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Encyclopedia > John the Baptist
John the Baptist
The Baptism of Christ, by Piero della Francesca, 1449
Forerunner, Precursor, Baptist
Born c. 6–2 BCE
Died c. 30 CE
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Eastern Catholic Churches, Oriental Orthodox Churches, Anglicanism, Islam, Mandeanism
Major shrine Church of St. John the Baptist, Jerusalem
Feast June 24 (Nativity), August 29 (Beheading), January 7 (Synaxis, Eastern Orthodox), Thout 2 ( Coptic Orthodox Church)
Attributes Cross, lamb, his own head
Patronage patron saint of French Canada, Puerto Rico, Knights Hospitaller of Jerusalem, Florence, Genoa, Jordan and many other places
Saints Portal
Christianity Portal
Icon depicting the Baptism of Jesus by John in the Jordan River.
Icon depicting the Baptism of Jesus by John in the Jordan River.

Saint John the Baptist (died c. 30)[1] was a Jewish preacher and ascetic. He drew large crowds on the banks of the River Jordan, demanding from them repentance and baptism in view of the imminent coming of the Kingdom of God.[2]Jesus was one of those whom he baptized. He was killed by Herod Antipas, whom he had denounced for his marriage.[2] The historian Josephus writes that Herod had John killed for fear that John might raise a rebellion.[3] Jesus' own ministry followed John's, and some of Jesus' early followers had been followers of John.[4] John, like Jesus, preached at a time of political, social, and religious conflict (see Cultural and historical background of Jesus), and he prophesied that fire was coming to destroy the wicked. This is a list of musical groups and producers that are affiliated with and receive support from the hip-hop group Wu-Tang Clan. ... The Baptism of Jesus Christ, by Piero della Francesca, 1449 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The Baptism of Christ, 1450 (National Gallery, London). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... It has been suggested that Johannite be merged into this article or section. ... Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thout also known as Tout is the first month of the Coptic calendar. ... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Knights Hospitaller (also known as the , Sovereign Order of Saint John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta, Knights of Malta, Knights of Rhodes, and Chevaliers of Malta; French: Ordre des Hospitaliers) is a Christian organization that began as an Amalfitan hospital founded in Jerusalem in 1080 to provide... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links John_Baptizes_Jesus_Mural. ... Image File history File links John_Baptizes_Jesus_Mural. ... This article is about the religious artifacts. ... In the synoptic gospels, Jesus is baptised by John the Baptist. ... This article is about the Jordan River and its valley in western Asia. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Jordan River in western Asia. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... Kingdom of Heaven redirects here. ... In the synoptic gospels, Jesus is baptised by John the Baptist. ... Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years. ... In Christianity, the disciples were the students of Jesus during his ministry. ... This article — a part of the Jesus and history series — describes the period within which Jesus, the central figure of Christianity, is said to have lived. ...


Christians commonly refer to John as the Precursor or Forerunner of Jesus Christ,[5] since in the gospels, John announces Jesus' coming. He is also identified with Elijah,[4] and as related to Jesus (Luke 1:36). In view of Luke 1:41, Early Church tradition describes John as endowed with prenatal grace, so the feast day of his birth (24 June) is celebrated more solemnly than that marking his death (29 August).[2] This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... // Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Early Christianity is the Christianity of the three centuries between the death of Jesus ( 30) and the First Council of Nicaea (325). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Mandaeans, a tiny Gnostic religion, consider John a divine prophet but reject Jesus as a false prophet. Mandaeanism is a pre-Christian religion which has been classified by scholars as Gnostic. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge) that only a few possess. ... False prophet is a label given to a person who is viewed as illegitimately claiming charismatic authority within a religious group. ...


Muslims, following the Quran, and Baha'i, also regard John as a prophet. A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Known in India as the Lotus Temple, the Bahai House of Worship attracts an average of three and a half million visitors a year. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


John followed the example of previous Hebrew prophets, living austerely, challenging sinful rulers, calling for repentance, and promising God's justice. The early Christian church used baptism, combined with imposition of hands, as a rite conferring membership in the church. Baptism is a nearly universal practice among Christians today. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Herod's step-daughter, to whom the name Salome was later attributed, is said in Matthew 14:8 and Mark 6:25 to have asked him for John's head on a platter, and the presentation of his severed head often appears in art. Another theme of Christian art is his beheading,[1] which is mentioned not only in these two gospels, but also in Luke 9:9. He is also depicted as an ascetic wearing camel hair and with a staff and scroll inscribed "Ecce Agnus Dei" (Latin, "Behold the Lamb of God" - John 1:29) or bearing a book or dish with a lamb on it.[2] In Orthodox icons, he often has angel's wings, since Mark 1:2 applies to him a prophecy about an ἄγγελος (angelos), a word that can mean a messenger, but also an angel.[2] Eastern Orthodox Icon of the Beheading of John the Baptist. ...

Contents

In the New Testament

The excavated remains of the baptism site in Bethany beyond the Jordan, in modern-day Jordan.
The excavated remains of the baptism site in Bethany beyond the Jordan, in modern-day Jordan.

All four Gospels record John the Baptist's ministry. They depict him as proclaiming Christ's arrival. In the Synoptics (Mark, Matthew, and Luke), Jesus is baptized. In Matthew and John, the Baptist recognizes Jesus as the one he had foretold. ImageMetadata File history File links Baptism_Site. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Baptism_Site. ...


Birth and infancy

Main article: Zechariah (priest)

The Gospel of Luke includes an account of John's infancy, introducing him as the son of St. Zachary/Zachariah and St. Elizabeth, who previously "had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and they were both well advanced in years".[6] His birth, name, and office were foretold by the angel Gabriel to Zachariah, while Zachariah was performing his functions as a priest in the temple of Jerusalem. According to Luke, Zachariah was a priest of the course of Abijah, and his wife, Elizabeth, was of the daughters of Aaron[7]; consequently John automatically held the priesthood of Aaron. According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... Abijah means father (i. ... The description Daughter of Aaron is given to several women in the New Testament, among them Elisabeth, mother of John the Baptist. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ...


Luke states that John was born about six months before Jesus. Zachariah had lost his speech at the behest and prophecy of the angel Gabriel,[8] and it was restored on the occasion of Zachariah naming John.[9] On the basis of Luke's account, the Catholic calendar placed the feast of John the Baptist on June 24, six months before Christmas.[10] According to Luke, Jesus and John the Baptist were related, their mothers being cousins Luke 1:36; there is no mention of this in the other Gospels, and the scholar Raymond E. Brown has described the relationship as 'of dubious historicity'[11]; Geza Vermes has called it 'artificial and undoubtedly Luke's creation'[12]. Raymond Edward Brown (May 22, 1928 - August 8, 1998), was an American Roman Catholic priest and Biblical scholar. ... Geza Vermes (born 22 June 1924) is a Jewish scholar and writer on religious history, particularly Jewish and Christian. ...


Ministry

Icon of John the Baptist by Theophan the Greek, c. 1400.
Icon of John the Baptist by Theophan the Greek, c. 1400.

All four canonical gospels relate John's ministry, his preaching and baptism in the River Jordan. This article is about the religious artifacts. ... This article is about the Jordan River in western Asia. ...


Most notably, according to the Bible, he is the one who recognized Jesus as the Messiah, and on Jesus' request, baptised him. The baptism marked the beginning of Jesus' ministry. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


The Gospels of Mark, Matthew and (less clearly) Luke relate that Jesus came from Galilee to John and was baptized by him, whereupon the Spirit descended upon him and a voice from Heaven told him he was God's Son. Their lives (e.g, births) are believed to have been similar, although in Christianity, John is thought of as last prophet and Jesus as the Messiah. The Gospel of Mark, anonymous[1] but traditionally ascribed to Mark the Evangelist, is a synoptic gospel of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ...


The problem that Jesus, considered by Christians to be without sin, received John's baptism, which was for the forgiveness of sins, is addressed in the Gospel of Matthew's account, which has John refusing to baptize Jesus, saying, "I need to be baptized by you," until Jesus convinces him to baptize him nonetheless (Matthew 3:13-15). The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ...


The Gospel of John does not describe John baptizing Jesus but has John introducing Jesus to his disciples as the "Lamb of God" (John 1:29-34). For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ...


The Gospel of John reports that Jesus' disciples were baptizing and that a debate broke out between some of the disciples of John and another Jew about purification with John explaining that Jesus "must become greater" while he, John, "must become less" (John 3:22-36). Gospel of John then points out that Jesus' disciples were baptizing more people than John (John 4:2).


Later, the Gospel relates Jesus regarding John as "a burning and shining lamp, and you were willing to rejoice for a while in his light". (John 5:35).


The book of Acts portrays the disciples of John as eventually merging into the followers of Jesus (Acts 18:24-19:6), a development not reported by the Gospels except for the early case of Andrew, Simon Peter's brother (John 1:35-42). Look up Andrew in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


On various occasions the Gospels relate John denying any claim to be the Messiah and clearly acknowledging his inferiority to Jesus. However, scholars such as Harold W. Attridge contend that John's status as a "self-conscious and deliberate forerunner of Jesus" is likely to be an invention by early Christians, arguing that "for the early church it would have been something of an embarrassment to say that Jesus, who was in their minds superior to John the Baptist, had been baptized by him."[13] Harold W. Attridge has been the Dean of the Yale Divinity School since 2002. ...


Imprisonment and beheading

The Beheading of St John, 1608, Valletta Co-Cathedral, Malta
The Beheading of St John, 1608, Valletta Co-Cathedral, Malta

According to the canonical Gospels, John the Baptist's public ministry was brought to a close when he was imprisoned on orders of Herod Antipas, probably about seven months after he had baptized Jesus.[citation needed] The synoptic Gospels state that Herod reacted to John's condemnation of Herod's marriage to Herodias, the wife of Herod's brother Philip (Luke 3:19; Matthew 14:3-5}. Josephus locates John's imprisonment in the fortress of Machaerus on the southern extremity of Peraea, nine miles (14 km) east of the Dead Sea (Josephus, Jewish Antiquities XVIII:5:1–2). Eastern Orthodox icon John the Baptist - the Angel of Desert (1620s). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3200x2173, 219 KB) Description: Title: de: Die Enthauptung Johannes des Täufers, für das Oratorium der Kathedrale San Giovanni die Cavalieri in Valletta Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 361 × 520 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3200x2173, 219 KB) Description: Title: de: Die Enthauptung Johannes des Täufers, für das Oratorium der Kathedrale San Giovanni die Cavalieri in Valletta Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 361 × 520 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location... Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... Herodias (c. ... Herod Philip I (4 BC–AD 34), or Philip the tetrarch, was son of Herod the Great and his fifth wife Cleopatra of Jerusalem and half-brother of Herod Antipas and Herod Archelaus. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... Machaerus is a fortress fifteen miles southeast of the mouth of the Jordan river, in the wild and desolate hills that overlook the Dead Sea from the east. ...


Matthew relates that the imprisoned John sent messengers to Jesus to ask him whether he was the Messiah. Jesus indirectly answered in the affirmative and described John in terms of a return of the prophet Elijah (Matthew 11:2-15).


Regarding John's death, Josephus states that Herod had John killed to preempt a possible uprising. Matthew links John's death as well with Herodias, as he related that her daughter Salome so much delighted Antipas with a dance that he vowed to grant her any wish to which, after being prompted by her mother (Herodias), she demanded the head of John the Baptist. (Matthew 14:6-8) Coin of Salome (daughter of Herodias), queen of Chalcis and Armenia Minor. ...


The Gospels date John's death before the crucifixion of Jesus. Josephus places John's death no later than 36 CE. Some scholars[who?] believe that Herod Antipas did not marry his brother's wife until his brother Philip died in 34 CE, placing these events after the date in the Gospel account.


Neither Josephus nor the Gospels state where John was buried, though the Gospels state that John's disciples took his body and placed it in a tomb and then told Jesus all that had occurred (Matthew 14:3-12). For the New York prison see The Tombs. ...


In the time of Julian the Apostate, however, his tomb was shown at Samaria, where the inhabitants opened it and burned part of his bones. The rest of the alleged remains were saved by some Christians, who carried them to an abbot of Jerusalem named Philip.[14]


Prophecies

Christians believe that John the Baptist had a specific role ordained by God which was to be the forerunner or precursor to the Messiah, whom they believe to be Jesus. "to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord." Luke 1:17 and also Luke 1:76 "...thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways; 1:77 "To give knowledge of salvation unto his people by the remission of their sins." In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


There are several passages within the Old Testament which are interpreted by Christians as being prophetic of John the Baptist in this role. These include a passage in the Book of Malachi that refers to a prophet who would prepare the way of the Lord: Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... Malachi (or Malachias, מַלְאָכִי, Malʾaḫi, Málakhî) is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh, written by the prophet Malachi. ...

Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts. - Malachi 3:1

Though the interpretation of this passage as referring to a forerunner of the Messiah was uncommon amongst Jews prior to the 2nd century BC[dubious ], it became significantly more common under Hellenic, and later Christian, influences.


Christians interpreted Isaiah 40:3-5 as referring prophetically to John, based on John's own statement as written in John 1:22-23::He said, 'I am the voice of one crying out in the wilderness, "Make straight the way of the Lord" ', as the prophet Isaiah said.


Josephus

An account of John the Baptist is found in all extant manuscripts of the Jewish Antiquities (book 18, chapter 5, 2) by Flavius Josephus (37-100)[15]: Josephus, also known as Flavius Josephus (c. ...

Now some of the Jews thought that the destruction of Herod's army came from God, and that very justly, as a punishment of what he did against John, that was called the Baptist: for Herod slew him, who was a good man, and commanded the Jews to exercise virtue, both as to righteousness towards one another, and piety towards God, and so to come to baptism; for that the washing [with water] would be acceptable to him, if they made use of it, not in order to the putting away [or the remission] of some sins [only], but for the purification of the body; supposing still that the soul was thoroughly purified beforehand by righteousness. Now when [many] others came in crowds about him, for they were very greatly moved [or pleased] by hearing his words, Herod, who feared lest the great influence John had over the people might put it into his power and inclination to raise a rebellion, (for they seemed ready to do any thing he should advise,) thought it best, by putting him to death, to prevent any mischief he might cause, and not bring himself into difficulties, by sparing a man who might make him repent of it when it would be too late. Accordingly he was sent a prisoner, out of Herod's suspicious temper, to Macherus, the castle I before mentioned, and was there put to death. Now the Jews had an opinion that the destruction of this army was sent as a punishment upon Herod, and a mark of God's displeasure to him.[3]

Jesus-mythicist Frank Zindler argues that the passage is an interpolation by a Sabian but his opinion is beyond the pale of mainstream scholarship.[16] The passage dates to at least the early third century as it is quoted by Origen in Contra Celsum. It was also quoted by Eusebius of Caesarea in the fourth century. Not to be confused with Sabaeans, who were ancient people living in what is now Yemen. ... Origen Origen (Greek: Ōrigénēs, 185–ca. ... Contra Celsus, or (probably better Latin) Contra Celsum, is the title of a major work by the Church Father Origenes, refutating the anti-christian writings of Celsus the Platonist. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ...


According to this passage, the execution of John was blamed for a defeat Herod suffered in around 36. Divergences between the passage's presentation and the Biblical accounts of John include the following:

  • Baptism for those whose souls have already been "purified beforehand by righteousness" is for purification of the body, not general repentance of sin (Mark 1:4).

Biblical scholar John Dominic Crossan differentiates between Josephus' account of John and Jesus: "John had a monopoly, but Jesus had a franchise." To get baptized, Crossan writes[clarify], you went only to John. Stopping the movement meant only stopping John. His movement ended with his death. Jesus invited all to come and see how he and his companions had already accepted the Government of God, entered it and were living it. Such a communal praxis was not just for himself, but could survive without him, unlike John's movement.[17] John Dominic Crossan (born Nenagh, Co. ...


Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern Orthodox icon John the Baptist - the Angel of the Desert (Stroganov School, 1620s) Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.
Icon depicting Elizabeth leaving the infant John in the desert (John the Baptist "in the Desert" Monastery near Jerusalem, Israel).
Icon depicting Elizabeth leaving the infant John in the desert (John the Baptist "in the Desert" Monastery near Jerusalem, Israel).

The Eastern Orthodox believe that John was the last of the Old Testament prophets, thus serving as a bridge between that period of revelation and the New Covenant. They also teach that, following his death, John descended into Hades and there once more preached that Jesus the Messiah was coming, so he was the Forerunner of Christ in death as he had been in life. According to Sacred Tradition, John the Baptist appears at the time of death to those who have not heard the Gospel of Christ, and preaches the Good News to them, that all may have the opportunity to be saved. Image File history File links Prokopiy Chirin of the Stroganov School. ... Image File history File links Prokopiy Chirin of the Stroganov School. ... This article is about the religious artifacts. ... Stroganov School (Строгановская школа in Russian) is a conventional name of one of the Russian icon-painting schools of the late 16th - early 17th century. ... State Tretyakov Gallery (2006) The State Tretyakov Gallery (Russian: , Russian: ), in Moscow, Russia, is the foremost depository of Russian fine art in the world. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Revelation of the Last Judgment by Jacob de Backer Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown, which could not be known apart from the unveiling (Goswiller 1987 p. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... The Catholic Church bases all of its teachings on Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture (The Bible). ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ...


Orthodox churches will often have an icon of St. John the Baptist in a place of honor on the iconostasis, and he is frequently mentioned during the Divine Services. Every Tuesday throughout the year is dedicated to his memory. This article is about the religious artifacts. ... 17th-century iconostasis of Prophet Elias church, Yaroslavl. ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time, developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between the prescribed prayers of the daily round. ...


The Eastern Orthodox Church remembers Saint John the Forerunner on six separate feast days, listed here in order in which they occur during the church year (which begins on September 1): Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. ...

In addition to the above, September 5 is the commemoration of Zechariah and Elisabeth, St. John's parents. is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Icon of the Synaxis of the Theotokos (Pskov, 17th century). ... This article is about the Christian feast. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nativity of St. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Orthodox icon John the Baptist - the Angel of Desert (1620s). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The Russian Orthodox Church observes October 12 as the Transfer of the Right Hand of the Forerunner from Malta to Gatchina (1799). The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gatchina is the city of 84900 inhabitants in the Leningrad oblast of the Russian Federation, 45 km south of St Petersburg by the road leading to Pskov. ...


Roman Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Church commemorates St. John the Baptist on three separate feast days:

Wood Sculpture of John The Baptist’s Head by Master Santiago Martinez Delgado, permanent Collection at the Museo Nacional in Bogotá, Colombia.

is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Orthodox Icon of the Beheading of John the Baptist. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ship of Hasekuras mission to Europe. ... Ship of Hasekuras mission to Europe. ... Master Santiago Martinez Delgado. ... Colombian National Museum (Spanish: Museo Nacional de Colombia) located in Bogotá downtown, is the biggest museum in Colombia. ... Bogota redirects here. ...

As a patron saint

Saint John the Baptist is the patron saint of Puerto Rico, and its capital city San Juan bears his name. In 1521, the island was given its formal name "San Juan Bautista de Puerto Rico", following the usual custom of christening the town with both its formal name and the name which Christopher Columbus had originally given the island, honouring John the Baptist. The indistinct use of "San Juan Bautista" and "Puerto Rico" for calling both the city and the island led to a reversal in practical use by most inhabitants due largely to a map-making error. Therefore by 1746 the name for the city (Puerto Rico) had become that of the entire island, while the name for the island (San Juan Bautista) had become the name for the city. The official motto for the island of Puerto Rico also references the saint, Joannes Est Nomen Eius (translated, "John is his name"). Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... For other uses, see San Juan. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ...


He is also a patron saint of French Canada, and Newfoundland. The Canadian cities of St. John's, Newfoundland (1497) and Saint John, New Brunswick (1604) were both named in his honor. In the UK Saint John the Baptist is the patron saint of Penzance, Cornwall. His feast day is June 24, celebrated in Quebec as the Fête nationale du Québec (la Fête St-Jean-Baptiste), and in Newfoundland as Discovery Day. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: , Country Province Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... Nickname: Motto: O Fortunati Quorum Jam Moenia Surgunt (Latin for, O Fortunate Ones Whose Walls Are Now Rising. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Fête Nationale parade, Montreal The Fête nationale du Québec (Quebec National Holiday) is an official holiday of Quebec, Canada. ... Discovery Day is celebrated in only two provinces in Canada. ...


Also on the night from 23rd to 24th June, Saint John is celebrated as the patron saint of Porto, the second largest city in Portugal. An article from June 2004 in The Guardian, remarked that "Porto's Festa de São João is one of Europe's liveliest street festivals, yet it is relatively unknown outside the country"[19]. Oporto redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Every year, on the 24th June, the city of Porto becomes lively and seemingly crazy. ...


He is also patron of the Knights Hospitaller of Jerusalem, Florence, and Genoa, Italy. The Knights Hospitaller (also known as the , Sovereign Order of Saint John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta, Knights of Malta, Knights of Rhodes, and Chevaliers of Malta; French: Ordre des Hospitaliers) is a Christian organization that began as an Amalfitan hospital founded in Jerusalem in 1080 to provide... Florence (Italian, Firenze) is a city in the center of Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River, with a population of around 400,000, plus a suburban population in excess of 200,000. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ...


Saint John the Baptist is also the patron saint of Jordan, his beheading is believed to have taken place in Machaerus in central Jordan. Machaerus is a fortress fifteen miles southeast of the mouth of the Jordan river, in the wild and desolate hills that overlook the Dead Sea from the east. ...


The Baptistines are the name given to a number of religious orders dedicated to the memory of John the Baptist. Baptistines were the name given to a number of Roman Catholic religious orders dedicated to Saint John the Baptist. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Saint John is also the patron saint of Lian, Batangas, San Juan, Metro Manila (Philippines) and the entire state of South Carolina. Lian is a 4th class municipality in the province of Batangas, Philippines. ... The City of San Juan (Filipino: Lungsod ng San Juan) is a city in Metro Manila in the Philippines. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...


St. John the Baptist is (along with St. John the Evangelist) claimed as a Patron Saint by the fraternal society of Free and Accepted Masons (better known as the Freemasons).[20] Freemasons redirects here. ...


Relics

A head said to be John's, enshrined in Rome
A head said to be John's, enshrined in Rome
St John's Shrine inside the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus
St John's Shrine inside the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus

According to ancient tradition, the burial-place of John the Baptist was at Sebaste in Samaria, and mention is made of his relics being honored there around the middle of the fourth century. The historians Rufinus and Theodoretus record that the shrine was desecrated under Julian the Apostate around 362, the bones being partly burned. A portion of the rescued relics were carried to Jerusalem, then to Alexandria, where on 27 May 395, they were laid in the basilica that was newly-dedicated to the Forerunner on the former site of the temple of Serapis. The tomb at Sebaste continued, nevertheless, to be visited by pious pilgrims, and St. Jerome bears witness to miracles being worked there. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 1360 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 1360 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 1230 KB) Summary St Johns Chapel inside the Ummayad mosque February 2005 M. Disdero Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Umayyad Mosque ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 1230 KB) Summary St Johns Chapel inside the Ummayad mosque February 2005 M. Disdero Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Umayyad Mosque ... The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night St Johns Shrine inside the Mosque The courtyard of the Mosque with the ancient Treasury (Beit al Mal) The Grand Mosque of Damascus, also known as the Umayyad Mosque (Arabic: جامع بني أمية الكبير, transl. ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... Sebaste is a common placename, mostly in classical Antiquity, since the word was the Greek equivalent of the Latin Augusta: ancient towns by the name sought to honor Augustus or a later Roman emperor. ... “Shomron” redirects here. ... Relics can be: Relics: the remains of saints (usually bones), honored in the Catholic and Orthodox churches. ... Tyrannius Rufinus or Rufinus of Aquileia (between 340 and 345–410 CE) was a monk, historian, and theologian. ... // Theodoret (c. ... Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... Desecration is the ninth book in the Left Behind series. ... Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... Look up basilica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Forerunner may mean: A Forerunner, in philately, a postage stamp used before a region can produce its own stamps. ... Serapion, or Sarapion (Fl. ... Serapis can refer to: A series of British ships named HMS Serapis. ... Monument to pilgrims in Burgos, Spain This article is on religious pilgrims. ... For other uses see: Jerome (disambiguation) Jerome (about 340 - September 30, 420), (full name Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus) is best known as the translator of the Bible from Greek and Hebrew into Latin. ...


What became of the head of John the Baptist is difficult to determine. Nicephorus[21] and Symeon Metaphrastes say that Herodias had it buried in the fortress of Machaerus (in accordance with Josephus). Other writers say that it was interred in Herod's palace at Jerusalem; there it was found during the reign of Constantine I, and thence secretly taken to Emesa, in Phoenicia, where it was concealed, the place remaining unknown for years, until it was manifested by revelation in 453. Nicephorus Callistus Xanthopoulos, of Constantinople, the last of the Greek ecclesiastical historians, flourished around 1320. ... Symeon Metaphrastes was the most renowned of the Byzantine hagiographers. ... Machaerus is a fortress fifteen miles southeast of the mouth of the Jordan river, in the wild and desolate hills that overlook the Dead Sea from the east. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... Emesa was an ancient city on the Orontes River in Syria. ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ... Revelation of the Last Judgment by Jacob de Backer Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown, which could not be known apart from the unveiling (Goswiller 1987 p. ...


The Coptic Christian Orthodox Church also claim to hold the relics of St. John the Baptist. These are to be found in a monastery in Lower Egypt between Cairo and Alexandria. It is possible, with permission from the monks, to see the original tomb where the remains were found.

Tomb of St. John the Baptist at a Coptic monastery in Lower Egypt. The bones of St. John the Baptist were said to have been found here.
Tomb of St. John the Baptist at a Coptic monastery in Lower Egypt. The bones of St. John the Baptist were said to have been found here.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Coptic is an adjective referring to the original inhabitants of Egypt, the Copts. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Map of Lower and Upper Egypt Lower Egypt is the northern-most section of Egypt. ...


Over the centuries, there have been many discrepancies in the various legends and claimed relics throughout the Christian world. Several different locations claim to possess the severed head of John the Baptist. Among the various claimants are:[22] For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ...

Istanbul claims to possess the saint's arm and a piece of his skull in the Topkapi Palace, as does the Coptic Orthodox Monastery of Saint Macarius the Great in Scetes, Egypt,[24] while John's right hand, with which he baptised Jesus, is said to be in the possession of the Serbian Orthodox Cetinje monastery in Montenegro, and also at the Romanian skete of the Forerunner on Mount Athos. For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Facade of San Silvestro in Capite on Piazza San Silvastro. ... The cathedral in Amiens Close-up of a stained glass window The Cathedral of Our Lady of Amiens (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame dAmiens), or just Amiens Cathedral, is the tallest complete cathedral in France with the greatest interior volume, estimated at 200,000 m³. The vaults of the... Belligerents Crusaders Holy Roman Empire Republic of Venice Montferret Champagne Blois Amiens ÃŽle-de-France Saint-Pol Burgundy Flanders Balkans Byzantine Empire Kingdom of Hungary Croatia Dalmatia Commanders Otto IV Boniface I Theobald I Lois I Alexios V Doukas Isaac II Angelos Alexios III Angelos Emeric I The Fourth Crusade... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night St Johns Shrine inside the Mosque The courtyard of the Mosque with the ancient Treasury (Beit al Mal) The Grand Mosque of Damascus, also known as the Umayyad Mosque (Arabic: جامع بني أمية الكبير, transl. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... Topkapı Palace (Topkapı Sarayı in Turkish, literally the Cannongate Palace - named after a nearby gate), located in Istanbul (Constantinople), was the administrative center of the Ottoman Empire from 1465 to 1853. ... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... The Monastery of Saint Macarius is a Coptic Orthodox monastery located in the Nitrian Desert, about 92 Km north west of Cairo, and off the highway between Cairo and Alexandria. ... Wadi El Natrun is a town in Al Buhayrah Governorate, Egypt. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... The Cetinje Monastery (Serbian Cyrillic: Цетињски манастир; also known as the New Cetinje Monastery) is the most famous Serb Orthodox monastery in Montenegro. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... A skete is a group of hermits following a monastic rule, allowing them to worship in comparative solitude, although with a level of support present not available for a lone hermit. ... Peak of Mount Athos as seen from the courtyard of the Prodromos Skete. ... Capital Karyes Largest city Karyes Official languages Greek, Church Slavonic, Bulgarian, Georgian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 335. ...


Mandaean view

John the Baptist plays a large part in some Mandaean writings, especially those dating from the Islamic period.[25] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mandaeism. ...


Mandaeans highly revere him and may possibly have some remote connection with his original disciples.[2]


They believe John the Baptist, called Yahya in the Sidra d-Yahia ("Book of John"), was the last and greatest of the prophets. While Mandaeans agree that he baptized Jesus (Yeshu), they reject the latter as either a saviour or prophet. They view John as the only true Messiah. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


According to the text of the Ginza Rba, John died at the hand of an angel. The angel appeared as a three-year-old child, coming to John for baptism. John knew the angel for what it was, and that once he touched its hand, he would die immediately. John performed the baptism anyway, and died in the process. Afterward, the angel covered John's body with mud. Ginza Rba (in Mandaic, which translates into The Great Treasure) or Siddra Rba (The Great Book) is one of many holy scriptures of the Mandaean religion. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ...


Islamic view

Main article: Yahya ibn Zakariyya

John the Baptist is known as Yahya in Arabic and in the Qur'an. The Qur'an, in the sura Maryam, identifies John is the son of Zachariah and maternal cousin of Jesus. It relates an account similar to that of the Gospel of Luke, including the barrenness of Zachariah's unnamed wife and his doubts, though Zachariah is not described as actually mute but only ordered not to speak for three nights. John, whose tidings are foretold by the angels, is exhorted to hold fast to the Scripture and was given wisdom by God while still child. (Surah 19:7-12). He is described as "pure", "devout", "dutiful towards his parents" and as "not arrogant or rebellious" (Surah 19:7-15) and is called "a Prophet of the Righteous" coming "to confirm a word from Allah". (Surah 3:39) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sura Maryam (Arabic: سورة مريم ) (Mary) is the 19th sura of the Quran and is a Makkan sura. ... According the the Quran, Zachariah is the guardian of Mary, the Mother of Jesus. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Bahá'í view

There are numerous quotations in the writings of Bahá'u'lláh, Founder of the Bahá'í Faith mentioning John the Baptist. He is regarded by Bahá'ís as a lesser Prophet. [26] Bahá'u'lláh claimed that His Forerunner, the Báb, was the spiritual return of John the Baptist. In His letter to Pope Pius IX, Bahá'u'lláh wrote: Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 – May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí Nuri (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... The Baháí Faith refers to what are commonly called prophets as Manifestations of God, or simply Manifestations (mazhar) who are directly linked with the concept of Progressive revelation. ... Shrine of the Báb in Haifa, Israel. ... The Blessed Pope Pius IX, born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, ( May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878) was pope for a record pontificate of over 31 years, from June 16, 1846 until his death. ...

"O followers of the Son! We have once again sent John unto you, and He, verily, hath cried out in the wilderness of the Bayán: O peoples of the world! Cleanse your eyes! The Day whereon ye can behold the Promised One and attain unto Him hath drawn nigh! O followers of the Gospel! Prepare the way! The Day of the advent of the Glorious Lord is at hand! Make ready to enter the Kingdom. Thus hath it been ordained by God, He Who causeth the dawn to break."[27] The Persian Bayán (بیان in Persian) is one of the principal scriptural writings of the Báb. ...

However, Bahá'ís consider the Báb to be a greater Prophet (Manifestation of God) and thus possessed of a far greater station than John the Baptist. Shrine of the Báb in Haifa, Israel. ... The Baháí Faith refers to what are commonly called prophets as Manifestations of God, or simply Manifestations (mazhar) who are directly linked with the concept of Progressive revelation. ...


Gnostic and anthroposophic views

In Gnosticism, John the Baptist was a "personification" of the Old Testament prophet Elijah. As an Old Testament prophet, Elijah did not know the True God (the God of the New Testament), and thus had to be reincarnated in Gnostic theology. As predicted by the Old Testament prophet Malachi, Elijah must "come first" to herald the coming of Jesus Christ. Gnosticism (Greek: gnōsis, knowledge) refers to a diverse, syncretistic religious movement consisting of various belief systems generally united in the teaching that humans are divine souls trapped in a material world created by an imperfect spirit, the demiurge, who is frequently identified with the Abrahamic God. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For the Northern Irish singer songwriter, see Malachi Cush. ...


Modern anthroposophy, initiated by Rudolf Steiner, concurs with the idea that the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah, in line with the Synoptic Gospels (e.g. Mark 9:11-13,Matthew 11:13-14,Luke 7:27), although the Gospel of John explicitly denies this (John 1:21). Furthermore, after his beheading at Machaerus his soul is said to have become the inspiring group genius of Christ's disciples. According to Steiner, the painter Raphael and the poet Novalis were more recent incarnations of John the Baptist.[28] Anthroposophy, also called spiritual science, is a spiritual philosophy based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner,[1] which states that anyone who conscientiously cultivates sense-free thinking can attain experience of and insights into the spiritual world. ... Rudolf Steiner. ... In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... Machaerus is a fortress fifteen miles southeast of the mouth of the Jordan river, in the wild and desolate hills that overlook the Dead Sea from the east. ... This page is about the artist. ... For the German rock band, see Novalis (band). ...


Unification church

The Unification Church teaches that God intended that John help Jesus during his public ministry in Israel. In particular, John should have done everything in his power to persuade the Jewish people that Jesus was the Messiah. He was to become Jesus' greatest disciple. John's failure to do so was the chief obstacle to the fulfillment of Jesus' mission.Divine Principle Chapter 4, Section 2 The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

According to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, latter-day revelation confirms the biblical account and also makes known additional events in the ministry of John the Baptist. According to this tradition, revelation reveals that John was "ordained by an angel," when he was 8 days of age, to overthrow the kingdom of the Jews and to prepare a people for the Lord. They also claim that he was baptized while yet in his childhood [29] (Doctrine and Covenants 84:27-28). For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ...


The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints believes that John the Baptist appeared on the banks of the Susquehanna River near Harmony Township, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania (present-day Oakton), as a resurrected being, to Joseph Smith, Jr. and Oliver Cowdery on 15 May 1829, and ordained them to the Aaronic priesthood.[30]; [31]. According to this tradition, John the Baptist's ministry has operated in three dispensations: the last of the prophets under the law of Moses, the first of the New Testament prophets, and the bringer of the Aaronic priesthood to the dispensation of the fulness of times. They also believe John's ministry was foretold by two prophets in the Book of Mormon: Lehi[2] and his son, Nephi (1 Nephi 11:27; 2 Nephi 31:4-18). The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... Harmony Township is a township located in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. ... Oakton is the name of some places in the United States of America: Oakton, Georgia Oakton, Kentucky Oakton, Missouri Oakton, North Carolina Oakton, Virginia Oakton, West Virginia Also, see Oakton High School This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... Photograph of Oliver Cowdery found in the Library of Congress, taken in the 1840s Oliver Hervy Pliny Cowdery[1] (3 October 1806 – 3 March 1850) was the primary participant with Joseph Smith, Jr. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Aaronic Priesthood is the lesser of the two (or sometimes three) orders of priesthood recognized in Mormonism. ... The Aaronic Priesthood is the lesser of the two (or sometimes three) orders of priesthood recognized in Mormonism. ... In Christianity, the dispensation (or administration) of the fulness of times is thought to be a world order or administration in which the heavens and the earth are under the political and/or spiritual government of Jesus. ... // The Book of Mormon [1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... In the Book of Mormon, Lehi (Hebrew לחי Léḥî / Lāḥî jawbone) was an ancient prophet who lived around 600 BC. He was an Israelite of the Tribe of Manasseh. ... In The Book of Mormon, Nephi, the son of Lehi, is a prophet and founder of the Nephite people. ...


Commemoration

St. John's, Newfoundland and The Basilica of St. John the Baptist
St. John's, Newfoundland and The Basilica of St. John the Baptist

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 2462 KB)City of St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 2462 KB)City of St. ... Religions Christianity Scriptures Bible Languages Vernacular: Lebanese Arabic, Cypriot Maronite Arabic Liturgical: Syriac Maronites (Arabic: ‎, transliteration: , Syriac: ܡܪܘܢܝܐ, Latin: Ecclesia Maronitarum) are members of one of the Eastern Catholic Churches, with a heritage reaching back to Maron in the early 5th century. ... Overlooking the capital of Lebanon, Beirut, the town of Beit Mery has been a summer, mountain resort since the times of the Romans. ... Peak of Mount Athos as seen from the courtyard of the Prodromos Skete. ... Capital Karyes Largest city Karyes Official languages Greek, Church Slavonic, Bulgarian, Georgian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 335. ... College name St Johns College Collegium Divi Joannis Baptistae Named after Saint John the Baptist Established 1555 Sister College Sidney Sussex College President Sir Michael Scholar KCB JCR President Rhys Jones Undergraduates 381 Graduates 184 Homepage Boatclub St Johns College is one of the constituent colleges of the... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... San Juan, the Spanish for Saint John, is a common toponym in parts of the world where Spanish is or was spoken: Argentina San Juan Province San Juan, Argentina, the capital of that province Cuba San Juan Hill Mexico San Juan, Campeche San Juan, Chihuahua San Juan, Coahuila San Juan... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: , Country Province Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1497 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... San Juan del Río is a city (1990 pop. ... Querétaro (formal name: Querétaro Arteaga) is a state in central Mexico. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake - thousands die. ... Nickname: Motto: O Fortunati Quorum Jam Moenia Surgunt (Latin for, O Fortunate Ones Whose Walls Are Now Rising. ... The Saint John River is a river, approximately 418 mi (673 km) long, located in the U.S. state of Maine and the Canadian province of New Brunswick. ... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ... St. ... Saint Johns University can refer to: St. ... Collegeville Township is a township located in Stearns County, Minnesota. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Fête Nationale parade, Montreal The Fête nationale du Québec (Quebec National Holiday) is an official holiday of Quebec, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Binomial name Hypericum perforatum Linnaeus, St Johns wort used alone refers to the species Hypericum perforatum, also known as Klamath weed or Goat weed, but is used with qualifiers to refer to any species of the genus Hypericum. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kamień Pomorski is a town in the north of Poland, in the West-Pomeranian Voivodship. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... St. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... The Verrazano Narrows Bridge (properly written as the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge) is a suspension bridge that connects the boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York City at the Narrows, the reach connecting the relatively protected upper bay with the larger lower bay. ... St John Ambulance vehicle in a London street. ... This article is about the order after its revival in the 19th century. ... Mission San Juan Bautista was founded on June 24, 1797. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Famous churches

The Catholic church in Ein Kerem on the site where John the Baptist is said to have been born.
The Catholic church in Ein Kerem on the site where John the Baptist is said to have been born.

Ain Karim (Arabic: عين كارم Hebrew עין כרם) (literally, Spring of the Vineyard) is an artisan village 7. ... Ain Karim (Arabic: عين كارم Hebrew עין כרם) (literally, Spring of the Vineyard) is an artisan village within the municipal boundaries of Jerusalem, Israel. ... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica of St. ... For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... For the Anglican cathedral of St. ... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: , Country Province Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. ... Torino or Turin is a major industrial city in north-western Italy, capital of the Piedmont region, located mainly on the west bank of the Po River. ... Audresselles is a seaside French village and commune, south of Cape Gris Nez, in the Pas-de-Calais département, Nord-Pas-de-Calais région. ... Valletta (Maltese: , commonly referred to as Il-Belt - The City) is the capital city of Malta. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... NSW redirects here. ... Union County Court House Elizabeth is a city in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... St. ...

See also

The Johannites are a sect of Gnostics who reject Jesus Christ, and instead posit that the true savior of the world (sent to fulfill Old Testament prophecy) was in fact John the Baptist, as he was performing baptisms before Jesus birth. ... In the synoptic gospels, Jesus is baptised by John the Baptist. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... The Ebionites (Greek: Ebionaioi from Hebrew; , , the Poor Ones) were an early Jewish Christian sect that lived in and around the land of Israel in the 1st to the 5th century CE.[1] Without authenticated archaeological evidence for the existence of the Ebionites, their views and practices can only be... Eastern Orthodox icon John the Baptist - the Angel of Desert (1620s). ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... A Carthusian Monastery in Jerez, Spain The Carthusians are a Christian religious order founded by St Bruno in 1084. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b Wetterau, Bruce. World history. New York: Henry Holt and company. 1994.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford University Press 2005 ISBN 978-0-19-280290-3) article John the Baptist, St
  3. ^ a b Flavius Josephus, Jewish Antiqities 18. 5. 2. (Translation by William Whiston).
  4. ^ a b Harris, Stephen L., Understanding the Bible. Palo Alto: Mayfield. 1985. John 1:36-40
  5. ^ Meier, John (1994), Mentor, Message, and Miracles (A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Volume 2), vol. 2, Anchor Bible, ISBN 0385469926 
  6. ^ Luke 1:7
  7. ^ Luke 1:5
  8. ^ Luke 1:20"And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words...."
  9. ^ Luke 1:64"And he asked for a writing table, and wrote, saying, His name is John. And they marvelled all. And his mouth was opened immediately, and his tongue loosed, and he spoke...."
  10. ^ Englebert, Omer (1951). The Lives of the Saints. Barnes & Noble, 529. ISBN 978-1566195164. 
  11. ^ Raymond Edward Brown, The Virginal Conception and Bodily Resurrection of Jesus, Paulist Press (1973), page 54
  12. ^ Geza Vermes, The Nativity, page 143.
  13. ^ Harold W. Attridge. Historical problems with John the Baptist. From Jesus to Christ: A Portrait of Jesus' World. PBS. Retrieved on 2007-10-31.
  14. ^ Eccl. lib. iii. cap. 3 Chronic. Alex, p.686)
  15. ^ "Josephus, Flavius." Cross, F. L., ed. The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church. Oxford University Press. 2005
  16. ^ Frank R. Zindler, The Jesus The Jews Never Knew, Sepher Toldoth Yeshu and the Quest of the historical Jesus in Jewish Sources (AAP), 2003
  17. ^ Crossan, John Dominic, God and Empire, HarperCollins, 2007, p.117ff
  18. ^ In late antiquity this feast in some churches marked the beginning of the Ecclesiastical Year; see Archbishop Peter (L'Huiller) of New York and New Jersey, "Liturgical Matters: "The Lukan Jump"", in: Newspaper of the Diocese of New York and New Jersey, Fall 1992.
  19. ^ The Guardian, June 12 2004, "There's only one São João"
  20. ^ Pietre-Stones Review of Freemasonry
  21. ^ Nicephorus, Ecclesiastical History I, ix. See Patrologia Graeca, cxlv.-cxlvii.
  22. ^ a b Lost Worlds: Knights Templar, July 10, 2006 video documentary on The History Channel, directed and written by Stuart Elliott
  23. ^ Sean Martin, The Knights Templar: The History & Myths of the Legendary Military Order, 2005. ISBN 1-56025-645-1
  24. ^ The Monastery of St. Macarius the Great
  25. ^ Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford University Press 2005 ISBN 978-0-19-280290-3), article Mandaeans
  26. ^ Compilations (1983). in Hornby, Helen (Ed.): Lights of Guidance: A Bahá'í Reference File. Bahá'í Publishing Trust, New Delhi, India, p. 475. ISBN 8185091463. 
  27. ^ Bahá'u'lláh (2002). The Summons of the Lord of Hosts. Haifa, Israel: Bahá'í World Centre, p. 63. ISBN 0853989761. 
  28. ^ Sergei Prokofieff, The Mystery of John the Baptist and John the Evangelist Turning Point of Time: An Esoteric Study, ISBN 1902636678
  29. ^ Doctrine and Covenants 84:27-28 [1]
  30. ^ [D&C 13]; D&C 27:7-8
  31. ^ Joseph Smith History 1:68-72

Josephus, also known as Flavius Josephus (c. ... Stephen L Harris is Professor and Chair, Department of Humanities and Religious Studies at California State University, Sacramento. ... John Paul Meier is a prominent Biblical scholar and Catholic priest. ... Harold W. Attridge has been the Dean of the Yale Divinity School since 2002. ... PBS redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... The Patrologia Graeca is an edited collection of writings by the Christian Church Fathers in the Greek language in 161 volumes, produced in 1857–1866 by J.P. Migne It includes both the Eastern Fathers and those Western authors who wrote before Latin became predominant the West in the 3rd... For the Canadian equivalent of this channel, see History Television. ... Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 – May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí Nuri (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ...

References

  • Catherine M. Murphy, John the Baptist: Prophet of Purity for a New Age. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 2003. ISBN 0-8146-5933-0

References to John (Yahya) in the Qur'an

External links

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Adam Enoch Noah Eber Shelah Abraham Lot Ishmael Isaac Jacob Joseph Job

Shoaib Musa Harun Dhul-Kifl Dawud Sulayman Ilyas Al-Yasa Yunus Zakariya Yahya Isa Muhammad
شُعيب موسى هارون ذو الكفل داود سليمان إلياس إليسع يونس زكريا يحيى عيسى مُحمد
Jethro Moses Aaron Ezekiel David Solomon Elijah Elisha Jonah Zechariah John Jesus Paraclete
v  d  e
Persondata
NAME John the Baptist
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Jewish preacher, religious prophet
DATE OF BIRTH circa 6 BCE
PLACE OF BIRTH
DATE OF DEATH 30 CE
PLACE OF DEATH
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Simeon the Righteous by Alexey Yegorov. ... According to the Gospel of Mark (15:21-22), Matthew (27:32), and Luke (23:26) Simon of Cyrene (שמעון Hearkening; listening, Standard Hebrew Šimʿon, Tiberian Hebrew Šimʿôn) was compelled by the Romans to carry the cross of Jesus as Jesus was taken to his crucifixion: And as they came... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Susanna is the name of one of the women associated with the ministry of Jesus of Nazarath. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... This article is about the supernatural being. ... 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Jesus and the Beloved Disciple, polychromed and gilded wood, c 1320 The phrase the disciple whom Jesus loved or Beloved Disciple is used several times in the Gospel of John, but in none of the other accounts of Jesus. ... St John the Evangelist, imagined by Jacopo Pontormo, ca 1525 (Santa Felicita, Florence) John the Evangelist (d. ... Saint John on Patmos by Hans Baldung Grien, 1511 Saint John of Patmos, by Jean Fouquet John of Patmos is the name given to the author of the Book of Revelation (or Book of the Apocalypse) in the New Testament. ... Iscariot redirects here. ... For other uses, see Saint Jude (disambiguation). ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי, Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew: Mattay; Septuagint Greek: Ματθαίος, Matthaios), most often called Saint Matthew, is an important Christian figure, and one of Jesus Twelve Apostles. ... This article is about the New Testament figure. ... St Peter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Saint Philip. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The apostle... Judas the Zealot is a New Testament figure whose identity is not completely clear. ... Subscript text == Headline text ==dfgdfgdsfgfdgdf Insert non-formatted text here Saint Thomas the Apostle, Judas Thomas or Didymus, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ... St Peter redirects here. ... St. ... Agabus - a prophet, probably one of the seventy disciples of Christ. ... This article is about Ananias and Sapphira. ... Ananias was one of the Seventy Apostles sent out by Jesus in Luke 10. ... 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According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years. ... According to the canonical Gospels, Jesus worked many miracles in the course of his ministry, which may be categorized into cures, exorcisms, dominion over nature, three instances of raising the dead, and various others. ... The parables of Jesus, found in the synoptic gospels, embody much of Jesus teaching. ... The chronology of Jesus depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of the life of Jesus by the four canonical gospels (which allude to various dates for several events). ... A large variety of names and titles are used in the New Testament to describe Jesus. ... St. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... A folio from P46, an early 3rd century collection of Pauline epistles. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... The word epistle is from the Greek word epistolos which means a written letter addressed to a recipient or recipients, perhaps part of exchanged correspondence. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... General epistles are books in the New Testament in the form of letters. ... The Apostolic Age is, to some church historians, the period in early church history during which some of Christs original apostles were still alive and helping to influence church doctrine, polity, and the like. ... // Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Early Christianity is the Christianity of the three centuries between the death of Jesus ( 30) and the First Council of Nicaea (325). ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Adam is the first Prophet of Islam and mentioned in the Quran as the husband of Eve (Hawwa). ... Idris (Arabic: إدريس ) is a Prophet in Islam. ... Nuh is a prophet in the Quran. ... Hud (Arabic هود) is a prophet in the Quran. ... Saleh (Arabic: صالح) is a prophet of Islam and is mentioned in the Quran. ... For information on the racehorse, see Ibrahim (horse) (Arabic: ), the biblical patriarch Abraham, is an important prophet in Islam, son of Azar, and the father of the Prophet Ismail (Ishmael), his firstborn son, who is considered the Father of the Arabs. ... Lut (circa 1781 BC - 1638 BC?[1] [2]), (Arabic: لوط ) was a prophet mentioned in the Quran and known as Lot in the Bible. ... In Islam, Ishmael is known as the first-born son of Abraham (Ibrahim in Arabic) from Hagar, and as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Yaqub (in Syriac: ܝܰܥܩܽܘܒ) is a common Syriac and Arabic name. ... This is a sub-article to Joseph (Hebrew Bible). ... In Islam, Job is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Image File history File links Mosque. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... According to the Bible and the Quran, Lot (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: لوط, ; Hidden, covered[1]) was the nephew of the patriarch, Abraham or Abram. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... Shoaib (Arabic: ‎ ; also ShuÊ•ayb, ShuÊ•aib, Shuaib, literally Who Shows the Right Path), is traditionally associated with the biblical figure Jethro. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harun (Arabic: هارون ) was a prophet of Islam mentioned in the Quran. ... Dhul-Kifl (Arabic ذو الكفل ) is considered by Muslims to be either a prophet of Islam or simply a righteous man mentioned in the Quran. ... In Islam, David is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Sulayman (Süleyman, Sulaiman, Suleyman, Suleiman) (Arabic: سليمان) is a prophet in the Quran, which assumes that he is King Solomon of the Bible. ... Ilyas is a prophet in the Quran. ... Al-Yasa is a prophet in the Quran. ... Yunus (Jonah) is one of the prophets of Islam whose story is recounted in the Quran. ... Zakariya (Arabic: زكريا), the New Testament priest Zechariah or Zacharias, is one of the prophets mentioned in the Quran. ... Isa redirects here. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Jethro (Hebrew: יִתְרוֹ, Standard Yitro Tiberian ; His Excellence/Posterity) is a figure from the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... This article is about the Biblical character . ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... For other uses, see Jonah (disambiguation). ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up Paraclete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

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CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. John the Baptist (5251 words)
John's reply was that he was Divinely "sent to baptize with water" (John 1:33); to this, later on, our Saviour bore testimony, when, in answer to the Pharisees trying to ensnare him, he implicitly declared that John's baptism was from heaven (Mark 11:30).
John, in his fetters, was attended by some of his disciples, who kept him in touch with the events of the day.
John languished probably for some time in the fortress of Machaerus; but the ire of Herodias, unlike that of Herod, never abated: she watched her chance.
John The Baptist - LoveToKnow 1911 (699 words)
A.D. 25-26) John began his public life in the "wilderness of Judaea," the wild district that lies between the Kedron and the Dead Sea, and particularly in the neighbourhood of the Jordan, where multitudes were attracted by his eloquence.
John was evidently convinced that he himself had received the divine commission to bring to a close and complete the prophetic period, by inaugurating the Messianic age.
The duration of John's ministry cannot be determined with certainty: it terminated in his imprisonment in the fortress of Machaerus, to which he had been committed by Herod Antipas, whose incestuous marriage with Herodias, the Baptist had sternly rebuked.
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