FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Roberts
John Roberts
John Roberts

Incumbent
Assumed office 
September 29, 2005
Nominated by George W. Bush
Appointed by United States Senate
Preceded by William Rehnquist
Succeeded by Incumbent

Born January 27, 1955 (1955-01-27) (age 52)
Buffalo, New York
Spouse Jane Sullivan Roberts
Alma mater Harvard University
Religion Roman Catholic

John Roberts (born January 27, 1955) is the seventeenth and current Chief Justice of the United States. Before joining the Supreme Court on September 29, 2005, Roberts was a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for two years. Previously, he spent 14 years in private law practice and held positions in Republican administrations in the U.S. Department of Justice and Office of the White House Counsel. John Roberts may refer to: John G. Roberts, Jr. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Official_roberts_CJ.jpg Summary Official 2005 photo of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Source: [1] Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: User:NoSeptember John Roberts Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the state. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. ... The United States Constitution, the supreme law of the United States The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ...

Contents

Early years

Adler was born in Buffalo, New York, on January 27, 1955, son of Danny Glover and Rosemary Podrasky. All of his maternal great-grandparents were from Czechoslovakia.[1] His father was an executive with Bethlehem Steel. When Roberts was in second grade, his family moved to the beachside town of Long Beach, Indiana. He grew up in a Roman Catholic home along with three sisters: Kathy, Peggy, and Barbara. Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Bethlehem Steel Corporations flagship manufacturing facility in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Adler attended Notre Dame Elementary, a Catholic grade school in Long Beach, and then La Lumiere School, a Catholic boarding school in LaPorte, Indiana and was an excellent student and athlete.[2] He studied six years of Latin and some French, and was known for his devotion to his studies. He was also captain of his football team (he later described himself as a "slow-footed linebacker"), and also was a Regional Champion in wrestling. He also participated in choir and drama, co-edited the school newspaper, and served on the athletic council and the Executive Committee of the Student Council. Catholic schools are education ministries of the Roman Catholic Church. ... La Lumiere School, in La Porte, Indiana, United States, is a private, University-preparatory school founded in 1963. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The defensive team or defense in American football or Canadian football, is the team that begins a play from scrimmage not in possession of the ball. ...


Education and memberships

Roberts graduated first in his high school class as a National Merit Scholar. Following high school, Roberts attended Sacred Heart University, then entered Harvard College as a sophomore. He initially planned to become a history professor. Roberts spent his summers working in a steel mill to help pay for college. Sacred Heart University, the second-largest Catholic university in New England, offers more than 50 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts Legislature. ...


Roberts is currently a member of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers, the American Law Institute, the Edward Coke Appellate American Inn of Court and the National Legal Center for the Public Interest.[3] He serves on the Federal Appellate Rules Advisory Committee. The American Academy of Appellate Lawyers is a non-profit organization consisting of the Fellows who have been elected to the Academy. ... The American Law Institute (ALI) was established in 1923 to promote the clarification and simplification of American common law and its adaptation to changing social needs. ... The National Legal Center for the Public Interest is a law and educational foundation with a membership of many prominent conservative lawyers. ...


Roberts is married to Jane Sullivan Roberts,[4] a lawyer, former legal counsel for Feminists for Life, and current partner at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP. They live in the Washington, DC suburb of Chevy Chase, Maryland, in an upscale neighborhood. John Roberts is a practicing Roman Catholic. He and his family worship at Church of the Little Flower. This parish is one attended by many Catholic officials in all three branches of government and on all ends of the political spectrum. The Roberts family adopted the first of two unrelated Irish infants in 2000: Josephine ("Josie") and later, Jack Roberts. Jack's dancing during Bush's White House introduction of his father brought the four-year-old international media attention and praise from the President as "a fellow who's comfortable with the cameras." [5] In an address at the University of Miami, Roberts stated, "People think Jack was dancing — he was not dancing, he was being Spider-Man, shooting the webs off."[6] Feminists for Life of America (FFL) is a non-sectarian, non-partisan, nonprofit pro-life feminist organization established in 1972. ... Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP is an international law firm, founded in 1868, specializing in Capital Markets and Finance, Energy, Global Sourcing, Litigation, Intellectual Property, Real Estate, Technology, Life Sciences and Communications. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Chevy Chase is the name of both a town and an unincorporated Census-Designated Place in Montgomery County, Maryland (see Chevy Chase (CDP), Maryland). ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ...


Personal finances

According to a 16-page financial disclosure form Roberts submitted to the Senate Judiciary Committee prior to his Supreme Court confirmation hearings, his personal fortune was more than $6 million, including $1.6 million in stock holdings. At the time Roberts left private practice to join the DC Circuit Court of Appeals in 2003, he took a pay cut from $1 million a year to $171,800; as Chief Justice his salary is $212,100. The Roberts' family home, a two-story white colonial, was recently assessed at $891,000, according to Montgomery County, Maryland property tax records. Roberts also holds a one-eighth interest in a cottage in Knocklong, his wife's ancestral village in County Limerick. The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Limerick Code: LK Area: 2,686 km² Population (2006) 183,863 (including Limerick City); 131,303 (without Limerick City) Website: www. ...


Health problems

Chief Justice Roberts suffered a seizure on July 30, 2007 while at his vacation home on Hupper Island off the village of Port Clyde in St. George, Maine.[7][8] As a result of the seizure he fell five to ten feet but suffered only minor scrapes.[7] The fall occurred on a dock near his house and he was taken by private boat to the mainland[8] (which is a couple hundred yards from the island) and was then taken by ambulance to Penobscot Bay Medical Center in Rockport where he stayed overnight, according to Supreme Court spokesperson Kathy Arberg.[9] Doctors called the incident a benign idiopathic seizure, which means there was no obvious physiological cause.[7][8][10][11] This article is about epileptic seizures. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Port Clyde, Maine is the southernmost settlement on the St. ... St. ... Rockport Harbor in the summer. ... Idiopathic means arising spontaneously or from an obscure or unknown cause. ...


Roberts suffered a similar seizure in 1993.[7][8][10] As a result of that first seizure, Roberts limited some of his activities, such as driving, temporarily. According to Senator Arlen Specter, who chaired the Senate Judiciary Committee during Roberts' nomination to be Chief Justice in 2005, senators were aware of this earlier seizure when they were considering his nomination but the committee felt it was not significant enough to bring up during his confirmation hearings. Federal judges are not required by law to release information about their health.[7] Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ...


According to neurologist Dr. Marc Schlosberg of Washington Hospital Center, who has no direct connection to the Roberts case, someone who has had more than one seizure without any other cause is by definition determined to have epilepsy. After two seizures, the likelihood of another at some point is greater than 60 percent.[8] Dr. Steven Garner of New York Methodist Hospital, who is also uninvolved with the case, said that Roberts' previous history of seizures means that the second incident may be less serious than if this were a newly-emerging problem.[10] This article is about the branch of medicine. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The Supreme Court said in a statement Roberts has "fully recovered from the incident," and a neurological evaluation "revealed no cause for concern." Sanjay Gupta, a CNN contributor and a neurosurgeon not directly involved in Roberts' case, said when an otherwise healthy person has a seizure, his doctor would investigate whether the patient had started any new medications and had normal electrolyte levels. If those two things were normal, then a brain scan would be performed. If Roberts does not have another seizure within a relatively short time period, Gupta said he was unsure if Roberts would be given the diagnosis of epilepsy. He said the Chief Justice may need to take an anti-seizure medication.[11] Sanjay Gupta (born October 23, 1969) is a first generation Indian-American physician and a contributing CNN senior health correspondent based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


Dr. Max Lee of the Milwaukee Neurological Institute, who is not involved in the case said, "Having two seizures so many years apart without any known culprit is going to be very difficult to figure out."[12]


Private practice

After graduating from law school, Roberts served as a law clerk for Judge Henry Friendly on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals for one year. From 1980 to 1981, he clerked for then-Associate Justice William Rehnquist on the United States Supreme Court. From 1981 to 1982, he served in the Reagan administration as a Special Assistant to U.S. Attorney General William French Smith. From 1982 to 1986, Roberts served as Associate Counsel to the President under White House Counsel Fred Fielding. In the United States, Canada and Brazil, a law clerk is a person who provides assistance to a judge in researching issues before the court and in writing opinions. ... Henry Jacob Friendly (July 3, 1903 in Elmira, New York - 1986) served as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on active service from 1959 through 1974 and in senior status from 1974 to 1986. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Law clerks have assisted Supreme Court Justices in various capacities since the first one was hired by Justice Horace Gray in the 1880s. ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... William French Smith (August 26, 1917–October 29, 1990) was an American lawyer and the 74th Attorney General of the United States. ... Fred Fisher Fielding (born March 21, 1939) is senior partner at Wiley, Rein, & Fielding, a Washington, D.C. law firm. ...


Roberts entered private law practice in 1986 as an associate at the Washington, D.C.-based law firm of Hogan & Hartson, but left to serve in the first Bush administration as Principal Deputy Solicitor General from 1989 to 1993. During this time, Roberts argued 39 cases for the government before the Supreme Court, prevailing in 25 of them. He represented 18 states in United States v. Microsoft. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... A law firm is a business entity formed by one or more lawyers to engage in the practice of law. ... Hogan & Hartson is the 2nd oldest major law firm headquartered in Washington, D.C. It is a global firm with more than 1,000 lawyers in 22 offices worldwide, including offices in Europe, Latin America and East Asia. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... United States v. ...


In 1992, George H. W. Bush nominated Roberts to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, but no Senate vote was held, and Roberts' nomination expired when Bush left office after losing the 1992 presidential election. Roberts returned to Hogan & Hartson as a partner, and became the head of the firm's appellate practice, in addition to serving as an adjunct faculty member at the Georgetown University Law Center. In his capacity as head of Hogan & Hartson's appellate practice, Roberts argued a total of thirty-nine cases before the Supreme Court, including: George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The United States Courts of Appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The schools original sign, preserved on the north quad of the present-day campus. ...

Case Argued Decided Represented
First Options v. Kaplan, 514 U.S. 938 March 22, 1995 May 22, 1995 Respondent
Adams v. Robertson, 520 U.S. 83 January 14, 1997 March 3, 1997 Respondent
Alaska v. Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government, 522 U.S. 520 December 10, 1997 February 25, 1998 Petitioner
Feltner v. Columbia Pictures Television, Inc., 523 U.S. 340 January 21, 1998 March 31, 1998 Petitioner
National Collegiate Athletic Association v. Smith, 525 U.S. 459 January 20, 1999 February 23, 1999 Petitioner
Rice v. Cayetano, 528 U.S. 495 October 6, 1999 February 23, 2000 Respondent
Eastern Associated Coal Corp. v. Mine Workers, 531 U.S. 57 October 2, 2000 November 28, 2000 Petitioner
TrafFix Devices, Inc. v. Marketing Displays, Inc., 532 U.S. 23 November 29, 2000 March 20, 2001 Petitioner
Toyota Motor Manufacturing v. Williams, 534 U.S. 184 November 7, 2001 January 8, 2002 Petitioner
Tahoe-Sierra Preservation Council, Inc. v. Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, 535 U.S. 302 January 7, 2002 April 23, 2002 Respondent
Rush Prudential HMO, Inc. v. Moran, 536 U.S. 355 January 16, 2002 June 20, 2002 Petitioner
Gonzaga University v. Doe, 536 U.S. 273 April 24, 2002 June 20, 2002 Petitioner
Barnhart v. Peabody Coal Co., 537 U.S. 149 October 8, 2002 January 15, 2003 Respondent
Smith v. Doe, 538 U.S. 84 November 13, 2002 March 5, 2003 Petitioner

NOTICE: This opinion is subject to formal revision before publication in the preliminary print of the United States Reports. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... NOTICE: This opinion is subject to formal revision before publication in the preliminary print of the United States Reports. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Alaska v. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Holding Court membership Chief Justice: William Rehnquist Associate Justices: John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day OConnor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer Case opinions Majority by: Ginsburg Joined by: unanimous Laws applied Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 National Collegiate Athletic... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Rice v. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Holding Court membership Chief Justice: William Rehnquist Associate Justices: John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day OConnor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer Case opinions Majority by: Breyer Joined by: Rehnquist, Stevens, OConnor, Kennedy, Souter, Ginsburg Concurrence by: Scalia Joined by: Thomas Eastern... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- TrafFix Devices, Inc. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Holding Court membership Chief Justice: William Rehnquist Associate Justices: John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day OConnor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer Case opinions Majority by: OConnor Joined by: unanimous Laws applied Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Toyota Motor Manufacturing v. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Holding The moratorium did not constitute a taking. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Holding Court membership Chief Justice: William Rehnquist Associate Justices: John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day OConnor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer Case opinions Majority by: Souter Joined by: Stevens, OConnor, Ginsburg, Breyer Dissent by: Thomas Joined by: Rehnquist, Scalia, Kennedy Laws... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... JoanneB 06:29, 20 September 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Holding Court membership Chief Justice: William Rehnquist Associate Justices: John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day OConnor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer Case opinions Majority by: Souter Joined by: Rehnquist, Stevens, Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer Dissent by: Scalia Joined by: OConnor, Thomas Dissent... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Smith v. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Jurisprudence

During Judiciary Committee hearings on his nomination to the circuit court, Roberts testified about his views on jurisprudence.[13]


The Commerce Clause

Roberts walks with Former First Lady Nancy Reagan at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in March of 2006.
"Starting with McCulloch v. Maryland, Chief Justice John Marshall gave a very broad and expansive reading to the powers of the Federal Government and explained that — and I don't remember the exact quote — but if the ends be legitimate, then any means chosen to achieve them are within the power of the Federal Government, and cases interpreting that, throughout the years, have come down. Certainly, by the time Lopez was decided, many of us had learned in law school that it was just sort of a formality to say that interstate commerce was affected and that cases weren't going to be thrown out that way. Lopez certainly breathed new life into the Commerce Clause.
"I think it remains to be seen, in subsequent decisions, how rigorous a showing, and in many cases, it is just a showing. It's not a question of an abstract fact, does this affect interstate commerce or not, but has this body, the Congress, demonstrated the impact on interstate commerce that drove them to legislate? That's a very important factor. It wasn't present in Lopez at all. I think the members of Congress had heard the same thing I had heard in law school, that this is unimportant — and they hadn't gone through the process of establishing a record in that case."[13]

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library is the presidential library of Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th President of the United States. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Holding Although the Constitution does not specifically give Congress the power to establish a bank, it does delegate the ability to tax and spend, and a bank is a proper and suitable instrument to assist the operations of the government in the collection and disbursement of the revenue. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who shaped American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court a center of power. ... Holding Possession of a gun near a school is not an economic activity that has a substantial effect on interstate commerce. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, states that Congress has the exclusive authority to manage trade activities between the states and with foreign nations and Indian tribes. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, states that Congress has the exclusive authority to manage trade activities between the states and with foreign nations and Indian tribes. ...

Federalism

"Simply because you have a problem that needs addressing, it's not necessarily the case that Federal legislation is the best way to address it.... The constitutional limitation doesn't turn on whether it's a good idea. There is not a 'good idea' clause in the Constitution. It can be a bad idea, but certainly still satisfy the constitutional requirements."[13]

Applying precedent

"The Supreme Court has, throughout its history, on many occasions described the deference that is due to legislative judgments. Justice Holmes described assessing the constitutionality of an act of Congress as the gravest duty that the Supreme Court is called upon to perform.... It's a principle that is easily stated and needs to be observed in practice, as well as in theory.
"Now, the Court, of course, has the obligation, and has been recognized since Marbury v. Madison, to assess the constitutionality of acts of Congress, and when those acts are challenged, it is the obligation of the Court to say what the law is. The determination of when deference to legislative policy judgments goes too far and becomes abdication of the judicial responsibility, and when scrutiny of those judgments goes too far on the part of the judges and becomes what I think is properly called judicial activism, that is certainly the central dilemma of having an unelected, as you describe it correctly, undemocratic judiciary in a democratic republic."[13]

In referring to Brown v. Board that overturned school segregation: "the Court in that case, of course, overruled a prior decision. I don't think that constitutes judicial activism because obviously if the decision is wrong, it should be overruled. That's not activism. That's applying the law correctly." Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ... Holding Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 is unconstitutional to the extent it purports to enlarge the original jurisdiction of the Supreme Court beyond that permitted by the Constitution. ... Judicial activism is a term used by political commentators to describe a tendency by judges to consider outcomes, attitudinal preferences, and other public policy issues in interpreting applicable existing law. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation...


Roe v. Wade

In his Senate testimony, Roberts acknowledged that, while sitting on the Appellate Court, he would have an obligation to respect precedents established by the Supreme Court, including the controversial decision invalidating many restrictions on the right to an abortion. He stated: "Roe v. Wade is the settled law of the land.... There is nothing in my personal views that would prevent me from fully and faithfully applying that precedent, as well as Casey." Following the traditional reticence of nominees to indicate which way they might vote on an issue likely to come before the high court, he did not explicitly say whether he would vote to overturn either.[14] Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ... Holding A Pennsylvania law that required spousal notification prior to obtaining an abortion was invalid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it created an undue burden on married women seeking an abortion. ...

See John Roberts Supreme Court nomination and hearings for speculation about Roberts's current views, concerns about these views raised in the hearings, and the potential impact they might have on his actions in the Supreme Court.

John Roberts, 17th Chief Justice of the United States The Senate hearings on the nomination of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, began on September 12, 2005, with U.S. Senators posing questions to Roberts, who was nominated by President George W. Bush to fill the vacancy of Chief Justice...

Free speech

Roberts espouses a largely constitutionalist approach to free speech protection in the First Amendment. He authored the 2007 student free speech case Morse v. Frederick, ruling that a student in a public school-sponsored activity does not have the right to advocate drug use on the basis that the right to free speech does not invariably prevent the exercise of school discipline.[13] Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Holding Because schools may take steps to safeguard those entrusted to their care from speech that can reasonably be regarded as encouraging illegal drug use, the school officials in this case did not violate the First Amendment by confiscating the pro-drug banner and suspending Frederick. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ...


Opinions as court of appeals judge

During his two year tenure on the D.C. Circuit, Roberts authored 49 opinions (which elicited only two dissents from other judges). During that same time frame, he authored only three dissenting opinions of his own. Because of this short record, it is difficult to ascertain from his appellate decisions a general approach to the Constitution, and he has not publicly stated on what he considers the best methods of constitutional and statutory interpretation. He has even said that "I do not think beginning with an all-encompassing approach to constitutional interpretation is the best way to faithfully construe the document."[15] Cass Sunstein, a law professor at the University of Chicago argued at the time of his confirmation as Chief Justice that, in general, Roberts appears to be a judicial minimalist, emphasizing precedent, as opposed to an originalism-oriented or rights-focused jurist. "Roberts's opinions thus far [as a court of appeals judge] are careful, lawyerly and narrow. They avoid broad pronouncements. They do not try to reorient the law."[16] The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. ... Cass R. Sunstein (b. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Judicial minimalism refers to a philosophy in United States constitutional law which promotes itself as a politically moderate viewpoint. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ...


His past rulings as a court of appeals judge included the following issues:


Fourth and Fifth Amendments

The D.C. Circuit case Hedgepeth v. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, 386 F.3d 1148, involved a twelve-year-old girl who was, according to the Washington Post, asked if she had any drugs in her possession, searched for drugs, taken into custody, handcuffed, driven to police headquarters, booked and fingerprinted because she violated a publicly-advertised zero tolerance "no eating" policy in a Washington D.C. metro station by eating a single french fry. Roberts wrote for a 3-0 panel affirming a district court decision that dismissed the girl's complaint, which was predicated on the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, specifically the claim that an adult would have only received a citation for the same offense, while children must be detained until parents are notified. Zero tolerance is a strict approach to rule enforcement. ... Washington Metro redirects here. ... French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth) are pieces of potato that have been chopped into batons and deep fried. ... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Roberts began his opinion by noting, "No one is very happy about the events that led to this litigation," and pointing out that the policies under which the girl was apprehended had since been changed. Because age discrimination is allowed under previous jurisprudence if there is any rational basis for it, only weak state interests were required to justify the policy. "Because parents and guardians play an essential role in that rehabilitative process, it is reasonable for the District to seek to ensure their participation, and the method chosen — detention until the parent is notified and retrieves the child — certainly does that, in a way issuing a citation might not." Roberts concluded that the age discrimination and detention in this case were constitutional, noting that "the question before us... is not whether these policies were a bad idea, but whether they violated the Fourth and Fifth Amendments to the Constitution.", language reminiscent of Justice Potter Stewart's dissent in Griswold v. Connecticut, in which Justice Stewart wrote, "We are not asked in this case to say whether we think this law is unwise, or even asinine. We are asked to hold that it violates the United States Constitution. And that, I cannot do." Rational basis rest, in U.S. constitutional law, is the lowest level of scrutiny applied by courts deciding constitutional issues through judicial review. ... Ageism is discrimination against a person or group on the grounds of age. ... Potter Stewart (January 23, 1915 – December 7, 1985) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Holding A Connecticut law criminalizing the use of contraceptives violated the right to marital privacy. ...


Military tribunals

In Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, Roberts was part of a unanimous Circuit panel overturning the district court ruling and upholding military tribunals set up by the Bush administration for trying terrorism suspects known as enemy combatants. Circuit Judge A. Raymond Randolph, writing for the court, ruled that Hamdan, a driver for al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden,[17] could be tried by a military court because: For the case involving a United States citizen, see Hamdi v. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... An enemy combatant has historically referred to members of the armed forces of the state with which another state is at war. ... Salim Ahmed Hamdan is a Yemeni, captured during the invasion of Afghanistan. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ...

  1. the military commission had the approval of the United States Congress;
  2. the Third Geneva Convention is a treaty between nations and as such it does not confer individual rights and remedies enforceable in U.S. courts;
  3. even if the Convention could be enforced in U.S. courts, it would not be of assistance to Hamdan at the time because, for a conflict such as the war against Al-Qaeda (considered by the court as a separate war from that against Afghanistan itself) that is not between two countries, it guarantees only a certain standard of judicial procedure without speaking to the jurisdiction in which the prisoner must be tried.

The court held open the possibility of judicial review of the results of the military commission after the current proceedings have ended.[18] This decision was overturned on June 29, 2006 by the Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision, with Roberts not participating due to his prior ruling as a circuit judge. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Third Geneva Convention The Third Geneva Convention (or GCIII) of 1949, one of the Geneva Conventions, is a treaty agreement that primarily concerns the treatment of prisoners of war (POWs), and also touched on other topics. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Individual rights represent the moral rights of individuals in society prior to government. ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Environmental regulation

On the U.S. Court of Appeals, Roberts wrote a dissenting opinion regarding Rancho Viejo, LLC v. Norton, 323 F.3d 1062, a case involving the protection of a rare California toad under the Endangered Species Act. When the court denied a rehearing en banc, 334 F.3d 1158 (D.C. Cir. 2003), Roberts dissented, arguing that the original opinion was wrongly decided because he found it inconsistent with United States v. Lopez and United States v. Morrison in that it focused on the effects of the regulation, rather than the taking of the toads themselves, on interstate commerce. In Roberts's view, the Commerce Clause of the Constitution did not permit the government to regulate activity affecting what he called "a hapless toad" that "for reasons of its own, lives its entire life in California." He said that reviewing the case could allow the court "alternative grounds for sustaining application of the Act that may be more consistent with Supreme Court precedent."[19] This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... En banc or in bank is a term used to refer to the hearing of a case by all the judges of a court. ... Holding Possession of a gun near a school is not an economic activity that has a substantial effect on interstate commerce. ... Holding The Violence Against Women Act of 1994, 42 U.S.C. § 13981, is unconstitutional as exceeding congressional power under the Commerce Clause and under section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, states that Congress has the exclusive authority to manage trade activities between the states and with foreign nations and Indian tribes. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


U.S. Supreme Court

Nomination and confirmation

On July 19, 2005, President Bush nominated Roberts to the U.S. Supreme Court to fill a vacancy that would be left by the announced retirement of Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Roberts was the first Supreme Court nominee since Stephen Breyer in 1994. Bush announced Roberts' nomination in a live, nationwide television broadcast from the East Room of the White House at 9 pm Eastern Daylight Time. John Roberts, 17th Chief Justice of the United States The Senate hearings on the nomination of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, began on September 12, 2005, with U.S. Senators posing questions to Roberts, who was nominated by President George W. Bush to fill the vacancy of Chief Justice... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Roberts is sworn in as Chief Justice by Associate Justice John Paul Stevens in the East Room of the White House on the same day as his confirmation, September 29, 2005. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... The East Room is one of the largest rooms in the White House, the home of the President of the United States. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...

John Roberts appears in the background, while President Bush is announcing his nomination for the position of Chief Justice.
John Roberts appears in the background, while President Bush is announcing his nomination for the position of Chief Justice.

Following the September 3, 2005 death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, Bush withdrew Roberts' nomination as O'Connor's successor, and on September 6, announced Roberts' new nomination to the position of Chief Justice. Bush asked the Senate to expedite Roberts' confirmation hearings in order to fill the vacancy by the beginning of the Supreme Court's session in early October. Image File history File links Robertsoath6. ... Image File history File links Robertsoath6. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William H. Rehnquist has served as the Chief Justice of the United States since 1986. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On September 22 the Senate Judiciary Committee approved Roberts' nomination by a vote of 13-5, with Senators Ted Kennedy, Richard Durbin, Charles Schumer, Joe Biden and Dianne Feinstein the dissenting votes. Roberts was confirmed by the full Senate on September 29, passing by a margin of 78-22. All Republicans and the lone Independent voted for Roberts; the Democrats split evenly, 22 for and 22 against. Roberts was confirmed by what was, historically, a narrow margin for a Supreme Court Justice. This reflects the increasing politicization and partisanship of Supreme Court nominees, though this margin was greater than the 1986 65-33 vote confirming Roberts' predecessor, William Rehnquist, as Chief Justice, and far greater than the 52-48 vote confirming Clarence Thomas as Associate Justice in 1991.[20] is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ... This article is about the United States Senator from Delaware, for other uses of the name, see Biden. ... Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is currently the senior U.S. Senator from California, having held office as a senator since 1992. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ...


The Roberts Court

Roberts is sworn in as Chief Justice by Justice John Paul Stevens in the East Room of the White House, September 29, 2005.
Roberts is sworn in as Chief Justice by Justice John Paul Stevens in the East Room of the White House, September 29, 2005.

On September 29, just hours after his Senate confirmation, Roberts took the Constitutional oath of office, which was administered by senior Associate Justice John Paul Stevens at the White House. He took the judicial oath provided for by the Judiciary Act of 1789 on September 29, 2005 at the United States Supreme Court building, prior to the first oral arguments of the 2005 term. Then 50, Roberts became the youngest member of the Court, and the third-youngest person to have ever become Chief Justice (John Jay was appointed at age 44 in 1789 while John Marshall was appointed at age 45 in 1801). However, many Associate Justices, such as Clarence Thomas (appointed at age 43) and William O. Douglas (appointed at age 41 in 1939), have joined the Court at a younger age than Roberts. Image File history File linksMetadata Robertsoath. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Robertsoath. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with President of the United States oath of office. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The first page of the Judiciary Act of 1789 The United States Judiciary Act of 1789 (1 Stat. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. The buildings facade underwent renovation during the summer of 2006. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who shaped American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court a center of power. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898 – January 19, 1980) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice. ...


Roberts presided over his first oral arguments on October 3, 2005, when the Court began its 2005–2006 session. Ending a week's worth of idle speculation, Roberts opted to wear a plain black robe on his first day, dispensing with the gold sleeve-bars added to the Chief Justice's robes by his late predecessor. is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Roberts Court decided the first case heard before it, IBP, Inc. v. Alvarez, on November 8, 2005. Justice Stevens wrote the opinion for an undivided court, upholding the informal tradition that a new "Chief's" first case be decided unanimously. is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On January 17, 2006, Roberts dissented along with Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas in Gonzales v. Oregon, which held that the Controlled Substances Act does not allow the United States Attorney General to prohibit physicians from prescribing drugs for the assisted suicide of the terminally ill as permitted by an Oregon law. However, the point of contention in this case was largely one of statutory interpretation, not federalism. is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Holding The Controlled Substances Act does not give the U.S. Attorney General the authority to prohibit doctors from prescribing drugs for use in physician-assisted suicide permitted by state law. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ...


On March 6, 2006, Roberts wrote the unanimous decision in Rumsfeld v. Forum for Academic and Institutional Rights that colleges that accept federal money must allow military recruiters on campus, despite university objections to the Clinton administration-initiated "Don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military. is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Holding Because Congress could require law schools to provide equal access to military recruiters without violating the schools’ freedoms of speech and association, the Third Circuit erred in holding that the Solomon Amendment likely violates the First Amendment. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the US military policy. ...


Roberts wrote his first dissent in the case Georgia v. Randolph, decided March 22, 2006. The majority's decision prohibited police from searching a home if, as in this case, both occupants are present but one occupant objected while another consented. Roberts' dissent criticized the majority opinion as inconsistent with prior case law and for basing its reasoning in part on its perception of social custom. Holding In the circumstances here at issue, a physically present co-occupant’s stated refusal to permit entry prevails, rendering the warrantless search unreasonable and invalid as to him. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Case law (precedential law) is the body of judge-made law and legal decisions that interprets prior case law, statutes and other legal authority -- including doctrinal writings by legal scholars such as the Corpus Juris Secundum, Halsburys Laws of England or the doctinal writings found in the Recueil Dalloz...


On the Supreme Court, Roberts has indicated he supports some abortion restrictions but has not committed to overturn Roe vs Wade. On April 18, 2007, the Supreme Court handed down a decision upholding the constitutionality of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act in the case of Gonzales v. Carhart. Roberts voted to uphold the Partial Birth Abortion Act along with four other justices. He assigned writing of the opinion to Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kennedy wrote for the five-justice majority that Congress was within its power to generally ban the procedure, although the Court left the door open for as-applied challenges. is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... It has been suggested that Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1995 be merged into this article or section. ... The majority of information on this page is speculative. ...


Kennedy's opinion did not reach the question whether the Court's prior decisions in Roe v. Wade, Planned Parenthood v. Casey, and Stenberg v. Carhart were valid, but stated that this opinion did not conflict with those opinions. Joining the majority was Justice Samuel Alito. Justice Clarence Thomas, joined by Justice Antonin Scalia, filed a concurring opinion, contending that the Court's prior decisions in Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey should be reversed, and also noting that the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act may exceed the powers of Congress under the Commerce Clause. Roberts, along with Alito, refused to sign on to that opinion. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter, John Paul Stevens and Stephen Breyer dissented, contending that the ruling ignored Supreme Court abortion precedent. Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ... Holding A Pennsylvania law that required spousal notification prior to obtaining an abortion was invalid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it created an undue burden on married women seeking an abortion. ... Holding Laws banning partial-birth abortion are unconstitutional if they do not make an exception for the womans health, or if they cannot be reasonably construed to apply only to the partial-birth abortion (intact D&X) procedure and not to other abortion methods. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ... Holding A Pennsylvania law that required spousal notification prior to obtaining an abortion was invalid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it created an undue burden on married women seeking an abortion. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ...


Although Roberts has often sided with Scalia and Thomas, Roberts was the tie-breaking vote (if a tie vote occurs, the lower court decision stands) in Jones v. Flowers. In Jones, Roberts sided with the liberal block of the court determining that before a home is seized and sold in a tax-forfeiture sale, due diligence must be demonstrated and proper notification needs to be sent to the owners. Dissenting were Anthony Kennedy along with Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas. Samuel Alito did not participate while Roberts' ruling was joined by David Souter, Stephen Breyer, John Paul Stevens, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Holding When the notice of a tax sale is returned unclaimed, the Fourteenth Amendments guarantee of due process requires the State to take additional reasonable steps to contact the property owner before it can sell his property. ... This article is about the Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ...


See also

  • United States Supreme Court cases during the Roberts Court

During the Senate Judiciary Committee Hearings, Roberts expressed a desire to unite the Supreme Court and issue more unanimous opinions. The Roberts Court has, however, been more sharply divided than Roberts would have hoped. Generally, there is a split between the more liberal wing, consisting of Ginsberg, Stevens, Souter, and Breyer and a more conservative wing, consisting of Roberts, Thomas, Kennedy, Scalia, and Alito. Proportionally speaking, there are more 5-4 divisions in the Roberts Court than the Rehnquist Court thus far. This is a chronological list of notable cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the tenure of Chief Justice John Roberts (29 September 2005 to the present). ...


Bibliography of articles by John G. Roberts Jr.

The University of Michigan Law Library (External Links, below) has compiled fulltext links to these articles and a number of briefs and arguments.

  • Developments in the Law — Zoning, "The Takings Clause," 91 Harv. L. Rev. 1462 (1978). (Section III of a longer article beginning on p. 1427)
  • Comment, "Contract Clause — Legislative Alteration of Private Pension Agreements: Allied Structural Steel Co. v. Spannaus," 92 Harv. L. Rev. 86 (1978). (Subsection C of a longer article beginning on p. 57)
  • New Rules and Old Pose Stumbling Blocks in High Court Cases, The Legal Times, February 26, 1990, co-authored with E. Barrett Prettyman, Jr.
  • Article III Limits on Statutory Standing, 42 Duke L. J. 1219 (1992–1993).
  • Riding the Coattails of the Solicitor General, The Legal Times, March 29, 1993.
  • The New Solicitor General and the Power of the Amicus, The Wall Street Journal, May 5, 1993.
  • The 1992–1993 Supreme Court, Public Interest Law Review 107 (1994).
  • Forfeitures: Does Innocence Matter?, New Jersey Law Journal, October 9, 1995.
  • Thoughts on Presenting an Effective Oral Argument, School Law in Review (1997). Link
  • The Bush Panel, 2003 BYU L. Rev. 62 (2003). (Part of a tribute to Rex. E. Lee beginning on p. 1. "The Bush Panel" contains a speech by Roberts.)
  • Oral Advocacy and the Re-emergence of a Supreme Court Bar, 30 J. Supr. Ct. Hist. 68 (2005).
  • What Makes the D.C. Circuit Different: A Historical View, 92 Va. L. Rev. (forthcoming).
  • A Tribute to Chief Justice Rehnquist, 119 Harv. L. Rev. 1 (2005)

is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... // is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...

References

Wikinews has related news:
President Bush nominates John Roberts as Chief Justice of the U.S.

Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

News articles

  • "Roberts Listed in Federalist Society '97-98 Directory". Washington Post. July 25, 2005. [3]
  • "Appellate judge Roberts is Bush high-court pick." MSNBC. July 19, 2005. [4]
  • Argetsinger, Amy, and Jo Becker. "The nominee as a young pragmatist: under Reagan, Roberts tackled tough issues." Washington Post. July 22, 2005. [5]
  • Barbash, Fred, et al: "Bush to nominate Judge John G. Roberts Jr." Washington Post. July 19, 2005. [6]
  • Becker, Jo, and R. Jeffrey Smith. "Record of accomplishment — and some contradictions." Washington Post. July 20, 2005. [7]
  • Bumuller, Elisabeth, and David Stout: "President chooses conservative judge as nominee to court." New York Times. July 19, 2005. [8]
  • "Bush: Meeting with Roberts during recount wasn't political." Associated Press. July 23, 2005. [9]
  • Entous, Adam. "Bush picks conservative Roberts for Supreme Court." Reuters. July 19, 2005. [10]
  • Kallestad, Brent. "Roberts helped counsel Jeb Bush." Associated Press. July 21, 2005. [11]
  • Lane, Charles. "Federalist affiliation misstated: Roberts does not belong to group." Washington Post. July 21, 2005. [12]
  • Lane, Charles. "Short record as judge is under a microscope." Washington Post. July 21, 2005. [13]
  • Groppe, Maureen, and John Tuohy. "If you ask John where he's from, he says Indiana." Indianapolis Star. July 20, 2005. [14]
  • McFeatters, Ann. "John G. Roberts Jr. is Bush choice for Supreme Court." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. July 19, 2005. [15]
  • Riechmann, Deb. "Federal judge Roberts is Bush's choice." Associated Press. July 20, 2005. [16]
  • "Roberts: A smart, self-effacing 'Eagle Scout'." Associated Press. July 20, 2005. [17]
  • "Who Is John G. Roberts Jr.?" ABC News. July 19, 2005. [18]

is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Government/official biographies

  • "President announces Judge John Roberts as Supreme Court nominee." Office of the Press Secretary, Executive Office of the President. [19]
  • "Roberts, John G., Jr." Federal Judicial Center. [20]
  • "John G. Roberts biography." Office of Legal Policy, U.S. Department of Justice. [21]
  • "Biographical Sketches of the Judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit." United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. [22]
  • John G. Roberts Questionnaire for Appeals Court Confirmation Hearing (p. 297–339) and responses to Questions from Various Senators (p. 443–461) [23] (large PDF file)

“PDF” redirects here. ...

Other

  • Coffin, Shannen W. "Meet John Roberts: The President Makes the Best Choice." National Review Online. July 19, 2005. [24]
  • "Former Hogan & Hartson partner nominated for the U.S. Supreme Court." Hogan & Hartson, LLP. July 20, 2005. [25]
  • Goldman, Jerry. "John G. Roberts, Jr." Oyez. [26]
  • "John G. Roberts, Jr. Fact Sheet" La Lumiere School. [27]
  • "John G. Roberts federal campaign contributions." Newsmeat.com. July 19, 2005. [28]
  • "Progress for America: Support for the Confirmation of John G. Roberts" [29]
  • "Report of the Alliance for Justice: Opposition to the Confirmation of John G. Roberts to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit." Alliance for Justice. [30] (PDF file)

Shannen W. Coffin (born ca. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alliance for Justice is a liberal judicial advocacy group centered mainly around the issues of the selection of federal judges to the Supreme Court, courts of appeals and district court & non-profit group advocacy as they pertain to laws governing how these groups can participate in policy processes. ... “PDF” redirects here. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.wargs.com/other/robertsj.html
  2. ^ School website
  3. ^ Lane, Charles. "Federalist affiliation misstated: Roberts does not belong to group." Washington Post. July 21, 2005. [1] ***** Although in the days immediately following his nomination Roberts was widely reported as being a member of the Federalist Society — by media outlets including CNN, the Los Angeles Times, the Legal Times, and the Washington Post — and he has spoken at Federalist Society events, Roberts subsequently stated that he never has paid the group's $50 membership fee, and does not recall ever having been a member, although the 1997–1998 directory lists him as a member of the steering committee.
  4. ^ Jane Roberts Biography. Retrieved on February 14, 2006.
  5. ^ http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20050930/news_1n30jack.html
  6. ^ http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/SupremeCourt/story?id=2651063&page=1&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312
  7. ^ a b c d e "Chief justice tumbles after seizure", CNN, 30 July 2007. 
  8. ^ a b c d e "Chief Justice Roberts Suffers Seizure", Washington Post, July 30, 2007. 
  9. ^ "Chief Justice John Roberts hospitalized in Maine", Maine Today, July 30, 2007. 
  10. ^ a b c "Chief Justice John Roberts Suffers Seizure, Remains in Hospital", Fox News, July 30, 2007. 
  11. ^ a b "Chief justice tells Bush he's 'doing fine' after seizure", CNN, 31 July 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-31. 
  12. ^ "Chief Justice Roberts Suffers Seizure", Washington Post, July 31, 2007. 
  13. ^ a b c d e http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/26jan20041230/www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/pdf/108hrg/92548.pdf
  14. ^ http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_senate_hearings&docid=f:92548.wais
  15. ^ http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_senate_hearings&docid=f:92548.wais
  16. ^ http://www.tnr.com/doc.mhtml?i=20050801&s=sunstein080105
  17. ^ http://www.yementimes.com/article.shtml?i=712&p=local&a=5
  18. ^ http://pacer.cadc.uscourts.gov/docs/common/opinions/200507/04-5393a.pdf
  19. ^ See also: "Chief Justice Roberts — Constitutional Interpretations of Article III and the Commerce Clause: Will the "Hapless Toad" and "John Q. Public" Have Any Protection in the Roberts Court?" Paul A. Fortenberry and Daniel Canton Beck. 13 U. Balt. J. Envtl. L. 55 (2005)
  20. ^ "Supreme Court Nominations, 1789–2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President" Congressional Research Service January 5, 2005 [2]

is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madisons silhouette The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
John Roberts
  • Judge Roberts's Published Opinions in a searchable database
  • Search and browse the transcripts from Judge Roberts's confirmation hearing
  • John Roberts at the Notable Names Database
  • Chief Justice John Roberts at About.com
  • Transcript of Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of John Roberts to the D.C. circuit (Roberts Q&A on pages 17–79) plain text available here
  • FindLaw Lawyer Profile
  • List of Circuit Judge Roberts's opinions for the DC Circuit
  • University of Michigan Law Library fulltext links
  • Federalist Society
  • A summary of media-related cases handled by Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. from The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, July 21, 2005
  • Experts Analyze Supreme Court Nominee John Roberts's Legal Record
  • Profile of the Nominee — The Washington Post
  • A Senate Hearing Primer — The New York Times
  • Video and Transcripts From the Roberts Confirmation Hearings — The New York Times
  • SCOTUSblog
  • Supreme Court Nomination Blog
  • Senate Vote on the Roberts nomination
  • List of Chief Justices, including John Roberts, Jr.
  • On first day, Roberts sets no-nonsense tone — The Boston Globe
Legal offices
Preceded by
James L. Buckley
Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit
2003 – 2005
Vacant
Preceded by
William H. Rehnquist
Chief Justice of the United States
September 29, 2005 – present
Incumbent
Order of precedence in the United States of America
Preceded by
Nancy Pelosi
Speaker of the House of Representatives
United States order of precedence
Chief Justice of the United States
Succeeded by
Jimmy Carter
Former President of the United States
Judicial opinions of John Roberts
United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (June 2, 2003 - September 29, 2005)
(organized by calendar year)
  • 2003
  • 2004
  • 2005
Supreme Court of the United States (September 29, 2005 - present)
(organized by term)
The Roberts Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
John Glover Roberts, Jr. (2005 to present)
2005–2006: J.P. Stevens | S.D. O'Connor | A. Scalia | A. Kennedy | D. Souter | C. Thomas | R.B. Ginsburg | S. Breyer
2006–present: J.P. Stevens | A. Scalia | A. Kennedy | D. Souter | C. Thomas | R.B. Ginsburg | S. Breyer | S. Alito
Persondata
NAME Roberts, John Glover, Jr.
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION U.S. Supreme Court justice
DATE OF BIRTH January 27, 1955
PLACE OF BIRTH Buffalo, New York, United States
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
John G. Roberts Jr. - dKosopedia (2648 words)
Roberts noted that "no one is very happy about the events that led to this litigation" and that the Metro authority had changed the policy that led to her arrest.
Roberts explained the Department’s position that, “the objective of a proper desegregation remedy” was simply “the end to official discrimination on the basis of race,” a position that effectively eliminated much of the government’s traditional role in working to eradicate the effects of prior discrimination.
Roberts co-authored the government’s amicus brief in a private suit brought against Operation Rescue by an abortion clinic it had targeted.14 The brief argued that Operation Rescue was not engaged in a conspiracy to deprive women of equal protection.
Wikinfo | John Robert Starr (679 words)
John Robert Starr, (1927 - 1 April 2000), was an American journalist and newspaper columnist.
John Robert Starr wrote sports for the Memphis Commercial Appeal and founded the Pine Bluff Star-Reporter at Pine Bluff, Arkansas before being hired by the Associated Press in 1957.
John Robert Starr died of a heart attack while on vacation at Del Norte, Colorado.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m