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Encyclopedia > John Woo
John Woo
吳宇森

John Woo attending the 2005 Cannes Film Festival
Born May 1, 1946 (1946-05-01) (age 61)
Guangzhou, China
Occupation Director, Producer, Writer, and Actor
Spouse Annie Woo Ngau Chun-lung

John Woo (Chinese: 吳宇森; Pinyin: Wú Yǔsēn) (born May 1, 1946) is a Chinese film director and producer. Woo is widely known for his stylised movies which are renowned for their balletic action sequences, Mexican stand-offs, and use of slow-motion.[1] He directed the notable Hong Kong action films, A Better Tomorrow, Hard Boiled, and The Killer.[1] His English-language movies include Hard Target, Broken Arrow, Face/Off, and Mission: Impossible 2.[1] As a young boy, Woo wanted to be a Christian minister; he later found a passion for movies influenced by European film, the French New Wave and Jean-Pierre Melville.[1] Woo has said he was shy and had difficulty speaking, but found making movies a way to explore his feelings and thinking and would "use movie as a language".[1] Woo cites his three favourite films as Lawrence of Arabia, Seven Samurai and Melville's Le Samouraï.[1] Woo was described by Dave Kehr in The Observer in 2002 as "arguably the most influential director making movies today".[2] John Woo may mean or refer to: John Woo, the Hong Kong movie director. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (554x750, 169 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): John Woo ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Guangzhou is the capital and the sub-provincial city of Guangdong Province in the southern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... A Mexican standoff is a stalemate or impasse, a confrontation that neither side can seemingly win. ... A Better Tomorrow (Chinese: 英雄本色; pinyin: yÄ«ngxióng bÄ›nsè, Cantonese: ying1 hung4 bun2 sik1; literally True Colors of a Hero) is a 1986 Hong Kong action movie which had a profound influence on the Hong Kong movie-making industry, and later on an international scale. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... The Killer (Traditional Chinese: 喋血雙雄, Simplified Chinese: 喋血双雄; Cantonese IPA: , Jyutping: dip6 hyt3 seong1 hung4; Mandarin Pinyin: ; literally: Bloodshed of Two Heroes) is a 1989 Hong Kong thriller starring Chow Yun-Fat as the hitman Ah Jong, Danny Lee as the cop Li Ying and Sally Yeh as the singer Jennie. ... English is a West Germanic language originating in England, and the first language for most people in Australia, Canada, the Commonwealth Caribbean, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States of America (also commonly known as the Anglosphere). ... For the military term, see Hard target. ... Broken Arrow is a 1996 American action film directed by John Woo and starring John Travolta and Christian Slater. ... Face/Off is a 1997 film directed by John Woo starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... Jean-Pierre Melville (born Jean-Pierre Grumbach) (October 20, 1917 – August 2, 1973) was a noted French director. ... Look up shy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Feelings are most generally INFORMATION that biological beings are capable of sensing in the situations they are in, exposed to or depending on. ... Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ... For other uses, see Seven Samurai (disambiguation). ... Le Samouraï (meaning The Samurai) is a French crime/drama/thriller directed by French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Melville in 1967. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Contents

Biography

At age five Woo's parents were faced with persecution and his Christian family fled to Hong Kong. During this time, the Woo family led a hard life in the slums at Shek Kip Mei, since his father had tuberculosis and could not work[3][4]. Woo went to Concordia Lutheran School and received Christian education. In 1953 the family was rendered homeless, when their house was burned to the ground as part of the famous HK Shek Kip Mei fire[4]. Thanks to donations from charities, his family was able to move into another house. Unfortunately, by this time, a wave of crime and violence was beginning to infest Hong Kong's housing projects. Shek Kip Mei (石硤尾) is an area in New Kowloon, the North Eastern Kowloon Peninsula of Hong Kong. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A Christian () is a person who... A homeless man pushes a cart down the street. ...


In order to escape his dismal surroundings, Woo would retreat to the local movie theater. Woo found his respite through musicals like The Wizard of Oz. During his youth, he enjoyed watching Western movies, especially the final scene in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid where the two comrades run out gun blazing (where he got the inspiration of holding two guns). Woo is also a fan of Hollywood musicals. The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ...


Woo married Annie Woo Ngau Chun-lung in 1976 and has had three children[4]. He plans to continue living in the United States.


Hong Kong career history

In 1969, when he was 23, Woo got a job as a script supervisor at Cathay Studios. In 1971, he became an assistant director at Shaw Studios, where the famous Chang Cheh took him under his wing. In 1974 he directed his first feature film The Young Dragons (鐵漢柔情, Tie han rou qing). Choreographed by Jackie Chan, it was a Kung fu action film that featured dynamic camera-work and elaborate action scenes. The film was picked up by Golden Harvest Studio where he went on to direct more martial arts films. He later had success as a comedy director with Money Crazy (發錢寒, Fa qian han) (1977), starring Hong Kong comedian Ricky Hui. Cathay Organisation Holdings Limited is one of Singapores leading leisure and entertainment groups. ... The Shaw Studio (邵氏片場), owned by Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd. ... Chang Cheh (張徹; pinyin:Zhāng Chè) (February 10, 1923 – June 22, 2002) was Shaw Brothers Studios best known and most prolific film director, with such films as the Five Venoms, the Brave Archer (based on the works of Jin Yong), the One-Armed Swordsman, and other classics of wuxia... Chan Kong-Sang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Jackie Chan Sing Lung (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) or Jackie Chan SBS, (born on April 7, 1954) is a Chinese martial artist, action star, actor, director, screenwriter, film producer, singer and stunt performer. ... Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ... Action movies usually involve a fairly straightforward story of good guys versus bad guys, where most disputes are resolved by using physical force. ... Golden Harvest (嘉禾) is a film production company based in Hong Kong. ... Ricky Hui Koon-Ying (許冠英, pinyin: XÇ” GuànyÄ«ng) (born August 3, 1946) is a Hong Kong movie star in the Hong Kongs 70s to 90s. ...


By the mid-1980s, Woo suffered a burnout. His films were failures at the box office and he retreated to Taiwan in exile. John Woo— once called the new comedy king of Hong Kong— seemed to be on his way out. It was then that director/producer Tsui Hark provided the funding for Woo to film a longtime pet project called A Better Tomorrow (1986). Burnout is a psychologica term for the experience of long-term exhaustion and diminished interest [depersonalization] or cynicism), usually in the work context. ... Tsui Hark (Chinese: 徐克; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsü Ko) (born Tsui Man-kong (徐文光) on February 15, 1950) is a New Wave film director in Hong Kong who is also a highly influential producer, often likened to Steven Spielberg for a similar galvanizing effect on his countrys cinematic scene. ... A Better Tomorrow (Chinese: 英雄本色; pinyin: yÄ«ngxióng bÄ›nsè, Cantonese: ying1 hung4 bun2 sik1; literally True Colors of a Hero) is a 1986 Hong Kong action movie which had a profound influence on the Hong Kong movie-making industry, and later on an international scale. ...


The story of two brothers— one a cop, the other a criminal— the film became a sensational blockbuster. A Better Tomorrow singularly redefined Hong Kong action cinema with its emotional drama, slow-motion gun-battles and gritty atmosphere. The film's trenchcoat/sunglasses fashion sense, and combat style of using a gun in each hand in close quarters— often referred to as 'Gun fu'— would later inspire Hollywood filmmakers such as Robert Rodriguez, Quentin Tarantino and the Wachowski brothers. Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ... Hong Kong action cinema is the principal source of the Hong Kong film industrys global fame. ... It has been suggested that Gun Kata be merged into this article or section. ... ... Laurence Larry Wachowski (born June 21, 1965) and Andrew Andy Wachowski (born December 29, 1967) are American film directors and writers most famous for creating The Matrix series. ...


Together with leading man Chow Yun-Fat, John Woo would make several more Heroic Bloodshed films in the late 1980s and early 1990s. His violent gangster thrillers typically focused on men who were steadfast in their honor and friendship, even though such values forced them to become outcasts in a rapidly-changing world that was more motivated by money and progress. In this respect, Woo's characters were modern-day knights who wielded guns instead of swords. He was heavily influenced by the films of French director Jean-Pierre Melville. Chow Yun-Fat (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born May 18, 1955) is a Hong Kong actor. ... Heroic Bloodshed, or Hong Kong Blood Opera (HKBO), refers to a genre of action film originating from Hong Kong revolving around stylised action sequences and common themes such as brotherhood, honour, and violence. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... Jean-Pierre Melville (born Jean-Pierre Grumbach) (October 20, 1917 – August 2, 1973) was a noted French director. ...


The most famous of these movies would be The Killer (1989), which brought Woo international recognition and began the Triad film movement. Often named as the best Hong Kong movie ever made, it was widely praised by critics and fans for its action sequences, acting and cinematography. With The Killer becoming the most successful Hong Kong film in the U.S. since Bruce Lee's Enter the Dragon (1973), John Woo became a cult favorite. One year later he made another masterpiece, Bullet in the Head, that he still considers his most personal work. The movie was a major commercial failure compared to the other films however. The Killer (Traditional Chinese: 喋血雙雄, Simplified Chinese: 喋血双雄; Cantonese IPA: , Jyutping: dip6 hyt3 seong1 hung4; Mandarin Pinyin: ; literally: Bloodshed of Two Heroes) is a 1989 Hong Kong thriller starring Chow Yun-Fat as the hitman Ah Jong, Danny Lee as the cop Li Ying and Sally Yeh as the singer Jennie. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Bruce Lee (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was an American-born martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bullet in the Head is a 1990 movie by John Woo. ...


It was only a matter of time before Hollywood took notice. By this time, John Woo had many American admirers, including the likes of Martin Scorsese, and Sam Raimi - who compared Woo's mastery of action to Hitchcock's mastery of suspense. Enormously impressed with his work, American executives green-lighted a contract for Woo to work in America. With the 1997 handover of Hong Kong fast approaching, Woo decided that it was indeed time to leave. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The transfer of the sovereignty of Hong Kong from the United Kingdom to China, often referred to as The Handover, occurred on July 1, 1997. ...


John Woo's last Hong Kong film was Hard Boiled (1992), which he made as an antithesis to his movies that glorified gangsters. Upping the ante with an all-out action film, it featured a Hollywood-scale spectacle in its second half with policemen and criminals waging war inside a hospital, while helpless patients are caught in the crossfire. The sequence lasted nearly 30 minutes. There is a long take in this scene which follows Tequila and Tony go from one floor to another. It lasts 2 minutes and 42 seconds. On the Criterion DVD and laserdisc, this chapter is called 2 minutes, 42 seconds. The film climaxes with supercop Chow Yun-Fat singing a lullaby to a baby while gunning down incoming gangsters, and then jumping out of a window to safety below, baby in arm. Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... A long take is an uninterrupted shot in a film which lasts much longer than the conventional editing pace either of the film itself or of films in general, usually lasting several minutes. ... The Criterion Collection logo The Criterion Collection is a privately held company that distributes authoritative consumer versions of important classic and contemporary films on DVD. It was established in 1984 as a joint venture between Janus Films and the Voyager Company. ... Chow Yun-Fat (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born May 18, 1955) is a Hong Kong actor. ...


John Woo: Interviews (ISBN 1578067766) is the first authoritative English-language chronicle of Woo’s career. The volume includes a new 36-page interview with Woo by editor Robert K. Elder, which documents the years 1968 to 1990, from Woo’s early career in working on comedies and kung fu films (in which he gave Jackie Chan one of his first major movie roles), to his gun-powder morality plays in Hong Kong. Robert K. Elder writes about film and pop culture for the Chicago Tribune. ...


On August 22, 2007, Fruit Chan announced that he will make a film on Bruce Lee's early years, specifically, the Chinese-language movie, Kowloon City, will be produced by John Woo's producer Terence Chang. The film will be set in 1950s Hong Kong. Chan's credits include "Made in Hong Kong," "Hollywood Hong Kong" and "Durian Durian." Also, Stanley Kwan stated that he was talking with Lee's family to make a movie about the late action movie icon. Further, in April, Chinese state media announced that its national broadcaster started filming a 40-part TV series on Bruce Lee to promote Chinese culture for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics.[5] Fruit Chan (陳果) (born April 15, 1959 in Guangdong province, China) is an independent Hong Kong film director, best known for his style of film reflecting the everyday life of Hong Kong Chinese. ... Bruce Lee (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was an American-born martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century. ... Terence Chang is one of John Woos long time friends and favoured producers. ... Stanley Kwan (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born October 9, 1957) is a Hong Kong film director and producer. ... Bruce Lee (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was an American-born martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be held in Beijing in the Peoples Republic of China from August 8, 2008 to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony to take place at 8 p. ...


United States career history

In 1993, John Woo found himself in a new land with a new culture. He was commissioned by Universal Studios to direct the Jean Claude Van Damme film Hard Target. While Woo was used to creative freedom in Hong Kong, he was forced to deal with a compressed production schedule. Like many foreign directors who come to Hollywood, Woo found himself hamstrung at every turn by the studios, having to deal with things such as how many people could be killed in each scene, how many bullets Van Damme could pump into somebody, how Van Damme could behave and so on. When initial cuts failed to yield an "R" rated film, the studio took the film from Woo's hands and pared it down themselves in order to produce a cut that was "suitable for American audiences". A "rough cut" of the film, supposedly his original unrated version, is still circulated among fans. The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Jean-Claude Van Damme (born Jean-Claude Camille François Van Varenberg in Sint-Agatha-Berchem, in the Brussels-Capital Region, on October 18, 1960), is a Belgian martial artist and actor who is most known for his action movies. ... For the military term, see Hard target. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and territories and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ...


It would be three long years before Woo made another American directorial attempt. Starring John Travolta and Christian Slater, Broken Arrow was a frantic chase-picture with a bigger budget. Unfortunately, Woo once again found himself hampered by studio interference and editors who did not share his sense of aesthetics and filming style. What resulted was a film that, despite modest financial success, lacked Woo's trademark style. John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and singer. ... Christian Slater (born August 18, 1969) is an American actor. ... Broken Arrow is a 1996 American action film directed by John Woo and starring John Travolta and Christian Slater. ...


Still smarting from his bitter experiences, Woo cautiously rejected the script for Face/Off several times until it was rewritten to suit him (by shifting the futuristic setting to a modern one). With Paramount Pictures offering him significantly more freedom this time around, Woo set out to craft a complex story of two enemies— a law enforcement agent played by John Travolta and a terrorist played by Nicolas Cage—who embark on a fantastical surgical procedure that allows them to switch faces. Trapped in each other's identities, they play a cat-and-mouse game that allowed Woo to do what he did best: emotional characterization and elaborate action. Face/Off opened in 1997 to critical acclaim and performed well at the box office, grossing over $100 million in the United States alone. As a result, John Woo became the first Asian director to hit mainstream, paving the way for other Asian filmmakers to follow in his footsteps. Many fans and critics consider this his best American film. Face/Off is a 1997 film directed by John Woo starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and singer. ... Nicolas Cage (born Nicholas Kim Coppola on January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ...


John Woo has made three additional Hollywood films: Mission: Impossible II, Windtalkers and Paycheck. While Mission: Impossible II was a huge hit in 2000, Windtalkers and Paycheck have been box office duds that were lambasted by critics. It is unclear whether Woo will be able to bounce back from these disappointments. Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... Windtalkers is a 2002 World War II film directed by John Woo. ... Paycheck is a 2003 film adaptation of the short story Paycheck by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2000. ...


Currently, John Woo is directing and producing a videogame called Stranglehold for next gen consoles and PC. It will be a sequel to his 1992 film, Hard Boiled. He is also slated to return to China with Chow Yun-Fat sometime in 2008 to shoot his next major project, the highly anticipated The Battle of Red Cliff, based on a historical epic battle from Romance of the Three Kingdoms, which is currently in pre-production. He is also involved in numerous projects in a producing capacity. Stranglehold (or John Woos Stranglehold) is a third-person shooter currently under development by Midway Games (Chicago studio), for next generation console systems. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... This article is about a film, for the historical battle see Battle of Red Cliffs Red Cliff (Chinese: ) is the highly anticipated John Woo film based on the events of Three Kingdoms period, specifically the Battle of Red Cliffs, as portrayed in historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms by... An illustration of the book Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), written by Luo Guanzhong in the 14th century, is a Chinese historical novel based upon events in the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty, and the Three Kingdoms period (220–280). ...


Directorial trademarks

  • use of doves, and birds in slow motion
  • use of gun fu, especially dual wielding pistols
  • use of rainbows
  • heavy use of slow motion
  • scenes in a hospital
  • use of freeze frame
  • use of motorcycles
  • use of reflection
  • use of unusual hand-to-hand weapons
  • characters engaged in a Mexican standoff
  • characters engaged in back-to-back banter
  • Beretta 92F/FS Pistol
  • use of boat chase
  • Roundhouse kicks followed by dual pistols to the chest

It has been suggested that Gun Kata be merged into this article or section. ... Slow motion is an effect resulting from running film through a movie camera at faster-than-normal speed. ... A Mexican standoff is a stalemate or impasse, a confrontation that neither side can seemingly win. ... The Beretta 92SB-F (later renamed Beretta 92F), Beretta 92FS, Beretta 92G, and Beretta 92FS Inox are a series of semi-automatic, locked-breech delayed recoil operated, double/single action pistols, chambered for the 9 mm Parabellum cartridge, designed and manufactured by Beretta. ...

Quotes

By Woo

  • Woo discovered then television actor Chow Yun-Fat to star in A Better Tomorrow, not anticipating the level of stardom the actor would achieve. Woo said of Yun-Fat in a 1999 interview with Robert K. Elder, "This guy was so elegant and also had great charisma. He reminded me of Alain Delon, and Steve McQueen, Ken Takakura—all my great idols, all in him. And I thought, while we are shooting, I just felt, "He’s a great actor; he will be popular.” But I didn’t know he’d be that popular, you know?"
  • Woo was quoted in the June 2000 edition of Premiere magazine: "I love doves. I am a Christian. Doves represent the purity of love, beauty. They're spiritual. Also the dove is a messenger between people and God... When I shot The Killer, these two men, the killer and the cop, they work in different ways, but their souls are pure, because they do the right thing. In the church scene, I wanted to bring them together. I wanted to use a metaphor of the heart. I came up with doves —they're white. When the men die, I cut to the dove flying —it's the soul, rescued and safe and also pure of heart. So the dove became one of my habits: I used it in Hard Boiled, Face/Off, and in Mission: Impossible II".
  • Woo likes the look of the Beretta 92F/FS pistol and had featured it in many of his movies. He stated in an interview that it "is a great character" and added that "it's so strong and elegant." He also mentioned that other pistols looked dumb to him.

Chow Yun-Fat (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born May 18, 1955) is a Hong Kong actor. ... A Better Tomorrow (Chinese: 英雄本色; pinyin: yīngxióng běnsè, Cantonese: ying1 hung4 bun2 sik1; literally True Colors of a Hero) is a 1986 Hong Kong action movie which had a profound influence on the Hong Kong movie-making industry, and later on an international scale. ... Robert K. Elder writes about film and pop culture for the Chicago Tribune. ... The Beretta 92SB-F (later renamed Beretta 92F), Beretta 92FS, Beretta 92G, and Beretta 92FS Inox are a series of semi-automatic, locked-breech delayed recoil operated, double/single action pistols, chambered for the 9 mm Parabellum cartridge, designed and manufactured by Beretta. ...

By others

  • In reply to a studio executive who said "I suppose Woo can't direct action scenes," Quentin Tarantino has been quoted as saying "Sure, and Michelangelo can't paint ceilings!"
  • When Jean-Claude Van Damme was trying to get Woo for Hard Target he described him as "the Martin Scorsese of Asia".

Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Oscar winning screenwriter. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ...

References in other media

  • In the anime series, R.O.D the TV which features three girls named after real life Hong Kong action stars, 'John Woo' is the name of a mysterious carrier pigeon.
  • In another anime series, FLCL, two characters can be seen watching the climactic end sequence of an action movie. Although the screen in not visible, it can be surmised that it is indeed a John Woo film, as one of the film's characters exclaims, "What are all these pigeons doing in here?" and a multitude of flapping wings heard. The screen was then broken, and a flock of white doves flew out of the TV set. Also the episode uses gun fu and frequent slow motion, as common in John Woo films. Also in the preview of the above mentioned episode (a preview of the next episode is alway shown at the end of the previous, as with most anime series), the character Haruko mentions humorous things to keep in mind when seeing a John Woo film.
  • Japanese professional wrestler SUWA, of the promotions Dragon's Gate and Pro Wrestling NOAH, utilizes a seated dropkick that frequently sends its victim flying back-first into the corner. As a fan of Hong Kong action cinema, he calls this move the "John Woo", as a homage to the impact of shotgun blasts on the human body in Woo's films.
  • In the video game Max Payne there are many homages and references to John Woo. For example, the black suit and tie Max is seen wearing at the beginning, as well as the dual guns and jumping and shooting in slow motion. One of the game's difficulty levels is named "Hard Boiled," and John Woo's name is mentioned as a password for entering into a gangster hideout.
  • In the PC game F.E.A.R., the developer admitted that they been inspired by John Woo action movies that they wanted the action to be exactly epic to Woo movies.
  • The Christian rock band Newsboys has a song called "John Woo" which makes reference to the religious symbolism he often employs in his films.
  • "I've got more action than my man John Woo" is a lyric from the Beastie Boys song "Sure Shot" from Ill Communication.
  • In one of the versions of the PC game "Unreal Tournament", when a character is killed by another wielding dual pistols, the deceased character is listed by the kill readout as having been "John Woo'd" by the victor.
  • Typing the cheat code "JOHNWOO" in the PC game Rise of the Triad gives the player dual pistols.
  • Picking up a second submachine gun in the PC game Shadow Warrior causes the player's avatar Lo Wang to quip "Be proud, Mr. Woo!"
  • Comedian Daniel Tosh references John Woo in a joke on both his CD "True Stories I Made Up" and his DVD "Completely Serious." ("I wish i were rich enough to release a bunch of doves everytime I entered a room, everyone would be like 'Did you see that guy? The guy that just released all the doves! He must be Woo's boy'"

R.O.D -THE TV- is a 26-episode TV anime series, animated by J.C.STAFF and produced by Aniplex, directed by Koji Masunari and scripted by Yousuke Kuroda, about the adventures of three paper-manipulating sisters, Michelle, Maggie and Anita, who become the bodyguards of Nenene Sumiregawa, a... Serialized in Magazine Z Original run 2000 – 2001 No. ... ... Pro Wrestling NOAH is a Japanese professional wrestling promotion, founded in 2000. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... For other uses, see Shotgun (disambiguation). ... Max Payne is a third-person shooter computer game developed by the Finnish company Remedy Entertainment, produced by 3D Realms and published by Gathering of Developers in July, 2001 for Windows. ... This computer/video game related article needs cleanup. ... F.E.A.R. (First Encounter Assault Recon) is a horror themed first-person shooter computer game developed by Monolith Productions and published by Vivendi Universal. ... Newsboys is a Christian pop band. ... Beastie Boys is a hip hop musical group from New York City, consisting of Michael Mike D Diamond, Adam MCA Yauch and Adam Ad-Rock Horovitz. ... Ill Communication is the fourth album by the Beastie Boys. ... Rise of the Triad: Dark War (acronym is ROTT) is a first-person shooter video game that was first released on February 17, 1995 and developed by Apogee Software (now known as 3D Realms). ... Shadow Warrior is a first-person shooter computer game featuring Lo Wang, a master ninja assassin or Shadow Warrior, developed by 3D Realms and released on May 13, 1997 by GT Interactive. ... Daniel Tosh is a comedian who currently resides in Los Angeles, CA. He has recently performed on Comedy Central Presents. ...

Filmography

Fist to Fist (Chinese title Chu ba) is a 1973 martial arts film directed by John Woo. ... Hand Of Death (aka Countdown In Kung Fu, Strike of Death, Shaolin Men, originally Shao Lin men) is a 1976 kung fu movie directed by John Woo, starring Jackie Chan and Sammo Hung. ... Princess Chang Ping is a Chinese legend about a Princess and her lover in the Qing Dynasty. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... One of John Woos movies prior to his success of A Better Tomorrow. A story about a group of mercenaries on a mission to bring a drug lord out of Indochina area. ... A Better Tomorrow (Chinese: 英雄本色; pinyin: yīngxióng běnsè, Cantonese: ying1 hung4 bun2 sik1; literally True Colors of a Hero) is a 1986 Hong Kong action movie which had a profound influence on the Hong Kong movie-making industry, and later on an international scale. ... A Better Tomorrow II is possibly the best family film you will ever come across. ... The Killer (Traditional Chinese: 喋血雙雄, Simplified Chinese: 喋血双雄; Cantonese IPA: , Jyutping: dip6 hyt3 seong1 hung4; Mandarin Pinyin: ; literally: Bloodshed of Two Heroes) is a 1989 Hong Kong thriller starring Chow Yun-Fat as the hitman Ah Jong, Danny Lee as the cop Li Ying and Sally Yeh as the singer Jennie. ... A Better Tomorrow 3: Love & Death in Saigon is a Hong Kong action film released in 1989. ... Bullet in the Head is a 1990 movie by John Woo. ... Once a Thief (縱橫四海; Zong heng si hai; literally: Criss-Cross Over Four Seas) is a 1991 film directed and written by John Woo. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... For the military term, see Hard target. ... Broken Arrow is a 1996 American action film directed by John Woo and starring John Travolta and Christian Slater. ... Once a Thief is a remake of a 1991 film of the same name. ... Face/Off is a 1997 film directed by John Woo starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... Windtalkers is a 2002 World War II film directed by John Woo. ... Paycheck is a 2003 film adaptation of the short story Paycheck by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... All the Invisible Children is a 2005 collection of seven short films, each focused on a different child. ... This article is about a film, for the historical battle see Battle of Red Cliffs Red Cliff (Chinese: ) is the highly anticipated John Woo film based on the events of Three Kingdoms period, specifically the Battle of Red Cliffs, as portrayed in historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms by...

Other works

The BMW film series The Hire was a series of eight short films (each about eight minutes long) produced for the Internet in the summers of 2001 and 2002. ... Stranglehold (or John Woo Presents Stranglehold) is a third-person shooter under development by Midway Games (Chicago studio), for Windows, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3. ... Appleseed EX Machina ( Latin Ex from within, Machina machine) is an anime film and is the sequel to the Appleseed film, similarly directed by Shinji Aramaki. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Pierce, Nev. "Getting Direct With Directors: John Woo", BBC, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-05-17. 
  2. ^ Kehr, Dave. "Ballets full of bullets", The Observor, 2002-07-14. Retrieved on 2007-05-17. 
  3. ^ Rawnsley, Gary D. Rawnsley, Ming-Yeh T. [2003] (2003). Political Communications in Greater China: the construction and reflection of identity. Routledge publishing. ISBN 070071734X.
  4. ^ a b c Elder, Robert K. [2005] (2005). John Woo Interviews. University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 1578067766
  5. ^ IHT, Report: Hong Kong director plans Bruce Lee biopic

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The history of Chinese language cinema has three separate threads of development: Cinema of Hong Kong, Cinema of China, and Cinema of Taiwan. ... The cinema of Hong Kong is one of the three major threads in the history of Chinese language cinema, alongside the cinema of China, and the cinema of Taiwan. ... Hong Kong action cinema is the principal source of the Hong Kong film industrys global fame. ...

External links

  • John Woo at the Internet Movie Database
  • John Woo at HKcinema.net
  • Hardboiled.de (via Internet Archive)
  • A John Woo Retrospective
  • ACTION WEB - Your John Woo & Tsui Hark Resource
  • John Woo - The Independents
  • John Woo Interviews
  • Ten HARD BOILED Moments - The Best of John Woo
  • A John Woo inspired Short Prime Justice

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Woo - definition of John Woo in Encyclopedia (1536 words)
John Woo (吳宇森; pinyin: Wú Yǔsēn; Gwohngdongwaa pengyam: Ng4 Yue5-sam1) (born May 1, 1946 in Guangzhou, China) is a Chinese film director known especially for the ballet-like violence in his movies.
When Woo's Christian parents were faced with persecution, his family fled to Hong Kong when he was five years old.
In 1993, John Woo found himself in a new land with a new culture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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