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Encyclopedia > John Thompson (basketball)

John Thompson Jr. (born September 2, 1941 in Washington, D.C.) is a former basketball coach for the Georgetown University Hoyas. He is now a professional radio and TV sports commentator. In 1984, he became the first African-American head coach to win the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship when Georgetown defeated the University of Houston 84-75. John Thompson is the name of: // Sir John Eric Sidney Thompson (1898–1975), English archeologist and Mayan scholar John G. Thompson (b. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... The Georgetown University Mens Basketball team (which, like all sports teams at Georgetown University, is named the Georgetown Hoyas) is a well-known basketball program in the NCAA. Georgetowns first intercollegiate mens basketball team was formed in 1907; the team played its first game February 9, 1907... // Final four redirects here. ... // Georgetown or George Town may refer to: Georgetown, Ascension Island capital of Ascension Island George Town, Bahamas George Town, Cayman Islands capital of the Cayman Islands Georgetown, Grenada Georgetown, Guyana capital city of Guyana Georgetown, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Janjanbureh, Gambia, formerly known as Georgetown Es Castell in Minorca... The University of Houston, formerly University of Houston–University Park, is a comprehensive doctoral degree-granting university[2] located in Houston, Texas. ...

Contents

Playing career

After attending Archbishop John Carroll High School in Washington, D.C., Thompson went to Providence College. At Providence, Thompson was a part of the 1963 NIT Championship team, and was part of the first Providence NCAA tournament team in 1964. He was an All-American in his senior year of 1964. He is currently eleventh on the all-time scoring list at PC, fourth in scoring average, sixth in field goal percentage, and third in rebounds. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Providence College is a Catholic college in Providence, Rhode Island, the states capital city. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


He graduated as the school leader in points, scoring average, and field goal percentage, and second in rebounds. He played two years in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Boston Celtics in 1964-1966. At 6'10" (2.08 m), 270 lbs (122.7 kg) he backed up Bill Russell, the Celtics' star center, en route to two championships. Nicknamed "The Caddy" for his secondary role to Russell, his career as a player was unimpressive, however, and he retired in 1966 to coach at St. Anthony High School near DC. After racking up an impressive 122-28 record as a high school coach, Thompson was hired to become the head coach of the men's basketball team at Georgetown University. Before retiring from playing basketball in 1966, Thompson had been selected by the Chicago Bulls in that year's expansion draft. “NBA” redirects here. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... William Fenton Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a former American basketball player remembered for his central role in the Boston Celtics dynasty that won 11 championships in the 13 seasons that he played. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... An expansion draft, in professional sports, occurs when a sports league decides to create one or more new expansion teams or franchises. ...


Coaching career

Georgetown

Thompson, an imposing figure on the sidelines who towered over many opposing coaches (and players, for that matter), was often noted for the trademark white towel that he carried on his shoulder during the games, a color from which his critics took symbolic meaning. Inheriting a Georgetown team which had been just 3-23 the year before, Thompson quickly and dramatically improved the team, making the NCAA tournament within three seasons. Over the following 27 years, Thompson's Hoyas went an impressive 596-239 (.714), running off a streak of 24 postseason appearances - 20 in the NCAA tournament, four in the NIT - including a 14-year streak of NCAA appearances from 1979-1992 that saw three Final Four appearances in 1982, 1984 and 1985, winning a National Championship in 1984 and narrowly missing a repeat the next year by losing to underdog Villanova. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Villanova University is a private university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. ...


Thompson still holds conference records for most overall Big East wins (231), most regular-season Big East wins (198) and conference championships (seven regular season, six tournaments). He won seven Coach of the Year awards: Big East (1980, 1987, 1992), United States Basketball Writers Association and The Sporting News (1984), National Association of Basketball Coaches (1985) and United Press International (1987). Thompson coached many notable players, including Patrick Ewing, Sleepy Floyd, Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo and Allen Iverson. Under Thompson, 26 players were chosen in the NBA Draft, eight in the first round including two players selected first overall, Ewing by the New York Knicks in 1985 and Iverson by the Philadelphia 76ers in 1996. The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) was founded in 1956 by Walter Byers and serves the interests of jounalists who cover college basketball. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... This article is about the year. ... The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri was founded in 1927 by Phog Allen, the University of Kansas basketball coach. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Patrick Aloysius Ewing (born August 5, 1962) is a Jamaican-born American former professional basketball player. ... Eric Augustus “Sleepy” Floyd (born March 6, 1960 in Gastonia, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player. ... Alonzo Harding Mourning, Jr. ... Dikembe Mutombo Mpolondo Mukamba Jean-Jacques Wamutombo, more commonly known as Dikembe Mutombo (born June 25, 1966), is a basketball player in the NBA, playing at the position of center for the Houston Rockets. ... Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Hoya Paranoia and the glory years

During the Hoya's glory years the term "Hoya Paranoia" became indelibly linked to Thompson and Georgetown basketball program. The term was originally coined by Mark Asher of The Washington Post and used to describe Hoya fans’ insecurity toward pro-Maryland media bias, but it soon came to refer to the team’s unusual forced seclusion from the media and Thompson's suffocating control over his program. Unlike most programs of the day, Thompson's practices were closed to the media and the players were placed off-limits to the members of the press. Backers of Thompson would defend Thompson's actions as his way of protecting his program and its players from detrimental media coverage and attention. In very real ethnocentric terms Georgetown in the 1980s was viewed as a team of Twelve Angry Men—or, to be blunt, twelve angry black men. They had a cadre of intimidating players, who happened to be African American, their reputations enhanced by the stifling press defense and aggressive offense which Thompson employed and encouraged.


Of course, much of it was fictionalized and borne out of racial stereotypes of the time. For example, it was oft-reported Thompson made the Hoyas stay more than an hour away from Seattle or in Canada when they won the national title in 1984. In reality, they stayed across the street from the airport, less than a half-hour out of town. There were other embellishments that lent credence to Thompson's us-against-our-detractors world.


Thompson's greatest success as a coach was his ability to create an "us against them" mentality among his players. Whether he specifically used race as the binding force in this belief is debatable although what certainly is not is the media's perception and perpetuation of the belief that he did.


Controversy

John Thompson's career as head coach of Georgetown was full of controversy. Perhaps one of the most controversial incidents was the hanging of a sign in the McDonough Gym. In 1975, after another perceived mediocre year, a sign was hung at the top of the rafters reading "Thompson the nigger flop must go."[1] The University quickly took down the sign and silenced talks for his termination.


In the late 1980s, Thompson got word that his star center, Alonzo Mourning, was associating with noted DC drug lord (and avid Hoya fan) Rayful Edmond III. Thompson invited Edmond over to his office at Georgetown and exploded on him, telling him to stay away from his players or there would indeed be consequnces, perhaps mortal, that he would suffer. By all accounts, Edmond never associated with a Hoya basketball player again and was sentenced to life in prison shortly thereafter. Alonzo Harding Mourning, Jr. ...


1988 Olympic Team

Thompson, who had served as an assistant coach for the gold medal winning team in the 1976 Summer Olympics, coached the United States team at the 1988 Summer Olympics. Although favored to win the international tournament, the United States was narrowly defeated by the Soviet Union in the semi-finals 82-76, marking the first time the United States did not reach the gold medal game. The team proceeded to win its final game against Australia to secure the bronze medal. The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The United States mens national basketball team is the representative for the United States of America in international mens basketball. ... you are such a dumb noob and the red sox rule Size = 200 | Optional caption = | Host city = Seoul, South Korea | Nations participating = 159 | Athletes participating = 8,465 (6,279 men, 2,186 women) | Events = 263 in 27 sports | Opening ceremony = September 17, 1988 | Closing ceremony = October 2, 1988 | Officially opened...


News of the humiliating loss sent shockwaves across the country and following the conclusion of the 1988 Olympics, Thompson came under heavy criticism for the players he selected for the team and the coaching style he employed. In particular, his critics pointed to the absence of notable players such as 1989 Naismith College Player of the Year Danny Ferry, and the inclusion of Mourning (then just a high school player) as one of the 17 Olympic team finalists, as examples of Thompson's professional incompetence during the selection process. Critics would additionally cite the Ferry/Mourning case as further proof of Thompson's blatant racism, although it must be noted that Ferry injured his knee during a pre-draft workout with the Washington Bullets prior to the final cut. Thompson proponents often point to Bobby Knight's handling of the 1984 Olympic Team (in which future Hall of Famers Charles Barkley, Karl Malone, and John Stockton were cut), as examples of the double standard to which black coaches are often held. The Naismith College Player of the Year award, named for basketball inventor James Naismith, is given annually by the Atlanta Tipoff Club to college basketballs top male and female player. ... Daniel John Willard Danny Ferry (born October 17, 1966 in Hyattsville, Maryland) is a former pro basketball player and current General Manager of the Cleveland Cavaliers. ... The Washington Wizards are a professional basketball team based in Washington, D.C.. They play in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Robert Montgomery (Bobby or Bob) Knight (born October 25, 1940, in Massillon, Ohio, USA), also known as The General, is the head mens basketball coach at Texas Tech University. ... Charles Wade Barkley (born February 20, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... John Houston Stockton (born March 26, 1962) is a former American professional basketball player who spent his entire career (1984–2003) as a point guard for the Utah Jazz of the NBA. Stockton is regarded as one of the best point guards of all time, holding the NBA records for... A double standard, according to the World Book Dictionary, is a standard applied more leniently to one group than to another. ...


A commonly held misconception is that it was the failure of the 1988 team to win gold which led to the inclusion of NBA players onto future Olympic teams. When the U.S. team with college players lost in 1988, the only professional players who could not participate in international competition were NBA players. To FIBA Secretary-General Borislav Stanković, the head of the organization that governs international basketball, that did not seem fair. So he decided a change was needed and he led the movement to change the rules. At the time, the NBA was not even a part of the organization that came to be known as USA Basketball, the governing body for basketball in the U.S. When the vote to change the rules was taken, in fact, the U.S. representatives voted against it. They were content for the U.S. to be represented by amateurs. The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ... Borislav Bora Stanković (Serbian Cyrillic: Борислав Станковић; born July 9, 1925) is a Serbian former basketball player and coach, as well as a longtime administrator in the sports various governing bodies. ...


Once the rules were changed, however, the NBA was invited to become a part of USA Basketball, and it was determined that NBA players would play in the Olympics and World Championships with college and other young players continuing to represent the U.S. in all other international competition. What is even less known, however, is that in 1986 — two years before Americans lost in '88 — the rules were nearly changed. Stankovic introduced the resolution for open play at a FIBA convention, and the vote to allow all professionals to play was 31-27. At the time, Stanković said 18 or 19 countries abstained from voting, but if only five had changed and voted "yes," the resolution would have passed and the original Dream Team could have debuted in 1988 rather than 1992. Ultimately, Stanković's push for the globalization of the game by showcasing its greatest players would have a dramatic effect on the popularity of the sport.


Resignation

On January 8, 1999, during a profanity-laced tirade, Thompson shocked the sports world by announcing his resignation as Georgetown's head coach, citing marriage problems. For those who knew him well the announcement seemed odd and ill-timed. First was the press conference's tone, bitter and confrontational. Although most of Thompson's public engagements were combative in nature and drew upon the heavy use of profanity, this press conference was different. January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


Moreover, the family problems he cited had been in the public eye since November 17, 1997, the date on which Gwendolyn Thompson first filed for divorce. Both these issues fueled speculation that Thompson was being forced to step down. The legendary coach was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame on October 1, 1999. Thompson was replaced by longtime assistant Craig Esherick, a popular player's coach. Esherick, however, would not be able to overcome the roster difficulties he had inherited. 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Craig Esherick was the head coach of the Georgetown University mens basketball team from 1999-2004. ...


He was fired in 2004 and replaced by John Thompson III, the old coach's eldest son. At the time the elder Thompson was serving Georgetown in what Rev. Leo J. O'Donovan, university president, referred to as a "coach emeritus" position, assisting on academic, athletic and community projects. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Thompson III John Thompson III (born March 11, 1966) is the current head coach of the Georgetown Hoyas, the mens basketball team at Georgetown University. ... Father Leo J. ODonovan (born in New York City, New York in 1934) was President of Georgetown University. ...


His younger son, Ronny Thompson, formerly an assistant coach at Georgetown, has recently resigned amid controversy as the head coach at Ball State University. Ronny Thompson is the former coach of the mens basketball team at Ball State University after resigning on July 12, 2007 in the midst of two sets of self-reported NCAA rules violations in the past year and allegations of racially charged notes being found in the coachs... Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana, USA. Located on the northwest side of the city, Ball States campus spans more than 1,000 acres (4 km²). The student body consists of more than 20,000 students, of which over 18,000 are...


Commentator

After retiring from coaching, Thompson continued to be active in basketball as a commentator for both professional (mainly for TNT) and collegiate games. He also hosts The John Thompson Show, a sports talk show on SportsTalk 980 (WTEM-AM) in Washington, D.C. Thompson is perhaps best known for preluding interviews with the statement, "let me ask you a question..." Thompson signed a lifetime contract with Clear Channel Radio and SportsTalk 980 in Feb. 2006. He continues to spend a lot of time around the Georgetown basketball program, including traveling to road games and participating in press conferences. Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... WTEM (AM 980 kHz) is a radio station that serves the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. ...

Joyce • Colliflower • O'Reilly • Colliflower • Maloney • O'Reilly • Ripley • Dudak • Colrich • Mesmer • Ripley • Engles • Ripley • O'Grady • Jeannette • Nolan • O'Keefe • Magee • Thompson, Jr.EsherickThompson III The Georgetown University Mens Basketball team (which, like all sports teams at Georgetown University, is named the Georgetown Hoyas) is a well-known basketball program in the NCAA. Georgetowns first intercollegiate mens basketball team was formed in 1907; the team played its first game February 9, 1907... Elmer Ripley (1891–1982) is a once celebrated, but now forgotten figure in the history of American basketball. ... Elmer Ripley (1891–1982) is a once celebrated, but now forgotten figure in the history of American basketball. ... Elmer Ripley (1891–1982) is a once celebrated, but now forgotten figure in the history of American basketball. ... Francis David Buddy OGrady (January 19, 1920–February 29, 1992) was an American basketball player and coach. ... Harry Edward Buddy Jeannette (b. ... Craig Esherick was the head coach of the Georgetown University mens basketball team from 1999-2004. ... John Thompson III John Thompson III (born March 11, 1966) is the current head coach of the Georgetown Hoyas, the mens basketball team at Georgetown University. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Signs of Change.

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Thompson (basketball) Summary (1789 words)
Thompson's college athletes were known for their aggressive playing styles as well as for their commitment to academic achievement at their elite Catholic institution.
Thompson, an imposing figure on the sidelines who towered over many opposing coaches (and players, for that matter), was often noted for the trademark white towel that he carried on his shoulder during the games, a color which his critics took symbolic meaning from.
Under Thompson, 26 players were chosen in the NBA Draft, eight in the first round including two players selected first overall, Ewing by the New York Knicks in 1985 and Iverson by the Philadelphia 76ers in 1996.
Encyclopedia: John Thompson (basketball coach) (1959 words)
Thompson also led the United States to a bronze medal in the 1988 Summer Olympics and was an assistant coach for the gold medal-winning team in the 1976 Summer Olympics.
Thompson continued to be active in basketball as a commentator for both professional (mainly for TNT) and collegiate games as well as hosting his own sports radio talkshow in the Washington, DC area.
Thompson knew this year would be a challenge, but any hopes of the Hoyas being competitive in the Big East were dashed when junior guard Shernard Long, the team's leading scorer last season, was suspended for the season for academic reasons.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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