief appearance in a play (or later, a movie) that stands out against the general context for its éclat or dramatic punch. ... El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer), also known as The Mysterious Voyage of Our Homer,[2] is the ninth episode of the eighth season of The Simpsons, which originally aired January 5, 1997. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Unchained is the second album in Johnny Cashs American Recording series. ... Tom Petty Thomas Earl Petty (born October 20, 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American musician. ... The Grammy Award for Best Country Album has been awarded since 1995. ...


Last years and death

In 1997, Cash was diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disease Shy-Drager syndrome. The diagnosis was later altered to autonomic neuropathy associated with diabetes. This illness forced Cash to curtail his touring. He was hospitalized in 1998 with severe pneumonia, which damaged his lungs. The albums American III: Solitary Man (2000) and American IV: The Man Comes Around (2002) contained Cash's response to his illness in the form of songs of a slightly more somber tone than the first two American albums. The video that was released for "Hurt", a song by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, fit Cash's view of his past and feelings of regret. The video for the song is now generally recognized as "his epitaph,"[10] from American IV; and received particular critical and popular acclaim. Neurodegenerative disease is a condition which affects brain function. ... Shy-Drager syndrome is a rare, progressively degenerative disease of the autonomic nervous system. ... Autonomic neuropathy is a disease of the non-voluntary, non-sensory nervous system affecting mostly the internal organs such as the bladder muscles, the cardiovascular system, the digestive tract, and the genital organs. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... For the village in Tibet, see Lung, Tibet. ... See also: 2000 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 2000 Record labels established in 2000 // John Tavener is knighted in the New Years Honours List. ... See also: 2002 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 2002 Record labels established in 2002 // 2002 was marked by significant trends in rock music. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... Hurt is a promotional single from Nine Inch Nails remix album Further Down the Spiral (Halo Ten). ... Michael Trent Reznor (born May 17, 1965) is an American musician, singer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. ... NIN redirects here. ...


June Carter Cash died on 15 May 2003, at the age of seventy-three. June had told Cash to keep working, so he continued to record and even performed a couple of surprise shows at the Carter Family Fold outside Bristol, Virginia. (The 5 July 2003, concert was his final public appearance.) At the 21 June 2003, concert, before singing "Ring of Fire", Cash read a statement about his late wife that he had written shortly before taking the stage. He spoke of how June's spirit was watching over him and how she had come to visit him before going on stage. He barely made it through the song. Despite his poor health, he spoke of looking forward to the day when he could walk again and toss his wheelchair into the river near his home. Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Carter Family Fold is a site dedicated to the preservation and performance of old time country and folk music. ... Motto: A Good Place to Live Nickname: The Birthplace of Country Music Map Political Statistics County Independent city Mayor To Be Determined Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 34. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ring of Fire is a country music song popularized by Johnny Cash and co-written by June Carter and Merle Kilgore. ...


Johnny Cash died less than four months after his wife, on 12 September 2003, while hospitalized at Baptist Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee. He was interred next to his wife in Hendersonville Memory Gardens near his home in Hendersonville, Tennessee. is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nashville redirects here. ... Hendersonville Memory Gardens located at 353 East Main Street in Hendersonville, Tennessee, USA was formerly known as Woodlawn Memorial Park East. ... Hendersonville is a large town in Sumner County, Tennessee, USA, on Old Hickory Lake. ...


On 24 May 2005, Vivian Liberto, Cash's first wife and the mother of Rosanne Cash, died from surgery to remove lung cancer. It was Rosanne Cash's fiftieth birthday. is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vivian Liberto (April 23, 1934 – May 24, 2005) met Johnny Cash in 1950 at a roller skating rink in San Antonio, Texas three weeks before the Air Force deployed him to Germany. ... Rosanne Cash (born May 24, 1955) is an American singer and songwriter. ...


His stepdaughter, Rosie "Nix" Adams and another passenger were found dead on a bus in Montgomery County, Tennessee, on October 24, 2003. It was speculated that the deaths may have been caused by carbon monoxide from the lanterns in the bus. Adams was 45 when she died. She was buried in the Hendersonville Memorial Gardens, Hendersonville, Tennessee, near her mother and stepfather.


In June 2005, his lakeside home on Caudill Drive in Hendersonville, Tennessee, went up for sale by the Cash estate. In January 2006, the house was sold to Bee Gees vocalist Barry Gibb and wife Linda Gibb and titled in their Florida limited liability company for $2.3 million. The listing agent was Cash's younger brother, Tommy Cash. The home was destroyed by fire on 10 April 2007.[11] Hendersonville is a large town in Sumner County, Tennessee, USA, on Old Hickory Lake. ... The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb — that became one of the most successful musical acts of the 20th century. ... Barry Alan Crompton Gibb CBE (born on 1 September 1946) is a singer, songwriter and producer. ... Tommy Cash pictured with brother, Johnny Cash Tommy Cash is a brother of Johnny Cash. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


One of Johnny Cash's final collaborations with producer Rick Rubin, entitled American V: A Hundred Highways, was released posthumously on 4 July 2006. The album debuted in the #1 position on Billboard Magazines Top 200 album chart for the week ending 22 July 2006. Enough of Cash's music was left to put together a posthumous album which he had helped plan. The album, American VI, is planned for release in 2008. Frederick Jay Rick Rubin (born March 10, 1963 in Lido Beach, New York) is a Jewish American record producer and is currently the co-head of Columbia Records. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A debut is the first publication from an artist. ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Legacy

From his early days as a pioneer of rockabilly and rock and roll in the 1950s, to his decades as an international representative of country music, to his resurgence to fame in the 1990s as a living legend and an alternative country icon, Cash influenced countless artists and left a large body of work. Upon his death, Cash was revered by the greatest popular musicians of his time. Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Matt Hillyer of Texas-based Eleven Hundred Springs Alternative country is a term applied to various subgenres of country music. ...


Among Johnny Cash's children, his daughter Rosanne Cash (by first wife Vivian Liberto) and his son John Carter Cash (by June Carter Cash) are notable country-music musicians in their own right. Rosanne Cash (born May 24, 1955) is an American singer and songwriter. ... John Carter Cash (born 3 March 1970) is an American Country-singer, songwriter and producer. ...


Cash nurtured and defended artists on the fringes of what was acceptable in country music even while serving as the country music establishment's most visible symbol. At an all-star TNT concert in 1999, a diverse group of artists paid him tribute, including Bob Dylan, Chris Isaak, Wyclef Jean, Norah Jones, Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, and U2. Cash himself appeared at the end and performed for the first time in more than a year. Two tribute albums were released shortly before his death; Kindred Spirits contains works from established artists, while Dressed in Black contains works from many lesser-known artists. This article is about the recording artist. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Nelust Wyclef Jean (IPA: ) (born October 17, 1972) is a Haitian-American rapper, guitarist, producer, and member of the hip hop trio The Fugees. ... Norah Jones (born Geethali Norah Jones Shankar on March 30, 1979) is an American singer-songwriter, pianist, keyboardist, guitarist, and occasional actress of Anglo-American and Bengali descent. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


In total, he wrote over a thousand songs and released dozens of albums. A box set titled Unearthed was issued posthumously. It included four CDs of unreleased material recorded with Rubin as well as a Best of Cash on American retrospective CD. A box set (sometimes referred to as a boxed set) is one or more musical recordings, films, television programs, or other collection of related things that are contained in a box. ...


In recognition of his lifelong support of SOS Children's Villages, his family invited friends and fans to donate to that charity in his memory. He had a personal link with the SOS village in Diessen, at the Ammersee-Lake in Southern Germany, near where he was stationed as a GI, and also with the SOS village in Barrett Town, by Montego Bay, near his holiday home in Jamaica. The Johnny Cash Memorial Fund was founded[12] SOS Childrens Villages is an independent, non-governmental international development organisation which has been working to meet the needs and protect the interests and rights of children since 1949. ... Diessen is a village in the Dutch province of North Brabant. ... Ammersee with German Alps Ammersee (Lake Ammer) is a lake in upper Bavaria, Germany located in the southwest of Munich between the towns of Herrsching and Diessen. ... Southern Germany is the term used to desribe the southern states of Germany: namely Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. ... Doctors Cave Beach Club is a popular tourist destination in Montego Bay Montego Bay is a city in Jamaica that contains Jamaicas largest airport, Sangster International Airport. ...


In 1999, Cash received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked Johnny Cash[13] #31 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[14] The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... This article is about the music magazine. ...


In a tribute to Cash after his death, country music singer Gary Allan included the song "Nickajack Cave (Johnny Cash's Redemption)" on his 2005 album entitled Tough All Over. The song chronicles Cash hitting rock bottom and subsequently resurrecting his life and career. Gary Allan (born Gary Allan Herzberg on December 5, 1967[1]) is an American country music singer. ... Tough All Over (MCA Nashville, 2005) Tough All Over is an album by American country music singer Gary Allan. ...


The main street in Hendersonville, Tennessee, Highway 31E, is known as "Johnny Cash Parkway". Hendersonville is a large town in Sumner County, Tennessee, USA, on Old Hickory Lake. ...


On November 2November 4, 2007 the Johnny Cash Flower Pickin' Festival was held in Starkville, Mississippi. Starkville, where Cash was arrested over 40 years earlier and held overnight at the city jail on May 11, 1965, inspired Cash to write the song "Starkville City Jail". The festival, where he was offered a symbolic posthumous pardon, honored Cash's life and music, and was expected to become an annual event.[15] is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Starkville is a city in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, United States. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Posthumous means after death. ...


Portrayals

In 1998, country singer Mark Collie portrayed Cash for the first time in a short film, "I Still Miss Someone". Shot mostly in black and white, it attempts to capture a moment in time for Cash during his darkest years, the mid 1960s. Mark Collie (born January 18, 1956 in Waynesboro, Tennessee) is an American country singer/songwriter and occasional actor. ...


Walk the Line, an Academy Award-winning biopic about Johnny Cash's lifetime starring Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny Cash and Reese Witherspoon as June Carter Cash (for which she won the 2005 Best Actress Oscar), was released in the U.S. on November 18, 2005 to considerable commercial success and great critical acclaim. Both Phoenix and Witherspoon have won various other awards for their roles, including the Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy and Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy, respectively. They both performed their own vocals in the film, and Phoenix learned to play guitar for his role as Johnny Cash. Phoenix received the Grammy Award for his contributions to the Walk the Line soundtrack. For the song, see I Walk the Line. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... A biographical film or biopic is a film about a particular person or group of people, based on events that actually happened. ... Joaquin Rafael Phoenix (pronounced wah-KEEN FEE-nix;[1] born October 28, 1974), formerly credited as Leaf Phoenix, is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe and Grammy Award-winning Puerto Rican film actor. ... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon[1] (born March 22, 1976) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... For the song, see I Walk the Line. ...


Ring of Fire, a jukebox musical of the Cash oeuvre, debuted on Broadway on March 12, 2006 at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, but closed due to harsh reviews and disappointing sales on April 30, 2006. Ring of Fire is a musical based on the music of Johnny Cash. ... A jukebox musical is a stage or film musical that uses previously released hit songs by a popular musician or group as its musical score and contextualizes the songs in a dramatic plot, sometimes the biographical story of the performers whose music is featured. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is located in New York City, on 243 W. 47th St (between 8th Avenue and Broadway). ...


Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story, a comedy film parodying biopic films such as Walk the Line and Ray (film), is a close parody of Cash's life and the way he was portrayed in Walk the Line. Ray is a 2004 biographical film focusing on thirty years[2]of the life of legendary rhythm and blues musician Ray Charles. ...


Discography

See Johnny Cash discography, and Johnny Cash Sun discography.

The Johnny Cash discography chronicles the output of one of the most prolific recorded music artists of all time, country music singer Johnny Cash. ... The Johnny Cash Sun discography details the music recorded by country music legend Johnny Cash and released on Sun Records. ...

Awards and honors

For detailed lists of music awards, see Johnny Cash discography.

Cash received multiple Country Music Awards, Grammys, and other awards, in categories ranging from vocal and spoken performances to album notes and videos. The Johnny Cash discography chronicles the output of one of the most prolific recorded music artists of all time, country music singer Johnny Cash. ... The Country Music Awards are voted on by business members of the Country Music Association. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...


In a career that spanned almost five decades, Cash was the personification of country music to many people around the world. Cash was a musician who was not tied to a single genre. He recorded songs that could be considered rock and roll, blues, rockabilly, folk, and gospel, and exerted an influence on each of those genres. Moreover, he had the unique distinction among country artists of having "crossed over" late in his career to become popular with an unexpected demographic, young indie and alternative rock fans. His diversity was evidenced by his presence in three major music halls of fame: the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame (1977), the Country Music Hall of Fame (1980), and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1992). Only thirteen performers are in both of the last two, and only Hank Williams Sr., Jimmie Rodgers, and Bill Monroe share the honor with Cash of being in all three. However, only Cash was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the regular manner, unlike the other country members, who were inducted as "early influences." His pioneering contribution to the genre has also been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.[16] He received the Kennedy Center Honors in 1996. Cash stated that his induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame, in 1980, was his greatest professional achievement. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame was established by the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, Inc. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Hank Williams Sr. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... For the retired NBC News correspondent of the same name, see Bill Monroe (journalist). ... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ...


In 2007, Johnny Cash was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame.[17]


References

Notes

  1. ^ "Johnny Cash's Story," Country Music Hall of Fame
  2. ^ Dalton, Stephanie. 15 Jan 2006. "Walking the line back in time." Scotsman.com. Retrieved 28 June 2007.
  3. ^ Cash, John R. with Patrick Carr. (1997) Johnny Cash, the Autobiography. Harper Collins. See p. 3.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Cash, Johnny. Cash: The Autobiography
  5. ^ Gross, Terry. All I Did Was Ask: Conversations with Writers, Actors, Musicians, and Artists
  6. ^ Zwonitzer, Mark (2002). Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone, The Carter Family and Their Legacy in American Music. Simon & Schuster. 
  7. ^ The Best of the Johnny Cash TV Show 1969-1971, Disc 1 (of 2), Reverse Angle Production, 2007
  8. ^ The good, bad and ugly of proposed uniforms. Navy Times. 4 October 2004.
  9. ^ Johnny Cash: The Rebel
  10. ^ Rolling Stone Magazine, The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, 2004 (bibliographic information is needed for this reference)
  11. ^ Fire Reported at Johnny Cash Tenn. Home. San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  12. ^ SOS-USA
  13. ^ Kristofferson, Kris. 31) Johnny Cash. Issue 946. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  14. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Issue 946. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  15. ^ Mississippi town to honor the ‘Man in Black’. MSNBC. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  16. ^ RHOF Inductees with Certificates. Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  17. ^ Johnny Cash. Hit Parade Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.

Collins was a Scottish printing company founded by a schoolmaster, William Collins, in Glasgow in 1819. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Gross, Terry (2006). All I Did Was Ask: Conversations with Writers, Actors, Musicians, and Artists. Hyperion. ISBN 1-4013-0010-3. 
  • Millier, Bill. (retrieved September 7, 2004). Johnny Cash Awards. JohnnyCash.com.
  • Peneny, D.K. (retrieved September 7, 2004). Johnny Cash. The History of Rock and Roll.
  • Streissguth, Michael. Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison: The Making of a Masterpiece, Da Capo Press (2004). ISBN 0-306-81338-6.
  • Urbanski, Dave. The Man Comes Around: The Spiritual Journey of Johnny Cash. New York: Relevant Books. ISBN 0-9729276-7-0.
  • Cash, Johnny; Patrick Carr (1997). Cash: The Autobiography. Harper Collins. ISBN 0-06-101357-9. 

Works published

  • Cash, Johnny. Man in Black: His Own Story in His Own Words. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1975. ISBN 99924-31-58-X.
  • Cash, Johnny, with Patrick Carr. Cash: The Autobiography. New York: Harper Collins, 1997. ISBN 0-06-101357-9.
  • Cash, Johnny, with June Carter Cash. Love liner notes. New York: Sony, 2000. ASIN B00004TB8A.
  • Turner, Steve. The Man Called Cash: The Life, Love, and Faith of an American Legend. Nashville, Thomas Nelson, 2004. (The Authorized Biography).

The Man in Black may refer to: Real people Johnny Cash, the American country and western singer, who regularly performed dressed all in black. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Johnny Cash
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Persondata
NAME Cash, Johnny
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Cash, John R.; Cash, J.R.
SHORT DESCRIPTION Singer and songwriter
DATE OF BIRTH February 26, 1930(1930-02-26)
PLACE OF BIRTH Kingsland, Arkansas
DATE OF DEATH September 12, 2003
PLACE OF DEATH Nashville, Tennessee

‹The template Lifetime is being considered for deletion.›  Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Johnny Cash with His Hot and Blue Guitar was the first album by the influential country singer Johnny Cash, released on 10 October 1957 (see 1957 in music). ... Sings the Songs That Made Him Famous is the second album by singer Johnny Cash. ... The Fabulous Johnny Cash is the third album by country singer Johnny Cash. ... Greatest! is the fourth album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Sun Records on 12 January 1959 (see 1959 in music). ... Hymns by Johnny Cash is the fourth album by Johnny Cash. ... Songs of Our Soil is an album by the singer Johnny Cash. ... Sings Hank Williams is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released under Sun Records on September 15, 1960 (see 1960 in music). ... Ride This Train is the eighth album by country singer Johnny Cash. ... Now, There Was a Song is an album by Johnny Cash, featuring songs by Ernest Tubb, Hank Williams, and George Jones. ... Now Heres Johnny Cash is an album by country singer Johnny Cash. ... The Lure of the Grand Canyon is a rare concept album, released in 1961 (see 1961 in music) on Columbia Records, featuring spoken narration by country singer Johnny Cash. ... Hymns from the Heart is an album by singer Johnny Cash, released in 1962 (see 1962 in music). ... The Sound of Johnny Cash is an album by singer Johnny Cash, released in 1962 (see 1962 in music). ... All Aboard the Blue Train is an album by singer Johnny Cash. ... Blood, Sweat, and Tears is an album by singer Johnny Cash, released in 1963 (see 1963 in music). ... The Christmas Spirit is a Christmas album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in November 1963 (see 1963 in music). ... I Walk the Line is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1964 (see 1964 in music). ... Orange Blossom Special is an album released by country singer Johnny Cash on Columbia Records in 1965 (see 1965 in music). ... Sings the Ballads of the True West is a concept album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1965 (see 1965 in music). ... Everybody Loves a Nut is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released by Columbia Records in the United States in 1966 (see 1966 in music). ... Happiness is You is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1966 (see 1966 in music). ... Carryin On with Johnny Cash and June Carter is an album released by country musicians Johnny Cash and June Carter in 1967 (see 1967 in music), on Columbia Records. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Old Golden Throat is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released in 1968 (see 1968 in music) on Columbia Records. ... The Holy Land is a concept album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1969 (see 1969 in music). ... More of Old Golden Throat is an album released by country singer Johnny Cash on Columbia Records in 1969 (see 1969 in music). ... Hello, Im Johnny Cash is an album released by country singer Johnny Cash on Columbia Records in 1970 (see 1970 in music). ... Man in Black is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... A Thing Called Love is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1972 (see 1972 in music). ... The Johnny Cash Family Christmas is a Christmas album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1972 (see 1972 in music). ... Any Old Wind That Blows is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1973 (see 1973 in music). ... Johnny Cash and His Woman is an album by American country singers Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1973 (see 1973 in music). ... Ragged Old Flag is an album by American country music singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1974 (see 1974 in music). ... Junkie and the Juicehead Minus Me is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1974 (see 1974 in music). ... The Johnny Cash Childrens Album is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1975 (see 1975 in music). ... Sings Precious Memories is a gospel album by country singer Johnny Cash, released in 1975 (see 1975 in music) on Columbia Records. ... In 1969, Johnny Cash was the best-selling recording artist in the United States. ... Look at Them Beans is an album by singer Johnny Cash, released in 1975 (see 1975 in music). ... One Piece at a Time is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... The Last Gunfighter Ballad is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1977 (see 1977 in music). ... The Rambler is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1977 (see 1977 in music). ... I Would Like to See You Again is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Gone Girl is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Silver is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1979 (see 1979 in music). ... A Believer Sings the Truth is a gospel double album by American country singer Johnny Cash. ... Rockabilly Blues is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... Classic Christmas is a Christmas album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... The Baron is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... The Adventures of Johnny Cash is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1982 (see 1982 in music). ... Johnny 99 is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1983 (see 1983 in music). ... Highwayman is a 1985 album by country supergroup The Highwaymen, comprising Kris Kristofferson, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. ... Rainbow is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, his last for Columbia Records, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... Believe in Him is a gospel album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Word Records in 1986 (see 1986 in music). ... Heroes is an album by country singers Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings, release on Columbia Records in 1986 (see 1986 in music). ... Class of 55 is a music album by Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and Carl Perkins released in 1986 through Chips Momans American Sound Studios and Smash Records. ... Johnny Cash is Coming to Town is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released in 1987 (see 1987 in music), and his first for Mercury Records. ... Water from the Wells of Home is an album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Mercury Records in 1988 (see 1988 in music). ... Boom Chicka Boom is an album by American country music icon Johnny Cash, released in 1990 (see 1990 in music) on Mercury Records. ... Highwaymen 2 (Columbia Records, 1990) Highwayman 2 is an album by American country supergroup The Highwaymen. ... The Mystery of Life is an album by country singer Johnny Cash, released in 1991 (see 1991 in music). ... American Recordings is a Grammy Award-winning album by the country singer Johnny Cash. ... The Road Goes on Forever is an album by American country supergroup The Highwaymen. ... Unchained is the second album in Johnny Cashs American Recording series. ... At Folsom Prison is a live album by Johnny Cash, recorded on January 13, 1968 at Folsom State Prison in Folsom, California. ... At San Quentin is a recording of a live concert given by Johnny Cash to the inmates of San Quentin State Prison. ... The Johnny Cash Show is a live album by country singer Johnny Cash, recorded at the Grand Ole Opry and released on Columbia Records in 1970 (see 1970 in music). ... PÃ¥ ÖsterÃ¥ker is a live album by country singer Johnny Cash, recorded inside a Swedish prison and released on Columbia Records in 1973 (see 1973 in music). ... Strawberry Cake is a live album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1975 (see 1975 in music). ... The Survivors Live is a live album by country musicians Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, released in 1982 (see 1982 in music) on Columbia Records. ... Johnny Cash at Madison Square Garden is an album by Johnny Cash that was recorded in December 1969 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, but which wasnt released until 2002. ... A Concert: Behind Prison Walls is a live album recorded by Johnny Cash in the 1976. ... I Walk the Line is a soundtrack album to a 1970 film of the same name starring Gregory Peck. ... Little Fauss and Big Halsy is a soundtrack album to the 1970 film of the same name. ... The Gospel Road is a double album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1973 (see 1973 in music). ... Return to the Promised Land is a gospel soundtrack album by American country singer Johnny Cash, first released in 1992 as the soundtrack to the movie of the same name, and re-released in 2000 on Renaissance Records with bonus tracks. ... Greatest Hits, Vol. ... Heart of Cash is an album released by country singer Johnny Cash in 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... The World of Johnny Cash is a compilation album released by country singer Johnny Cash on Columbia Records in 1970 (see 1970 in music). ... Greatest Hits, Vol. ... Sunday Morning Coming Down is a Johnny Cash album, released in 1972. ... International Superstar is an double compilation album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1972 (see 1972 in music). ... Five Feet High and Rising is a compilation album of the famous country singer Johnny Cash releasen in 1974 under the label Columbia. ... Greatest Hits, Vol. ... The Unissued Johnny Cash is a compilation album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Bear Family Records in 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Johnny & June is a compilation album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Bear Family Records in 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Tall Man is a compilation album by American country singer Johnny Cash, released on Bear Family Records in 1979 (see 1979 in music). ... Encore is a compilation album by country singer Johnny Cash, released on Columbia Records in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Biggest Hits is one of the many albums of the famous country singer Johnny Cash released in 1984. ... Wanted Man is one of the many albums of the famous country singer Johnny Cash released in 1994. ... 16 Biggest Hits is an album made by the famous country singer Johnny Cash released in 1999. ... Love, God and Murder is a Johnny Cash compilation box set released in 2000. ... The Essential Johnny Cash is a double-compact disc compilation by Johnny Cash, part of Sony Musics Essential CD anthology series. ... American series chronology Unearthed is an acclaimed box set by Johnny Cash released in 2003. ... The Legend is a box set compilation by country singer Johnny Cash, released in 2005 (see 2005 in music) on Columbia Records and Legacy Recordings. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Personal File is an album by the late American music icon Johnny Cash. ... After the success of the 2005 career-spanning compilation The Legend of Johnny Cash, a follow-up, appropriately titled The Legend of Johnny Cash Vol. ... 25 Minutes to Go is a song performed by Johnny Cash on his famous At Folsom Prison concert album. ... A Boy Named Sue is a country song made famous by Johnny Cash. ... This article is about the 1974 song. ... Cocaine Blues is a song written by TJ Arnall, though it is a rework of a traditional song title Little Sadie. Johnny Cash famously peformed the song at his Folsom Prison concert, an event portrayed by Joaquin Phoenix in Walk The Line. ... Cry Cry Cry is a song written and recorded by Johnny Cash. ... Dark as the Dungeon is a song written by singer-songwriter Merle Travis. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Johnny Cash. ... Folsom Prison Blues is an American country music song written by Johnny Cash in the early 1950s and originally recorded with his trio in 1956 for the Sun Records label. ... Get Rhythm is a song written and recorded by Johnny Cash. ... Goodnight Irene, or Irene, Goodnight, is a 20th century American folk standard. ... Green Green Grass of Home is a country song which Tom Jones made popular in 1966 and since then has it been a popular cover song which Elvis Presley recorded 1975 and was one of his favorite songs. ... Greystone Chapel is an American country music song written by Glen Sherley in the late 1960s and was included on the 1968 Johnny Cash Album At Folsom Prison, released by the Sun Records label. ... One of Johnny Cashs earliest songs. ... Recorded after I Walk the Line, July 1, 1957 in Memphis, Tenessee by Johnny Cash. ... Hurt is a promotional single from Nine Inch Nails remix album Further Down the Spiral (Halo Ten). ... I Walk the Line is a song written by Johnny Cash and recorded in 1956. ... This article is about the song by the Beatles. ... It Aint Me Babe is the title of a 1964 song by Bob Dylan, first included on his album, Another Side of Bob Dylan album. ... Jackson is a song written by Jerry Leiber and Billy Edd Wheeler about a married couple who find that the fire has gone out of their relationship. ... The Man Comes Around is the title track from Johnny Cashs American IV: The Man Comes Around, released in 2002 (see 2002 in music). ... One Piece At A Time is a humorous song by Johnny Cash. ... The One on the Right is on the Left is a song by American singer Johnny Cash. ... Remember the Alamo is a song written by Texan folk singer and songwriter Jane Bowers. ... Ring of Fire is a country music song popularized by Johnny Cash and co-written by June Carter and Merle Kilgore. ... This article is about the song by Ray Charles. ... Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... John Carter Cash (born 3 March 1970) is an American Country-singer, songwriter and producer. ... Rosanne Cash (born May 24, 1955) is an American singer and songwriter. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Vivian Liberto (April 23, 1934 – May 24, 2005) met Johnny Cash in 1950 at a roller skating rink in San Antonio, Texas three weeks before the Air Force deployed him to Germany. ... Tommy Cash pictured with brother, Johnny Cash Tommy Cash is a brother of Johnny Cash. ... Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... American Recordings is a Los Angeles-based record label headed by record producer Rick Rubin. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kingsland is a city in Cleveland County, Arkansas, United States. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nashville redirects here. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
JOHNNYCASH.COM RADIO WITH BILL MILLER (THE OFFICIAL JOHNNY CASH SITE) (344 words)
Johnny Cash Listener song contest finalists are announced.
Johnny Cash discusses his silver anniversary in show business.
Johnny's youngest sibling, Tommy Cash chats with Bill Miller about his elder brother's early beginnings.
Johnny Cash | Featured Videos, Photos and Articles | MTV (1955 words)
Johnny Cash was one of the most imposing and influential figures in post-World War II country music.
Cash's success continued to roll throughout 1958, as he earned his biggest hit, "Ballad of a Teenage Queen" (number one for ten weeks), as well another number one single, "Guess Things Happen That Way." For most of 1958, Cash attempted to record a gospel album, but Sun refused to allow him to record one.
Cash was arrested in El Paso for attempting to smuggle amphetamines into the country through his guitar case in 1965.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m