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Encyclopedia > John Prescott
The Right Honourable
 John Prescott MP


In office
2 May 1997 – 27 June 2007
Prime Minister Tony Blair
Preceded by Michael Heseltine
Succeeded by Currently Vacant

In office
8 June 2001 – 27 June 2007
Preceded by Michael Heseltine (none since 1997)
Succeeded by Currently Vacant

Member of Parliament
for Hull East
Incumbent
Assumed office 
18 June 1970
Preceded by Harry Pursey
Majority 11,747 (37.7%)

Born 31 May 1938 (1938-05-31) (age 69)
Prestatyn, Wales, UK
Nationality British
Political party Labour
Alma mater Ruskin College, Oxford

John Leslie Prescott (born 31 May 1938) is a Welsh Labour Party politician, former Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Secretary of State and current Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hull East. He was elected Deputy Leader of the Labour Party after coming second in the Labour leadership election in 1994, and was appointed Deputy Prime Minister after Labour's victory in the 1997 General Election. John Prescott is the former deputy leader of the UK Labour Party and British Deputy Prime Minister. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated as or ) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Image File history File links John_Prescott. ... Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ... First Secretary of State is a title within the British government, principally regarded as purely honorific, currently held by the Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ... Hull East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Comman[[der Harry Pursey MP (1891—13 December 1980) was a British politician and naval officer. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Prestatyn is a seaside resort in Denbighshire, North Wales, lying on the north coast. ... This article is about the country. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... Ruskin College is an independent college in Oxford, founded in 1899 and named after John Ruskin. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ... First Secretary of State is a title within the British government, principally regarded as purely honorific, currently held by the Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Hull East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The British Labour Party has always sought to ensure that the power to shape party policy was not consolidated in the hands of the leader. ... A Deputy Prime Minister is a member of a nations cabinet who can take the position of acting Prime Minister when the real Prime Minister is temporarily absent. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ...


A former ship's steward and trade union activist, he is presented as the political link to the working class in a "New" Labour party led by modernising middle class professionals. Prescott had overcome the handicap of failing his grammar school entrance Eleven Plus examination, to graduate from Ruskin College in Oxford. Prescott also developed a reputation as a key conciliator in the often tense relationship between the two other senior figures in government, then chancellor Gordon Brown and former Prime Minister Tony Blair. A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin... The Eleven Plus or Transfer Test is an examination given to students in their last year of primary education in the United Kingdom. ... Ruskin College is an independent educational institution in Oxford, England, but is not part of the University of Oxford. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


On 27 June 2007, he resigned as Deputy Prime Minister, to coincide with the resignation of Prime Minister Tony Blair, following his replacement in a deputy leadership election by Harriet Harman. His former post of Deputy Prime Minister was not assigned to any minister. On 27 August 2007, he announced that he would not stand for re-election as an MP at the next election.[1] is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Harriet Ruth Harman QC MP (born 30 July 1950) is a British solicitor (professional legal adviser) and Labour politician. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Contents

Early life

The son of a railway signalman (and Labour councillor) and grandson of a miner, Prescott was born in Prestatyn, Wales and brought up initially in Brinsworth in South Yorkshire, England. He attended Brinsworth Primary School, where he sat but failed the Eleven Plus examination in 1948. His family moved to Ellesmere Port in Cheshire, where he attended Grange Secondary Modern School. He became a steward and waiter in the Merchant Navy, working for Cunard, and was a popular left-wing union activist. Prescott's time in the Merchant Marine included a cruise from England to New Zealand in 1957.[2][3] Among the passengers was Sir Anthony Eden, recuperating after his resignation over the Suez Crisis. Prescott reportedly described Eden as a "real gentleman". Apart from serving Eden, who stayed in his cabin much of the time, Prescott also won several boxing contests, at which Eden presented the prizes. He then went to the independent Ruskin College in Oxford, which specialises in courses for union officials, where he gained a diploma in economics and politics. Thereafter, he obtained a BSc in economics and economic history at the University of Hull. A signalman is an employee of a railway transport network who operates the points and signals in a signal box. ... Surface coal mining in Wyoming. ... , Prestatyn is a seaside resort in Denbighshire, North Wales, lying on the north coast. ... Brinsworth is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham, in South Yorkshire, England, between Rotherham (to the north-east) and Sheffield (to the south-east). ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Eleven Plus is an examination which was given to students in their last year of primary education in the United Kingdom under the Tripartite System. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Cheshire (disambiguation). ... For the steam locomotives, see SR Merchant Navy Class. ... The Cunard Line, formerly Cunard White Star Line, is a British cruise line, operator of ocean liners RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) and RMS Queen Mary 2 (QM2). ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Merchant Navy. ... For the eponymous hat, see Anthony Eden hat. ... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Ruskin College is an independent college in Oxford, founded in 1899 and named after John Ruskin. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... BSC is an abbreviation for: Bachelor of Science (usually written BSc), an academic science degree Base Station Controller, a subsystem in a GSM mobile phone network Binary symmetric channel in coding theory Binary Synchronous Communications, a data link protocol developed by IBM in the 1960s In medical literature: best supportive... Economic history is the study of economic change, and of economic phenomena in the past. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ...


Member of Parliament

He returned to the National Union of Seamen as a full-time official before being elected to the House of Commons as Member of Parliament (MP) for Hull East in 1970, succeeding Commander Harry Pursey, the retiring Labour MP. The defeated Conservative challenger was Norman Lamont. Previously, he had attempted to become MP for Southport in 1966, but came in second place, approximately 11,200 votes behind the Conservative candidate. From 1974 to 1979, he concurrently served as a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) and Leader of the Labour Group, when its members were nominated by the national Parliaments. The National Union of Seamen was the principal trade union of merchant seafarers in Great Britain from 1888/1889 to 1990. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Hull East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Comman[[der Harry Pursey MP (1891—13 December 1980) was a British politician and naval officer. ... Norman Stewart Hughson Lamont, Baron Lamont of Lerwick, PC (born 8 May 1942) was Conservative Member of Parliament for Kingston-upon-Thames, England from 1972 until 1997. ... Southport is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ...


Prescott held various posts in Labour's Shadow Cabinet, but his career was secured by an impassioned closing speech in the debate at the Labour Party Conference in 1993 on the introduction of 'one member, one vote' elections for the party leadership that helped swing the vote in favour of this reform. Prescott became deputy leader with the first leadership vote under the new system following the death of John Smith in 1994. The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... The Labour Party Conference, or annual national conference of the Labour Party, is formally the supreme decision-making body of the Party. ... A leadership election was held in 1994 for the Labour Party in the United Kingdom, after the death of incumbent leader John Smith. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ...


Deputy Prime Minister

John Prescott in May 2007

With the election of a Labour government in 1997, Prescott was made Deputy Prime Minister and given a very large portfolio as the head of the newly created Department for Environment, Transport and the Regions. In July 2001, an Office of the Deputy Prime Minister was created to deal with the areas under his responsibility.[4] This new office was originally part of the Cabinet Office, but became a department in its own right in May 2002 when it absorbed some of the responsibilities from the former Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 329 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1324 × 2413 pixel, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: Getoar I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 329 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1324 × 2413 pixel, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: Getoar I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A Deputy Prime Minister is a member of a nations cabinet who can take the position of acting Prime Minister when the real Prime Minister is temporarily absent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions was a UK Cabinet position created in 1997, with responsibility for the Department for Environment, Transport and the Regions. ... The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister is a department of the British government. ... The Cabinet Office is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for supporting the Prime Minister and Cabinet in progressing matters that require coordination across Government departments. ...


In the United Kingdom, the title Deputy Prime Minister is used only occasionally and confers no constitutional powers (in which it is similar to the pre-20th century usage of Prime Minister). Since the Deputy Prime Minister draws no salary, Prescott's remuneration was based on his position as Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions until 2001. Upon losing that role he was given the title First Secretary of State and a much smaller department called the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. The Deputy Prime Minister stands in when the Prime Minister is unavailable, most visibly at Prime Minister's Questions, and Prescott has attended various Heads of Government meetings on behalf of Tony Blair.[5] A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister is a department of the British government. ... Prime Ministers Questions (PMQs) (officially Questions to the Prime Minister) is a constitutional convention in the United Kingdom, where every Wednesday when the House of Commons is sitting the Prime Minister spends half an hour answering questions from Members of Parliament (MPs). In Canada, this convention is known as...


Environment

The UK played a major role in the successful negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol on climate change and Prescott led for the country during the discussions.[6][7] Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 450,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ...


In May 2006, in recognition of his work in delivering the Kyoto Treaty, Tony Blair asked Prescott to work with the Foreign Secretary and the Secretary of State for the Environment on developing the Government's post-Kyoto agenda.[8] For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... The Secretary of State for the Environment was a UK cabinet position. ...


Transport

Integrated transport policy

On coming to office, Prescott pursued an integrated public transport policy. On 6 June 1997 he said: "I will have failed if in five years time there are not... far fewer journeys by car. It's a tall order but I urge you to hold me to it." [9] However, by June 2002, car traffic was up by 7%. This prompted Friends of the Earth’s Tony Bosworth to say "By its own test, Government transport policy has failed".[10] is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Friends of the Earth is an international network of environmental organizations in 70 countries. ...


Prescott had success in focusing attention on the role of car usage in the bigger environmental picture and the need for effective public transport alternatives if car volume is to be reduced. The subsequent debate on road pricing evolved from his policy. A contrast was highlighted between Prescott's transport brief and an incident, in 1999, when an official chauffeur-driven car was used to transport Prescott and his wife 250 yards from their hotel to the venue of the Labour Party Conference, where Prescott gave a speech on how to encourage the use of public transport. Prescott explained, "Because of the security reasons for one thing and second, my wife doesn't like to have her hair blown about. Have you got another silly question?"[11] Road pricing is a term that refers to the charging for the use of streets and roads. ...


Rail regulation

Prescott had a stormy relationship with the privatised railway industry. He had vigorously opposed the privatisation of the industry while the Labour Party was in opposition, and disliked the party's policy, established in 1996 just before the flotation of Railtrack on the London Stock Exchange, of committing to renationalise the industry only when resources allowed, which he saw as meaning that it would never be done. Reluctantly, he supported the alternative policy, produced by then shadow transport secretary Clare Short, that the industry should be subjected to closer regulation by the to-be-created Strategic Rail Authority (in the case of the passenger train operators) and the Rail Regulator (in the case of the monopoly and dominant elements in the industry, principally Railtrack). The policy was spelled out in some detail in the Labour Party's statement in the June 1996 prospectus for the sale of Railtrack shares, and was widely regarded as having depressed the price of the shares. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up policy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... IPO redirects here. ... For the generic term, see rail tracks. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... Nationalization, also spelled nationalisation, is the act by which a nation takes possession of assets without requiring the owners consent, with or without payment of compensation. ... Clare Short (born 15 February 1946) is a British politician and a member of the British Labour Party. ... Categories: Stub ... Statutory office - created by section 1 of the Railways Act 1993 - for the independent economic regulation of the British railway industry. ...


In 1998, Prescott was criticised by investors in the railway for his statement - at the Labour Party conference that year - that the privatised railway was a "national disgrace". The companies felt that they had had some considerable successes in cutting costs and generating new revenues in the short time since their transfer to private sector hands, and that the criticisms were premature and unfair.[citation needed]


In that speech, Prescott also announced that he would be taking a far tougher line with the companies, and to that end he would be having a "spring clean of the regulators". This meant that the incumbent Director of Passenger Rail Franchising - John O'Brien - and the Rail Regulator John Swift QC - both appointed by the previous Conservative government, would have to make way for New Labour appointees. In February 1999, the regulation of the passenger rail operators fell to Sir Alastair Morton,[12] who Prescott announced would be appointed as chairman of the Strategic Rail Authority, which would take over from the Director of Passenger Rail Franchising whose office would be wound up. In July 1999, the new Rail Regulator appointed by Prescott was Tom Winsor.[12] They shared Prescott's view that the railway industry needed a considerable shake-up in its institutional, operational, engineering and economic matrix to attract and retain private investment and enable the companies within it to become strong, competent and successful. The Director of Passenger Rail Franchising is a statutory office created in 1993 by the Railways Act 1993 and usually called the Franchising Director. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Alastair Morton (January 11, 1938 — 1 September 2004) was Chief Executive of Eurotunnel and Chairman of the Strategic Rail Authority. ... Categories: Stub ... Tom Winsor (born December 7, 1957) is a British lawyer who was, from July 5, 1999 until July 4, 2004, the Rail Regulator and International Rail Regulator for Great Britain. ...


Regional development

Prescott supported regional government in England. Early in his term, he introduced regional assemblies (consisting of delegates from local authorities) to oversee the work of new Regional Development Agencies in the regions of England. Following Labour's second election victory, he pressed for the introduction of elected regional assemblies, which would have seen about 20 members elected under a similar electoral system to that used for the London Assembly. However, due to opposition, the government was forced to hold regional referendums on the change. The first three were intended to be in the North-East, North-West and Yorkshire and Humberside. The North-East referendum in 2004 was first (where support was felt to be strongest) but resulted in an overwhelming vote of 78% against. As a consequence, the plan for elected regional assemblies was shelved. Subnational entity is a generic term for an administrative region within a country — on an arbitrary level below that of the sovereign state — typically with a local government encompassing multiple municipalities, counties, or provinces with a certain degree of autonomy in a varying number of matters. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... The three northern regions. ...


The rising number of households (especially in the south-east) means that new houses need to be built. Given that there are insufficient brownfield (developed) sites, Prescott determined that some greenfield (undeveloped) sites must be used for them, including some in the Green Belt. Prescott said in January 1998 in a radio interview that "The green belt is a Labour achievement; and we intend to build upon it.".[13] Examples of brownfields that were redeveloped into productive properties Brownfields are abandoned, idled, or under-used industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contaminations. ... Greenfield land is a term used to describe a piece of undeveloped land, either currently used for agriculture or just left to nature. ... In city planning, the Green Belt is a concept for controlling metropolitan growth introduced around London, England by minister of housing Duncan Sandys via a Government Circular. ...


In the north of England, Prescott approved the demolition of some 200,000 homes that were judged to be in 'failing areas' as part of his Pathfinder regeneration scheme. It has been argued that renovating properties, rather than demolishing them, would have made better financial and community sense.[14] Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... The Neighbourhood Management Pathfinder Programme is a co-operative programme in the United Kingdom between residents and stakeholders such as the local authority, businesses etc aimed at improving specific deprived neighbourhoods. ...


Responsible for local government, Prescott introduced a new system guiding members' conduct after 2001. The new system included a nationally agreed Code of Conduct laid down by Statutory Instrument which all local authorities were required to adopt; the Code of Conduct gives guidance on when councillors have an interest in a matter under discussion and when that interest is prejudicial so that the councillor may not speak or vote on the matter. Although on many areas councillors had previously been expected to withdraw where they had declared an interest, the new system made the system more formal and introduced specific sanctions for breaches; it was criticised for preventing councillors from representing the views of their local communities.[15] Statutory Instruments (SIs) are parts of United Kingdom law separate from Acts of Parliament which do not require full Parliamentary approval before becoming law. ...


Opposition to education reforms

On 17 December 2005, Prescott made public his disapproval of Tony Blair's plans to give state schools the right to govern their finances and admission policies and to increase the number of city academies in the first policy stance that Prescott had made against Blair since his election as leader in 1994. Prescott said that the move would create a two-tier educational system that would discriminate against the working class.[16] He added that Labour were "always better fighting class".[17] December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... State school is an expression used in the United Kingdom and other countries apart from the United States to distinguish schools provided by the government from public schools which are in fact private institutions. ... A city academy is a type of British secondary school, of which one of the major architects was Andrew Adonis in his capacity as education advisor to the Prime Minister (now Lord Adonis, a junior Minister at the Department for Education and Skills) in the late 1990s. ...


Links with the grass roots

Prescott, sometimes described as 'an old-school unionist', has kept in touch with the views of the traditional Labour voters throughout his career. He became an important figure in Tony Blair's 'New Labour' movement, as the representative of 'old Labour' interests in the Shadow Cabinet and subsequently around the Cabinet table as Deputy Prime Minister. For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... This article is about the governmental body. ... Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ...


However, now a member of the establishment, relationships with the grass roots were not always smooth. Whilst attending the BRIT Awards in 1998, Chumbawamba vocalist Danbert Nobacon poured a jug of iced water over Prescott, saying, "This is for the Liverpool Dockers".[18][19] (Dock workers in Liverpool had been involved in a two-year industrial dispute: a strike that had turned into a lockout, until a few weeks earlier.) A reporter from the Daily Mirror threw water over Nobacon the following day.[20] For other uses, see Establishment. ... A grassroots movement (often referenced in the context of a political movement) is one driven by the constituents of a community. ... The Brit Awards are the annual United Kingdom pop music awards founded by the British Phonographic Industry. ... Chumbawamba are an English band that started out playing punk rock, but over a 25-year career have gone on to play music ranging from pop influenced dance music and world music to acoustic folk music. ... Danbert Nobacon pictured playing live at Leeds University, 1986, supporting Conflict Danbert Nobacon, real name Nigel Hunter, was vocalist and keyboard player of the Leeds based anarchist band Chumbawamba. ... The Liverpool Dockers refused to cross a picket line. ... St Petersburg Docks in the early morning smog. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... A lockout is a work stoppage in which an employer prevents employees from working. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ...


Abolition of department

In a Cabinet reshuffle on 5 May 2006, Prescott's departmental responsibilities were transferred to Ruth Kelly, as Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, following revelations about his private life and a poor performance by Labour in UK local elections. He remained as deputy PM, with a seat in the Cabinet, and was given a role as special envoy to the Far East.[21] . Following poor results for the Labour Party in the May 4, 2006 local elections in England, British Prime Minister Tony Blair held a Cabinet reshuffle on May 5. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ruth Maria Kelly (born 9 May 1968) is a British politician. ... The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, formerly Minister of State for Communities and Local Government, is a Cabinet position currently within the UKs Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, formerly headed by John Prescott. ...


The press speculated on 9 July 2006 that, as a consequence of the continuing problems centred on Prescott, Blair was preparing to replace him as Deputy Prime Minister with David Miliband MP, whilst possibly retaining Prescott as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party,[22] but nothing came of this. is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2007 Labour Party deputy leadership election is a British political party election for the position of Deputy Leader of the Labour Party and in the event of the leader for some reason having to stand down or dying then the Deputy Leader becomes leader, John Prescott has announced that... David Wright Miliband (born 15 July 1965) is a British politician who is the current Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [1] and Member of Parliament for the constituency of South Shields, Tyne and Wear. ...


Announcement of retirement

On 28 September 2006, at the Labour Party conference in Manchester, John Prescott apologized for the bad press he had caused for the party during the previous year. He said: "I know in the last year I let myself down, I let you down. So Conference, I just want to say sorry." He confirmed he would stand down as Labour's deputy leader when Tony Blair leaves Downing Street.[23] On 30 January 2007, he announced in the House of Commons that "I'm in a rather happy demob stage" in a combative performance.[24] is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Demobilization is the process of standing down a nations armed forces from combat-ready status. ...


Within 30 minutes of Tony Blair announcing his impending resignation on 10 May 2007, Prescott announced that he was standing down as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party. At the special Labour Party conference at which Gordon Brown was formally elected (and Harriet Harman succeeded Prescott as Deputy Leader), Prescott received a prolonged standing ovation from the Labour Party members present, in recognition of his years of service to the party. is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... Harriet Ruth Harman QC MP (born 30 July 1950) is a British solicitor (professional legal adviser) and Labour politician. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Post-Government positions

Prescott is a member of the board of Super League Rugby League club Hull Kingston Rovers who are based in his constituency of East Hull.[25] Super League (Europe) began in March 1996 and is the only full-time professional rugby league competition operating in the northern hemisphere. ... Official website www. ...


Council of Europe

Following his resignation, it was announced that he would take over from Tony Lloyd as the lead UK representative in the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. The post is unpaid but with expenses and allows him to sit on the Assembly of Western European Union. Shadow Europe minister Mark Francois wished the translators good luck.[26]He has stated he will stand down as an MP at the next general election and is expected to become a Lord. He has also engaged in the campaign against slave labour which he intends to make a key issue in his work at the Council.[27] Anthony Joseph Lloyd, known as Tony Lloyd, (born 25 February 1950, Manchester) is a British Labour Party politician and the Member of Parliament for Manchester Central. ... The Palace of Europe in Strasbourg The Council of Europe is an international organisation of 46 member states in the European region. ... The position of Minister of State for Europe, in charge of affairs with the European Union, is a cabinet-level minister of the United Kingdom government under the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. ... Mark Gino Francois (born August 14, 1965 in London) is a Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ...


Health concerns

On 2 June 2007 he was admitted to hospital after being taken ill on a train from his constituency in Hull to London King's Cross. He was later diagnosed with pneumonia and was treated at University College Hospital, London. He was moved to a high-dependency ward on 5 June 2007 so he could be monitored more closely because of his age and the fact he suffers from diabetes. On 6 June 2007 it was reported in the media that his condition was stable and that he was sitting up and "joking" with hospital staff. He was subsequently released from hospital on 10 June 2007 to continue his recovery at home. is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... Kings Cross station (often spelt Kings Cross on platform signs) is a railway station in the district of the same name in northeast central London. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... University College Hospital is a teaching hospital in London, part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and associated with University College London. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Criticism and Controversies

Prescott has been involved in a number of controversies and incidents that have caused public concern and widespread media interest. When a farmer threw an egg at him during the 2001 general election, Prescott responded with a punch. In 2003 he was forced to repay council tax paid for by the public purse. There have been various controversies over sexual infidelities and harassment allegations. He was criticised for maintaining the benefits of Deputy Prime Minister despite losing his department in 2006. He has been attacked for visiting the American billionaire Phil Anschutz who was bidding for the government licence to build a super casino in the UK, and questioned over his involvement in the business of his son Johnathan Prescott. While acting Prime Minister he was photographed playing croquet at his then "grace and favour" home Dorneywood, and his silence during the airport terrorism plot of August 2006 was commented on by the media. He denies saying the Bush administration had been "crap" on the Middle East road map. The United Kingdom general election of 7 June 2001 was dubbed as the quiet landslide by the media. ... Philip Frederick Anschutz (born 28 December 1939 in Russell, Kansas) is an American businessman. ... Johnathan Prescott is an English businessman who is the joint owner of the regeneration company Estate Partnerships, with Richard Carlowe, a property developer from north London. ... Dorneywood is a moderately large Queen Anne style house built in 1920, near Burnham in Buckinghamshire. ...


Prescott was fined for speeding in July 1988, March 1989, January 1991 and January 1997. The last conviction related to an offence on 28 December 1996, when he was found to be driving at 80mph on the M62 at a time when police recommended a 30 mile per hour limit due to ice; he was fined £40 and given three penalty points on his driving licence.[28] is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The M62 motorway is a west-east trans-Pennine motorway in northern England, connecting the cities of Liverpool and Hull. ...


He has gained a reputation in the British press for confused speech, mangled syntax and grammar. The Guardian columnist Simon Hoggart once commented: "Every time Prescott opens his mouth, it's like someone has flipped open his head and stuck in an egg whisk."[29]. An oft-quoted but unverified story in Jeremy Paxman's The Political Animal is that, before being accepted as transcribers to Hansard, applicants must listen to one of Prescott's speeches and write down what they think he was trying to say. It has been a game played by the media to attach various nicknames to John Prescott. Whilst the way has been led by the red tops, even the normally staid and sober Independent has got in on the act. Originally, Prescott's nickname was simply "Prezza".[30]. For other uses, see Guardian. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jeremy Dickson Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is an English BBC journalist, news presenter and author. ... Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


As various misfortunes befell Prescott the soubriquets became more colourful leading to "Two Jags"[31] (Prescott owns one Jaguar, and had the use of another as his official ministerial car). Jaguar Cars Limited is a luxury car manufacturer, originally with headquarters in Browns Lane, Coventry, England but now at Whitley, Coventry. ...


"Two Jabs"[32] (referring to his retaliation against a protester farmer in 2001).


"Two Shags"[33] (in reference to his extramarital affairs)


"Two Shacks"[34] (referring to his former country house) Dorneywood is a moderately large Queen Anne style house built in 1920, near Burnham in Buckinghamshire. ...


"No Jobs" as referred to by The Independent [35] (after he lost his department in a cabinet reshuffle, following exposure of his affair). For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


Bibliography

  • Punchlines: A Crash Course in English with John Prescott by Simon Hoggart (Pocket Books, 2003) ISBN 0-7434-8397-9
  • Fighting Talk: Biography of John Prescott by Colin Brown (Simon & Schuster, 1997) ISBN 0-684-81798-5

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

See also

In British politics, the Cabinet is comprised of the most senior government ministers, most of them heads of government departments with the title Secretary of State. The Cabinet is actually a committee of the Privy Council and all Cabinet members are also Privy Councillors and therefore have the prefix of... Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
John Prescott

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

References

  1. ^ John Prescott to stand down as MP. BBC (2007-08-27). Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  2. ^ Prescott at Your Service. BBC Radio 4. Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  3. ^ "When Prescott Served Eden", BBC News, January 25, 2007. 
  4. ^ The office of Deputy Prime Minister (pdf). House of Commons. Retrieved on 2006-07-18.
  5. ^ BILATERAL MEETING OF THE PRIME MINISTER OF THE REPUBLIC OF POLAND WITH THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER OF GREAT BRITAIN (HTML). The Chancellery of the Prime Minister (Poland). Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  6. ^ Paul Brown. "Hopes for Kyoto rise after Japan and EU ratify treaty", Guardian Unlimited, June 1, 2002. 
  7. ^ Stephen Habberley. "Prescott's highs and lows", Guardian Unlimited, June 1, 2006. 
  8. ^ John Leslie Prescott. 10 Downing Street. Retrieved on 2006-01-13.
  9. ^ ENVIRONMENT, TRANSPORT AND THE REGIONS, RELATING TO TRANSPORT The Secretary of State was asked. Hansard (1998-10-20).
  10. ^ Friends of the Earth - Transport policy fails the Prescott test
  11. ^ "Prescott walks it like he talks it", BBC, September 30, 1999
  12. ^ a b Sir Alastair Morton left office, early, in October 2001. Tom Winsor continued until the end of his five-year term in July 2004.
  13. ^ "Planning", Hansard, 3 February 1999 : Column 996. 
  14. ^ Charles Clover. "Has John Prescott got his sums right?", Daily Telegraph, May 16, 2005. 
  15. ^ Daily Telegraph 26.2.06, "Christopher Booker's notebook".
  16. ^ Francis Elliot. "Prescott hits out over 'great danger' from Blair's school reforms", The Independent, December 17, 2005. 
  17. ^ Patrick Hennessy and Melissa Kite. "Class war: Prescott attacks Blair's education reforms and Cameron's 'Eton Mafia'", Daily Telegraph, December 18, 2005. 
  18. ^ "Soaked Prescott Rages At Pop Band", Evening Standard, February 10, 1998. 
  19. ^ "Brits to go live again", The Sun. 
  20. ^ "Four claret gold! Burnley's soccer-mad pop anarchists who fly first-class", Lancashire Evening Telegraph, June 3, 1998. 
  21. ^ Isabel Oakeshott. "Prescott the predator keeps his spoils", Sunday Times, May 7, 2006. 
  22. ^ "No. 10 lines up Miliband for Prescott job", Sunday Times, July 9, 2006. 
  23. ^ "Prescott tells Labour: I'm sorry", BBC News, September 28, 2006. 
  24. ^ "I'm 'demob happy', says Prescott", BBC News, January 31, 2007. 
  25. ^ Prescott handed role at Hull KR. BBC (2007-10-18). Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  26. ^ "Prescott in Council of Europe job", BBC News, July 4, 2007. 
  27. ^ "Prescott to stand down at election and focus on Council of Europe role", The Independent, August 23, 2007. 
  28. ^ "80mph Prescott fined", Sunday Times, January 5, 1997, p. 2; Guy Patrick, "Cops nick speeding Prescott", News of the World, January 5, 1997, p. 9
  29. ^ "John Prescott: An Upstanding Member of UK PLC", The Friday Project, 28 April 2006. 
  30. ^ "Prezza's big gamble on Dome billionaire", The Times, 09 July 2006. 
  31. ^ "'Two Jags' Prescott in parking row", The BBC, 27 July 2001. 
  32. ^ "Prescott punches protester", BBC News, 16 May 2001. 
  33. ^ "Two Shags has two inches", The Sun, April 2006. 
  34. ^ "Two Shacks", Guardian Unlimited, 1 June 2006. 
  35. ^ "Another sacked minister holds on to his residence", Independent Online, 24 May 2006. 
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Harry Pursey
Member for Hull East
1970 – present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Margaret Beckett
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party
1994–2007
Succeeded by
Harriet Harman
Preceded by
New Office
Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions
1997–2001
Succeeded by
Office Abolished
Preceded by
Michael Heseltine
Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1997–2007
Succeeded by
Currently Vacant
First Secretary of State
2001–2007

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Prescott: Information from Answers.com (2060 words)
John Leslie Prescott MP (born May 31, 1938) is a British Labour Party politician, Deputy Prime Minister, First Secretary of State and Member of Parliament for the north east constituency of Hull East.
Prescott held various posts in Labour's shadow cabinet, but his career was secured by an impassioned closing speech in the debate at the Labour Party Conference in 1993 on the introduction of "one member, one vote" elections for the party leadership.
Prescott made a gaffe in January 1998 when he declared in a radio interview that "the green belt is a Labour achievement, and we mean to build on it".
John Prescott - Uncyclopedia (993 words)
John Prescott aka Big Fat Bastard, began life as a garden gnome in his native isle of Europe, where he immediately set about planning the destruction of the mighty Lego army.
John was seen as a new dynamic type and his meteoric rise from office boy to deputy Prime Rib Minister was accomplished when he came up with the idea of the world's first battery operated kettle.
Further investigation into John's condition revealed he had the Tracey Temple variant of the female AIDS virus, although it is still unknown who he caught this from.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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