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Encyclopedia > John McLean

John McLean (March 11, 1785April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. The official portrait of Supreme Court Justice John McLean. ... The official portrait of Supreme Court Justice John McLean. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of the Ohio constitution. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...


McLean was born in Morris County, New Jersey, the son of Fergus McLean and Sophia Blackford. After living in a succession of frontier towns, Morgantown, Virginia; Nicholasville, Kentucky; and Maysville, Kentucky; in 1797 his family settled in Ridgeville, Warren County, Ohio. Morris County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... Nicholasville is a city located in Jessamine County, Kentucky. ... Maysville is a city located in Mason County, Kentucky. ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Ridgeville, Ohio, an unincorporated place of Clearcreek Township, in north central Warren County, Ohio, on Ohio Route 48 in sections 30 and 36, T4R4, Between the Miami Rivers Survey. ... Warren County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ...


He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1807. That same year he founded The Western Star, a weekly newspaper at Lebanon, the Warren County seat, where he practiced law. He was elected to the U.S. House for the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Congresses, serving from March 4, 1813, until he resigned in 1816 to take a seat on the Ohio Supreme Court which he had been elected to February 17, 1816, replacing William W. Irwin. 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Western Star is Ohios oldest weekly newspaper and second oldest of any sort (the oldest is the Chillicothe Gazette). ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Thirteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Fourteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of the Ohio constitution. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


He resigned his judgeship in 1822 (Charles Robert Sherman replaced him on the court) to take President James Monroe's appointment to be Commissioner of the General Land Office, serving until 1823, when Monroe appointed him United States Postmaster General. McLean served in that post from December 9, 1823, to March 7, 1829, under Monroe and John Quincy Adams, presiding over a massive expansion of the Post Office into the new western states and territories and the elevation of the Postmaster Generalship to a cabinet office. While Postmaster General, he supported Andrew Jackson, who offered him the posts of Secretary of War and Secretary of the Navy, but he declined both and was instead appointed to the Supreme Court. Order: 5th President Vice President: Daniel D. Tompkins Term of office: March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1825 Preceded by: James Madison Succeeded by: John Quincy Adams Date of birth: April 28, 1758 Place of birth: Westmoreland County, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1831 Place of death: New York City... The General Land Office, a former agency of the United States government, was created in 1812 to take over functions previously conducted by the United States Department of the Treasury relating to the public domain. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Order: 6th President Vice President: John Caldwell Calhoun Term of office: March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767 Place of birth: Waxhaws area of North Carolina Date of... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ...

Justice McLean in 1860, photographed by Matthew Brady

Known as "The Politician on the Supreme Court," he associated himself with every party on the political spectrum, moving from a Jackson Democrat, to the Anti-Jackson Democrats, the Anti-masonic Party, the Whigs, the Free Soilers, and finally the Republicans. President John Tyler again offered the post of Secretary of War, but he declined. Because of his fierece anti-slavery positions, he was considered by the new Republican party as a candidate in 1856. Despite his efforts, the nomination went to John C. Fremont. In 1860, he tried again, winning twelve votes on the first ballot at the Republican convention in Chicago; Abraham Lincoln ultimately was nominated. 1860 photograph of John McLean by Matthew Brady This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1860 photograph of John McLean by Matthew Brady This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Mathew B. Brady (ca. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... John Tyler (March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth (1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... John C. Frémont John Charles Frémont (January 21, 1813-July 13, 1890), birth name John Charles Fremon [Harvey, p. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


In Dred Scott v. Sanford, his fierce dissenting views are believed to have forced the hand of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney into a harsher and more polarizing opinion than he originally planned. He also wrote the Court's opinion denying there was a common-law copyright in American law in Wheaton v. Peters. Holding Blacks, whether slaves or free, could not become United States citizens and the plaintiff therefore lacked the capacity to file a lawsuit. ... Chief Justice Taney Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777–October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States from 1836 until his death in 1864. ... Common law copyright is the legal doctrine that contends that copyright is a natural right and creators have the same inherent right to it as they would tangible property. ... Wheaton v. ...


He died in Cincinnati, Ohio and was buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati. Cincinnati, The Queen City and also referred to as Cincy, is a city in Southwestern Ohio on the Ohio River and is the county seat of Hamilton County6. ...



Preceded by:
Return Meigs
United States Postmaster General
18231829
Succeeded by:
William T. Barry
Preceded by:
Robert Trimble
Associate Justice
January 11, 1830April 4, 1861
Succeeded by:
Noah Haynes Swayne


Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... William Taylor Barry (February 5, 1784–August 30, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | 1776 births | 1828 deaths ... In order to become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Noah Haynes Swayne (December 7, 1804 - June 8, 1884) was an American jurist and politician. ...


References

  • Thomas E. Carney. "The Political Judge: Justice John McLean's Pursuit of the Presidency. Ohio History. v. 111. Summer/Autumn 2002. 121+ [1] (http://publications.ohiohistory.org/pdf/Carn111SA.pdf#search='Justice%20John%20McLean')
  • Francis Phelphs Weisenberger. The Life of John McLean, A Politician On the United States Supreme Court. Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University Press, 1937

This article incorporates facts obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Skyline of downtown Columbus, Ohio, viewed across the Scioto River. ... The Ohio State University (legal name), also known as Ohio State or OSU (not to be confused with Ohio University), is currently the largest state University in the United States. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...


External links

  • Biography on the Ohio Historial Society's website (http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/ohc/h/peo/mcleanj.shtml)

  Results from FactBites:
 
John McLean - definition of John McLean in Encyclopedia (497 words)
John McLean (March 11, 1785-April 4, 1861) was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court.
McLean was born in Morris County, New Jersey, the son of Fergus McLean and Sophia Blackford.
McLean served in that post from December 9, 1823, to March 7, 1829, under Monroe and John Quincy Adams, presiding over a massive expansion of the Post Office into the new western states and territories and the elevation of the Postmaster Generalship to a cabinet office.
John McLean - encyclopedia article about John McLean. (2181 words)
John McLean (1785 - 1861) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
John McLean (March 11 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year).
McLean served in that post from December 9 December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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