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Encyclopedia > John Pond

John Pond (c. 1767September 7, 1836) was an English astronomer. 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Astrometry: the study of the position of objects in the sky and their changes of position. ...


Pond was born in London, where his father made a fortune in trade. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, at the age of sixteen, but took no degree, his course being interrupted by severe pulmonary attacks which compelled a long residence abroad. In 1800 he settled at Westbury near Bristol, and began to determine star-places with a fine altitude and azimuth circle of 2 1/2 feet in diameter by Edward Troughton. His demonstration in 1806 of a change of form in the Greenwich mural quadrant led to the introduction of astronomical circles at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, and to his own appointment as its head. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on February 26, 1807; he married and went to live in London in the same year, and in 1811 succeeded Nevil Maskelyne as Astronomer Royal. Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,421,328 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College Christ Church Master Martin Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Bristol is an English city and county and one of the three administrative centres of South West England (the others being Plymouth and Exeter). ... Edward Troughton (October 1753 – June 12, 1835) was a British instrument maker, who was notable for making telescopes and other astronomical instruments. ... Look up Quadrant on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Quadrant can mean: HMS Quadrant (G11), a WW-II British/Australian warship. ... Royal Observatory, Greenwich The original site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO), which was built as a workplace for the Astronomer Royal, was on a hill in Greenwich Park in Greenwich, London, overlooking the River Thames. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Nevil Maskelyne. ... Astronomer Royal is a senior post in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ...


During an administration of nearly twenty-five years Pond effected a reform of practical astronomy in England comparable to that effected by Friedrich Bessel in Germany. In 1821 he began to employ the method of observation by reflection; and in 1825 he devised means of combining two mural circles in the determination of the place of a single object, the one serving for direct and the other for reflected vision. Under his auspices the instrumental equipment at Greenwich was completely changed, and the number of assistants increased from one to six. The superior accuracy of his determinations was attested by Seth Carlo Chandler's discussion of them in 1894, in the course of his researches into the variation of latitude. He persistently controverted (1810–1824) the reality of John Brinkley's imaginary star-parallaxes. He briefly served as Superintendent of the Nautical Almanac (1829–1831). Delicacy of health compelled his retirement in the autumn of 1835. Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (July 22, 1784 – March 17, 1846) was a German mathematician, astronomer, and systematizer of the Bessel functions (which, despite their name, were discovered by Daniel Bernoulli). ... Seth Carlo Chandler, Jr. ... John Brinkley (1763–September 14, 1835) was the first Royal Astronomer of Ireland and later the Bishop of Cloyne. ... A Nautical Almanac is a publication describing the positions and movements of celestial bodies, including the sun, moon, planets, and 57 stars chosen for their ease of identification and wide spacing. ...


The Copley Medal was conferred upon him in 1823, and the Lalande prize in 1817 by the French Academy of Sciences, of which he was a corresponding member. He published eight folio volumes of Greenwich Observations, translated Pierre-Simon Laplace's Système du monde, and contributed thirty-one papers to scientific collections. His catalogue of 1,112 stars (1833) was of great value. The Copley Medal is a scientific award for work in any field of science, the highest award granted by the Royal Society of London. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The French Academy of Sciences (Académie des sciences) is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research. ... Pierre-Simon Laplace Pierre-Simon, Marquis de Laplace (March 23, 1749 – March 5, 1827) was a French mathematician and astronomer who put the final capstone on mathematical astronomy by summarizing and extending the work of his predecessors in his five volume Mécanique Céleste (Celestial Mechanics) (1799-1825). ...


As Astronomer Royal, Pond was responsible for a substantial modernisation of the Observatory at Greenwich extending from improvements to equipment to new working practices. Perhaps his most noticeable addition was the 1833 installation of the time ball on the roof of the Observatory. This — arguably, the first public time signal in the UK — falls daily at 1pm and was intended to help passing mariners on the River Thames check their chronometers. The timeball at Greenwich is shown in the top right of picture A time ball is a large metal or painted wooden ball, visible to shipping, that drops at a predetermined time to enable sailors to set their chronometers. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... A chronometer is a clock designed to have sufficient long-term accuracy that it can be used as a portable time standard on a vehicle, usually in order to determine longitude by means of celestial navigation. ...


He died in Blackheath, and was buried beside Edmond Halley, and near fellow Astronomer Royal Nathaniel Bliss, in the churchyard of St Margaret's in nearby Lee, London. Blackheath is a place in London, divided between the London Borough of Lewisham and the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Edmond Halley. ... The Reverend Nathaniel Bliss (28 November 1700-2 September 1764) was a noted English astronomer of the 18th century, serving as Astronomer Royal between 1762 and 1764. ... Lee is a place in the London Borough of Lewisham in south-east London. ...


References

The core of this article originally from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ...

Preceded by:
Nevil Maskelyne
Astronomer Royal
1811–1835
Succeeded by:
George Airy

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Pond - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (493 words)
Pond was born in London, where his father made a fortune in trade.
He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on February 26, 1807; he married and went to live in London in the same year, and in 1811 succeeded Nevil Maskelyne as Astronomer Royal.
As Astronomer Royal, Pond was responsible for a substantial modernisation of the Observatory at Greenwich extending from improvements to equipment to new working practices.
John Pond - definition of John Pond in Encyclopedia (504 words)
During an administration of nearly twenty-five years Pond effected a reform of practical astronomy in England comparable to that effected by Friedrich Bessel in Germany.
In 1821 he began to employ the method of observation by reflection; and in 1825 he devised means of combining two mural circles in the determination of the place of a single object, the one serving for direct and the other for reflected vision.
He briefly served as Superintendent of the Nautical Almanac (1829–1831).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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