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Encyclopedia > John Mott

John Raleigh Mott (May 25, 1865January 31, 1955) was a long-serving leader of the YMCA. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 for his work in establishing and strengthening international Christian student organizations that worked to promote peace. May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... YMCAs in the United States and Canada use this logo. ... The Nobel Peace Prize Medal featuring a portrait of Alfred Nobel The Nobel Peace Prize is one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... The concept of peace ranks among the most controversial in our time. ...


In 1910, Mott, an American Methodist layperson, presided at the Edinburgh Missionary Conference, which launched both the modern missions movement and the modern ecumenical movement. For his labors in both missions and ecumenism, as well as for peace, some historians consider him to be "the most widely traveled and universally trusted Christian leader of his time" (Cracknell & White, 243). Intimately involved in the formation of the World Council of Churches in 1948, that body elected him as a life-long honorary President. His best-known book, The Evangelization of the World in this Generation, became a missionary slogan in the early 20th century (Cracknell & White, 233).-1... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist, the largest mainline, and, after the Southern Baptist Convention, the second-largest Protestant denomination in the United States. ... The Edinburgh Missionary Conference held in June of 1910 was both the culmination of nineteenth-century Christian missions and the formal beginning of the modern Christian ecumenical movement. ... Since the Lausanne Congress of 1974, a widely-accepted definition of a Christian mission has been to form a viable indigenous church-planting movement. ... Christian ecumenism is the promotion of unity or cooperation between distinct religious groups or denominations of the Christian religion, more or less broadly defined. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ...


He attended Upper Iowa University, where he studied history and was an award-winning student debater. He transferred to Cornell University, where he received his bachelor's degree in 1888. Mott married Leila Ada White in 1891 and had two sons and two daughters. He also founded the P&S club at Columbia University- the group that houses all of the student organizations at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. Upper Iowa University, the largest private university in Iowa, is a four-year, liberal arts institution of higher learning offering quality degree programs to over 670 on-campus students and to over 3,600 center, graduate, and independent study students. ... Cornell University is a research university whose main campus is located on the East Hill of Ithaca, New York, and whose two medical campuses are located in New York City and in Education City, Qatar, near Doha. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three or four years. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


External links

  • Nobel Committee information on 1946 Peace laureates
  • Biography at Nobelprize.org

Notes & References

  • Cracknell, Kenneth and Susan J. White. An Introduction to World Methodism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. ISBN 0521818494.
  • Fisher, Galen Merriam. John R. Mott: Architect of Cooperation and Unity. New York: Association Press, 1953.
  • Hopkins, Charles Howard. John R. Mott, 1865-1955. Eerdmans, 1979. ISBN 0802835252.
  • Mackie, Robert C. Layman Extraordinary: John R. Mott, 1865-1955. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1965.
  • Matthews, Basil Joseph. John R. Mott: World Citizen. New York, Harper, 1934.
  • Mott, John Raleigh. The Evangelization of the World in This Generation. Arno, 1972. ISBN 0405040784.

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Mott - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (274 words)
John Raleigh Mott (May 25, 1865 – January 31, 1955) was a long-serving leader of the YMCA.
In 1910, Mott, an American Methodist layperson, presided at the Edinburgh Missionary Conference, which launched both the modern missions movement and the modern ecumenical movement.
Mott married Leila Ada White in 1891 and had two sons and two daughters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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