FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Russell Pope
The Jefferson Memorial, built 1939 — 1943
The Jefferson Memorial, built 1939 — 1943

John Russell Pope (April 24, 1874August 27, 1937) was an architect most known for his designs of the Jefferson Memorial (completed in 1943) and the West Building of the National Gallery of Art (completed in 1941) in Washington, DC. Download high resolution version (1327x999, 133 KB)Picture of the Jefferson Memorial from across the tidal basin Taken by Raul654 on June 23, 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1327x999, 133 KB)Picture of the Jefferson Memorial from across the tidal basin Taken by Raul654 on June 23, 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jefferson Memorial at dusk, illuminated Rudolph Evans statue with the Declaration of Independence preamble to the right The front steps of the Jefferson Memorial The Jefferson Memorial at night, reflected on the Potomac River. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (240th in leap years), with 126 days remaining. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... Jefferson Memorial at dusk, illuminated Rudolph Evans statue with the Declaration of Independence preamble to the right The front steps of the Jefferson Memorial The Jefferson Memorial at night, reflected on the Potomac River. ... The East Building of the National Gallery of Art The National Gallery of Art is an art museum managed by the government of the United States but privately owned, although it functions as a public institution. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


Pope was born in New York in 1874, the son of a successful portrait painter. He studied architecture at Columbia University and graduated in 1894. He received a scholarship to attend the newly-founded American Academy in Rome, a training ground for the designers of the "American Renaissance." Pope travelled for two years through Italy and Greece, where he studied and sketched and made measured drawings of more Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance structures than he did of the remains of ancient buildings. Pope was one of the first architectural students to master the use of the large-format camera, with glass negatives. Pope attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1896, honing his Beaux-Arts style, returning to New York in 1900, to spend a few practical years in the office of Bruce Price before opening a practice. Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Largest city Albany New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi  (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City and a member of the Ivy League. ... The American Academy in Rome is an arts institution, founded in the late 19th century by American composer Edward MacDowell and others. ... For the white nationalist magazine, see American Renaissance (magazine). ... cole des Beaux Arts refers to several art schools in France. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Beaux-Arts architecture denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris, the home territory of this style, which influenced American architecture in the period 1885 – 1920. ... Prices Château Frontenac in Québec City Bruce Price (Cumberland, Maryland 1845 – 1902) was the architect of many of the Canadian Pacific Railways Chateau-type stations and hotels. ...

The West Building of the National Gallery of Art
The West Building of the National Gallery of Art

Throughout his career, Pope designed private houses (including for the Vanderbilt family: see Vanderbilt houses), and other public buildings besides the Jefferson Memorial and the National Gallery, such as the massive Masonic Temple of the Scottish Rite (1911 - 1915), also in Washington, and the triumphal-arch Theodore Roosevelt Memorial at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. In 1919 he provided a master plan for the future growth of Yale University, one that was significantly revised by James Gamble Rogers in 1921 with more sympathy for the requirements of the city of New Haven, Connecticut, but which kept the Collegiate Gothic unifying theme offered by Pope. Pope's original plan is a prime document in the City Beautiful movement in city planning. The west building of the U.S. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. The photograph is a work of the U.S. federal government, and so is in the public domain. ... The west building of the U.S. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. The photograph is a work of the U.S. federal government, and so is in the public domain. ... This article details the family of Cornelius Vanderbilt. ... From the late 1870s to the 1920s the Vanderbilt clan employed Americas best Beaux-Arts architects and decorators to build an unequalled string of New York townhouses and East Coast palaces in the United States. ... A mason is a worker in brick or stone, now primarily involved in building walls, but previously also arches and vaults. ... The American Museum of Natural History is a landmark of Manhattans Upper West Side in New York, USA, at 79th Street and Central Park West. ... Nickname: The Big Apple, The Capital of the World Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... Yale redirects here. ... Nickname: The Elm City Official website: www. ... The City Beautiful movement was a Progressive reform movement in North American architecture and urban planning that flourished in the 1890s and 1900s with the intent of using beautification and monumental grandeur in cities to counteract the perceived moral decay of poverty-stricken urban environments. ... Urban, city, or town planning, deals with design of the built environment from the municipal and metropolitan perspective. ...

National Archives, Washington D.C., James Earle Fraser, sculptor; opened 1935
Enlarge
National Archives, Washington D.C., James Earle Fraser, sculptor; opened 1935

Pope's designs alternated between revivals of Gothic, Georgian, eighteenth-century French, and classical styles. The Jefferson Memorial and the National Gallery of Art were both neoclassical, modelled by Pope on the Roman Pantheon. Download high resolution version (930x670, 374 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran John Russell Pope File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (930x670, 374 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran John Russell Pope File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... End of the Trail James Earle Fraser (November 4, 1876 – October 11, 1953) was an American sculptor, born in Winona, Minnesota. ... See also Gothic art. ... From the point of view of modern times, the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean sometimes seem to blend smoothly into one melange we call the Classical. ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... The Pantheon, Rome, in front of which stands the obelisk Macuteo, one of fourteen ancient Egyptian obelisks in Rome. ...


Less known projects by Pope include Union Station, Richmond, Virginia (1919), with a central rotunda capped with a low saucer dome, now housing the Science Museum of Virginia; Branch House (1917-1919), a tudor-style mansion also in Richmond that now houses the Virginia Center for Architecture ; Baltimore Museum of Art; and in Washington the Masonic Temple of the Scottish Rite (1911-1915), Constitution Hall, Pharmaceutical Building, and the National Archives Building (illustration, left). In Milwaukee, Wisconsin he provided a severe neo-Georgian clubhouse for the University Club (1926). He designed additions to the Tate Gallery and British Museum in London, an unusual honor for an American architect, and the War Memorial at Montfaucon, France. Pope was also responsible for extensive alterations to Belcourt, the Newport residence of Oliver and Alva Belmont. Broad Street Station was a Union railroad station in Richmond, Virginia across Broad Street from the Fan district. ... Nickname: River City Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra Official website: http://www. ... The Science Museum of Virginia is a science museum located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Branch House Located at 2501 Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virignia, this 27,000 sq. ... Virginia Center for Architecture is one of the nation’s few museums dedicated to architecture. ... The Baltimore Museum of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, was founded in 1914 and is located on the edge of the campus of Johns Hopkins University. ... Nickname: The City of Festivals, The Brew City, The Cream City, The Nations Watering Hole Official website: http://www. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury Georgian architecture at Royal Crescent, Bath, seen from a hot air balloon. ... Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, located in Newport, Rhode Island. ... A side street in Newport, Rhode Island, showing the historic buildings near the waterfront Newport is a city located in Newport County, Rhode Island, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont (November 12, 1858 - June 10, 1908) was a wealthy American socialite and Congressman. ... Alva Erskine Belmont ( January 17, 1853 - January 26, 1933) was a multi-millionaire American socialite and a major funder of the womens suffrage movement. ...

Union Station (a.k.a. Broad Street Station) , Richmond, VA, opened 1919
Union Station (a.k.a. Broad Street Station) , Richmond, VA, opened 1919

In 1991 an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, "John Russell Pope and the Building of the National Gallery of Art" spurred the reappraisal of his work, which had been scorned and derided by the critics of International Modernism. Image File history File links Richmond_Science_Museum. ... Image File history File links Richmond_Science_Museum. ... Broad Street Station was a Union railroad station in Richmond, Virginia across Broad Street from the Fan district. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) International style, also known as the Modern movement, is a primarily American offshoot of Bauhaus architecture that was exported to various parts of the world. ...


External links

  • Steven McLeod Bedford, John Russell Pope: Architect of Empire e-text of introduction, outlining the curriculum of academic American instruction in architecture
  • University Club, Milwaukee
  • Yale University plan, 1919
  • Alpha Delta Phi at Cornell, 1931, John Russell Pope, architect

  Results from FactBites:
 
John - Columbia Encyclopedia article about John (2100 words)
John, 1167–1216, king of England (1199–1216), son of Henry II Henry II, 1133–89, king of England (1154–89), son of Matilda, queen of England, and Geoffrey IV, count of Anjou.
John deserted his dying father in 1189 and joined the rebellion of his brother Richard, who succeeded to the throne as Richard I Richard I, Richard Cœur de Lion (kör də lyôN`), or Richard Lion-Heart, 1157–99, king of England (1189–99); third son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine.
On Richard's death, John ascended the English throne to the exclusion of his nephew, Arthur I Arthur I, 1187–1203?, duke of Brittany (1196–1203?), son of Geoffrey, fourth son of Henry II of England and Constance, heiress of Brittany.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m