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Encyclopedia > John Sullivan
John Sullivan
John Sullivan

In office
1786 – 1788
17891790
Preceded by John Langdon (1786 & 1789)
Succeeded by John Langdon (1788)
Josiah Bartlett (1790)

Born February 17, 1740
Somersworth, New Hampshire
Died January 23, 1795
Durham, New Hampshire
Political party Federalist

John Sullivan (b. February 17, 1740, Somersworth, New Hampshire – d. January 23, 1795, Durham, New Hampshire) was an American general in the Revolutionary War and a delegate in the Continental Congress. Image File history File links Sullivan,_John. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Josiah Bartlett (November 21, 1729–May 19, 1795), was an American physician and statesman who, as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New Hampshire, signed the Declaration of Independence. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... Location in Strafford County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Strafford Settled before 1700 Incorporated (town) 1754 Incorporated (city) 1893 Government  - City Manager Robert M. Belmore  - Mayor Mike Watman  - City Council William Guilmette Roger Gagne Michael Micucci Todd Marsh Denis Messier Jim Wiggin Dana Hilliard Brian Tapscott Sherie Dinger Area... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 12,664 at the 2000 census. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... Location in Strafford County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Strafford Settled before 1700 Incorporated (town) 1754 Incorporated (city) 1893 Government  - City Manager Robert M. Belmore  - Mayor Mike Watman  - City Council William Guilmette Roger Gagne Michael Micucci Todd Marsh Denis Messier Jim Wiggin Dana Hilliard Brian Tapscott Sherie Dinger Area... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 12,664 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ...


Sullivan served as a major general in the Continental Army and as Governor (or "President") of New Hampshire. He is most famous for leading the Sullivan Expedition in 1779, a scorched earth campaign against those Iroquois towns that had taken up arms against the American revolutionaries. [citation needed] Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... The Sullivan Expedition, also known as the Sullivan-Clinton Expedition, was a campaign led by Major General John Sullivan and General James Clinton against Loyalists (Tories) and the four nations of the Iroquois who had sided with the British in the American Revolutionary War. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For the computer game, see Scorched Earth (computer game). ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early career

Sullivan was the third son of a schoolmaster. He read law with Samuel Livermore of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and began its practice in 1764 when he moved to Durham. He annoyed many neighbors in his early career, when he was the only lawyer in town, with numerous suits over foreclosures. But by 1772, he was firmly established and began work to improve his relations with the community. In 1773 Alexander Scammel joined John Sullivan's law practice. Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 12,664 at the 2000 census. ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Alexander Scammel sometimes Scammell (1747-1781) was born in Mendon, Massachusetts and as a young man was a graduate of Harvard College in 1769. ...


He was sent by Durham to the colony's general assembly, and built a friendship with the royal governor John Wentworth. As the American Revolution grew nearer, he began to side more with the radicals. In 1774 the first Provincial (or rebel) Congress sent him as a delegate to the Continental Congress. John Wentworth (1737-1820) was the British colonial governor of New Hampshire at the time of the American Revolution. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ...


In 1775 he was returned to the Congress, but when they appointed him a brigadier general in June, he left to join the army at the siege of Boston. Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Combatants New England militia, Continental Army Great Britain Commanders Artemas Ward, George Washington Thomas Gage, William Howe Strength 17,000 The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War, in which New England militiamen—and then the Continental Army—surrounded...


Revolutionary War

After the British evacuated Boston in the spring of 1776, Washington sent General Sullivan north to replace the fallen John Thomas as commander in Canada. He took command of the sick and faltering invasion force, led an unsuccessful counterattack against the British at Trois-Rivières, and withdrew the survivors to Crown Point. This led to the first of several controversies between Congress and General Sullivan, as they sought a scapegoat for the failed invasion of Canada. He was exonerated and promoted to major general on August 9, 1776. For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... There have been several people with this name, see John Thomas for others. ... Combatants United States of America United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Commanders John Sullivan Sir Guy Carleton Strength 2,500 3,000 Casualties 25 dead, 140 wounded, 236 captured 8 dead, 9 wounded The Battle of Trois-Rivières was fought on June 8, 1776, in the American Revolutionary... Crown Point is a town located in Essex County, New York. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ...


Sullivan rejoined Washington and was placed in command of the troops on Long Island to defend against British General Howe's forces about to envelop New York City. But then, on August 23, Washington split the command between Sullivan and General Israel Putnam. Confusion about the distribution of command contributed to the American defeat at the Battle of Long Island four days later. Sullivan's personal bravery was unquestioned, as he engaged the Hessian attackers with a pistol in each hand, however he was captured. This article is about the island in New York State. ... For the surrealist painter, see William Howe (painter). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Maj. ... Combatants United States Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Israel Putnam William Howe, Charles Cornwallis, Henry Clinton Strength 11,000-13,000 (about 10,000 of which were militia ) 22,000 (including 9,000 Hessians) Casualties 1,719 total (312 dead, 1,407 wounded, captured or missing) 377 total... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ...


As a prisoner under parole, he carried letters from Admiral Richard Howe to the Congress. When the resulting peace discussions on Staten Island fell apart in September 1776 some in the Congress, particularly John Adams, found fault with Sullivan.[citation needed] Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe (8 March 1726 – 5 August 1799) was a British admiral. ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ...


War with the Main Army

General Sullivan was released in a prisoner exchange in time to rejoin Washington before the Battle of Trenton. There his division secured the important bridge over the Assunpink Creek to the north of the town. This prevented escape and ensured the high number of Hessian prisoners captured. This route is now the main road in Ewing Township, New Jersey called "Sullivans Way". In January 1777. Sullivan also performed well in the Battle of Princeton. [citation needed] Combatants Continental Army a Hessian Brigade Commanders George Washington Johann Rall† Strength 2,400 1,400 Casualties 2 dead,On the march 2 wounded 23 dead, 92 wounded, 913 captured The Battle of Trenton was a battle which took place on December 26, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War after... Assunpink Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River in western New Jersey in the United States. ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Hugh Mercer†, John Haslet† Charles Mawhood Strength 4,600 1,200 (Rearguard of main force) Casualties 46 killed c. ...


In August, he led a failed attempt to retake Staten Island. Again Congress found fault, but he was exonerated by the court of inquiry. This was followed by American losses at Brandywine and Germantown. Congress was frustrated by the continued British occupation of Philadelphia, but since Washington was the only man holding the army together, they made Sullivan the scapegoat. This article is about the borough in New York City. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe Strength 10,600 (8,000 present) 17,000 (6,000 present) Casualties 1,200-1,300 casualties 600-2000 killed 488 wounded 6 missing The Battle of Brandywine was a battle of the Philadelphia campaign of the American Revolutionary War... , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania|Germantown]] || result = inconclusive || combatant1 = Continental Army || combatant2 = Great Britain|Hessian Forces || commander1 = George Washington || commander2 = William Howe || strength1 = 13,000 || strength2 = 8,000 || casualties1 = 152 killed, 521 wounded, 400 captured || casualties2 = 71 killed, 450 wounded, 14 missing |}} |- | |} The Battle of Germantown was a battle in the American Revolutionary... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


In early 1778 he was transferred to the unimportant post of Rhode Island where he commanded the largely unsuccessful Battle of Rhode Island in August 1778. Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants British United States Commanders Robert Pigot John Sullivan Strength 7,139 10,100 Casualties at least 260 at least 211 The Battle of Rhode Island was a battle fought on August 29, 1778 when units of the Continental Army under the command of John Sullivan attempted to recapture Aquidneck... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In the summer of 1779, Sullivan led the Sullivan Expedition, a massive campaign against the Iroquois in western New York. During this campaign, troops destroyed a very large Cayuga settlement, called Coreorgonel, on what is now the southwest side of Ithaca, New York. 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Sullivan Expedition, also known as the Sullivan-Clinton Expedition, was a campaign led by Major General John Sullivan and General James Clinton against Loyalists (Tories) and the four nations of the Iroquois who had sided with the British in the American Revolutionary War. ... This article is about the state. ... The Cayuga nation (Guyohkohnyo or the People of the Great Swamp) was one of the five original constituents of the Iroquois, a confederacy of Indians in New York. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ...


He pushed his troops so hard that their horses became unusable, and killed them on this campaign, creating the namesake for Horseheads, New York. The lukewarm response of the Congress was more than he could accept. Broken, tired, and again opposed by Congress, he retired from the Army in 1779 and returned to New Hampshire. Horseheads may refer to: Horseheads (village), New York Horseheads (town), New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ...


After the war

At home Sullivan was a hero. New Hampshire returned him as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1780. But he still had opponents there. In 1781 when he borrowed money from the French minister to Congress, they accused him of being a foreign agent. [citation needed] He resigned from the Congress in August 1781. 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Back home again, he was named the state's attorney general in 1782 and served until 1786. During this same time he was elected to the state assembly, and served as speaker of the house. He led the drive in New Hampshire that led to ratification of the United States Constitution on June 21, 1788. He was elected President of New Hampshire (now Governor) in 1786, 1787, and in 1789. 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


When the new federal government was created, Washington named him federal judge for the District Court in New Hampshire in 1789. While his health prevented his sitting on the bench after 1792 [citation needed], he held the post until he died on January 23, 1795, aged 54, at his home in Durham. He was interred in the family cemetery there. Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Legacies

Sullivan County, New York, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, Sullivan County, New Hampshire, Sullivan County, Tennessee, and Sullivan County, Missouri were all named for him, as was Sullivan Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. [citation needed] Sullivan County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


External links

  • John Sullivan Congressional biography
  • Chemung County History General John Sullivan
Preceded by
John Langdon
Governor of New Hampshire
17861788
Succeeded by
John Langdon
Preceded by
John Langdon
Governor of New Hampshire
17891790
Succeeded by
Josiah Bartlett

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ceramic Tile Internet Expert Advice (2087 words)
When cracks in a floor seem to run in a continuous line through a few joining tiles, it is likely because the concrete slab beneath it is cracking.
John J. Sullivan will be providing expert advice for homeowners and others interested in ceramic tile care, cleaning, installation, selection and more.
John Sullivan is an Arizona ceramic tile contractor who has been doing ceramic tile flooring installations for thirty+ years, he is licensed, bonded, and insured and does a fantastic job.
John L. Sullivan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (786 words)
Born at Roxbury, Boston, to Irish immigrants, Mike Sullivan from Abbeydorney, County Kerry and Catherine Kelly from Athlone, County Roscommon.
Sullivan became a champion after defeating Paddy Ryan in Mississippi City, MS on February 7, 1882.
Sullivan retired, but appeared in several exhibitions over the next 12 years, including a three rounder against Tom Sharkey and a final two rounder against Jim McCormick in 1905.
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