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Encyclopedia > John Maxwell Coetzee
John Maxwell Coetzee

Born: 9 February 1940
Cape Town, South Africa
Occupation: Novelist, Short Story Writer, Essayist, Literary Critic, Linguist
Nationality: South African by birth, Australian Citizen
Influences: Samuel Beckett, Ford Madox Ford, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Daniel Defoe

John Maxwell Coetzee (IPA pronunciation: [kutseː]; born 9 February 1940), often called J.M. Coetzee, is a South African author (now living in Australia) and academic. A novelist and literary critic as well as a translator, Coetzee won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature. Image File history File linksMetadata J.M._Coetzee. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... City motto: Spes Bona (Latin: Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Province Western Cape Mayor Helen Zille Area  - % water 2,499 km² N/A Population  - Total (2004)  - Density Not ranked 2,893,251 1,158/km² Established 1652 Time zone SAST (UTC+2... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Ford Madox Ford (December 17, 1873 - June 26, 1939) was an English novelist and publisher. ... Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, IPA: , sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky  ) (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821 – February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) is considered one of the greatest Russian writers. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ...

Contents

Early life and education

Coetzee was born in Cape Town. His father was a lawyer and his mother was a schoolteacher; he is a descendent of early Dutch settlers dating to the 17th century. City motto: Spes Bona (Latin: Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Province Western Cape Mayor Helen Zille Area  - % water 2,499 km² N/A Population  - Total (2004)  - Density Not ranked 2,893,251 1,158/km² Established 1652 Time zone SAST (UTC+2...


He spent most of his early life in Cape Town and in Worcester in Western Cape Province as recounted in his fictionalized memoir, Boyhood (1997). He attended St. Joseph's College, a Catholic school in the Cape Town suburb of Rondebosch, and later studied mathematics and English at the University of Cape Town, receiving his Bachelor of Arts with Honours in English in 1960 and his Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Mathematics in 1961. Worcester, South Africa is a town situated about 120 km from Cape Town, in the Breede River Valley. ... Capital Cape Town Largest city Cape Town Premier Ebrahim Rasool Area - Total Ranked 4th 129,370 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 5th 4,524,335 35/km² Languages Afrikaans (55. ... Catholic students of the Cathedral Church of St. ... Rondebosch is one of the Southern Suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The University of Cape Town, abbreviated as UCT, is a public university located on the Rhodes Estate on the slopes of Devils Peak, in Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa. ... Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ...


Academic and literary career

In the early 1960s, Coetzee relocated to London, where he worked for a time at IBM as a computer programmer; and in 1963 he was awarded Master of Arts degree from UCT; his experiences there were later recounted in Youth (2002), his second volume of fictionalized memoirs. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... International Business Machines Corporation (known as IBM or Big Blue; NYSE: IBM) is a multinational computer technology corporation headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA. The company is one of the few information technology companies with a continuous history dating back to the 19th century. ... Computer programming (often shortened to programming or coding) is the process of writing, testing, and maintaining the source code of computer programs. ... Youth (or Youth: Scenes from Provincial Life II) (2002) is a semi-autobiographical book by J. M. Coetzee, recounting his struggles in 1960s London after fleeing the political unrest of Cape Town. ...


Coetzee received a Ph.D in linguistics at The University of Texas at Austin, where his dissertation was on computer stylistic analysis of the works of Samuel Beckett. After leaving Texas he taught English and literature at the SUNY-Buffalo in New York until 1971. In 1971, Coetzee sought permanent residence in the United States, but it was denied due to his involvement in anti-Vietnam War protests. He then returned to South Africa to become an English literature professor at the University of Cape Town. Upon retiring in 2002, Coetzee relocated to Adelaide, Australia, where he was made an honorary research fellow at the English Department of the University of Adelaide, where his partner, Dorothy Driver, is a fellow academic. He served as professor on the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago until 2003. In addition to his novels, he has published critical works and translations from Dutch and Afrikaans. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language. ... University of Texas at Austin The University of Texas at Austin (full official name), often UT or Texas for short, is the flagship institution of the University of Texas System, the largest public university system in Texas, established in 1883. ... This article is about the thesis in dialectics and academia. ... Stylistics is the study of style used in literary, and verbal language and the effect the writer/speaker wishes to communicate to the reader/hearer. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Official language(s) English (de facto) See also languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (261,797 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... University at Buffalo, The State University of New York (also known as University at Buffalo or simply UB) is a coeducational public research university having campuses located on in Buffalo and Amherst, New York, USA. Offering over 100 bachelors, 112 masters and 98 doctoral degrees, it is the... NY redirects here. ... Opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War began slowly and in small numbers in 1964 on various college campuses in the United States. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... The University of Cape Town, abbreviated as UCT, is a public university located on the Rhodes Estate on the slopes of Devils Peak, in Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa. ... Adelaide is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of South Australia, and is the fifth largest city in Australia, with a population of over 1. ... The University of Adelaide (colloquially Adelaide University or Adelaide Uni) is a public university located in Adelaide. ... The Committee on Social Thought, one of several PhD-granting committees at the University of Chicago, was started in 1941 by the historian John U. Nef along with economist Frank Knight, anthropologist Robert Redfield, and University President Robert Maynard Hutchins. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Look up Wiktionary:Swadesh lists for Afrikaans and Dutch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


On 6 March 2006 Coetzee became an Australian citizen in a ceremony presided over by Australian Immigration Minister Amanda Vanstone. Following the ceremony, Coetzee said that "I was attracted by the free and generous spirit of the people, by the beauty of the land itself and–when I first saw Adelaide–by the grace of the city that I now have the honour of calling my home." March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Australian citizenship was created on 26 January 1949 by the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 (later renamed the Australian Citizenship Act 1948). ... Amanda Eloise Vanstone (born 7 December 1952) is the Australian Immigration Minister and Minister for Multicultural Affairs. ...


Personality and reputation

He is known as reclusive and eschews publicity to such an extent that he did not collect either of his two Booker Prizes in person. He married in 1963 and divorced in 1980. He had a daughter and a son from the marriage, but his son was killed at the age of 23 in an accident, an event Coetzee confronts in his 1994 novel The Master of Petersburg. The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Booker Prize, is one of the worlds most prestigious literary prizes, awarded each year for the best original full-length novel written in the English language by a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations or the Republic of Ireland. ... The Master of Petersburg is a 1994 novel by South African writer J.M. Coetzee. ...


Rian Malan wrote that Coetzee is "a man of almost monkish self-discipline and dedication. He does not drink, smoke or eat meat. He cycles vast distances to keep fit and spends at least an hour at his writing-desk each morning, seven days a week. A colleague who has worked with him for more than a decade claims to have seen him laugh just once. An acquaintance has attended several dinner parties where Coetzee has uttered not a single word." [1] Rian Malan is a South African author, journalist and songwriter of Afrikaner descent. ... Discipline is any training intended to produce a specific character or pattern of behaviour, especially training that produces moral or mental development in a particular direction. ...


Achievements and awards

Coetzee has gained many awards throughout his career. The novel Waiting for the Barbarians was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 1980, and he is three times winner of the CNA Prize. Age of Iron was awarded the Sunday Express Book of the Year award, and The Master of Petersburg was awarded the Irish Times International Fiction Prize in 1995. He has also won the French Fémina Prize, the Faber memorial Award, the Commonwealth Literary Award, and in 1987 won the Jerusalem Prize for literature on the freedom of the individual in society. Waiting for the Barbarians is a novel by the South African author J.M. Coetzee, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. ... Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book awards in Britain. ... The Central News Agency Literary Award (CNA Literary Award, CNA Prize) is a major annual literary award in South Africa. ... Age of Iron is a 1990 novel by South African Nobel Prize winner J.M. Coetzee. ... The Master of Petersburg is a 1994 novel by South African writer J.M. Coetzee. ... The Jerusalem Prize for the Freedom of the Individual in Society is a biennial literary award given to writers whose work has dealt with themes of human freedom, society, politics, and government. ...


He was the first author to be awarded the Booker Prize twice: first for Life & Times of Michael K in 1983, and again for Disgrace in 1999. Life & Times of Michael K is a 1983 novel by J.M. Coetzee. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Disgrace (1999) is a novel by South African author J. M. Coetzee, winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature; the book itself won the Booker Prize in 1999, the year in which it was published. ...


On 2 October 2003 it was announced that he was to be the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the fourth African writer to be so honoured, and the second (as he then was) South African (after Nadine Gordimer). When awarded the prize, he was praised for "in innumerable guises portraying the involvement of the outsider." The press release for the award cited his "well-crafted composition, pregnant dialogue, and analytical brilliance," while focusing on the moral nature of his work. The prize ceremony was held in Stockholm on 10 December 2003. October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... Nadine Gordimer (born 20 November 1923) is a South African novelist and writer, winner of the 1991 Nobel Prize in literature and 1974 Booker Prize. ...   (IPA: ; UN/LOCODE: SE STO) is the capital of Sweden, and consequently the site of its Government and Parliament as well as the residence of the Swedish head of state, King Carl XVI Gustaf. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Coetzee was awarded the Order of Mapungubwe by the South African government on 27 September 2005 for his "exceptional contribution in the field of literature and for putting South Africa on the world stage." The Order of Mapungubwe is South Africas highest honour. ... This article is about the country on the southern tip of the African continent. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bibliography

Fiction

Dusklands (1974) is the first novel by J. M. Coetzee, winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... In the Heart of the Country (1977) is a novel by J. M. Coetzee which delves in the complex relationships that form between the colonizer and the colonized. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Waiting for the Barbarians is a novel by the South African author J.M. Coetzee, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Life & Times of Michael K is a 1983 novel by J.M. Coetzee. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Foe is a novel by J. M. Coetzee published in 1986. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Age of Iron is a 1990 novel by South African Nobel Prize winner J.M. Coetzee. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The Master of Petersburg is a 1994 novel by South African writer J.M. Coetzee. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Disgrace (1999) is a novel by South African author J. M. Coetzee, winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature; the book itself won the Booker Prize in 1999, the year in which it was published. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Elizabeth Costello is a 2003 novel by South African Nobel Laureate J. M. Coetzee. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Slow Man is a 2005 novel by South African author J.M. Coetzee who has Australian citizinship. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...

Fictionalised autobiography

  • Boyhood: Scenes from Provincial Life (1997) ISBN 0-14-026566-X
  • Youth (2002) ISBN 0-670-03102-X

1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Youth (or Youth: Scenes from Provincial Life II) (2002) is a semi-autobiographical book by J. M. Coetzee, recounting his struggles in 1960s London after fleeing the political unrest of Cape Town. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...

Non-fiction

  • White Writing: On the Culture of Letters in South Africa (1988) ISBN 0-300-03974-3
  • Doubling the Point: Essays and Interviews (1992) ISBN 0-674-21518-4
  • Giving Offense: Essays on Censorship (1997) ISBN 0-226-11176-8
  • The Lives of Animals (1999) ISBN 0-691-07089-X
  • Stranger Shores: Literary Essays, 1986-1999 (2002) ISBN 0-14-200137-6
  • Inner Workings: Literary Essays, 2000-2005 (2007)

1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...

Translations/Introductions

2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Oxford Worlds Classics is an imprint of Oxford University Press. ... This article refers to the book by Graham Greene. ... Graham Greene Henry Graham Greene, OM, CH (October 2, 1904 – April 3, 1991) was a prolific English novelist, playwright, short story writer, travel writer and critic whose works explore the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world. ... Penguin Books is a British publisher founded in 1935 by Allen Lane. ...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
John Maxwell Coetzee

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... African Writers: This is a list of literary figures from Africa, including poets, novelists, childrens writers, essayists, and scholars. ...

External links


John Maxwell Coetzee
Novels
Dusklands (1974) • In the Heart of the Country (1977) • Waiting for the Barbarians (1980) • Life & Times of Michael K (1983) • Foe (1986) • Age of Iron (1990) • The Master of Petersburg (1994) • Disgrace (1999) • Elizabeth Costello (2003) • Slow Man (2005) • Diary of a Bad Year (2007)
Essays
White Writing: On the Culture of Letters in South Africa (1988) • Doubling the Point: Essays and Interviews (1992) • Giving Offense: Essays on Censorship (1996) • The Lives of Animals (1999) • Stranger Shores: Literary Essays, 1986–1999 (2001)
Autobiographical works
Boyhood: Scenes from Provincial Life (1997) • Youth: Scenes from Provincial Life II (2002)
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Persondata
NAME Coetzee, John Maxwell
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Contemporary South African novelist, translator and academic (now living in Australia), won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature
DATE OF BIRTH 9 February 1940
PLACE OF BIRTH Cape Town, South Africa
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Maxwell Coetzee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (917 words)
John Maxwell Coetzee (pronounced [kuˈtseə]) (OMG) born in Cape Town on 9 February 1940 to English and German parents is a South African / Australian author and 2003 Nobel Prize laureate, who emigrated from South Africa in 2002.
Coetzee was later awarded a PhD in Linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin in the United States, where he applied computerised stylistic analysis to the works of Samuel Beckett.
Coetzee was awarded the Order of Mapungubwe by the South African government on 27 September 2005, for his "exceptional contribution in the field of literature and for putting South Africa on the world stage".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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