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Encyclopedia > John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck

Steinbeck (centre), with his son,
visits President Lyndon B. Johnson
Born February 27, 1902(1902-02-27)
Salinas Valley, California, United States
Died December 20, 1968 (aged 66)
New York, New York, United States
Occupation Novelist, Short story writer, War Correspondent
Notable work(s) The Grapes of Wrath; Of Mice and Men[1]
Notable award(s) Nobel Prize in Literature
1962

John Steinbeck (February 27, 1902December 20, 1968) was one of the best-known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. He wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939 and the novel Of Mice and Men, published in 1937. In all, he wrote twenty-five books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books and several collections of short stories. In 1962 Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Steinbeck may refer to several people, mostly related to John Steinbeck, the American writer, including: Thomas Steinbeck, John Steinbecks eldest son and screenwriter John Steinbeck IV, John Steinbecks second son and journalist Nancy Steinbeck, John Steinbeck IVs wife and biographer Janet Steinbeck, Australian swimmer This page or... LBJ redirects here. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Salinas Valley, on River Road near Marina. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. ... This article is about the novel. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the novel. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the book by Chuck Palahniuk titled Non-fiction, see Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes...


Steinbeck grew up in the Salinas Valley region of California, a culturally diverse place of rich migratory and immigrant history. This upbringing imparted a regionalistic flavor to his writing, giving many of his works a distinct sense of place.[2][3] Steinbeck moved briefly to New York City, but soon returned home to California to begin his career as a writer. Most of his earlier work dealt with subjects familiar to him from his formative years. An exception was his first novel Cup of Gold which concerns the pirate Henry Morgan, whose adventures had captured Steinbeck's imagination as a child. Salinas Valley, on River Road near Marina. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Admiral Sir Henry Morgan (Hari Morgan in Welsh), (ca. ...


In his subsequent novels, Steinbeck found a more authentic voice by drawing upon direct memories of his life in California. Later he used real historical conditions and events in the first half of 20th century America, which he had experienced first-hand as a reporter. Steinbeck often populated his stories with struggling characters; his works examined the lives of the working class and migrant workers during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression. His later body of work reflected his wide range of interests, including marine biology, politics, religion, history, and mythology. One of his last published works was Travels with Charley, a travelogue of a road trip he took in 1960 to rediscover America. He died in 1968 in New York of a heart attack and his ashes are interred in Salinas. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Migrant farm worker, New York A migrant worker is someone who regularly works away from home, if they even have a home. ... Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Categories: Literature stubs | 1962 books | Books starting with T | Novels | John Steinbeck ... This article is in the process of being merged into Travel literature, and may be outdated. ... This article is about the film Road Trip. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Salinas, California Country State County Monterey Government  - Mayor Dennis Donohue Area  - City 19 sq mi (49. ...


Seventeen of his works, including Cannery Row (1945), The Pearl (1947), and East of Eden (1952), went on to become Hollywood films (some appeared multiple times, i.e. as remakes), and Steinbeck also achieved success as a Hollywood writer, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Story in 1944 for Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat. Cannery Row is a 1945 novel by John Steinbeck. ... This article is about the 1947 novel. ... For other uses, see East of Eden (disambiguation). ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Best Story was the Academy Award that was the predecessor to the Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay which was introduced in 1940. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Lifeboat is a 1944 World War II war film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock from a story written by John Steinbeck. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and work

The house in Salinas, California where John Steinbeck lived until he was 17 years old.
The house in Salinas, California where John Steinbeck lived until he was 17 years old.

John Ernst Steinbeck was born on February 27, 1902, in Salinas, California. He was of German American and Irish American descent. Johann Adolf Großteinbeck (i.e. Grossteinbeck), Steinbeck's grandfather, changed the family name from Grossteinbeck to Steinbeck when he migrated to the United States. His father, John Steinbeck, Sr., served as the Monterey County Treasurer while his mother, Olive (Hamilton) Steinbeck, a former school teacher, fostered Steinbeck's love of reading and writing.[4] Image File history File links SteinbeckHouse. ... Image File history File links SteinbeckHouse. ... Nickname: Location of Salinas, California Country State County Monterey Government  - Mayor Dennis Donohue Area  - City 19 sq mi (49. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... Monterey County is a county located on the Pacific coast of California, its northwestern section forming the southern half of Monterey Bay. ... Look up Treasurer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For university teachers, see professor. ...


At the time of his childhood, Salinas was a small Californian town. Though growing larger, more prosperous, and modern, it was still essentially a rough-and-tumble frontier place, set amid some of the world's most fertile land.[2] Steinbeck spent his summers working on nearby ranches and later with migrants on the huge Spreckels ranch. During this time, Steinbeck became aware of the harsher aspects of the migrant life in the region and of the darker side of human nature-- material which was to be explored in works such as Of Mice and Men.[2] He also explored the surrounding Salinas Valley, walking across local forests, fields and farms. This material was to provide background for most of his short stories.[2] Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, United States, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... A frontier is a political and geographical term referring to areas near or beyond a boundary, or of a different nature. ... Spreckels can refer to several things: Spreckels, California, USA, originally a company town of the Spreckels Sugar Company Spreckels Sugar Company, founded by Claus Spreckels Claus Spreckels, founder of the Spreckels Sugar Company, at one time considered the King of Sugar Spreckels Organ, donated by Claus sons Adolph and John... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ...


Steinbeck graduated from Salinas High School in 1920. He then attended Stanford University intermittently until 1925, eventually leaving without a degree, as he disliked the university lifestyle. From Stanford, he traveled to New York City and held various temporary jobs while pursuing his dream as a writer. However, he was unable to get any of his work published and returned to California [4] where for a time he was resort handyman in Lake Tahoe.[5] Stanford redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the lake in California/Nevada. ...


In California he continued to write. His first novel, Cup of Gold was published in 1929. It is based on the privateer Henry Morgan's life and death. It centers on Morgan's assault and sacking of the city of Panama, sometimes referred to as the 'Cup of Gold', and the woman fairer than the sun reputed to be found there.[3] Admiral Sir Henry Morgan (Hari Morgan in Welsh), (ca. ...


After Cup of Gold Steinbeck produced three shorter works between 1931 and 1933: The Pastures of Heaven, published in 1932, consisted of twelve interconnected stories about a valley in Monterey, California, which was discovered by a Spanish corporal while chasing runaway American Indian slaves. In 1933 Steinbeck brought out two works: The Red Pony is a short 100-page, four-chapter story, which recollects memories from Steinbeck's childhood.[3] To a God Unknown follows the life of a homesteader and his family in California, depicting a character with a primal and pagan worship of the land he works. He lived for many years in a cottage in Pacific Grove owned by his father, Ernest, who provided John ledger paper on which to write his manuscripts.[6] The Pastures of Heaven cover The Pastures of Heaven is a book by John Steinbeck consisting of twelve interconnected stories about a valley in Monterey, California, which was discovered by a Spanish corporal while chasing runaway Indian slaves. ... For other uses, see Monterey (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military rank. ... Note that this classification is now considered incorrect and should not be used in everyday writing. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... The Red Pony is a short 100-page, four-chapter story written by American author John Steinbeck in 1933. ... To a God Unknown cover To a God Unknown is a novel by John Steinbeck, first published in 1933. ... The Homestead Act is a piece of U.S. legislation which gave one quarter of a section of a township (160 acres, or about 65 hectares) of undeveloped land in the American West to any family head provided he lived on it for five years, or allowed the family head... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Pacific Grove, California city hall. ...

Steinbeck lived for many years in a cottage in Pacific Grove, California; he planted the pine tree in the front yard.
Steinbeck lived for many years in a cottage in Pacific Grove, California; he planted the pine tree in the front yard.

Steinbeck achieved his first critical success with the novel Tortilla Flat (1935), which won the California Commonwealth Club's Gold Medal.[3] The book portrays the adventures of a young group of classless and usually homeless men in Monterey, set in the era after World War I, just before U.S. prohibition. These characters, who are portrayed in ironic comparison to mythologic knights on a quest, reject nearly all of the standard morals of American society in enjoyment of a dissolute life centering around wine, lust, comradery, and petty thievery. The book, was made into a film of the same name in 1942, starring Spencer Tracy, Hedy Lamarr, and John Garfield. Pacific Grove, California city hall. ... For other uses, see Tortilla Flat (disambiguation). ... The Customs House at Monterey View of Monterey Bay and its kelp A sea lion rookery at the marina Museum interior with ship models and equipment Kelp Forest display at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Monterey is a city near the Pacific coast in northern California. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... John Garfield (March 4, 1913 – May 21, 1952) was an Academy Award nominated American actor. ...


Critical success

Steinbeck began to write a series of "California novels" and Dust Bowl fiction, set among common people during the Great Depression. These included In Dubious Battle in 1936, Of Mice and Men in 1937, and The Grapes of Wrath in 1939. Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... In Dubious Battle cover In Dubious Battle is a novel by John Steinbeck, written in 1936. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... This article is about the novel. ...


Of Mice and Men (1937), his novella about the dreams of a pair of migrant laborers working the California soil, was critically acclaimed.[3] Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ...


The stage adaptation of Of Mice and Men was a hit, starring Broderick Crawford as the mentally child-like but physically powerful itinerant farmhand "Lennie," and Wallace Ford as Lennie's companion, "George." However, Steinbeck refused to travel from his home in California to attend any performance of the play during its New York run, telling Kaufman that the play as it existed in his own mind was "perfect" and that anything presented on stage would only be a disappointment. Steinbeck would ultimately write only two stage plays (the second an adaptation of The Moon Is Down). Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... Crawford in Black Angel William Broderick Crawford (born December 9, 1911; died April 26, 1986) was an American actor. ... Ford as Det. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Of Mice and Men was rapidly adapted into a 1939 Hollywood film, in which Lon Chaney, Jr. (who had portrayed the role in the Los Angeles production of the play) was cast as Lennie and Burgess Meredith as "George."[7] Steinbeck followed this wave of success with The Grapes of Wrath (1939), based on newspaper articles he had written in San Francisco. The novel would be considered by many to be his finest work. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1940, even as it was made into a notable film directed by John Ford, starring Henry Fonda as Tom Joad, who was nominated for an Academy Award for the part. ... Lon Chaney, Jr. ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907[1] – September 9, 1997) was a versatile American actor. ... This article is about the novel. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ...

Bust of John Steinbeck in Monterey, California

The success of The Grapes of Wrath, however, was not free of controversy, as Steinbeck's liberal political views, portrayal of the ugly side of capitalism, and mythical reinterpretation of the historical events of the Dust Bowl migrations led to backlash against the author, especially close to home.[8] In fact, claiming the book was both obscene and misrepresented conditions in the county, the Kern County Board of Supervisors banned the book from the county's public schools and libraries in August 1939. This ban lasted until January 1941.[9] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1083x1503, 323 KB) Summary A bust of en:John Steinbeck located on en:Cannery Row in en:Monterey, California, the setting of his 1945 novel Cannery Row. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1083x1503, 323 KB) Summary A bust of en:John Steinbeck located on en:Cannery Row in en:Monterey, California, the setting of his 1945 novel Cannery Row. ... This article is about the novel. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... Obscenity has several connotations. ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of California. ... In some counties, the legislature is the board of supervisors. ... Many societies have banned certain books. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Alternative meanings: Library (computer science), Library (biology) Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ...


Of the controversy, Steinbeck wrote, "The vilification of me out here from the large landowners and bankers is pretty bad. The latest is a rumor started by them that the Okies hate me and have threatened to kill me for lying about them. I'm frightened at the rolling might of this damned thing. It is completely out of hand; I mean a kind of hysteria about the book is growing that is not healthy." An insult is a statement or action which affronts or demeans someone. ... Rear view of an Okies car, passing through Amarillo, Texas, heading west, 1941 Okie, also known as a Pafundi in Northern Oklahoma, is a synonym, dating from as early as 1905, denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. ...


The film versions of The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men (by two different movie studios) were in production simultaneously. Steinbeck spent a full day on the set of The Grapes of Wrath and the next day on the set of Of Mice and Men.


1940s—1950s

Steinbeck divorced his first wife, Carol Henning, in 1943. He married Gwyn Conger that same year, a union which produced Steinbeck's only children, Thomas ("Thom") Myles Steinbeck in 1944 and John Steinbeck IV (Catbird), in 1946. They divorced in 1948. Two years later, Steinbeck married Elaine (Anderson) Scott, the ex-wife of actor Zachary Scott. Thomas Myles Steinbeck is the eldest son of Gwyndolyn Steinbeck and John Steinbeck, the Nobel Laureate. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Zachary Scott (Austin, Texas February 24, 1914 – October 3, 1965 also in Austin from a brain tumour) was an American actor, most notable for his roles as villains and mystery men. He was a distant cousin of both George Washington and Bat Masterson. ...


Ed Ricketts

In 1940, Steinbeck's interest in marine biology and his friendship with Ed Ricketts led him to a voyage around the Gulf of California, also known as the "Sea of Cortez," where they collected biological specimens. Steinbeck's narrative portion of the total expedition report (with some philosophical additions by Ricketts) was later published as The Log from the Sea of Cortez, and describes the daily experiences of the trip. The narrative-log plus the full catalog of the marine invertebrates taken, had earlier been published as a naturalist's narrative and biological catalog of the invertebrate life of the Gulf of California. While it remains a classic of an earlier tradition in biological reporting, in 1942 it did not sell well, in part due to failure to find a popular audience.[10] Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... Edward Flanders Robb Ricketts (May 14, 1897 - May 11, 1948) commonly known as Ed Ricketts, was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher. ... The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or, much less frequently, Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... The Log from the Sea of Cortez is a book by John Steinbeck about his voyage with Ed Ricketts in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez. ... The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or, much less frequently, Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. ...

Ed Ricketts lab at 800 Cannery Row, Monterey which was the basis for Docs marine Lab in the novel Cannery Row
Ed Ricketts lab at 800 Cannery Row, Monterey which was the basis for Docs marine Lab in the novel Cannery Row

Ed Ricketts had a tremendous impact on Steinbeck's writing. Not only did he help Steinbeck while he was in the process of writing, but he aided Steinbeck in his social adventures. Steinbeck frequently took small trips with Ricketts along the California coast, to collect the biological specimens which Ricketts sold for a living, and to give Steinbeck a vacation from his writing.[10] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California (36. ... Monterrey is a city in Nuevo León, Mexico. ... Edward Flanders Robb Ricketts (May 14, 1897 - May 11, 1948) commonly known as Ed Ricketts, was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher. ...


Ricketts' impact on Steinbeck was so great that Steinbeck decided to base his character "Doc" in the novels Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday on Ricketts. Steinbeck's close relationship with Ricketts would end with the coming of the second World War, and as Steinbeck moved away from Salinas, California, to pursue a life away from his wife Carol. [10] Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California (36. ... Sweet Thursday is a 1954 novel by John Steinbeck. ...


World War II

During World War II, Steinbeck served as a war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune. It was at that time he became friends with Will Lang Jr. of Time/Life magazine. During the war, Steinbeck saw action in accompanying some of the commando raids of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.'s Beach Jumpers program, which (among other things) launched small-unit diversion operations against German-held islands in the Mediterranean. As a war correspondent, Steinbeck would certainly have been executed if he had been captured with the automatic weapon which he routinely carried on such missions, but all were successful. These missions would help to earn Fairbanks a number of decorations, but as a civilian, Steinbeck's role in these doings went officially unrecognized. Some of Steinbeck's writings from his correspondence days were collected and made into the novelistic documentary Once There Was A War (1958). Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... Will Lang Jr. ... Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr. ... Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Once There Was a War is a collection of articles written by John Steinbeck while he was a special war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune from June to December, 1943. ...


During the war, he continued to work in film, writing Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944), and the film A Medal for Benny (1945), about paisanos from Tortilla Flat going to war. John Steinbeck later requested that his name be removed from the credits of Lifeboat, because he believed the final version of the film had racist undertones. Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Lifeboat is a 1944 World War II war film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock from a story written by John Steinbeck. ... A Medal for Benny is a 1945 film conceived by writer Jack Wagner, who enlisted his longtime friend John Steinbeck to help him put it into script form. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Tortilla Flat (disambiguation). ...


His novel The Moon is Down (1942), about the Socrates-inspired spirit of resistance in a Nazi-occupied village in northern Europe, was made into a film almost immediately. It was presumed that the unnamed country of the novel was Norway, and in 1945 Steinbeck received the Haakon VII Medal of freedom for his literary contributions to the Norwegian resistance movement. This article is about the novel. ... This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... King Haakon VII King Haakon VII of Norway, Christian Frederik Carl Georg Valdemar Axel (August 3, 1872 - September 21, 1957) was the first King of Norway after the dissolution of the personal union with Sweden in 1905. ...


After the war

After the war, he wrote The Pearl (1947), already knowing it would be filmed. The story first appeared in the December 1945 issue of Woman's Home Companion magazine as "The Pearl of the World." It was illustrated by John Alan Maxwell. The novel is an imaginative telling of a story which Steinbeck had heard in La Paz, as related in The Log From the Sea of Cortez, which he described in Chapter 11 as being "so much like a parable that it almost can't be".[citation needed] Steinbeck traveled to Mexico for the filming; on this trip he would be inspired by the story of Emiliano Zapata, and subsequently wrote a film script (Viva Zapata!) directed by Elia Kazan and starring Marlon Brando and Anthony Quinn. This article is about the 1947 novel. ... The Womans Home Companion was an American monthly publication, published from 1873 to 1957. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For other uses, see Emiliano Zapata (disambiguation). ... Viva Zapata! is a 1952 biographical drama film directed by Elia Kazan. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... For other people named Anthony Quinn see Anthony Quinn (disambiguation) Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 – June 3, 2001) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican/American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ...


In 1948 Steinbeck again toured the Soviet Union, together with renowned photographer Robert Capa. They visited Moscow, Kiev, Tbilisi, Batumi and the ruined Stalingrad. He wrote a humorous report-book about their experiences, A Russian Journal, which was illustrated with Capa's photos. Avoiding political topics and reporting about the life of simple Soviet peasants and workers, Steinbeck tried to generate more understanding toward people living in the Soviet Union, in a time when anti-Communism was widespread in the U.S. and the danger of war between the two countries was imminent. However, throughout his writing, until nearly the end of his career, Steinbeck was far more concerned with the biological problems and biological facts of existence of the individual human, than he was with ideological systems. Robert Capa (Budapest, October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954) was a famous war photographer during the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Location of Tbilisi in Georgia Coordinates: , Country Established c. ... A general view of Batumi Batumi Batumi (Georgian: , formerly Batum or Batoum) is a seaside city on the Black Sea coast and capital of Adjara, an autonomous republic in southwest Georgia. ... Stalingrad is the former name of two cities: Volgograd, Russia Karviná-Nové Město, near Ostrava, Czech Republic Other uses: The Battle of Stalingrad (a major turning-point of World War II and arguably the bloodiest battle in human history) Stalingrad (German film set during the above battle) Stalingrad (metro station...


In the same year he was also elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. American Academy of Arts and Letters is an organization whose goal is to foster, assist, and sustain an interest in American literature, music, and art. ...


1950s—1960s

Following his divorce from Gwyndolyn Conger and the sudden, tragic death of his close friend Ed Ricketts, Steinbeck wrote one of his most popular novels, East of Eden (1952). This book, which he wrote to give his sons some idea of their heritage, was the book he repeatedly wrote of as his best, and his life's work. For other uses, see East of Eden (disambiguation). ...


In 1952, Steinbeck appeared as the on-screen narrator of 20th Century Fox's film, O. Henry's Full House. Although Steinbeck later admitted he was uncomfortable before the camera, he provided interesting introductions to several filmed adaptations of short stories by the legendary writer O. Henry. About the same time, Steinbeck recorded readings of several of his short stories for Columbia Records; despite some obvious stiffness, the recordings provide a literal record of Steinbeck's deep, resonant voice. Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... O. Henrys Full House is a 1952 portmanteau film made by 20th Century Fox, consisting of five separate stories by O. Henry. ... Not to be confused with Oh Henry!. O. Henry is the pen name of American writer William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862 – June 5, 1910). ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


Following the success of Viva Zapata!, Steinbeck collaborated with Kazan on the theatrical production of East of Eden, James Dean's film debut. East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ...


Steinbeck's next to last major work, Travels with Charley (subtitle: In Search of America) is a travelogue of a coast-to-coast road trip he took across the United States in 1960, in a camper truck, with his standard poodle Charley. In the work, Steinbeck misses his lost youth and lost roots, and both criticizes and praises America on many levels. According to Thom Steinbeck, the author's older son, the real reason for the trip was that Steinbeck knew he was dying and wanted to see his country one last time. Thom says he was surprised that his stepmother (Steinbeck's wife) allowed Steinbeck to make the trip, since Steinbeck's heart disease put him at risk of dying without warning at any time.[11] Categories: Literature stubs | 1962 books | Books starting with T | Novels | John Steinbeck ... This article is about the film Road Trip. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Poodle is a breed of dog; specifically, it is a gundog noted for its ability in the water. ...

Rocinante, Steinbeck's camper truck which he used to travel across the United States in 1960
Rocinante, Steinbeck's camper truck which he used to travel across the United States in 1960

Steinbeck's last novel, The Winter of Our Discontent, was written in 1961. The book examines moral decline in America through a tragic story.[12] The book reflected Steinbeck's increasing concern over the loss of integrity amongst members of society and the subsequent moral decay; in the book, the protagonist Ethan, like Steinbeck grows discontented both with his own moral decline and of those around him.[12] The book is quite different in tone to Steinbeck's amoral and ecological description of the innocent thievery of the protagonists of his earlier works such as Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row. Like many of Steinbeck's works, his last one was critically savaged. Many reviewers saw the quality and importance of the novel but were again disappointed, as many were still hoping for a work similar to the Grapes of Wrath.[12] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Rocinante is the name of Don Quixotes horse, in the novel Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. ... The Winter of Our Discontent is a 1961 novel by John Steinbeck. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Decline is a change over time from previously efficient to inefficient organizational functioning, from previously rational to non-rational organizational and individual decision-making, from previously law-abiding to law violating organizational and individual behavior, from previously virtuous to iniquitous individual moral behavior. ... For other uses, see Tortilla Flat (disambiguation). ... Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California (36. ... The Grapes of Wrath book cover The Grapes of Wrath is a work of fiction published by John Steinbeck in 1939, in which descriptive, narrative, and philosophical passages succeed one another. ...


Nobel prize for literature

In 1962, Steinbeck won the Nobel Prize for Literature for his “realistic and imaginative writing, combining as it does sympathetic humor and keen social perception.” Privately, he felt he did not deserve the honor. In his acceptance speech, he said: The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes...

"the writer is delegated to declare and to celebrate man's proven capacity for greatness of heart and spirit—for gallantry in defeat, for courage, compassion and love. In the endless war against weakness and despair, these are the bright rally flags of hope and of emulation. I hold that a writer who does not believe in the perfectibility of man has no dedication nor any membership in literature."

Steinbeck Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech[13]

The gravesite of Steinbeck's ashes in Salinas Cemetery
The gravesite of Steinbeck's ashes in Salinas Cemetery

In September of 1964, Steinbeck was awarded the United States Medal of Freedom by President Lyndon B. Johnson.[14] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Salinas is a Portuguese and Spanish word meaning saltworks, salt mines or salt pans. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the highest civilian award in the United States. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


In 1967, at the behest of Newsday magazine, Steinbeck went to Vietnam to report on the war there. Thinking of the Vietnam War as a heroic venture, he was considered a Hawk for his position on that war. His sons both served in Vietnam prior to his death, and Steinbeck visited one son in the battlefield (at one point being allowed to man a machine-gun watch position at night at a firebase, while his son and other members of his platoon slept). [15] Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... War Hawk is a term originally used to describe a member of the House of Representatives of the Twelfth Congress of the United States (usually from the south & southwest) who advocated going to war against Great Britain in the War of 1812. ...


Death

On December 20, 1968 John Steinbeck died in New York City. His death is listed as heart disease or heart attack. An autopsy showed nearly complete occlusion of Steinbeck's main coronary arteries.[3] is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Heart disease is an umbrella term for a number of different diseases which affect the heart and as of 2007 it is the leading cause of death in the United States,[1] and England and Wales. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... A stenosis is an abnormal narrowing in a blood vessel or other tubular organ or structure. ...


In accordance with his wishes, his body was cremated and an urn containing his ashes was interred at his family gravesite. His ashes were placed with those of the Hamiltons (grandparents). His third wife, Elaine was buried with him in 2004.[10] He had earlier written to his doctor that he felt deeply "in his bones" that he would not survive his physical death, and that the biological end of his life was the final end to it.[10]


After Steinbeck's death, his incomplete novel based on the King Arthur legends, Acts of King Arthur and his Noble Knights was finally published, in 1976. For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ...


Legacy

The National Steinbeck Centre in Salinas, California

The day after Steinbeck's death in New York City, reviewer Charles Poore wrote in the New York Times: "John Steinbeck's first great book was his last great book. But Good Lord, what a book that was and is: The Grapes of Wrath." Poore noted a "preachiness" in Steinbeck's work, "as if half his literary inheritance came from the best of Mark Twain—and the other half from the worst of Cotton Mather." But he asserted that "Steinbeck didn't need the Nobel Prize—the Nobel judges needed him." Poore concluded: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... This article is about the 17th century Puritan minister. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ...

"His place in [U.S.] literature is secure. And it lives on in the works of innumerable writers who learned from him how to present the forgotten man unforgettably."

Many of Steinbeck's works are often included on required reading lists in American high schools. His works are often read in other countries, in particular, in schools in Canada and the United Kingdom. In the United Kingdom Of Mice and Men is one of the key texts used by the examining body AQA for its English Literature GCSE. A study by the Center for the Learning and Teaching of Literature in the United States found that Of Mice and Men was one of the ten most frequently read books in both public high and independent schools.[16] High school, or secondary school, is the last segment of compulsory education in Hong Kong, United States, Australia, Canada, China, Korea and Japan. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... AQA logo The Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, or AQA, is the largest exam board in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ...


Steinbeck's works have aroused controversy. For example, at the time of its release The Grapes of Wrath was banned by several school boards, who believed his work to be obscene and misrepresentational. In one case, Kern County Board of Supervisors banned the book from the county's public schools and libraries in August 1939.[17] The Grapes of Wrath was also burned in Steinbecks home town of Salinas on two occasions.[18][19] Controversy however, still surrounds some of his work today; Of Mice and Men as another example, was banned in 2003 by a school board in Mississippi who considered the books use of profanity as a danger to its students.[20] The American Library Association states that Steinbeck was one of the ten most challenged and banned authors from 1990 to 2004, with Of Mice and Men the sixth highest challenged out of the 100 most frequently challenged books in the United States.[21][22] For the Wikipedia policy regarding controversial issues in articles, see Wikipedia:Guidelines for controversial articles. ... This article is about the novel. ... Many societies have banned certain books. ... Obscenity has several connotations. ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of California. ... In some counties, the legislature is the board of supervisors. ... Many societies have banned certain books. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Alternative meanings: Library (computer science), Library (biology) Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... Salinas is a Portuguese and Spanish word meaning saltworks, salt mines or salt pans. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


California

The California area which includes Salinas and the Salinas Valley, Monterey, and parts of the nearby San Joaquin Valley, acted as a setting for many of his stories. The area is now sometimes referred to as "Steinbeck Country".[10] This article is about the U.S. state. ... Salinas is a Portuguese and Spanish word meaning saltworks, salt mines or salt pans. ... Salinas Valley, on River Road near Marina. ... For other uses, see Monterey (disambiguation). ... The Central Valley of California The San Joaquin Valley (English pronunciation in IPA: [sæn wɑˈkin]) refers to the area of the Central Valley of California that lies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in Stockton. ...


Steinbeck's boyhood home, a turreted Victorian building in downtown Salinas, has been preserved and restored by the Valley Guild, a nonprofit organization. Fixed menu lunches are served Monday through Saturday, and the house is open for tours during the summer on Sunday afternoons.[23] Victorian can refer to: people from or attributes of places called Victoria (disambiguation page), including Victoria, Australia, people who lived during the British Victorian era of the 19th century, and aspects of the Victorian era, for example: Victorian architecture Victorian fashion Victorian morality Victorian literature This is a disambiguation page... Salinas is a Portuguese and Spanish word meaning saltworks, salt mines or salt pans. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... Tours is a city in France, the préfecture (capital city) of the Indre-et-Loire département, on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ...

Cannery Row in Monterey where Steinbeck's friend and fellow biologist Ed Ricketts worked
Cannery Row in Monterey where Steinbeck's friend and fellow biologist Ed Ricketts worked

The National Steinbeck Center, two blocks away at One Main Street is the only museum in the U.S. dedicated to a single author. Dana Gioia (chair of the National Endowment for the Arts) told an audience at the Center, "This is really the best modern literary shrine in the country, and I've seen them all." Its Steinbeckiana includes Rocinante, the camper truck in which Steinbeck made the crosscountry trip described in "Travels with Charley." A detailed breakdown of all of Steinbecks work are narrated through audio and visual materials including some original manuscripts, first editions and personal possessions.[24] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California (36. ... Monterrey is a city in Nuevo León, Mexico. ... Edward Flanders Robb Ricketts (May 14, 1897 - May 11, 1948) commonly known as Ed Ricketts, was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher. ... National Steinbeck Center A museum dedicated to author John Steinbeck which is located in Salinas, California. ... Main Street in Los Altos, California. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... see also: The First Edition, a musical group fronted by Kenny Rogers. ...


The cottage his father owned on Eleventh Street in Pacific Grove, where Steinbeck wrote some of his earliest books, has also survived.[10]


In Monterey, "Doc" Ed Ricketts' laboratory has survived (though is not yet open to the public) and at the corner which Steinbeck describes in Cannery Row, also the store which once belonged to Lee Chong, and the adjacent vacant lot frequented by the hobos of Cannery Row. The sardine cannery next to Doc's lab has long stopped operation as a cannery, and is now the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which contains some historical treasures, including a selection of Doc's library books. The town displays a series of civic links to Steinbeck's work including an avenue of flags from famous characters from Cannery Row, as well as a series of historical display signs.[10] Monterrey is a city in Nuevo León, Mexico. ... Edward Flanders Robb Ricketts (May 14, 1897 - May 11, 1948) commonly known as Ed Ricketts, was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher. ... Cannery Row is a 1945 novel by John Steinbeck. ... Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California (36. ... Sardines in the Pacific An open Sardines can Sardines on a plate grilled Sardines For the hide and seek-like game, see Hide and seek. ... Canning is a method of preserving food by first heating it to a temperature that destroys contaminating microorganisms, and then sealing it in air-tight jars, cans or pouches. ... The Monterey Bay Aquarium, which is located in a former sardine cannery on Cannery Row in Monterey, California, is one of the largest and most respected aquariums in the world. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... [1]#redirect Book ... The Flags (Far North Liquids and Associated Gas System) Pipeline is used to transport gas from the following Oil platforms: Cormorant A North Cormorant North West Hutton Ninian Central Ninian North & South Brent A, B, C and D Tern Magnus Thistle Murchison Statfjord Heather The pipeline is a 36 inch...


Honors

Steinbeck's poem plaque at San Francisco's Jack Kerouac Alley.
Steinbeck's poem plaque at San Francisco's Jack Kerouac Alley.

On December 5, 2007 California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria Shriver inducted Steinbeck into the California Hall of Fame, located at The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts.[25] His son, author Thomas Steinbeck accepted the award on his behalf. In 1979, the United States Postal Service issued a stamp featuring Steinbeck, starting the Postal Service’s Literary Arts series honoring American writers.[26] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 1. ... Jack Kerouac Alley (formerly Adler Street) is an alleyway in San Franciscos Chinatown. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Maria Owings Shriver (pronounced: ) (born November 6, 1955[1] in Chicago, Illinois) is an American journalist and the wife of California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and as such, the current First Lady of California. ... Conceived by First Lady Maria Shriver, the California Hall of Fame was established with The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts to honor legendary individuals and families who embody California’s innovative spirit and have made their mark on history. ... The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts – home of the California Hall of Fame – is housed in the State Archives Building in Sacramento, one block from the State Capitol. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Political views

Steinbeck's literary background brought him into close collaboration with leftist authors, journalists, and labor union figures, who may have influenced his writing. Steinbeck was mentored by radical writers Lincoln Steffens and his wife Ella Winter, and through Francis Whitaker, a member of the United States Communist Party’s John Reed Club for writers, Steinbeck met with strike organizers from the Cannery and Agricultural Workers' Industrial Union.[27] In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers who have banded together to achieve common goals in key areas such as wages, hours, and working conditions, forming a cartel of labour. ... Eric Parker is the most amazing kid alive and he will go on the win a national title at SYracuse University--71. ... Ella Winter was an American Communist agent and the wife of journalist Lincoln Steffens. ... Francis Whitaker (1906 - October 3, 1999) was a famous blacksmith in Carmel, California. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... John Reed John Jack Silas Reed (October 22, 1887 – October 19, 1920) was an American journalist and communist activist, famous for his first-hand account of the Bolshevik Revolution, Ten Days that Shook the World. ...


Steinbeck complained publicly about government harassment. In a 1942 letter to United States Attorney General Francis Biddle he wrote "Do you suppose you could ask Edgar's boys to stop stepping on my heels? They think I am an enemy alien. It is getting tiresome".[28] The FBI issued disingenuous denials that Steinbeck was not "under investigation". In fact, Steinbeck was indeed the object of intense FBI scrutiny. He was not under investigation, which is a technical term used by the FBI when it seeks to collect evidence in connection with a specific crime. The Nuremberg judges, left to right: John Parker, Francis Biddle, Alexander Volchkov, Iona Nikitchenko, Geoffrey Lawrence, Norman Birkett Francis Beverley Biddle (May 9, 1886 – October 4, 1968) was an American lawyer and judge who is most famous as the primary American judge during the Nuremberg trials after World War II... John Edgar Hoover (January 1, 1895 – May 2, 1972), known popularly as J. Edgar Hoover, was the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United States. ...


Steinbeck was also screened for his political beliefs by Army Intelligence during World War II to determine his suitability for an officer's commission. It found him ideologically unqualified. In later years, he would be criticized from the left by those who accused him of insufficient ideological commitment to socialism. In 1948 a women's socialist group in Rome condemned Steinbeck for converting to "the camp of war and anti-Sovietism". Then in a 1955 article in the Daily Worker his portrayal of the American Left was criticised.[29] The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The Daily Worker was a newspaper published by the Communist Party USA, a Comintern affiliated organization in New York, beginning in 1924. ...


In 1967, Steinbeck traveled to Vietnam to report on the war, and his sympathetic portrait of the United States Army caused the New York Post to denounce him for betraying his liberal past. Steinbeck's biographer, Jay Parini, has suggested that Steinbeck's affection for Lyndon B. Johnson, whom he considered a friend, influenced his view of the situation in Vietnam.[3] Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... LBJ redirects here. ...

Flag honoring Steinbeck in Monterey, California
Flag honoring Steinbeck in Monterey, California

Steinbeck was a close associate of playwright Arthur Miller, author of Death of a Salesman and The Crucible. In June 1959, Steinbeck took a personal and professional risk by standing up for his companion, who was held in contempt of the United States Congress for refusing to name names in the House Un-American Activities Committee trials.[18] Steinbeck called the period one of the "strangest and most frightening times a government and people have ever faced."[18] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Monterey (disambiguation). ... Arthur Bob Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... For other uses, see Death of a Salesman (disambiguation). ... For the 1996 film, see The Crucible (1996 film). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... HUAC hearings The House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA,[1] 1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


Major Works

Of Mice and Men

For more details on this topic, see Of Mice and Men.

Of Mice and Men is a tragedy that was written in the form of a play in 1937. The story is about two traveling ranch workers, George and Lennie, trying to work up enough money to buy their own farm/ranch. It encompasses themes of racism, loneliness, prejudice against the mentally ill, and the struggle for personal independence. Along with Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, and The Pearl, Of Mice and Men is one of Steinbeck's best known works. It was made into a movie three times, in 1939 starring Burgess Meredith, Lon Chaney Jr., and Betty Field, in 1982 starring Randy Quaid, Robert Blake and Ted Neeley, and in 1992 starring Gary Sinise and John Malkovich. Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907[1] – September 9, 1997) was a versatile American actor. ... Lon Chaney, Jr. ... Actress Betty Field (1947) photo taken by Carl Van Vechten Betty Field (February 8, 1913 - September 13, 1973) was an American film and stage actress. ... Randall Rudy Randy Quaid (born October 1, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and comedian. ... There have been several notable individuals with the name Robert Blake: Robert Blake (admiral) (1599 - 1657) Robert Blake, Baron Blake (1916-2003), British historian Robert Blake (actor), (born 1933), of TVs Baretta Robert Blake (management), developed the Managerial Grid Model. ... Ted Neeley at The Peace Center in Greenville, SC on May 13, 2007 after a show. ... Gary Alan Sinise (born March 17, 1955) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning, Golden Palm- and Academy Award-nominated American actor and film director. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ...


The Grapes of Wrath

For more details on this topic, see The Grapes of Wrath.

The Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1940. The book is set in the Great Depression and describes a family of sharecroppers, the Joads, who were driven from their land due to the dust storms of the Dust Bowl. The title is a reference to the Battle Hymn of the Republic. The book was made into a film in 1940 starring Henry Fonda and directed by John Ford. This article is about the novel. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... The Battle Hymn of the Republic is a patriotic anthem written by Julia Ward Howe for the United States during the American Civil War as a replacement for the words to the marching song John Browns Body. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ...


East of Eden

For more details on this topic, see East of Eden.

Steinbeck deals with the nature of good and evil in this Salinas Valley saga. The story follows two families: the Hamiltons - based on Steinbeck's own maternal ancestry - and the Trasks, reprising stories about the Biblical Adam and his progeny. The book was published in 1952. For other uses, see East of Eden (disambiguation). ...


Travels With Charley

For more details on this topic, see Travels With Charley: In Search of America.

In 1960, Steinbeck bought a pickup truck and had it modified with a custom-built camper top - rare for that day - and drove across the United States with his faithful poodle, Charley. In this sometimes comical, sometimes melancholic book, Steinbeck describes what he sees from Maine to Montana to California, and from there to Texas and Louisiana and back to his home in Long Island. The restored camper truck is on exhibit in the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas, California. Categories: Literature stubs | 1962 books | Books starting with T | Novels | John Steinbeck ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... National Steinbeck Center A museum dedicated to author John Steinbeck which is located in Salinas, California. ... Nickname: Location of Salinas, California Country State County Monterey Government  - Mayor Dennis Donohue Area  - City 19 sq mi (49. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Film credits

Of Mice and Men is a 1939 film based on the novella of the same title by American author John Steinbeck. ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907[1] – September 9, 1997) was a versatile American actor. ... Lon Chaney, Jr. ... Actress Betty Field (1947) photo taken by Carl Van Vechten Betty Field (February 8, 1913 - September 13, 1973) was an American film and stage actress. ... This article is about the film. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Jane Darwell (October 15, 1879 – August 13, 1967) was an Academy Award-winning American theater and film actress. ... John Carradine (February 5, 1906 – November 27, 1988) was a Daytime Emmy Award-winning American actor, perhaps best known for his roles in horror films and Westerns. ... Tortilla Flat is a 1942 film with Spencer Tracy, Hedy Lamarr, John Garfield, Frank Morgan, Akim Tamiroff, and Sheldon Leonard based on the novel by John Steinbeck. ... Victor Fleming (February 23, 1883 - January 6, 1949) (sometimes Vic Fleming) was an American film director. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... John Garfield (March 4, 1913 – May 21, 1952) was an Academy Award nominated American actor. ... Irving Pichel was an American actor and director. ... Lee J. Cobb Lee J. Cobb (December 8, 1911 – February 11, 1976) was an American actor. ... Sir Cedric Webster Hardwicke (February 19, 1893 - August 6, 1964) was a British actor. ... Lifeboat is a 1944 World War II war film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock from a story written by John Steinbeck. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Actor John Hodiak was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1914. ... A Medal for Benny is a 1945 film conceived by writer Jack Wagner, who enlisted his longtime friend John Steinbeck to help him put it into script form. ... Dorothy Lamour (December 10, 1914 – September 22, 1996) was an American motion picture actress. ... La perla (The pearl) is a 1945 production of the Cinema of Mexico. ... The Red Pony is a short 100-page, four-chapter story written by American author John Steinbeck in 1933. ... Myrna Loy (August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American motion picture actress. ... Robert Charles Durman Mitchum (August 6, 1917 – July 1, 1997) was an Academy award nominated American film actor and singer. ... Louis Calhern (February 19, 1895 - May 12, 1956) was an American stage and screen actor. ... Viva Zapata! is a 1952 biographical drama film directed by Elia Kazan. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... For other people named Anthony Quinn see Anthony Quinn (disambiguation) Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 – June 3, 2001) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican/American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Elizabeth Jean Peters (October 15, 1926 – October 13, 2000) was an American actress. ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ... Actress Julie Harris photo taken by Carl Van Vechten 1952 Julie Harris (born Julia Ann Harris on December 2, 1925 in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan) is an American actress. ... Jo Van Fleet (December 30, 1914 – June 10, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning American theater and film actress. ... Raymond Massey photographed by Carl Van Vechten Raymond Hart Massey (August 30, 1896 – July 29, 1983) was a Canadian actor. ... The Wayward Bus, by John Steinbeck, is one of Steinbecks lesser novels, but its clear writing and solid character delineation testify that second-rank Steinbeck is still very good writing indeed. ... Jayne Mansfield (born Vera Jayne Palmer; April 19, 1933—29 June 1967) was an American actress working both on Broadway and in Hollywood. ... Joan Henrietta Collins OBE (born 23 May 1933) is a Golden Globe Award winning British actress and bestselling author. ... Cannery Row is the title of a 1982 film directed by David S. Ward. ... Nicholas King Nolte (born February 8, 1941) is a Oscar-nominated American actor, model, and producer. ... Debra Winger (born May 16, 1955) is an Academy Award- nominated American actress. ... Of Mice and Men is a 1992 movie starring John Malkovich and Gary Sinise (who also directed). ... Gary Alan Sinise (born March 17, 1955) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning, Golden Palm- and Academy Award-nominated American actor and film director. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ...

Partial Bibliography

Posthumous publishings include: The Pastures of Heaven cover The Pastures of Heaven is a book by John Steinbeck consisting of twelve interconnected stories about a valley in Monterey, California, which was discovered by a Spanish corporal while chasing runaway Indian slaves. ... The Red Pony is a short 100-page, four-chapter story written by American author John Steinbeck in 1933. ... To a God Unknown cover To a God Unknown is a novel by John Steinbeck, first published in 1933. ... For other uses, see Tortilla Flat (disambiguation). ... In Dubious Battle cover In Dubious Battle is a novel by John Steinbeck, written in 1936. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by Nobel Prize winning author John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced Anglo migrant ranch workers in California during the Great Depression. ... theme, settings, and symbols of john steinbecks short stories ... This article is about the novel. ... The Gulf of California (highlighted) The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or, much less frequently, Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula... This article is about the novel. ... Cannery Row is a 1945 novel by John Steinbeck. ... The Wayward Bus, by John Steinbeck, is one of Steinbecks lesser novels, but its clear writing and solid character delineation testify that second-rank Steinbeck is still very good writing indeed. ... This article is about the 1947 novel. ... Russian Journal cover A Russian Journal, published by John Steinbeck in 1948, is an eyewitness account of his travels through Soviet Russia during the early years of the Cold War era. ... Burning Bright is a 1950 novella by John Steinbeck written as an experiment with producing a play in novel format. ... The Log from the Sea of Cortez is a book by John Steinbeck about his voyage with Ed Ricketts in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez. ... For other uses, see East of Eden (disambiguation). ... Sweet Thursday is a 1954 novel by John Steinbeck. ... The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication book cover The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication is a novel by John Steinbeck published in 1957. ... Once There Was a War is a collection of articles written by John Steinbeck while he was a special war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune from June to December, 1943. ... The Winter of Our Discontent is a 1961 novel by John Steinbeck. ... Categories: Literature stubs | 1962 books | Books starting with T | Novels | John Steinbeck ...

Viva Zapata! is a 1952 biographical drama film directed by Elia Kazan. ... John Steinbecks retranslation of the Arthurian legend, based primarily in the Mallory text, Le Morte d Artur. ...

Further reading

  • DeMott, Robert and Steinbeck, Elaine A., eds. John Steinbeck, Novels and Stories 1932-1937 (Library of America, 1994) ISBN 978-1-88301101-7
  • DeMott, Robert and Steinbeck, Elaine A., eds. John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath and Other Writings 1936-1941 (Library of America, 1996) ISBN 978-1-88301115-4
  • DeMott, Robert, ed. John Steinbeck, Novels 1942-1952 (Library of America, 2002) ISBN 978-1-93108207-5
  • DeMott, Robert and Railsback, Brian, eds. John Steinbeck, Travels With Charlie and later novels, 1947-1962 (Library of America, 2007) ISBN 978-1-59853-004-9
  • Benson, Jackson J., ed. The Short Novels Of John Steinbeck: Critical Essays with a Checklist to Steinbeck Criticism. Durham: Duke UP, 1990. PS3537 .T3234 Z8666
  • Davis, Robert C. The Grapes of Wrath: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1982. PS3537 .T3234 G734
  • French, Warren. John Steinbeck's Fiction Revisited. NY: Twayne, 1994.
  • Hughes, R. S. John Steinbeck: A Study of the Short Fiction. R.S. Hughes. Boston : Twayne, 1989. PS3537 .T3234 Z7147
  • Meyer, Michael J. The Hayashi Steinbeck Bibliography, 1982-1996. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow, 1998.
  • Benson, Jackson J. Looking for Steinbeck's Ghost. Reno: U of Nevada P, 2002.
  • Ditsky, John. John Steinbeck and the Critics. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2000.
  • Heavilin, Barbara A. John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath: A Reference Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002.
  • Li, Luchen. ed. John Steinbeck: A Documentary Volume. Detroit: Gale, 2005.
  • Parini, Jay,. John Steinbeck: A Biography, , Holt Publishing, 1996

Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...

References

  1. ^ The Nobel Prize in Literature 1962: Presentation Speech by Anders Österling, Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy, NobelPrize.org, <http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1962/press.html>. Retrieved on 21 April 2008 
  2. ^ a b c d Introduction to John Steinbeck, The Long Valley, pages 9 - 10, John Timmerman, Penguin Publishing, 1995
  3. ^ a b c d e f g John Steinbeck: A Biography, Jay Parini, Holt Publishing, 1996
  4. ^ a b National Steinbeck Centre, Biography Page, 2007
  5. ^ Introduction to 'The Grapes of Wrath' Penguin edition (1192) by Rober DeMott
  6. ^ Jackson J. Benson, John Steinbeck, writer (New York: The Viking Press, 1984), pgs. 147, 651)
  7. ^ Of Mice and Men (1939). The Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  8. ^ Steibeck backlash of his portrayal of the depression, New Criterion, Accessed 2007
  9. ^ Steinbecks works Banned, Accessed 2007
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Susan Shillinglaw (2006), A Journey into Steinbeck's California, Roaring Forties Press 
  11. ^ "Steinbeck knew he was dying," September 13, 2006. Audio interview with Thom Steinbeck
  12. ^ a b c The students companion to John Steinbeck, page 24, Cynthia Burkhead, Greenwood Press, 2002
  13. ^ Steinbeck Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech
  14. ^ John Steinbeck, Recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Medal of Freedom Recipients, Accessed 2007
  15. ^ See Steinbeck, A Life in Letters.
  16. ^ Books taught in Schools, Center for the Learning and Teaching of Literature. Accessed 2007
  17. ^ Steinbeck Book Ban, Accessed 2007
  18. ^ a b c John Steinbeck, Writer: A Biography, Jackson J. Benson , Penguin, 1990
  19. ^ The Grapes of Wrath Burnt in Salinas, National Steinbeck Centre, Accessed 2007
  20. ^ Steinbecks work banned in Mississippi 2003, American Library Association, Accessed 2007
  21. ^ Steinbeck 10 most most banned list, American Library Association, Accessed 2007
  22. ^ 100 Most Frequently banned books in the U.S., American Library Association, Accessed 2007
  23. ^ John Steinbeck's Home and Birthplace, Information Point, Accessed 2007
  24. ^ The National Steinbeck Centre, Accessed 2007
  25. ^ Steinbeck inducted into California Hall of Fame, California Museum, Accessed 2007
  26. ^ Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author Gets ‘Stamp of Approval’. United States Postal Service (2008-02-21). Retrieved on 2008-03-15.
  27. ^ Steinbeck and radicalism New Criterion, Accessed 2007
  28. ^ Steinbeck Political Beliefs, Smoking Gun Part 1, Accessed 2007
  29. ^ Steinbeck Political Beliefs, Smoking Gun Part 2, Accessed 2007

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Persondata
NAME Steinbeck, John Ernst
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American writer, Nobel Prize for Literature laureate in 1962
DATE OF BIRTH February 27, 1902(1902-02-27)
PLACE OF BIRTH Salinas Valley, California, United States
DATE OF DEATH December 20, 1968
PLACE OF DEATH New York
American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Salinas Valley, on River Road near Marina. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the state. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Steinbeck Biography and List of Works - John Steinbeck Books (278 words)
John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 - December 20, 1968) was one of the most famous American novelists of the 20th century.
East of Eden is Steinbeck's most ambitious work, in which he turns his attention from social injustice to human psychology, in a Salinas Valley saga loosely patterned on the Garden of Eden story.
Steinbeck received the Nobel prize for literature in 1962 for his �realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception.� He died in New York.
Author Profile: John Steinbeck (889 words)
John Steinbeck was born in Salinas, and lived the early part of his life in Monterey County, California.
It was here that Steinbeck developed a knowledge and love of the natural world and the diverse cultures that figure so prominently in his works.
John Steinbeck was born in 1902 in Salinas, California.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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