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Encyclopedia > John Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer

John Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer (1782-1845), known during his father's lifetime by his courtesy title Viscount Althorp, was an English statesman. 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my [birth]right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ...

Contents


Early years

His father George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer had served in the ministries of Pitt the Younger, Charles James Fox and Lord Grenville, and was First Lord of the Admiralty (1794 - 1801). He was married to the eldest daughter of Lord Lucan Their eldest son, John Charles, was born at Spencer House, London, on 30 May 1782. In 1800 , after Harrow , he took up his residence at Trinity College, Cambridge, and for some time applied himself energetically to mathematical studies; but he spent most of his time in hunting and racing. In 1804 he entered parliament as a member for Okehampton in Devon. He vacated his seat in 1806, to contest the University of Cambridge against Lord Henry Petty and Lord Palmerston (when he was hopelessly beaten), but he was elected that same year for St Albans, and appointed a lord of the treasury. At the general election in November 1806, he was elected for Northamptonshire, and he continued to sit for the county until he succeeded to the peerage. For the next few years after this speech Lord Althorp occasionally spoke in debate and always on the side of Liberalism, but from 1813 to 1818 he was only rarely in the House of Commons. His absence was partly due to a feeling that it was hopeless to struggle against the will of the Tory ministry, but more particularly to his marriage on 14 April 1814, to Esther, only daughter of Richard Acklom of Wiseton Hall, Northamptonshire, who died in childbirth 1818. The Right Honourable Sir George John Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer KG PC FRS FSA (1 September 1758–10 November 1834) was a Whig politician of the late 18th and early 19th century. ... The Right Honourable William Pitt, the Younger (28 May 1759–23 January 1806) was a British politician during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... The Right Honourable Charles James Fox (13 January 1749–13 September 1806) was a British Whig politician. ... William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville (October 25, 1759 - January 12, 1834), was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... For other uses, see London (disambiguation) and Defining London (below). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Alternative meanings: Harrow, London, a place in the London Borough of Harrow; Harrow School, a famous public school in the United Kingdom; The Harrow, a fantasy and horror magazine. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... Location within the British Isles. ... The inner harbour, Brixham, south Devon, at low tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordering on Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Cambridge (often called Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne (1780-1863), Son of the 1st Marquess by his second marriage, was born on 2 July 1780 and educated at Edinburgh University and at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... The Right Honourable Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid 19th century. ... St Albans (thus spelt, no apostrophe or dot) is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... For the Peerage in France, see French peerage. ... This article discusses liberalism as a major political ideology as it developed and stands currently. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ...


Leader of the Commons

In 1819, on his return to political life, he pressed for establishing a more efficient bankruptcy court, and of expediting the recovery of small debts; and he saw both these reforms accomplished before 1825. During the greater part of the reign of George IV the Whigs lost their legitimate influence in the state from their want of cohesion, but this defect was soon remedied in 1830 when Lord Althorp was chosen their leader in the lower house, and his capacity for the position was proved by experience. In Lord Grey's government Althorp was both Leader of the House of Commons and Chancellor of the Exchequer. He was instrumental in success of the government measures. Along with Lord John Russell, he led the fight to pass the Reform Bill of 1832, making more than twenty speeches, and is generally considered the architect of its victory. 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Right Honourable Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764–17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Rt. ... John Russell, 1st Earl Russell (August 18, 1792 - May 28, 1878), known as Lord John Russell before 1861, was a Whig politician who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... The Reform Act of 1832 (known also as the Great Reform Act and The Parliamentary Reform Act 1832) introduced wide-ranging changes to electoral franchise legislation in the United Kingdom. ...


The Lords

After the dissolution of 1833 the Whig government had been slowly dying, and was further weakened by Althorp's promotion to the House of Lords following the death of his father in 1834. The new Lord Spencer abandoned the cares of office and returned to country life with unalloyed delight. Henceforth agriculture, not politics, was his principal interest. He was the first president of the Royal Agricultural Society (founded 1838), and a notable cattle-breeder. Often as he was urged by his political friends to come to their assistance, be rarely quitted the peaceful pleasures which he loved. He died without issue at Wiseton on 1 October 1845, and was succeeded by his brother Frederick (d. 1857). This article is about the British House of Lords. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Was one of the homes of Queens Park Rangers Football Club played at before they moved to their permanent current home Loftus Road London W12 in 1917 ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Legacy

He had held, as a statesman, a remarkable position. The Whigs required, to carry the Reform Bill, a leader of unstained character, one to whom party spirit could not attach the suspicion of greed of office, and against Lord Althorp malevolence was powerless. No stronger proof of his pre-eminence could be given than the oft-quoted saying of Lord Hardinge that one of Croker's ablest speeches was demolished by the simple statement of Lord Althorp that he "had collected some figures which entirely refuted it, but had lost them." The trust which the house put in him then was never wanting.


Spencer Street in Melbourne, Australia, is named in his honour. Spencer Street is a major street in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ... Melbourne is the state capital and largest city in the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-largest city in Australia (after Sydney), with a population of approximately 3. ...

Preceded by:
Henry Goulburn
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1830–1834
Succeeded by:
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Preceded by:
Sir Robert Peel
Leader of the House of Commons
1830–1834
Succeeded by:
Lord John Russell
Preceded by:
George John Spencer
Earl Spencer Succeeded by:
Frederick Spencer

Henry Goulburn (1784–1856) was an English statesman and a member of the Peelite faction after 1846. ... The Rt. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable John Russell, 1st Earl Russell (August 18, 1792 – May 28, 1878), known as Lord John Russell before 1861, was a British Whig and Liberal statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... George John Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer (1 September 1758 - 10 November 1834) was a Whig politician of the late 18th and early 19th century. ... The title Earl Spencer was created in 1765 in the Peerage of Great Britain for John Spencer, 1st Viscount Spencer, a great-grandson of the 1st Duke of Marlborough. ... Frederick Spencer, 4th Earl Spencer (1798-1857) was younger brother of John Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer, and succeeded his brother, who was politically active in the House of Commons as Lord Althorp. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
Chancellors of the Exchequer
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  Results from FactBites:
 
John Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (656 words)
John Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer (1782-1845), known during his father's lifetime by his courtesy title Viscount Althorp, was an English statesman.
His father George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer had served in the ministries of Pitt the Younger, Charles James Fox and Lord Grenville, and was First Lord of the Admiralty (1794 - 1801).
He was married to the eldest daughter of Lord Lucan Their eldest son, John Charles, was born at Spencer House, London, on 30 May 1782.
John Spencer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (156 words)
John Spencer is the former Republican mayor of Yonkers, New York from 1995 to 2003 who has announced on June 1, 2005 his intention to run for the United States Senate against Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2006.
John Poyntz Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer (1835-1910) was a British politican.
John Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer (1782-1845) was a British politician.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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