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Encyclopedia > John Martin (Governor of Kansas)
John A. Martin


In office
January 12, 1885 – January 14, 1889
Lieutenant(s) Alexander Pancoast Riddle
Preceded by George Washington Glick
Succeeded by Lyman U. Humphrey

Born March 10, 1839
Flag of Pennsylvania Brownsville, Pennsylvania
Died October 2, 1889
Flag of Kansas Atchison, Kansas
Political party Republican
Spouse Ida Challiss
Profession newspaper editor, abolitionist, politician, soldier
Religion Baptist (preference)

John Alexander Martin (March 10, 1839October 2, 1889) was the tenth Governor of Kansas. John Martin may refer to: John Martin (Bailiff of Guernsey), Bailiff of Guernsey (1499-1510) John Martin, (d. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Governor of Kansas holds the supreme executive power of the State as provided by the first article of the Kansas Constitution. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Governor of Kansas holds the supreme executive power of the State as provided by the first article of the Kansas Constitution. ... George Washington Glick (former NSHC statue) George Washington Glick (July 4, 1827 – April 13, 1911) was an American politician. ... Lyman Underwood Humphrey (July 25, 1844 – September 12, 1915) was the eleventh Governor of Kansas. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Pennsylvania. ... Brownsville is a borough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, 35 miles (56 km) south of Pittsburgh along the Monongahela River. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kansas. ... Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Governor of Kansas holds the supreme executive power of the State as provided by the first article of the Kansas Constitution. ...


Martin was born in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, a son of James and Jane Montgomery (Crawford) Martin. His father was a native of Maryland, and his mother a native of Pennsylvania. He was of Scots-Irish extraction, and the family was related to General Richard Montgomery. His maternal grandfather, Thomas Brown, was the founder of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Martin was educated in the public schools and, at the age of fifteen, began learning the printer's trade. Brownsville is a borough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, 35 miles (56 km) south of Pittsburgh along the Monongahela River. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... An engraving depicting the death of General Montgomery at the Battle of Quebec. ... Brownsville is a borough located in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. ...

Contents

Freedom's Champion

In 1857, at the age of 18, he came to Kansas, bought the newspaper known as the Squatter Sovereign, published at Atchison, and changed the name to Freedom's Champion. He continued to publish this paper until his death. He was a firm free-state man and soon became actively identified with the political affairs of the territory. In 1858 he was nominated for the territorial legislature, but declined because he was not yet of legal age. In 1859 he was a delegate to the Osawatomie convention which organized the Republican party in Kansas, and for the remainder of his life he was an unswerving supporter of the principles and policies of that organization. His intelligent activity in political affairs led to his being honored by election or appointment to various positions of trust and responsibility. On July 5, 1859, he was elected secretary of the Wyandotte constitutional convention; was secretary of the railroad convention at Topeka in October, 1860; was a delegate to the Republican national convention of that year, and was elected to the state senate in 1861. Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the... Free Stater[1] is an Irish blog set up (amongst other reasons) as a response to the censorship policies in place at the so-called Freedom Institute, a young think-tank effort by a coterie of (current and former) Irish third-level students of a right-wing bent. ... The Kansas Republican Party is the Kansas organization of the national Republican Party. ... Drawn up at Wyandotte (now part of Kansas City) in July 1859, the Wyandotte Constitution was the 4th and final constitution voted on by the people of Kansas regarding the terms of Kansas admission to the union, particularly whether as a free state or slave state. ...


Colonel Martin

Before the expiration of his term as senator the Civil war broke out, and in October, 1861, he was mustered into the United States volunteer service as lieutenant-colonel of the 8th Kansas Volunteer Infantry. Early in 1862 he was appointed provost-marshal of Leavenworth and held the position until his regiment was ordered to Corinth, Mississippi, in March. There the 8th Kansas became a part of General Buell's army, and it remained in the Army of the Cumberland until the close of the war. On November 1, 1862, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin was promoted to full Colonel, and a few weeks later was assigned to duty as provost-marshal of Nashville, Tenn., which position he filled until the following June. With his command he took part in the battles of Perryville and Battle of Lancaster, Kentucky; the various engagements of the Tullahoma campaign; the sanguinary battle of Chickamauga, where on the second day he was assigned to the command of the Third brigade, First division, XX Corps; and in November was present at the siege of Chattanooga and the storming of Missionary Ridge. With Gen. Sherman's army he marched to Atlanta in the memorable campaign of 1864, the line of march being marked by engagements at Rocky Face Ridge, Dalton, Resaca, Kingston, Kennesaw Mountain and various other points. After the fall of Atlanta Colonel Martin's regiment joined in the pursuit of Gen. Hood as he marched northward into Tennessee, where it closed its service. During the closing scenes of his military career Colonel Martin commanded the First brigade, Third division, IV Corps, until he was mustered out at Pulaski, Tenn., November 17, 1864, receiving at that time the rank of brevet brigadier-general "for gallant and meritorious services." Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Don Carlos Buell Don Carlos Buell (March 23, 1818 – November 19, 1898) was a career U.S. Army officer who fought in the Seminole War, the Mexican-American War, and the Civil War. ... Union army in the west during the American Civil War, commanded at various times by Generals Robert Anderson, Don Carlos Buell, William S. Rosecrans, and George Thomas. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Don Carlos Buell Braxton Bragg Strength Army of the Ohio Army of Mississippi Casualties 4,211 3,196 The Battle of Perryville, also known as Battle at Perryville and Battle of Chaplin Hills, was an important but largely neglected encounter... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed... Two corps of the Union Army were called XX Corps during the American Civil War. ... The third Battle of Chattanooga (popularly known as The Battle of Chattanooga) was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Missionary Ridge was a major battle of the American Civil War fought on November 25, 1863 in Chattanooga, Tennessee as part of the Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign. ... William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. ... Palisades and chevaux-de-frise in front of the Potter House, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman Joseph E. Johnston Strength Military Division of the Mississippi Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,747 2,800 The Battle of Resaca was part of the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. ... Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Conflict American Civil War Date June 27, 1864 Place Kennesaw, Georgia Result Confederate victory The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain was fought on June 27, 1864 during the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. ... John Bell Hood (June 1[1] or June 29[2], 1831 – August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and an old friend of Lt. ... There were two corps of the Union Army called IV Corps during the American Civil War. ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ...


After the War

Returning to Kansas he resumed the editorial management of his paper, and again he became a factor in political affairs. In 1865 he was elected Mayor of Atchison, of which city he had served as the third postmaster, holding the office for twelve years. For twenty-five consecutive years he was chairman of the Atchison county Republican central committee; was a member of the Republican national committee from 1868 to 1884, and secretary of the committee during the last four years of that period; served as delegate to the national convention of his party in 1868, 1872 and 1880; was a member of one of the vice-presidents of the United States Centennial commission; was one of the incorporators of the Kansas State Historical Society, of which he was president in 1878; was president the same year of the Editors' and Publishers' Association; and from 1878 to the time of his death was one of the board of managers of the Leavenworth branch of the National Soldiers' Home. During all the years following the Civil war he manifested a keen interest in the work and welfare of the Grand Army of the Republic, and when the Department of Kansas was organized, he was honored by being elected its first commander. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The United States Centennial was on July 4, 1876. ... Many of the original old soldiers homes were constructed in high Victorian style, like the New Hampshire Soldiers Home in Tilton, New Hampshire. ... Stephenson GAR Memorial, Washington, D.C. For the fictional Star Wars military force, see Army of the Republic The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army who had served in the American Civil War. ...


Governor Martin

For years before his election to the office of Governor, Martin had an ambition to be the chief executive of his adopted state, but knew he had to wait and prepare himself for the duties of the office in case he should be called to fill it. The call came in 1884, when he was nominated and elected. His first administration commended him to the people, and in 1886 he was reelected. His years of experience as a journalist and political leader gave him a ripe judgment which enabled him to discharge his gubernatorial duties with marked ability, and it is probable that no governor of Kansas ever retired from the office with a larger number of friends.hahaha


Marriage and Death

On June 7, 1871, Governor Martin married Ida Challiss, and together they had seven children.


Governor Martin died from pneumonia on October 2, 1889 in Atchison, Kansas at the age of 50. Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the alveoli (microscopic air-filled sacs of the lung responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere) become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the...


References

  • "Martin, John Alexander". Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc ... II. (1912). Ed. Frank W. Blackmar. Chicago: Standard Pub Co. 233–235. 

Sources

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Martin (Governor of Kansas) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (900 words)
Martin, John Alexander, governor of the State of Kansas from 1885 to 1889, the tenth man to hold that office, was born on March 10, 1839, at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, a son of James and Jane Montgomery (Crawford) Martin, the father a native of Maryland and the mother of Pennsylvania.
On July 5, 1859, he was elected secretary of the Wyandotte constitutional convention; was secretary of the railroad convention at Topeka in October, 1860; was a delegate to the Republican national convention of that year, and was elected to the state senate in 1861.
Martin had a laudable ambition to be the chief executive of his adopted state, but that he knew how to wait and prepare himself for the duties of the office in case he should be called to fill it.
Kansas and Kansans Ch. 56 Pt. 1 (996 words)
John A. Martin, tenth Governor of Kansas, was born at Brownsville, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1839.
At first, Governor Martin was not a prohibitionist, but in time, as he saw the beneficial effects of prohibition, he became converted to be one of its most ardent champions.
Kansas had steadily progressed in prosperity and her towns and broad farming lands had increased immensely in value.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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