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Encyclopedia > John Milledge
John Milledge

John Milledge (1757February 9, 1818) was an American politician. He fought in the American Revolution and was later a United States Representative and a Senator representing Georgia. He was a founder of Athens, Georgia and the University of Georgia. 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Before the Revolution: The 13 colonies are in red, the pink area was claimed by Great Britain after the French and Indian War, and the orange region was claimed by Spain. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Downtown Athens, as seen through the University of Georgia arch Athens or Athens-Clarke County is a city located in Clarke County,Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, just off of Georgia 316. ... The Arch, the gateway to UGAs historic North Campus. ...


Milledge was born in Savannah, Georgia, the grandson of an original settler of Georgia. He was tutored privately and studied law. After being admitted to the bar, he opened a law practice in Savannah. At the onset of the Revolutionary War, Milledge was part of a group that took colonial governor Sir James Wright as a prisoner in 1775. He also took part in a raid of Savannah's royal armory to procure gunpowder for the revolutionary cause. When the British captured Savannah, Milledge escaped to South Carolina, where American patriots nearly hanged him as a spy. He participated in the Siege of Savannah in an attempt to drive the British forces out. Savannah Savannah is a city located in (and the county seat of) Chatham County, Georgia. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law (and in other forms of dispute resolution). ... Sir James Wright (1716-1785) was an American lawyer and jurist who was the last British Royal Governor of Georgia. ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... An armory is a military depot used for the storage of weapons and ammunition. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... The Siege of Savannah was a battle of the American Revolutionary War in 1779. ...


After serving as the attorney general of Georgia, Milledge was member of the Georgia state legislature. In 1792, the House of Representatives declared the seat of Anthony Wayne vacant due to disputes over his residency. Milledge was elected to the Second Congress to fill this vacancy and served from November 22, 1792, to March 3, 1793. Later, Milledge would be elected to the Fourth and Fifth Congresses, serving from March 4, 1795 to March 3, 1799. In 1801, he was again elected to Congress, this time as a Democratic Republican, and served until he resigned in May 1802 to become Governor of Georgia. During this time, he was named to a comission to establish a site for the state university. On July 25, 1801, Milledge bought with his own money some land on the Oconee River for the school, and named the surrounding area Athens, in honor of the city of Plato's Academy. In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Anthony Wayne (January 1, 1745 - December 15, 1796), was a United States Army general and statesman. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... 1802 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Oconee River is a river which has its origin in Hall County, Georgia and terminates 170 miles later where it joins the Ocmulgee River to form the Altamaha River near Lumber City at the borders of Montgomery County, Wheeler County, and Jeff Davis County. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Statue of a philosopher, presumely Plato, in Delphi. ... An academy is an institution for the study of higher learning. ...


Milledge was Governor of Georgia from 1802 to 1806. As governor, he created Georgia's first land lottery to combat corruption in the distribution of former Creek land to settlers. He also reorganized the state militia, and built a road from Georgia to Tennessee passing through Cherokee lands. In 1803, Milledgeville, Georgia, the one-time state capital, was named in his honor. 1802 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Creek can be: A native American tribe, see Creek (people) The language of that tribe, see Creek language In US and Australian usage, a waterflow, smaller than a river, see Creek (stream) In UK usage, a tidal watercourse, usually drying to little or no flow at low tide, see Creek... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis (largest metropolitan area is Nashville) Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... Alternate meanings: Cherokee (disambiguation) The Cherokee are a people native to North America who first inhabited what is now the eastern and southeastern United States before most were forcefully moved to the Ozark Plateau. ... Milledgeville is a city located in Baldwin County, Georgia (of which it is the county seat), northeast of Macon, Georgia between Eatonton, Georgia and Hardwick, Georgia along Highway 441 on the banks of the Oconee River. ...


In 1806, he was elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of James Jackson. In the Tenth Congress, he was named President pro tempore of the Senate. He served until November 14, 1809, when he resigned. He died on his plantation near Augusta, Georgia. James Jackson (1757–1806) was a politician in the United States Democratic Party. ... The United States Senate, according to the United States Constitution, (Article I), is required to choose a President Pro Tempore (or, president for a time, often shortened to President Pro Tem), who presides over the Senate in the absence of the Vice President. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The seal of the City of Augusta Augusta is a city located in the state of Georgia. ...


This article incorporates facts obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...


External links

  • John Milledge (http://www.famousamericans.net/johnmilledge/)
  • The founding of Milledgeville (http://www.friendsofcems.org/NSDAR/History.htm)


Preceded by:
Josiah Tattnall, Jr.
Governor of Georgia
18021806
Succeeded by:
Jared Irwin


This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... 1802 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: John Milledge (1757-1818) (1003 words)
Milledge was one of the most important political figures in Georgia during the Revolutionary War (1775-83) and early national period, holding positions as governor, congressman for four terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, and president pro tempore in the U.S. Senate.
Milledge, one of the party who seized British colonial governor James Wright at Savannah in January 1776, was also a principal figure in the organization of the University of Georgia.
Milledge was on the committee that decided the location of the institution, and he later purchased and donated the land on which the university and the town of Athens now stand.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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