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Encyclopedia > John Rutledge
John Rutledge
John Rutledge

In office
July 1, 1795 – December 15, 1795
Nominated by George Washington
Preceded by John Jay
Succeeded by Oliver Ellsworth

In office
February 15, 1790 – March 5, 1791
Nominated by George Washington
Preceded by (none)
Succeeded by Thomas Johnson

In office
July 4, 1776 – March 7, 1778
Lieutenant(s) Henry Laurens (1776-1777)
James Parsons (1777-1778)
Preceded by William Campbell
Succeeded by Rawlins Lowndes
In office
January 9, 1779 – January 31, 1782
Lieutenant(s) Thomas Bee (1779-1780)
Christopher Gadsden (1780-1782)
Preceded by Rawlins Lowndes
Succeeded by John Mathews

Born September 17, 1739(1739-09-17)
Charleston, South Carolina
Died July 18, 1800 (aged 60)
Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Spouse Elizabeth Grimke
Religion Episcopalian

John Rutledge (September 17, 1739July 18, 1800) was Governor of South Carolina, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, signer of the United States Constitution, and served on the U.S. Supreme Court (Chief Justice from August to December 1795). He was the elder brother of Edward Rutledge, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. This article is about the U.S. Representative from South Carolina. ... 18th century painting of John Rutledge This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the day. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Thomas Johnson Thomas Johnson (1732-1819) was an American jurist with a distinguished political career. ... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Laurens Henry Laurens (1724–1792) was an American merchant and rice planter from South Carolina who became a political leader during the Revolutionary War. ... James Parsons (1705-4 April 1770) was an English physician, antiquary and author. ... William Campbell (and Bill Campbell) are common names. ... Rawlins Lowndes (1722–1800) was an American lawyer and jurist from South Carolina. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Bee (1739–1812) was an American planter, lawyer, and jurist from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Christopher Gadsden (1724-1805) was an American general and statesman during the American Revolution. ... Rawlins Lowndes (1722–1800) was an American lawyer and jurist from South Carolina. ... John Mathews (1744–November 17, 1802) was an American lawyer from Charleston, South Carolina. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... Edward Rutledge Edward Rutledge (November 23, 1749–January 23, 1800), South Carolina statesman, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and later governor of South Carolina. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ...

Contents

Childhood and family

John Rutledge was born into a large family at or near Charleston, South Carolina, and received his early education from his father who was an alcoholic Scots Irish immigrant and physician, and from an Anglican priest and a tutor. After studying law at London's Middle Temple in 1760, he was admitted to English practice. But, almost at once, he sailed back to Charleston to begin a fruitful legal career and to build on his mother's fortune in plantations and slaves. Three years later, he married Elizabeth Grimke, who eventually bore him 10 children, and moved into a townhouse, where he resided most of the remainder of his life. Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ... Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ... Slave redirects here. ...


Pre-Revolutionary War activism

In 1761, Rutledge became politically active. That year, on behalf of Christ Church Parish, he was elected to the provincial assembly and held his seat until the American Revolution. For 10 months in 1764 he temporarily held the post of provincial Attorney General. When the troubles with Great Britain intensified about the time of the Stamp Act in 1765, Rutledge, who hoped to ensure continued self-government for the colonies, sought to avoid severance from the British and maintained a restrained stance. He did, however, chair a committee of the Stamp Act Congress that drew up a petition to the House of Lords. Christ Church is a parish of Barbados at the southern end of the island. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... The Stamp Act of 1765 (short title Duties in American Colonies Act 1765; 5 George III, c. ... The Stamp Act Congress was a meeting in New York City in October 1765 of delegates from the American Colonies that discussed and acted upon the recently passed Stamp Act. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


In 1774, Rutledge was sent to the First Continental Congress, where he pursued a moderate course. After spending the next year in the Second Continental Congress, he returned to South Carolina and helped reorganize its government. In 1776, he served on the committee of safety and took part in the writing of the state constitution. That year, he also became president of the lower house of the legislature, a post he held until 1778. During this period, the new government met many stern tests. The First Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of twelve North American colonies of Great Britain in 1774. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence depicts the five-man drafting committee presenting the first draft of the Declaration of Independence to the Second Continental Congress. ...


In 1778, the conservative Rutledge, disapproving of democratic revisions in the state constitution, resigned his position. The next year, however, he was elected as governor. It was a difficult time. The British were invading South Carolina, and the military situation was desperate. Early in 1780, by which time the legislature had adjourned, Charleston was besieged. In May it fell, the American army was captured, and the British confiscated Rutledge's property. He ultimately escaped to North Carolina and set about attempting to rally forces to recover South Carolina. In 1781, aided by Gen. Nathanael Greene and a new Continental Army force, he reestablished the government. In January 1782 he resigned the governorship and took a seat in the lower house of the legislature. He never recouped the financial losses he suffered during the war. For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Charles Willson Peale painted a portrait of General Greene from life in 1783, which was then copied several times by C.W. Peale and his son, Rembrandt Peale. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ...


Post-war

In 1782-1783, Rutledge was a delegate to the Continental Congress. He next sat on the state chancery court (1784) and again in the lower house of the legislature (1784-1790). One of the most influential delegates at the Constitutional Convention, where he maintained a moderate nationalist stance and chaired the Committee of Detail, he attended all the sessions, spoke often and effectively, and served on five committees. Like his fellow South Carolina delegates, he vigorously advocated southern interests. He had strong feelings on the right to the slave trade and even threatened to leave if slavery was not allowed. One of the courts of equity in England and Wales. ...


Supreme Court Associate Justice

The new government under the Constitution soon lured Rutledge. He was a presidential elector in 1789, and George Washington then appointed him as Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, but he served for only two years. In 1791, he became chief justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court. The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the...


Second Chief Justice of the United States

In 1795, George Washington again appointed Rutledge during a recess of the Senate to the U.S. Supreme Court, this time as Chief Justice of the United States replacing John Jay. Rutledge became Chief Justice on July 1 of 1795.[1] Soon thereafter, on July 16 of 1795, Rutledge gave a highly controversial speech denouncing the Jay Treaty with England. He reportedly said in the speech "that he had rather the President should die than sign that puerile instrument — and that he preferred war to an adoption of it."[2] A recess appointment occurs when the President of the United States fills a vacant Federal position during a recess of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty The Jay Treaty between the United States and Great Britain averted war, solved many issues left over from the Revolution, and opened ten years of peaceful trade in the midst of a large war. ...


Rutledge's outspoken opposition to the Jay Treaty, and the rumors of mental illness he had suffered since the death of his wife in 1792, caused the Federalist-dominated Senate to reject his appointment on December 15 of 1795, ending his public career. In the meantime, however, he had presided over one term of the Court. Alexander Hamilton questioned his sanity, and Vice President John Adams wrote to Abigail Adams that the Senate's rejection of Rutledge "gave me pain for an old friend, though I could not but think he deserved it. C. Justices must not ... inflame the popular discontents which are ill founded, nor propagate Disunion, Division, Contention and delusion among the people."[3] Rutledge attempted suicide, shortly before resigning as Chief Justice on December 28 of 1795.[4] A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... The term federalist refers to several sets of political beliefs around the world. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Abigail Smith Adams she was (November 11, 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife of John Adams, the second President of the United States, and is seen as the second First Lady of the United States though that term was not coined until after her death. ...


Rutledge died in 1800 at the age of 60 and was interred at St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Charleston. One of his houses, said to have been built in 1763 and definitely sold in 1790, was renovated in 1989 and opened to the public as the John Rutledge Inn. Established in 1703, St. ...


punjabbiiiiiiii

  • "By doing good with his money, a man, as it were, stamps the image of God upon it, and makes it pass, current for the merchandise of heaven." ~ John Rutledge

References

  1. ^ Fisher, Louis. “Recess Appointments of Federal Judges,” Congressional Research Service (2001-09-05).
  2. ^ Independent Chronicle (Boston). 1795-08-13, reprinted in The Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1789-1800 by Maeva Marcus and James Russell Perry.
  3. ^ Maltese, John. The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees (Johns Hopkins University Press 1998), pp. 30-31.
  4. ^ Haw, James. John and Edward Rutledge of South Carolina, (University of Georgia Press 1997).

Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Note

This article is based on public domain text created for the US National Archives

Preceded by
(none)
President of South Carolina
17761778
Succeeded by
Rawlins Lowndes
Preceded by
Rawlins Lowndes
Governor of South Carolina
17791782
Succeeded by
John Mathews
Preceded by
(none)
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
February 15, 1790March 5, 1791
Succeeded by
Thomas Johnson
Preceded by
John Jay
Chief Justice of the United States
July 1, 1795December 15, 1795
Succeeded by
Oliver Ellsworth
The Jay Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
1789–1792: J. Wilson | Wm. Cushing | J. Blair | J. Rutledge | J. Iredell
The Rutledge Court
1795: J. Wilson | Wm. Cushing | J. Blair | J. Iredell | Wm. Paterson

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > John Rutledge (714 words)
John Rutledge (1739-1800) was governor of South Carolina, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and served on the US Supreme Court.
John was born into a large family at or near Charleston, South Carolina, and received his early education from his father, an Irish immigrant and physician, and from an Anglican minister and a tutor.
Rutledge died in 1800 at the age of 60 and was interred at St.
John Rutledge - Plagiarism on Wikipedia (1125 words)
John Rutledge (September 17, 1739 – July 18, 1800) was Governor of South Carolina, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, signer of the United States Constitution, and served on the U.S. Supreme Court (Chief Justice from August to December 1795).
In 1782-1783, Rutledge was a delegate to the Continental Congress.
Rutledge was one of the founders of the College of Charleston in Charleston, SC.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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