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Encyclopedia > John Wain

John Wain (born John Barrington Wain, March 14, 1925 - May 24, 1994) was an English poet, novelist, and critic, associated with the literary group The Movement. For most of his life, Wain worked as a freelance journalist and author, writing and reviewing for newspapers and the radio. March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... The word critic comes from the Greek κριτικός, kritikós - one who discerns, which itself arises from the Ancient Greek word κριτής, krités, meaning a person who offers reasoned judgement or analysis, value judgement, interpretation, or observation. ... The Movement was a term coined by J. D. Scott, literary editor of The Spectator, in 1954 to describe a group of writers including Kingsley Amis, Philip Larkin, Donald Davie, D.J. Enright, John Wain, Elizabeth Jennings, Thom Gunn, and Robert Conquest. ... A freelancer or (freelance worker) is a self-employed person working in a profession or trade in which full-time employment is also common. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ...


Life and work

Wain was born and brought up in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, and attended St. John's College, Oxford, gaining a B.A. in 1946 and M.A. in 1950. He wrote his first novel Hurry on Down in 1953, a comic picaresque about an unsettled university graduate who turns his life against conventional society. Other notable novels include Strike the father dead (1962), a tale of a jazzman's rebellion against his conventional father, and Young shoulders (1982), winner of the Whitbread Prize, the searing tale of a young boy facing the death of loved ones. Wain's use of lower-case letters in the titles of his novels indicates his non-conventional manner. This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... St Johns College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The degree of Master of Arts degree is an undergraduate degree awarded by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge as well as by the University of Dublin. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular subgenre of prose fiction which is usually satirical and depicts in realistic and often humorous detail the adventures of a roguish hero of low social class who lives by his or her wits in a... Jazz is an original American musical art form that originated around the start of the 20th century in New Orleans, rooted in African American musical styles blended with Western music technique and theory. ... Young shoulders is a 1982 novel by John Wain. ... The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. ... Minuscule, or lower case, is the smaller form (case) of letters (in the Roman alphabet: a, b, c, ...). Originally alphabets were written entirely in majuscule (capital) letters which were spaced between well-defined upper and lower bounds. ...


Wain was also a prolific poet and critic, with critical works on fellow Midlands writers Arnold Bennett, Samuel Johnson, and William Shakespeare. Among the other writers he has written works about are the Americans Theodore Roethke and Edmund Wilson. He himself was the subject of a bibliography by David Gerard. In general, the midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... Arnold Bennett, British novelist Enoch Arnold Bennett (May 27, 1867-March 27, 1931) was a British novelist. ... Samuel Johnson circa 1772, painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Theodore Huebner Roethke (; RET-key) (May 25, 1908 – August 1, 1963) was a United States poet, who published several volumes of poetry characterized by its rhythm and natural imagery. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ...


Wain taught at the University of Reading in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and in 1963 spent a term as professor of rhetoric at Gresham College, London. In 1973 he was elected to the five-year lectureship post of Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford: some of his lectures are collected in his book Professing Poetry. The University of Reading is one of the older established UK universities. ... // Events and trends World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atomic bomb. ... The 1950s was the decade spanning the years 1950 to 1959. ... Rhetoric (from Greek ρήτωρ, rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is the art or technique of persuasion, usually through the use of language. ... Gresham College is an unusual institution of higher learning in London which enrolls no students and grants no degrees. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The University of Oxford (often called Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


Literary associations

Wain was (much to his own annoyance) often referred to as one of the Angry Young Men, a term applied to 1950s writers such as John Braine, John Osborne, Alan Sillitoe and Keith Waterhouse thought to be radicals who bitterly opposed the British establishment and conservative elements of society at that time. But it is more accurate to associate Wain with The Movement, a group of post-war poets including luminaries such as Kingsley Amis, D.J. Enright, Thom Gunn, Elizabeth Jennings and Philip Larkin. Amis and Larkin, close friends of Wain's for a time, were also associated, with equal dubiousness, with the "angries". But if looking beyond poetry, it is more accurate to refer to these three, as was sometimes done at the time, as "The New University Wits", writers who aimed to communicate rather than to experiment, and who often did so in a comic mode. However, they all turned more serious after their initial work. Wain's poetry remains very fine (for example An Apology for Understatement) and many feel that it is sad that he was belittled by Amis and Larkin in their letters, and that few editors now include him in their anthologies. Angry Young Men (or Angries for short) is a journalistic catchphrase applied to a number of British playwrights and novelists from the mid-1950s. ... The 1950s was the decade spanning the years 1950 to 1959. ... John Gerard Braine (April 13, 1922 – October 28, 1986) was a British novelist. ... John James Osborne (December 12, 1929 – December 24, 1994) was an English playwright. ... Alan Sillitoe (born March 4, 1928) is an English writer, one of the Angry Young Men of the 1950s. ... Keith Waterhouse (born 6 February 1929 in Leeds, England) is a novelist, newspaper columnist, and the writer of many television series. ... The Establishment is a slang term (chiefly in British and Commonwealth English) for a traditional conservative ruling class and its institutions. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The Movement was a term coined by J. D. Scott, literary editor of The Spectator, in 1954 to describe a group of writers including Kingsley Amis, Philip Larkin, Donald Davie, D.J. Enright, John Wain, Elizabeth Jennings, Thom Gunn, and Robert Conquest. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Dennis Joseph Enright (March 11, 1920 – December 31, 2002) was a British academic, poet, novelist and critic, and general man of letters. ... Thom Gunn (August 29, 1929 - April 25, 2004) was a British poet. ... This article is about the English poet. ... Philip Arthur Larkin (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ...


Wain's tutor at Oxford had been C.S. Lewis. He encountered, but did not feel he belonged to, Lewis's literary circle, the Inklings. Wain took literature as seriously as the Inklings did, and believed as they did in the primacy of literature as communication, but as a modern realist writer he shared neither their conservative social beliefs nor their propensity for fantasy. The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... The Eagle and Child pub in Oxford where the Inklings met on Thursday nights from 1939. ... Realism is commonly defined as a concern for fact or reality and rejection of the impractical and visionary. ... haha For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ...


Works

Novels

  • Hurry on Down (1953) aka Born in captivity (US title)
  • Living in the present (1953)
  • The Contenders (1958)
  • A Travelling Woman (1959)
  • Strike the father dead (1962)
  • The Young Visitors (1965)
  • The Smaller Sky (1967)
  • A Winter in the Hills (1970)
  • The Pardoner's Tale (1978)
  • Lizzie's floating shop (1981)
  • Young shoulders (1982) aka The free zone starts here (winner of the Whitbread Prize)
  • Where the rivers meet (1988)
  • Comedies (1990)
  • Hungry generations (1994)

The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. ...

Poetry

  • A word carved on a sill (1956)
  • Weep before God (1961)
  • Wildtrack (1965)
  • Letters to five artists, poems (1969)
  • Feng, a poem (1975)
  • Poems 1949-79 (1980)
  • Poems for the Zodiac (1980)
  • The Twofold (1981)
  • Open country (1987)

Plays

  • Johnson is leaving (1973) (monodrama)
  • Harry in the night (1975)
  • Frank (1984) (radio play)

Short story collections

  • Nuncle and Other Stories (1960)
  • Death of the Hind Legs and Other Stories (1966)
  • The Life Guard (1971)

Literary criticism

  • Interpretations, essays on twelve English poems (1955 and 1972)
  • Preliminary Essays (1957)
  • American Allegory (1959)
  • Essays on Literature and Ideas (1963)
  • The Living World of Shakespeare, a playgoer's guide (1964)
  • Theodore Roethke (1964) (in Critical Quarterly)
  • Arnold Bennett (1967)
  • A House for the truth, critical essays (1972)
  • Johnson as critic (1973)
  • An Edmund Wilson celebration (1978)
  • Edmund Wilson, the man and his work (1978)
  • Professing poetry (1979)

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Wain - Encyclopedia.com (1186 words)
John Wain 1925-94, English novelist and critic, b.
JOHN WAIN is often thought of as one of the group...
A sculpture of Lapper, naked and pregnant, is to occupy the vacant plinth on the square Toby Madden
John Wain (1925-1994) (442 words)
For most of his life, John Wain worked as a freelance jouranlist and author, writing and reviewing for newspapers and the radio.
John Wain was associated with several literary groups.
John Wain was also associated with The Movement, a group mainly made up of post-war British poets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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