FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Rolfe

This article is about the Virginia colonist. For other uses, see John Rolfe. John Rolfe may refer to: John Rolfe, a 17th century English settler of Virginia, and husband of Pocahontas John Carew Rolfe, a 20th century American classicist John Rolfe, an actor who starred in the British soap opera Eastenders as Alec Carter John Rolph, a Canadian lawyer and politician Category: ...

an 1850s painting of John Rolfe and Pocahontas

John Rolfe (c. 15851622) was one of the early English settlers of North America. He is credited with the first successful cultivation of tobacco as an export crop in the Colony of Virginia and is known as the husband of Pocahontas, daughter of the chief of the Powhatan Confederacy. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Pocahontas (disambiguation). ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... -1... For other uses, see Pocahontas (disambiguation). ... Chief Powhatan in a longhouse at Werowocomoco (detail of John Smith map, 1612) The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten), or Powhatan Renape (literally, the Powhatan Human Beings), is the name of a Native American tribe, and also the name of a powerful confederacy of tribes that they dominated. ...

Contents

Biography

Rolfe was born in Heacham, Norfolk, England. At the time, Spain held a virtual monopoly on the lucrative tobacco trade within Europe. Most Spanish colonies in the New World were located in southern climates more favorable to tobacco growth than the English settlements, notably Jamestown. As the consumption of tobacco had increased, the balance of trade between England and Spain began to be seriously affected. Rolfe was one of a number of businessmen who saw the opportunity to undercut Spanish imports by growing tobacco in England's new colony at Jamestown, in Virginia. Map sources for Heacham at grid reference TF6837 Heacham is a village of 4611 inhabitants, located in north west Norfolk, England, between Kings Lynn, 14 miles to the south and Hunstanton about 3 miles to the North, on The Wash. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ...


A project of the proprietary Virginia Company of London, Jamestown had been established by an initial group of settlers on May 14, 1607. This colony proved as troubled as earlier English settlements, and after two return trips with supplies by Christopher Newport arrived in 1608, another larger than ever relief fleet was dispatched in 1609, carrying hundreds of new settlers and supplies across the Atlantic. Heading the Third Supply fleet was the new flagship of the Virginia Company, the Sea Venture, on which Rolfe, his wife, and a small child were embarked Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Christopher Newport (c. ... “Atlantic” redirects here. ... The Third Supply was the first truly successful wave of colonization, in the first British settlement in the Americas; Jamestown, Virginia. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... The coat of arms of Bermuda features a representation of the wreck of the Sea Venture The Sea Venture was a 17th-century English sailing ship, the wrecking of which in Bermuda is widely thought to have been the inspiration for Shakespeares The Tempest. ...


The Third Supply fleet left England in May of 1609 destined for Jamestown with seven large ships, towing two smaller pinnaces. In the southern Atlantic Ocean, they encountered a three day-long storm, thought to have been a severe hurricane. The ships of the fleet became separated. The new Sea Venture, whose caulking had not cured, was taking on water faster than it could be bailed. The Admiral of the Company, Sir George Somers, took the helm and the ship was deliberately driven onto the reefs of Bermuda to prevent its foundering. All aboard, 150 passengers and crew, and 1 dog, survived. Most remained for ten months in Bermuda, subsequently also known as The Somers Isles, while they built two small ships to continue the voyage to Jamestown. A number of passengers and crew, however, did not complete this journey. Some had died or been killed, lost at sea (the Sea Venture's long boat had been fitted with a sail, and several men sent to take word to Jamestown, and they were never heard from again), or left behind to maintain England's claim to Bermuda. Because of this, although the Virginia Company's charter was not extended to Bermuda until 1612, the Colony at Bermuda dates its settlement from 1609. Among those left buried in Bermuda were Rolfe's wife and child. A pinnace is a light boat, propelled by sails or oars, formerly used as a tender for guiding merchant and war vessels. ... Admiral Sir George Somers (1554-1610) was a British naval hero. ...


In May 1610, the two newly-constructed ships set sail from Bermuda, with 142 castaways on board, including Rolfe, Admiral Somers, Stephen Hopkins and Sir Thomas Gates. On arrival at Jamestown, they found the Virginia Colony almost destroyed by famine and disease during what has become known as the Starving Time. Very few of the supplies from the Third Supply had arrived (the same hurricane which caught the Sea Venture had also badly affected the rest of the fleet), and only 60 settlers remained alive. It was only through the arrival of the two small ships from Bermuda, and the arrival of another relief fleet commanded by Lord Delaware in June 10th 1610 that the abandonment of Jamestown was avoided and the colony was able to survive. After finally settling in, although his first wife and child had died, Rolfe began his long-delayed work with tobacco. Stephen Hopkins (b. ... Sir Thomas Gates (fl. ... The Starving Time at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony occurred during the winter of 1609–10. ... Arrival of De La Warr at Jamestown Thomas West, 3rd (or 12th) Baron De La Warr (July 9, 1577 – June 7, 1618), was the Englishman for whom the state, river, and the American Indian tribe now called Delaware (in the United States) were named. ...


In competing with Spain for European markets, there was another problem beside the warmer climates the Spanish settlements enjoyed. The native tobacco from Virginia was not liked by the English settlers, nor did it appeal to the market in England. However, Rolfe wanted to introduce sweeter strains from Trinidad, using seeds he brought with him. In 1611, Rolfe is credited with being the first to commercially cultivate Nicotiana tabacum tobacco plants in North America; export of this sweeter tobacco beginning in 1612 helped turn the Virginia Colony into a profitable venture. Soon, Rolfe and others were exporting substantial quantities of the new cash crop, and new plantations began growing along the James River, where export shipments could use wharfs along the river. Look up Trinidad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Agriculture (encompasses farming, ranching, and the tending of orchards and vineyards) is the production of food, feed, fiber, fuel and other goods by the systematic raising of plants and animals. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ...


In 1612, Rolfe established Varina Farms, a plantation on the James River about 30 miles upstream from the Jamestown Settlement, and across the river from Sir Thomas Dale's progressive development at Henricus. In 1614 Rolfe married Pocahontas, daughter of the local Native American leader Chief Powhatan. Chief Powhatan gave the newlyweds property that included a small brick house just across the James River from Jamestown which was used as a home or cottage by Pocahontas and John Rolfe when they were first married. Today that location is known as Fort Smith, and is located in Surry County. Varina is a former town and current magisterial district in easternmost portion of Henrico County, Virginia, USA. It was named for Varina Farms, a plantation on the James River about 35 miles upstream from the Jamestown Settlement in the Virginia Colony, and across the river from Sir Thomas Dales... // This article is about crop plantations. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... Sketch of Jamestown c. ... Sir Thomas Dale was a British naval commander and colonial deputy-governor of Virginia. ... The Citie of Henricus was a city founded by Sir Thomas Dale in 1611 as an alternative to the swampy and dangerous area around Jamestown Settlement, Virginia. ... “Spouse” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pocahontas (disambiguation). ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Chief Powhatan (detail of map published by John Smith (1612) Chief Powhatan ( 1547— 1618) , whose proper name was Wahunsenacawh or (in seventeenth century English spelling) Wahunsunacock, was the leader of the Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten), a powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in... Surry County is a county located in the South Hampton Roads region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ...


When suitable quarters were built, the estate at Varina Farms became the permanent home of John Rolfe and Pocahontas, and served as such for several years following their marriage. Varina Farms was the birthplace of their son, Thomas Rolfe. Rolfe's plantation at Varina Farms was named for a mild variety of tobacco from Spain which was similar to the strains Rolfe had successfully introduced. Thomas Rolfe (January 30, 1615 - c. ...


On what would be called a "public relations trip" for the Virginia Company in modern terminology, Pocahontas and Rolfe traveled to England in 1616 with their baby son, where the young woman was widely received as visiting royalty. However, just as they were preparing to return to Virginia, she became ill and died. Their young son Thomas Rolfe survived, and stayed in England when his father returned to the colony minus his second wife and their young son. Thomas Rolfe (January 30, 1615 - c. ...


In 1619, Rolfe married Jane Peirce. They had a daughter, Elizabeth, in 1620. She died in 1635 at the age of 15.


John Rolfe died suddenly in 1622, but it is unknown in what manner. He may have been killed by the Powhatan Confederacy during the Indian Massacre of 1622, or at another time during that year of warfare between the colonists and the tribes. Alternatively, some nonfiction books assert that he died of an illness.[citation needed] Chief Powhatan in a longhouse at Werowocomoco (detail of John Smith map, 1612) The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten), or Powhatan Renape (literally, the Powhatan Human Beings), is the name of a Native American tribe, and also the name of a powerful confederacy of tribes that they dominated. ... Indian massacre of 1622, depicted as a woodcut by Theodore de Bry The Indian massacre of 1622 (also known as the Jamestown massacre) occurred in the Virginia Colony on March 22, 1622. ...


Thomas Rolfe, the son of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, later returned to Virginia, where he was accepted by both the Powhatans and the English settlers. He married an English settler, and through their children, many First Families of Virginia trace their roots to both an English and Native American heritage. First Families of Virginia is an informal association of people, some of whom can trace their ancestry to the original Virginian colonists from England who landed at primarily at Jamestown and along the James River and other navigable waters in the Virginia Colony during the 17th century. ...


Heritage and legacy

  • The strain of tobacco cultivated by John Rolfe was the export cash crop that helped make the Virginia Colony profitable. It was the mainstay of the farming plantations for generations. Huge warehouses such as those which were built on Richmond's Tobacco Row attest to its popularity. Even almost 400 years later, tobacco figures prominently in Virginia's economy.
  • In eastern Virginia, State Route 31 is named the John Rolfe Highway. It links Williamsburg with Jamestown, the southern entrance to the Colonial Parkway, and via the Jamestown Ferry leads to the rich farming area of Surry County and Sussex County, ending in Wakefield, Virginia.
  • John Rolfe Middle School, in Henrico County, Virginia, one of Virginia's eight original shires of 1634, is named for him. Varina magisterial district in Henrico County is named for Rolfe's Varina Farms plantation, where the tiny village was also the first county seat (from 1634 to 1752).
  • The abandoned corridor planned for State Route 288 in western Henrico County became a connector street, rather than a limited-access highway. It was named the John Rolfe Parkway.

Tobacco Row warehouses in Richmond, Virginia, circa 1939 Tobacco Row is a collection of tobacco warehouses and cigarette factories in Richmond, Virginia adjacent to the James River and Kanawha Canal near its eastern terminus at the head of navigation of the James River. ... State Route 31, known as the John Rolfe Highway, is located in the eastern part of the state, and connects U.S. Route 460 in the town of Wakefield in Sussex County with State Route 5 and State Route 199 in Williamsburg. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... Jamestown Ferry (also known as the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry) is an automobile ferry on the James River in Virginia, connecting Jamestown in James City County with Scotland in Surry County. ... Surry County is a county located in the South Hampton Roads region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Sussex County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Wakefield is a town located in Sussex County, Virginia. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Varina (Va-ry-nah) is a former town and current magisterial district in easternmost portion of Henrico County, Virginia, USA. It was named for Varina Farms, a plantation on the James River about 35 miles upstream from the Jamestown Settlement in the Virginia Colony, and across the river from Sir... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... State Route 288 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... A limited-access highway is a highway where access is limited. ...

Rolfe in fiction

Rolfe appears in the 2005 film The New World, in which he is played by Christian Bale. In the cartoon Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World he was voiced by Billy Zane. In S.M. Stirling's novel Conquistador, a fictional descendant and namesake of Rolfe founds a country called "New Virginia" after opening a door between dimensions to a world where Europeans never discovered North America. The New World is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated drama / romance film directed by Terrence Malick. ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is a Welsh-born English[2][3] method actor who is known for his roles in the films American Psycho, Shaft, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins and The Prestige, among others. ... Billy Zane (born William George Zane, Jr. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. ...


External links

  • "John Rolfe's Letter to Sir Thomas Dale," 1614. (John Rolfe explains his reasons for marrying Powhatan's daughter, Pocahontas.)
  • Living History Associates Ltd. John Rolfe Portrayed by Dick Cheatham

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Rolfe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (704 words)
Rolfe was a businessman who saw the opportunity to undercut Spanish imports by growing tobacco in England's new colony of Jamestown, in Virginia.
Rolfe's plantation at Varina Farms was named for a mild variety of the tobacco from Spain, similar to the strain from Rolfe had brought with him from England, which helped make the colony profitable.
John Rolfe may have been killed by the Powhatan Confederacy during the Indian Massacre of 1622; it is known that he died suddenly in 1622, which was a year of warfare between the colonists and the tribes.
Virtual Jamestown (767 words)
John Rolfe was the son of John Rolfe and Dorothea Mason.
Rolfe planted seeds from the West Indies and produced a crop which was more fragrant and sweet than native tobacco, yet was also well-suited to the growing conditions of the new colony.
John Rolfe presumably met Pocahontas after her conversion; he fell in love with the young Indian woman and decided to marry her.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m