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Encyclopedia > John Tyler
John Tyler
John Tyler

In office
April 4, 1841 – March 4, 1845
Vice President none
Preceded by William Henry Harrison
Succeeded by James K. Polk

In office
March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841
President William Henry Harrison
Preceded by Richard Mentor Johnson
Succeeded by George Dallas

In office
December 10, 1825 – March 4, 1827
Preceded by James Pleasants
Succeeded by William Branch Giles

In office
March 4, 1827 – February 29, 1836
Preceded by John Randolph of Roanoke
Succeeded by William C. Rives

In office
March 3, 1835 – December 6, 1835
Preceded by George Poindexter
Succeeded by William R. King

Born March 29, 1790(1790-03-29)
Charles City County, Virginia
Died January 18, 1862 (aged 71)
Richmond, Virginia
Nationality American
Political party Whig, Democrat
Spouse Letitia Christian Tyler (1st wife)
Julia Gardiner Tyler (2nd wife)
Alma mater The College of William and Mary
Occupation Lawyer
Religion Episcopal (possibly Deist) [1]
Signature John Tyler's signature

John Tyler, Jr. (March 29, 1790January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. A long-time Democrat-Republican, he was elected Vice President on the Whig ticket and on becoming president in 1841, broke with that party. His term as Vice President began on March 4, 1841 and one month later, on April 4, incumbent President William Henry Harrison died of what is today believed to have been viral pneumonia. Harrison's death left Tyler, the federal government, and the American nation briefly confused on the process of succession. Opposition members in Congress argued for an acting caretaker that would continue to use only the title Vice President. The act of taking over as official president, rather than as acting president, came from the influence of the Harrison cabinet and some members of Congress. Members of Harrison's cabinet feared an acting leader would compromise the ability to successfully run the country. Tyler took the presidential oath of office on April 6, 1841, initiating a custom that would govern future successions, and became the first U.S. vice president to assume the office of president upon the death of his predecessor. It was not until 1967 that Tyler's action of assuming full powers of the presidency was legally codified in the Twenty-fifth Amendment. His most famous achievement was the annexation of the Republic of Texas in 1845. Tyler was the first president born after the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 426 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1420 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... James Pleasants James Pleasants (1769–1836) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1819 to 1822 and was the Governor of Virginia from 1822 to 1825. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Randolph (June 2, 1773 – May 24, 1833), known as John Randolph of Roanoke[1], was a leader in Congress from Virginia and spokesman for the Old Republican or Quids faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to restrict the federal governments roles. ... William Cabell Rives (May 4, 1793– April 25, 1868) was an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from Albemarle County, Virginia. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... George Poindexter (1779–September 5, 1853) was a American politician. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Letitia Christian Tyler (November 12, 1790 - September 10, 1842), first wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death. ... White House portrait Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is a public, liberal-arts university located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Deism is belief in a God or first cause based on reason, rather than on faith or revelation, and thus a form of theism in opposition to fideism. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Viral pneumonia is an inflammation of the lung caused by a virus. ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting president or a president-elect. ... Parliamentary opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... A caretaker is a term mainly used in the United Kingdom, meaning a concierge or janitor. ... Acting President of the United States is a temporary office in the U.S. government, established under the auspices of the Constitution, particularly its 25th Amendment (ratified in 1967). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Lyndon B. Johnson taking the oath of office after the death of John F. Kennedy. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Page 1 of Amendment XXV in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendment Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the... Ceremonies during the annexation of Hawaii. ... For the latter day independence movement surrounding Texas, see Republic of Texas (group). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...

Contents

Early life

John Tyler was born the son of John Tyler, Sr. (1747-1813) and Mary Armistead (1761-1797), in Charles City County, Virginia, as the second of eight children, and reputedly a descendant of Wat Tyler.[citation needed] He is the first President born after the Ratification of the Constitution of the United States (Virginia having ratified it in 1788) making him the first President to be born a United States Citizen. He was educated at the College of William and Mary and went on to study law with his father, who became Governor of Virginia (1808-1811). Tyler was admitted to the bar in 1809 and commenced practice in Charles City County. He served as a captain of a volunteer military company in 1813 and became a member of the Virginia House of Delegates 1811-1816 and was later a member of the council of state in 1816. John Tyler (February 28, 1747-January 6, 1813) was a Virginia planter, judge, Governor of Virginia (1808-1811), and father of President John Tyler. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... This article is about the revolt leader Wat Tyler. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... The Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... The Council of State is the name of an organ of government in many states, and especially in republics. ...


Career

John Tyler was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Fourteenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of John Clopton. He was reelected to the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Congresses and served from December 17, 1816, to March 3, 1821 in the House of Representatives. Tyler declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1820 because of impaired health. He became a member of the Virginia State house of delegates 1823-1825. Tyler was elected to be the Governor of Virginia (1825-1827). He was popularly known as voting against nationalist legislations and for his open opposition of the Compromise. (Redirected from 14th United States Congress) Fourteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... John Clopton (February 7, 1756 - September 11, 1816) was a United States Representative from Virginia. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ...

Tyler was elected as a Jacksonian (later Anti-Jacksonian) to the United States Senate in 1827. He was reelected in 1833 and served from March 4, 1827, to February 29, 1836, when he resigned. He served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Twenty-third Congress (the only President to have served as President pro tempore of the Senate), and was chairman of the Committee on the District of Columbia (Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Congresses), as well as the Committee on Manufactures (Twenty-third Congress), a member of the Virginia State constitutional convention in 1829 and 1830 and a member of the Virginia State House of Delegates in 1839. Image File history File links Letitia_Tyler. ... Image File history File links Letitia_Tyler. ... Letitia Christian Tyler (November 12, 1790 - September 10, 1842), first wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death. ... The Democratic-Republican Party was founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in 1792. ... -1... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on the District of Columbia was one of the first standing committees created in the United States Senate, in 1816. ...


He was drawn into the newly-organized Whig Party, and was elected Vice President in 1840 as running mate to William Henry Harrison. Their campaign slogans of "Log Cabins and Hard Cider" and "Tippecanoe and Tyler too" are among the most famous in American politics. "Tippecanoe and Tyler too" not only offered the slight sectionalism that would further be apparent in the presidency of Tyler, but also the nationalism that was imperative to gain the American vote. He was inaugurated March 4, 1841, and served until Harrison's death on April 4, 1841. Upon Harrison's death, Tyler became the new President. Tyler was the first Vice President to assume the Presidency in this manner. The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... A campaign banner with the Tip and Ty slogan. ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolizing French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ...


He took the presidential oath of office as specified by the Constitution on April 6. The Cabinet and Senate agreed with Tyler that he was President and not merely Acting President of the United States, and as the Constitution was not explicit on that aspect of succession (until the 1967 ratification of the 25th Amendment), both the House and Senate passed resolutions recognizing Tyler as President. He even delivered an Inaugural Address, proving his formal entrance into the position. The oath or affirmation of office of the President of the United States was established in the United States Constitution and is mandatory for a President upon beginning a term of office. ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Acting President of the United States is a temporary office in the U.S. government, established under the auspices of the Constitution, particularly its 25th Amendment (ratified in 1967). ... Page 1 of Amendment XXV in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendment Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the...

After his presidential career Tyler became a delegate to and president of the peace convention held in Washington, D.C. in 1861 as an effort to devise means to prevent the impending war. Tyler was a delegate to the Provisional Confederate Congress in 1861; elected to the House of Representatives of the Confederate Congress, but died in Richmond, Virginia before he could assume office. He is buried in Hollywood Cemetery. public domain image from http://www. ... public domain image from http://www. ... White House portrait Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Provisional Confederate Congress was the body which drafted the Confederate Constitution, elected Jefferson Davis President of the Confederacy, and designed the first Confederate flag. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ...


John Tyler was married twice. His first wife was Letitia Christian Tyler with whom he had eight children; she died in the White House in September 1842. His second wife was Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 - July 10, 1889), with whom he had seven children. As of 2007, one of his grandsons, Harrison Ruffin Tyler, is still alive. Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Presidency 1841-1845

Policies

1888 illustration of Vice President Tyler receiving the news of President Harrison's death from Chief Clerk of the State Department Fletcher Webster
1888 illustration of Vice President Tyler receiving the news of President Harrison's death from Chief Clerk of the State Department Fletcher Webster

Tyler's Presidency was rarely taken seriously in his time. He was usually referred to as the "Acting President" or "His Accidency" by opponents. Further, Tyler quickly found himself at odds with his former political supporters. Harrison had been expected to adhere closely to Whig Party policies and work closely with Whig leaders, particularly Henry Clay. Tyler shocked Congressional Whigs by vetoing virtually their entire agenda, twice vetoing Clay's legislation for a national banking act following the Panic of 1837 and leaving the government deadlocked. Tyler was officially expelled from the Whig Party in 1841, a few months after taking office, and became known as "the man without a party." The entire cabinet he had inherited from Harrison resigned in September, aside from Daniel Webster, Secretary of State, who remained to finalize the Webster-Ashburton Treaty in 1842, demonstrating his independence from Clay. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 579 pixel Image in higher resolution (2587 × 1873 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 579 pixel Image in higher resolution (2587 × 1873 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... The Chief Clerk, between 1789 and 1853, was the second-ranking official within the United States Department of State, known as the Department of Foreign Affairs before September 5, 1789. ... Colonel Fletcher Webster, the son of statesman Daniel Webster, was the commanding officer of the 12th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times (1840). ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The Webster-Ashburton Treaty, signed August 9, 1842, settled the dispute over the location of the Maine-New Brunswick border between the United States and Great Britain and the shared use of the Great Lakes. ...


For two years, Tyler struggled with the Whigs, but when he nominated John C. Calhoun as Secretary of State, to 'reform' the Democrats, the gravitational swing of the Whigs to identify with "the North" and the Democrats as the party of "the South," led the way to the sectional party politics of the next decade. Tyler was the first president to have a veto overridden by Congress, when both houses overrode a veto on a bill relating to revenue cutters and steamers on Tyler's last full day in office; March 3, 1845. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ...


The last year of Tyler's presidency was marred by a freak accident that killed two of his Cabinet members. During a ceremonial cruise down the Potomac River on February 28, 1844, the main gun of the USS Princeton blew up during a demonstration firing, instantly killing Thomas Gilmer, the Secretary of the Navy, and Abel P. Upshur, the Secretary of State. Julia Gardiner (whom Tyler had met two years earlier at a reception, and would go on to become his second wife) was also aboard the Princeton that day. Her father, David Gardiner, was among those killed during the explosion. Upon hearing of her father's death, Gardiner fainted into the President's arms.[1] Tyler and Gardiner were married not long afterwards in New York City, on June 26, 1844. The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... The first Princeton was the first screw steam warship in the United States Navy. ... Thomas Walker Gilmer (April 6, 1802–February 28, 1844) was an American statesman. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur Abel Parker Upshur (June 17, 1790–February 28, 1844) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ...


Annexation of Texas

Uncle Sam and his ServantsAn anti-Tyler satire lampoons President Tyler's efforts to secure a second term against challengers Whig Henry Clay and Democrat James K. Polk. Clay, Polk, John C. Calhoun and Andrew Jackson attempt to get in as Tyler pushes the door shut on them. Uncle Sam demands that Tyler stop and let Clay in.
Uncle Sam and his Servants
An anti-Tyler satire lampoons President Tyler's efforts to secure a second term against challengers Whig Henry Clay and Democrat James K. Polk. Clay, Polk, John C. Calhoun and Andrew Jackson attempt to get in as Tyler pushes the door shut on them. Uncle Sam demands that Tyler stop and let Clay in.

Tyler advocated annexation of Texas to the Union. Many Whigs opposed this expansion because it would upset the balance between North and South and risked war with Mexico. However the Whigs lost the 1844 election to James K. Polk, who favored annexation. When the Senate blocked a treaty (which needed a 2/3 vote), Tyler pushed Congress to annex Texas through an adopted joint resolution. The tactic worked and it passed the House 132-72 and the Senate 27-25. The Missouri Compromise helped to promise security to the west of the United States with the line of 36°30'N. Such meant that any states north of the line would be free and those south of the line would be open to slavery. The option to potentially have four more states south of the line, left the House ready and willing to pass the bill. On March 3, Tyler sent instructions to his representative in Texas, Andrew Jackson Donelson, to announce the annexation. The next day, he left office. Even with a brief period of skeptical instinct, Polk told Donelson to carry out the orders of Tyler. Texas formally joined the Union on December 29, 1845, when James K. Polk was President. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 715 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2643 × 2215 pixel, file size: 754 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 715 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2643 × 2215 pixel, file size: 754 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the U.S. President. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the national personification of the USA. For other uses, see Uncle Sam (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... The United States in 1820. ... Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799–1871) was a diplomat and candidate for the Vice Presidency. ...


Rhode Island's Dorr Rebellion

In May 1842, when the Dorr Rebellion in Rhode Island came to a head, Tyler pondered the request of the governor and legislature to send in Federal troops to help it suppress the Dorrite insurgents. The insurgents under Thomas Dorr had armed themselves and proposed to install a new state constitution. Previous to such acts, Rhode Island had been following the same constitutional structure that was established in 1663. Tyler called for calm on both sides, and recommended the governor enlarge the franchise to let most men vote. Tyler promised that in case an actual insurrection should break out in Rhode Island he would employ force to aid the regular, or Charter, government. He made it clear that federal assistance would be given, not to prevent, but only to put down insurrection, and would not be available until violence had been committed. After listening to reports from his confidential agents, Tyler decided that the 'lawless assemblages' were dispersing and expressed his confidence in a "temper of conciliation as well as of energy and decision." He did not send any federal forces. The rebels fled the state when the state militia marched against them.[2] With their dispersion, they accepted the expansion of suffrage. The Dorr Rebellion was a short-lived armed insurrection in Rhode Island in 1841 and 1842, led by Thomas Wilson Dorr who was agitating for changes to the states electoral system. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Separation of Church and State

On July 10, 1843, President Tyler wrote a letter to Joseph Simpson which included the following text. is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

The United States has adventured upon a great and noble experiment, which is believed to have been hazarded in the absence of all previous precedent — that of total separation of Church and State. No religious establishment by law exists among us. The conscience is left free from all restraint and each is permitted to worship his Maker after his own judgment. The offices of the Government are open alike to all. No tithes are levied to support an established Hierarchy, nor is the fallible judgment of man set up as the sure and infallible creed of faith. The Mohammedan, if he will to come among us would have the privilege guaranteed to him by the Constitution to worship according to the Koran; and the East Indian might erect a shrine to Brahma if it so pleased him. Such is the spirit of toleration inculcated by our political institutions… The Hebrew persecuted and down trodden in other regions takes up his abode among us with none to make him afraid… and the Aegis of the government is over him to defend and protect him. Such is the great experiment which we have tried, and such are the happy fruits which have resulted from it; our system of free government would be imperfect without it.

Impeachment attempt

In 1843, after he vetoed a tariff bill, the House of Representatives considered the first impeachment resolution against a president in American history. A committee headed by former president John Quincy Adams concluded that Tyler had misused the veto, but the impeachment resolution did not pass. Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ...


Nicknames

John Tyler had three main nicknames. His first one was "Honest John" because he was honest and kind to the people. His second one was "His Accidency" because no one thought he should have been president when Harrison died in office, but as vice president he decided he should be president. His third one was "The Veto President" because he had vetoed so many laws.[citation needed]


Administration and Cabinet

Official White House portrait of John Tyler, oil on canvas, 1859 by George P. A. Healy. Located in the Blue Room.
Official White House portrait of John Tyler, oil on canvas, 1859 by George P. A. Healy. Located in the Blue Room.
The Tyler Cabinet
OFFICE NAME TERM
President John Tyler 1841 – 1845
Vice President None 1841 – 1845
Secretary of State Daniel Webster (W) 1841 – 1843
Abel P. Upshur (W) 1843 – 1844
John C. Calhoun (D) 1844 – 1845
Secretary of Treasury Thomas Ewing, Sr. (W) 1841
Walter Forward (W) 1841 – 1843
John C. Spencer (W) 1843 – 1844
George M. Bibb (D) 1844 – 1845
Secretary of War John Bell (W) 1841
John C. Spencer (W) 1841 – 1843
James M. Porter (W) 1843 – 1844
William Wilkins (D) 1844 – 1845
Attorney General John J. Crittenden (W) 1841
Hugh S. Legaré (D) 1841 – 1843
John Nelson (W) 1843 – 1845
Postmaster General Francis Granger (W) 1841
Charles A. Wickliffe (W) 1841 – 1845
Secretary of the Navy George E. Badger (W) 1841
Abel P. Upshur (W) 1841 – 1843
David Henshaw (D) 1843 – 1844
Thomas W. Gilmer (D) 1844
John Y. Mason (D) 1844 – 1845


Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A photograph of G.P.A. Healy by Mathew Brady George Peter Alexander Healy (July 15, 1808 - June 24, 1894), American painter, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Blue Room, looking toward the southeast. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur Abel Parker Upshur (June 17, 1790–February 28, 1844) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Walter Forward (January 24, 1786–November 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and politician. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788–May 18, 1855) was an American politician who was Secretary of War from 1841 to 1843 and Secretary of the Treasury from 1843 to 1844 under President John Tyler. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... George Mortimer Bibb (October 30, 1776–April 14, 1859) was an American politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788–May 18, 1855) was an American politician who was Secretary of War from 1841 to 1843 and Secretary of the Treasury from 1843 to 1844 under President John Tyler. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... James Madison Porter (1793–1862) was a U.S. Presidential Cabinet officer. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... William Wilkins (December 20, 1779–June 23, 1865) was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Hugh Swinton Legaré (January 2, 1797–June 20, 1843) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Nelson (1794 - 1860) was a U.S. lawyer. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Charles A. Wickliffe Charles Anderson Wickliffe, politician, born in Bardstown, Kentucky, 8 June 1788; died in Ilchester in Howard County, Maryland, 31 October 1869. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... George Edmund Badger (1795 - 1866) was a Whig U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur Abel Parker Upshur (June 17, 1790–February 28, 1844) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... David Henshaw (1791-1852) was the 14th United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Thomas Walker Gilmer (April 6, 1802–February 28, 1844) was an American statesman. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Young Mason (April 18, 1799–October 3, 1859) was an American politician and diplomat. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

Supreme Court appointments

Tyler appointed the following Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States: The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...

Nelson's successful confirmation in February 1845 was a surprise. Tyler had failed to fill the vacancy left by Smith Thompson, as the Whig-controlled Senate rejected his multiple nominees of John Spencer, Ruben Walworth, Edward King and John Read. King was rejected twice. Nelson, while a Democrat, had a reputation as a careful and noncontroversial jurist. Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ...


States admitted to the Union

A daguerreotype of John Tyler circa 1850.
A daguerreotype of John Tyler circa 1850.

This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre. ...

Post-Presidency

Tyler retired to a Virginia plantation located on the James River in Charles City County, Virginia and originally named "Walnut Grove." He renamed it "Sherwood Forest" to signify that he had been "outlawed" by the Whig party. He withdrew from electoral politics, though his advice continued to be sought by states-rights Democrats. This article is about crop plantations. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... Sherwood Forest Plantation is located on the north bank of the James River in Charles City County, Virginia. ...

Tyler postage stamp
Tyler postage stamp

1938 u. ... 1938 u. ...

Confederate allegiances and death

Tyler had long been an advocate of states' rights, believing that the question of a state's "free" or "slave" status ought to be decided at the state level, with no input from federal government. He was a slaveholder for his entire life. He re-entered public life to sponsor and chair the Virginia Peace Convention in February 1861. The convention sought a compromise to avoid civil war while the Confederate Constitution was being drawn up at the Montgomery Convention. When the Senate rejected his plan, Tyler urged Virginia's immediate secession. States rights refers to the idea, in U.S. politics and constitutional law, that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in relation to the federal government. ... Prior to the beginning of fighting between Americans in 1861, there took place a meeting at Washington, D. C. of many of the most influential Americans in the United States. ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... The Confederate States Constitution The Constitution of the Confederate States of America was the supreme law of the Confederate States of America, as adopted on March 11, 1861 and in effect through the conclusion of the American Civil War. ... The Montgomery Convention, held on February 4th, 1861, was a convention in Montgomery, Alabama to organize a provisional government for the Confederate States of America and adopt the Confederate Constitution, a document patterned after the United States Constitution, but stressed the autonomy of each state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ...


Having served in the provisional Confederate Congress in 1861, he was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives but died of bronchitis and bilious fever before he could take office. His final words were "I am going now, perhaps it is for the best." Tyler is buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. The city of Tyler, Texas is named for him.[3] The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchi and may specifically refer to: Acute bronchitis, caused by viruses or bacteria and lasting several days or weeks Chronic bronchitis, a persistent, productive cough lasting at least three months in two consecutive years. ... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Tyler is the county seat of Smith County in East Texas, United States. ...


Throughout Tyler's life, he suffered from poor health. Frequent colds occurred every winter as he aged. After his exit from the White House, he fell victim to repeated cases of dysentery. He has been quoted as having many aches and pains in the last eight years of his life. In 1862, after complaining of chills and dizziness, he vomited and collapsed during the Congress of Confederacy. He was revived, yet the next day he admitted to the same symptoms. It was likely that John Tyler died of a stroke.


Tyler's death was the only one in presidential history not to be officially mourned in Washington, because of his allegiance to the Confederacy. Tyler is also sometimes considered the only president to die outside the United States seeing that his place of death, Richmond, Virginia, was part of the Confederate States at the time. Tyler's favorite horse named "The General" is buried at his Sherwood Forest Plantation with a gravestone which reads, "Here lies the body of my good horse 'The General'. For twenty years he bore me around the circuit of my practice and in all that time he never made me blunder. Would that his master could say the same."[4] Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Sherwood Forest Plantation is located on the north bank of the James River in Charles City County, Virginia. ...

Tyler's grave at Hollywood Cemetery
Tyler's grave at Hollywood Cemetery

A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ...

Children

In all, Tyler had fifteen children, eight with his first wife Letitia and seven with his second wife Julia. His last surviving child, Pearl Tyler, who was also his last child born, died on June 30, 1947, one hundred years, one week and six days after the death of his first child, Mary Tyler. Letitia Christian Tyler (November 12, 1790 - September 10, 1842), first wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death. ... White House portrait Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


By Letitia Christian Tyler Letitia Christian Tyler (November 12, 1790 - September 10, 1842), first wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death. ...


Mary Tyler (1815-48); Robert Tyler (1816-77); John Tyler (1819-96); Letitia Tyler (1821-1907); Elizabeth Tyler (1823-50); Anne Contesse Tyler (1825); Alice Tyler (1827-54); Tazewell Tyler (1830-74); She married William N. Waller at a White House wedding in 1842. ...


By Julia Gardiner Tyler White House portrait Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. ...


David Gardiner Tyler (1846-1927); John Alexander Tyler (1848-83); Julia Gardiner Tyler (1849-71); Lachlan Tyler (1851-1902); Lyon Gardiner Tyler (1853-1935); Robert Fitzwalter Tyler (1856-1927); Pearl Tyler (1860-1947) David Gardiner Tyler (July 12, 1846-September 5, 1927), U.S. politician, He was born in Easthampton, New York. ... Lyon Gardiner Tyler (August 24, 1853-February 12, 1935), U.S. educator and historian, he was the son of former President John Tyler and and former First Lady Julia Gardiner Tyler. ...


John Dunjee claimed to be the illegitimate son of John Tyler, a child of Tyler and one of his female slaves. There was also a mulatto woman who frequently traveled with the Tyler family who was alleged to be the president's daughter. John William Dunjee (also Dungy or Dungee) (1833-1903) was a prominent African American missionary, educator, Baptist minister, and founder of many Baptist churches across the United States. ... Illegitimacy was a term in common usage for the condition of being born of parents who are not validly married to one another; the legal term is bastardy. ...


See also

The Second Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1824 to 1854. ... The Dorr Rebellion was a short-lived armed insurrection in Rhode Island in 1841 and 1842, led by Thomas Wilson Dorr who was agitating for changes to the states electoral system. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Sherwood Forest Plantation is located on the north bank of the James River in Charles City County, Virginia. ... Letitia Christian Tyler (November 12, 1790 - September 10, 1842), first wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death. ... White House portrait Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. ...

References

  • White House website John Tyler biography, 2007.
  • Chitwood, Oliver Perry. John Tyler, Champion of the Old South. University of North Carolina Press: 1939.
  • Crapol, Edward P. John Tyler, the Accidental President. The University of North Carolina Press 2006. ISBN 978-0807830413.
  • Crapol, Edward P. "John Tyler and the Pursuit of National Destiny." Journal of the Early Republic 1997 17(3): 467-491. ISSN 0275-1275.
  • Kruman, Marc W., and Alan Brinkley, editor. The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency: John Tyler. Houghton Mifflin Company: 2004. ISBN 978-0395788899.
  • Macmahon, Edward B. and Leonard Curry. Medical Cover-Ups in the White House. Farragut Publishing Company: 1987. ISBN 978-0918535016.
  • Monroe, Dan. The Republican Vision of John Tyler Texas A&M University Press: 2003. ISBN 1-58544-216-X.
  • Peterson, Norma Lois. The Presidencies of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler. University Press of Kansas: 1989. ISBN 978-0700604005.
  • Schouler, James. History of the United States of America: Under the Constitution vol. 4. 1831-1847. Democrats and Whigs. (1917) online edition
  1. ^ Paletta, Lu Ann and Worth, Fred L. (1988). "The World Almanac of Presidential Facts".
  2. ^ Chitwood pp 326-30
  3. ^ Lamb, Brian; the C-SPAN staff (2000). Who's Buried in Grant's Tomb?: A Tour of Presidential Gravesites. Washington, DC: National Cable Satellite Corporation. ISBN 1-881846-07-5. 
  4. ^ Paletta, Lu Ann and Worth, Fred L. (1988). "The World Almanac of Presidential Facts".

External links

Wikisource
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John Tyler
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John Tyler
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Clopton
Member from Virginia's 23rd congressional district
1817 – 1821
Succeeded by
Andrew Stevenson
Political offices
Preceded by
James Pleasants
Governor of Virginia
1825 – 1827
Succeeded by
William Branch Giles
Preceded by
George Poindexter
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
March 3, 1835 – December 6, 1835
Succeeded by
William R. King
Preceded by
Richard M. Johnson
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841
Succeeded by
George M. Dallas
Preceded by
William Henry Harrison
President of the United States
April 4, 1841¹ – March 4, 1845
Succeeded by
James K. Polk
United States Senate
Preceded by
John Randolph
Senator from Virginia (Class 1)
1827 – 1836
Served alongside: Littleton W. Tazewell, William C. Rives,
Benjamin W. Leigh
Succeeded by
William C. Rives
Party political offices
New political party Whig Party vice presidential candidate
1836³, 1840
Succeeded by
Theodore Frelinghuysen
Notes and references
1. Tyler did not take the oath of office until April 6.
2. Tyler was elected in 1861, but died before taking office.
3. The Whig Party ran regional candidates in 1836. Tyler ran in the Southern states, and Francis Granger ran in the Northern states.
Persondata
NAME Tyler, John
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American lawyer, politician
DATE OF BIRTH March 29, 1790
PLACE OF BIRTH Charles City County, Virginia
DATE OF DEATH January 18, 1862
PLACE OF DEATH Richmond, Virginia, United States
Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... John Clopton (February 7, 1756 - September 11, 1816) was a United States Representative from Virginia. ... Categories: | ... Andrew Stevenson (January 21, 1784–January 25, 1857) was a U.S. political figure. ... James Pleasants James Pleasants (1769–1836) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1819 to 1822 and was the Governor of Virginia from 1822 to 1825. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... George Poindexter (1779–September 5, 1853) was a American politician. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the ninth Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... John Randolph (June 2, 1773 – May 24, 1833), known as John Randolph of Roanoke[1], was a leader in Congress from Virginia and spokesman for the Old Republican or Quids faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to restrict the federal governments roles. ... Virginia ratified the Constitution on June 25 1788. ... Littleton Waller Tazewell (December 17, 1774–May 6, 1860) was a U.S. Senator from and governor of Virginia. ... William Cabell Rives (May 4, 1793– April 25, 1868) was an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from Albemarle County, Virginia. ... Benjamin Watkins Leigh (June 18, 1781– February 2, 1849) was an American lawyer and politician from Richmond, Virginia. ... William Cabell Rives (May 4, 1793– April 25, 1868) was an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from Albemarle County, Virginia. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Theodore Frelinghuysen (1787–1862) Theodore Frelinghuysen (March 28, 1787–April 12, 1862) was a American politician, serving as New Jerseys Attorney General, United States Senator, and Mayor of Newark, New Jersey before running as a candidate for Vice President with Henry Clay on the Whig ticket in the election... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was the twentieth President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Reagan redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Image File history File links Seal_Of_The_President_Of_The_Unites_States_Of_America. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the American politician. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Virginia ratified the Constitution on June 25 1788. ... William Grayson (1740 - 12 March 1790) was an American politician of the Anti-Federalist faction. ... John Walker (13 February 1744 - 2 December 1809) was an American politician. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... Stevens Thomson Mason (December 29, 1760–May 9, 1803) was a Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, a member of the Virginia state legislature and a Republican U.S. Senator from Virginia (1794-1803). ... John Taylor (December 19, 1753-August 21, 1824) of Caroline County, Virginia was a politician and writer. ... Abraham Bedford Venable (November 20, 1758– December 26, 1811) was an American planter, lawyer, and politician from Prince Edward County, Virginia. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... Andrew Moore (1752–April 14, 1821) was an American lawyer and politician from Lexington, Virginia. ... Richard Brent (1757– December 30, 1814) was an American planter, lawyer, and politician from Stafford County, Virginia. ... James Barbour (June 10, 1775-June 7, 1842) was an American lawyer, a member and speaker of the Virginia house of delegates, the 19th Governor of Virginia, and United States Secretary of War from 1825-1828. ... John Randolph (June 2, 1773 – May 24, 1833), known as John Randolph of Roanoke[1], was a leader in Congress from Virginia and spokesman for the Old Republican or Quids faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to restrict the federal governments roles. ... William Cabell Rives (May 4, 1793– April 25, 1868) was an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from Albemarle County, Virginia. ... Senator Pennybacker Isaac Samuels Pennybacker (September 3, 1805– January 12, 1847) was an American lawyer, federal judge, and politician from Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... James M. Mason James Murray Mason (November 3, 1798 - April 28, 1871) was a United States Representative and United States Senator from Virginia. ... Waitman T. Willey Waitman Thomas Willey (October 18, 1811– May 2, 1900) was an American lawyer and politician from Morgantown, West Virginia. ... Lemuel Jackson Bowden (January 16, 1815– January 2, 1864) was an American lawyer and politician from Williamsburg, Virginia. ... John Francis Lewis (March 1, 1818–September 2, 1895) was an American farmer and politician from Rockingham County, Virginia. ... Robert Enoch Withers (September 18, 1821– September 21, 1907) was an American physician and politician from Lynchburg, Virginia. ... William Mahone (December 1, 1826 – October 8, 1895), of Southampton County, Virginia, was a civil engineer, teacher, soldier, railroad executive, and a member of the Virginia General Assembly and U.S. Congress. ... John Warwick Daniel (September 5, 1842– June 29, 1910) was an American lawyer and Democratic politician from Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Claude Augustus Swanson (March 31, 1862–July 7, 1939) was an American politician. ... Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. ... Harry Flood Byrd, Jr. ... Paul Seward Trible, Jr. ... Charles Spittal Chuck Robb (born June 26, 1939) is an American politician. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a former Republican United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the son of former NFL head coach George Allen. ... For other persons named James Webb, see James Webb (disambiguation). ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... John Taylor (December 19, 1753-August 21, 1824) of Caroline County, Virginia was a politician and writer. ... Categories: People stubs | United States Senators | 1753 births | 1799 deaths ... Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761–1820) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1799 to 1804 and was the governor of Virginia from 1814 to 1816. ... Andrew Moore (1752–April 14, 1821) was an American lawyer and politician from Lexington, Virginia. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... Armistead Thomson Mason Armistead Thomson Mason (August 4, 1787 – February 6, 1819), the son of Stevens Thomson Mason, was a U.S. Senator from Virginia from 1816-1817. ... John Wayles Eppes John Wayles Eppes (April 19, 1773 – September 13, 1823) was a United States Representative and a Senator from Virginia. ... James Pleasants James Pleasants (1769–1836) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1819 to 1822 and was the Governor of Virginia from 1822 to 1825. ... John Taylor (December 19, 1753-August 21, 1824) of Caroline County, Virginia was a politician and writer. ... Littleton Waller Tazewell (December 17, 1774–May 6, 1860) was a U.S. Senator from and governor of Virginia. ... William Cabell Rives (May 4, 1793– April 25, 1868) was an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from Albemarle County, Virginia. ... Benjamin Watkins Leigh (June 18, 1781– February 2, 1849) was an American lawyer and politician from Richmond, Virginia. ... Richard Elliot Parker (December 27, 1783– September 10, 1840) was born at Rock Spring, Westmoreland County, Virginia. ... William Henry Roane (September 17, 1787 – May 11, 1845) was a politician from Virginia and the grandson of founding father Patrick Henry. ... William Segar Archer (March 5, 1789– March 28, 1855) was an American farmer, lawyer, and politician from Amelia County, Virginia. ... Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (April 21, 1809 - July 18, 1887), American statesman, was born in Essex County, Virginia. ... John Carlile John Snyder Carlile (December 16, 1817 – October 24, 1878) was an American merchant, lawyer, and politician, including a United States Senator. ... John Warfield Johnston (September 9, 1818–February 27, 1889) was an American lawyer and politician from Tazewell, Virginia. ... Harrison Holt Riddleberger (October 4, 1844– January 24, 1890) was an American lawyer and politician from Woodstock, Virginia. ... John Strode Barbour, Jr. ... Eppa Hunton II (September 24, 1822 – October 11, 1908) was a U.S. Representative and Senator from Virginia and a brigadier general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. ... Thomas Staples Martin (July 29, 1847– November 12, 1919) was an American lawyer and politician from Charlottesville, Virginia. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... Thomas Granville Burch (July 3, 1869– March 20, 1951) was an American farmer, tobacco manufacturer, and politician from Martinsville, Virginia. ... Absalom Willis Robertson, circa 1940s Absalom Willis Robertson (27 May 1887 – 1 November 1971) was an American lawyer and Democratic Party politician from Lexington, Virginia. ... Spong, William Belser, Jr. ... William Lloyd Scott was a Representative and a Senator from Virginia; born in Williamsburg, Virginia, July 1, 1915; received a law degree from George Washington University; employed by the federal government 1934-1961, principally as trial attorney with Department of Justice; engaged in private practice of law, Fairfax, Va. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972 to 1974 and has served as the Republican senior U.S. Senator from Virginia since January 2, 1979. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... William Fleming briefly served as Governor of Virginia during 1781. ... Thomas Nelson, Jr. ... Benjamin Harrison V Benjamin Harrison (V) (April 5, 1726 – April 24, 1791) was an American planter and revolutionary leader from Charles City County, Virginia. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Beverley Randolph (September 11, 1753– February 1797) was a American politician from Virginia. ... Henry Lee III (January 29, 1756 - March 25, 1818), American general, called Light Horse Harry, was born near Dumfries, Virginia. ... Robert Brooke (1751-1799) was a Virginia politician. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... John Page John Page (April 17, 1744 – October 11, 1808) was a figure in early United States history. ... William H. Cabell (December 16, 1772-January 12, 1853) a Virginia politician and Democratic-Republican. ... John Tyler (February 28, 1747-January 6, 1813) was a Virginia planter, judge, Governor of Virginia (1808-1811), and father of President John Tyler. ... George William Smith (1762-1811) was a Virginia politician. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... George William Smith (1762-1811) was a Virginia politician. ... Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) Virginia politician. ... James Barbour (June 10, 1775-June 7, 1842) was an American lawyer, a member and speaker of the Virginia house of delegates, the 19th Governor of Virginia, and United States Secretary of War from 1825-1828. ... Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761–1820) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1799 to 1804 and was the governor of Virginia from 1814 to 1816. ... James Patton Preston (1774 - 1853) was a U.S. political figure. ... Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. ... James Pleasants James Pleasants (1769–1836) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1819 to 1822 and was the Governor of Virginia from 1822 to 1825. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... John Floyd (April 24, 1783–August 17, 1837) was a United States Representative from Virginia. ... Littleton Waller Tazewell (December 17, 1774–May 6, 1860) was a U.S. Senator from and governor of Virginia. ... Wyndham Robertson (January 26, 1803 – February 11, 1888) was Governor of the U.S. state of Virginia from 1836 to 1837. ... David Campbell (August 2, 1779-March 19, 1859) Governor of Virginia 1837-1840. ... Thomas Walker Gilmer (April 6, 1802–February 28, 1844) was an American statesman. ... John Mercer Patton (August 10, 1797 – October 29, 1858) was a nineteenth century politician and lawyer from Virginia. ... John Rutherfoord (1792 - 1866) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Munford Gregory (1804 - 1884) was a U.S. political figure and governor of Virginia from 1842 to 1843. ... James McDowell (October 13, 1795-August 24, 1851) Congressman and Governor of Virginia, 1843-1846. ... William Smith (September 6, 1797 – May 18, 1887), known as Extra Billy, was a lawyer, Governor of Virginia, U.S. Congressman, and one of the oldest Confederate generals in the American Civil War. ... John Buchanan Floyd (June 1, 1806 – August 26, 1863), was a Virginia politician (legislator and governor), U.S. Secretary of War, and the Confederate general in the American Civil War who lost the crucial Battle of Fort Donelson. ... Joseph Johnson (1785–1877) was a U.S. political figure. ... Henry Alexander Wise (December 3, 1806–September 12, 1876) was an American statesman from Virginia. ... John Letcher (1813-1884) of Lexington, Virginia, was an American lawyer, journalist, politician, served as Representative in U.S. Congress (1851-1859), Governor of Virginia (1860-1864), Delegate in Virginia General Assembly 1875-1877, and on the Board of Visitors of Virginia Military Institute 1866-1880. ... William Smith (September 6, 1797 – May 18, 1887), known as Extra Billy, was a lawyer, Governor of Virginia, U.S. Congressman, and one of the oldest Confederate generals in the American Civil War. ... Francis Harrison Pierpont (January 25, 1814–March 24, 1899), called the Father of West Virginia, was an American lawyer, politician, and governor of the union controlled parts of Virginia during the Civil War. ... Henry Horatio Wells (1823-1890) was born September 17, 1823. ... Gilbert Carlton Walker (1833–1885) was a United States political figure. ... James L. Kemper James Lawson Kemper (June 11, 1823 – April 7, 1895) was a lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and a governor of Virginia. ... Frederick W.M. Holliday (February 22, 1828-May 29, 1899) a Governor of Virginia from 1878 to 1882. ... William E. Cameron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Fitzhugh Lee in the Civil War Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 – April 18, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and U.S. Army general in the Spanish-American War. ... Philip Watkins McKinney (May 1, 1832-March 1, 1899) American politician who served as a Democratic Governor of Virginia from 1890 to 1894. ... Charles Triplett OFerrall (October 21, 1840 - September 22, 1905) was an American politician who served as the Governor of Virginia from 1894 to 1898. ... James Hoge Tyler (1846 - 1925) was a U.S. political figure. ... andrew montague is a skux ne hot chick hu wants him email ... Claude Augustus Swanson (March 31, 1862–July 7, 1939) was an American politician. ... William Hodges Mann (1843 - 1927) was a U.S. political figure. ... Henry Carter Stuart (1855 - 1933) was a U.S. political figure. ... Westmoreland Morley Davis (August 21, 1859-September 7, 1942) a lawyer, farmer, and Governor of Virginia from February 1, 1918 to February 1, 1922. ... Elbert Lee Trinkle or E. Lee Trinkle (1876-1939) an American politician who served as Governor of Virginia from 1922 to 1926. ... Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... George C. Peery (October 28, 1873-October 14, 1952), was an American Democratic politician, and was Governor of Virginia from 1934-1938. ... James Hubert Price (1878 - 1943) was a American politician. ... Colgate Whitehead Darden, Jr. ... William M. Tuck (1896-1983) served as Governor of Virginia from 1946 to 1950 as a Democrat. ... John Stweart Battle (July 11, 1890-April 9, 1972) was an American politician and Democratic Governor of Virginia from 1950-1954. ... Thomas Bahnson Stanley (1890 - 1970) was an American politician. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub | 1898 births | 1986 deaths | Governors of Virginia ... Albertis S. Harrison Jr. ... Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr. ... A. Linwood Holton Jr. ... Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr. ... John Nichols Dalton (1931–1986) was a Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Virginia from 1978 to 1982. ... Charles Spittal Chuck Robb (born June 26, 1939) is an American politician. ... Gerald L. Baliles (born 1940) was the Governor of Virginia from 1986 to 1990. ... Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a former Republican United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the son of former NFL head coach George Allen. ... James Stuart Jim Gilmore III (born October 6, 1949) is a Republican politician who was Governor of Virginia from 1998 to 2002. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Timothy Michael Tim Kaine (born February 26, 1958) is an American politician and the current Governor of Virginia. ... Virginia state seal Source http://usa. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... Theodore Frelinghuysen (1787–1862) Theodore Frelinghuysen (March 28, 1787–April 12, 1862) was a American politician, serving as New Jerseys Attorney General, United States Senator, and Mayor of Newark, New Jersey before running as a candidate for Vice President with Henry Clay on the Whig ticket in the election... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... William Alexander Graham (September 5, 1804–August 11, 1875) was a United States Senator from North Carolina from 1840 to 1843 and Governor of North Carolina from 1845 to 1849. ... Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799–1871) was a diplomat and candidate for the Vice Presidency. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Ralph Izard Ralph Izard (January 23, 1741 or 1742–May 30, 1804) was a U.S. politician. ... Categories: People stubs | United States Senators | 1753 births | 1799 deaths ... Samuel Livermore This article is about the New Hampshire lawyer and politician; for the New Orleans lawyer and legal scholar, see Samuel Livermore (legal writer). ... William Bingham (1752–1804) was an American statesman from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... William Bradford (November 4, 1729 - July 6, 1808) was a physician, lawyer, and United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Jacob Read (1752–July 17, 1816) was an American lawyer from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... John Laurance (1750 – November 11, 1810) was an American lawyer, statesman, and speculator from New York. ... James Ross (July 12, 1762 – November 27, 1847) was a nerish noi and monkey whisperer from Pennsylvania from 1794 to 1803. ... Samuel Livermore This article is about the New Hampshire lawyer and politician; for the New Orleans lawyer and legal scholar, see Samuel Livermore (legal writer). ... Categories: Stub ... John Eager Howard (June 4, 1752 - October 12, 1827) was a American politician from Maryland. ... James Hillhouse (October 20, 1754 - December 29, 1832), of New Haven, Connecticut, was a real estate developer responsible for much of the current look of New Haven, a politician, and a treasurer of Yale University. ... Abraham Baldwin Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754—March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Stephen Row Bradley (February 20, 1754 December 9, 1830) was an American politician. ... For other people with the same name, see John Brown. ... Jesse Franklin (March 24, 1760 -- August 31, 1823) was the Democratic-Republican U.S. senator from the U.S. state of North Carolina between 1799 and 1805 and between 1807 and 1813. ... Joseph Anderson (November 5, 1757–April 17, 1837) was a U.S. political figure who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee and later as the first Comptroller of the United States Treasury. ... Samuel Smith Samuel Smith (July 27, 1752 - April 22, 1839) was a United States Senator and Representative from Maryland, as well as a former mayor of Baltimore, Maryland, and a general in the Maryland Militia. ... Stephen Row Bradley (February 20, 1754 December 9, 1830) was an American politician. ... John Milledge (1757–February 9, 1818) was an American politician. ... Andrew Gregg (June 10, 1755 - May 20, 1835) was a U.S. political figure. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... John Pope (1770–July 12, 1845) was a United States Senator from Kentucky, a member of the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky, Secretary of State of Kentucky, and Governor of Arkansas Territory. ... William Harris Crawfordlalalalalalala (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician, as well as a judge, during the early 19th century. ... Joseph Bradley Varnum Joseph Bradley Varnum (January 29, 1751–September 21, 1821) was a U.S. politician of the Democratic-Republican Party from the state of Massachusetts. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... James Barbour (June 10, 1775-June 7, 1842) was an American lawyer, a member and speaker of the Virginia house of delegates, the 19th Governor of Virginia, and United States Secretary of War from 1825-1828. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Nathaniel Macon (December 17, 1758 – June 29, 1837) was a spokesman for the Old Republican faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to strictly limit the federal government. ... Samuel Smith Samuel Smith (July 27, 1752 - April 22, 1839) was a United States Senator and Representative from Maryland, as well as a former mayor of Baltimore, Maryland, and a general in the Maryland Militia. ... Littleton Waller Tazewell (December 17, 1774–May 6, 1860) was a U.S. Senator from and governor of Virginia. ... This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... George Poindexter (1779–September 5, 1853) was a American politician. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... U.S. Navy collection portrait of Samuel Southard Samuel Lewis Southard (1787-1842) (son of Henry Southard and brother of Isaac Southard) was a prominent U.S. statesman of the early 1800s, serving as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, and Governor of New Jersey. ... Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792–September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. ... Ambrose Hundley Sevier Ambrose Hundley Sevier (4 November 1801 - 31 December 1848) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from Arkansas. ... Portrait by George Caleb Bingham Statue at Clinton County Courthouse in Missouri David Rice Atchison (11 August 1807 – 26 January 1886) was a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from Missouri. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Portrait by George Caleb Bingham Statue at Clinton County Courthouse in Missouri David Rice Atchison (11 August 1807 – 26 January 1886) was a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from Missouri. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Jesse D. Bright Jesse D. Bright (December 18, 1812–May 20, 1875) was a Democratic Senator from Indiana during the period of March 4, 1845 to February 5, 1862. ... Charles Edward Stuart (November 25, 1810 – May 19, 1887) was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan. ... Jesse D. Bright Jesse D. Bright (December 18, 1812–May 20, 1875) was a Democratic Senator from Indiana during the period of March 4, 1845 to February 5, 1862. ... James M. Mason James Murray Mason (November 3, 1798 - April 28, 1871) was a United States Representative and United States Senator from Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson Rusk Thomas Jefferson Rusk December 5,1803 - July 29,1857; was a U.S. political figure and a Senator from Texas from 1846 until his suicide. ... Benjamin Fitzpatrick (June 30, 1802 - November 21, 1869) was an American politician, who served as Governor of Alabama and as United States Senator from Alabama as a Democrat. ... Jesse D. Bright Jesse D. Bright (December 18, 1812–May 20, 1875) was a Democratic Senator from Indiana during the period of March 4, 1845 to February 5, 1862. ... Benjamin Fitzpatrick (June 30, 1802 - November 21, 1869) was an American politician, who served as Governor of Alabama and as United States Senator from Alabama as a Democrat. ... Solomon Foot Solomon Foot (born on November 19, 1802 in Cornwall, Vermont - died on March 28, 1866 in Washington, D.C.) was Vermont lawyer, state representative and later senator who spent more than 25 years in elected office. ... Daniel Clark Daniel Clark (October 24, 1809 - January 2, 1891) was an American politician who served in the New Hampshire legislature and the United States Senate. ... Lafayette S. Foster Born in Franklin, New London County, Connecticut, November 22, 1806. ... Benjamin Franklin Bluff Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States Senator. ... Categories: Stub | 1815 births | 1884 deaths | Governors of Rhode Island | United States Senators ... Senator Matthew Carpenter Matthew Hale Carpenter, born Decatur Merritt Hammond Carpenter, (December 22, 1824 - February 24, 1881) was a member of the Republican Party who served in the United States Senate for the state of Wisconsin from 1869 - 1875 and again from 1879 - 1881. ... Categories: Stub | 1815 births | 1884 deaths | Governors of Rhode Island | United States Senators ... Thomas White Ferry (June 10, 1827–October 13, 1896) was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr. ... For other persons of the same name, see David Davis. ... Categories: Stub | 1828 births | 1919 deaths | United States Senators ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... 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Bryon Patton Pat Harrison (August 29, 1881 - June 22, 1941) was a Mississippi politician who served as a Democrat in the United States House of Representatives from 1911 to 1919 and in the United States Senate from 1919 until his death. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Arthur Hendrick Vandenberg (March 22, 1884–April 18, 1951) was a Republican Senator from the state of Michigan who participated in the creation of the United Nations. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Henry Styles Bridges Henry Styles Bridges (September 9, 1898–November 26, 1961) was an American teacher, editor, and Republican Party politician from Concord, New Hampshire. ... Walter Franklin George (January 29, 1878 – August 24, 1957) was an American politician from the state of Georgia. ... Carl Trumbull Hayden (February 10, 1877 – January 25, 1972) was an American politician and the first United States Senator to serve seven terms. ... Richard Brevard Russell, Jr. ... Allen Joseph Ellender (September 24, 1890 - July 27, 1972) was a U.S. political figure from Houma, Louisiana who served as a Democratic United States Senator from Louisiana from 1937 until his death in 1972. ... For other uses, see James Eastland (disambiguation). ... Warren G. Magnuson Warren Grant Maggie Magnuson (April 12, 1905–May 20, 1989) was a United States Senator of the Democratic Party from Washington from 1944 until 1981. ... Milton Ruben Young (December 6, 1897–May 31, 1983) was a United States politician, he served in the U.S. Senate from 1945 until 1981 as senator for North Dakota. ... Warren G. Magnuson Warren Grant Maggie Magnuson (April 12, 1905–May 20, 1989) was a United States Senator of the Democratic Party from Washington from 1944 until 1981. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the senator. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The seal for the President pro Tempore of the United States Senate. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the senator. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... 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The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... George Edmund Badger (1795 - 1866) was a Whig U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ...

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John Tyler (952 words)
John Tyler (March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth (1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States.
Tyler's last act in office was perhaps the most significant: he signed the bill annexing Texas, which had formerly been part of Mexico, thus extending the territory of slave-holding states and unbalancing the Missouri Compromise.
Tyler retired to a plantation named "Walnut Grove" he had bought in Virginia, renaming it "Sherwood Forest" to signify that he had been "outlawed" by the Whig party, and withdrew from electoral politics, though his advice continued to be sought by states-rights Democrats.
John Tyler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1636 words)
John Tyler was born the son of John Tyler, Sr.
Tyler retired to a plantation named "Walnut Grove" he had bought in Virginia, renaming it "Sherwood Forest" to signify that he had been "outlawed" by the Whig party and withdrew from electoral politics, though his advice continued to be sought by states-rights Democrats.
Tyler had long been an advocate of states' rights, believing that the question of a state's "free" or "slave" status ought to be decided at the state level, with no input from the federal government.
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