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Encyclopedia > John M. Ford
John M. Ford portrait 2000
John M. Ford portrait 2000

John Milo "Mike" Ford (April 10, 1957September 25, 2006) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer, game designer, and poet. Image File history File linksMetadata JohnMFord_2001_ddb. ... Image File history File linksMetadata JohnMFord_2001_ddb. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... A poet is some one who writes poetry. ...


Ford was known as an extraordinarily intelligent, erudite and witty man. He was a popular contributor to several online discussions. He composed poems, often improvised, in both complicated forms and blank verse, notably Shakespearean pastiche; he also wrote pastiches and parodies of many other authors and styles. At Minicon and other science fiction conventions he would perform "Ask Dr. Mike", giving humorous answers to scientific questions in a lab coat before a whiteboard. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Blank verse is a type of poetry, distinguished by having a regular meter, but no rhyme. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Science fiction conventions are gatherings of the community of fans (called science fiction fandom) of various forms of science fiction and fantasy. ...

Dr. Mike at Minicon 38 in 2003
Dr. Mike at Minicon 38 in 2003

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata JohnMFord_as_DrMike_ddb176. ... Image File history File linksMetadata JohnMFord_as_DrMike_ddb176. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

Life

Ford was born in East Chicago, Indiana, and raised in Whiting, Indiana.[1] In the mid-1970s he attended Indiana University Bloomington, where he was active in the IU science fiction club and Society for Creative Anachronism (using the name Miles Atherton de Grey); while there, he published his first short story "This, Too, We Reconcile" in the May 1976 issue of Analog. East Chicago is a city located in Lake County, Indiana, opposite Chicago, Illinois. ... Whiting is a city located in Lake County, Indiana. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Science fiction fandom or SF fandom is the community of people actively interested in science fiction and fantasy literature, and in contact with one another based upon that interest. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... This article is in need of attention. ... April 1997 issue of Analog. ...


Ford left IU and moved to New York to help start Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine,[1] for which he wrote poetry, fiction, articles, and game reviews; even after he stopped publishing non-fiction there since 1982, he was tenth most frequent contributor for the 1977-2002 period.[2] About 1990, he moved to Minneapolis.[1] In addition to writing, he worked at various times as a hospital orderly, computer consultant, slushpile reader, and copy editor. [3] Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Asimovs Science Fiction is a science fiction magazine, first published in 1977 as Isaac Asimovs Science Fiction Magazine or IASFM for short. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ...


Ford suffered from complications related to diabetes since childhood and also had renal dysfunction which required dialysis and in 2000, a kidney transplant which improved his quality of life considerably. He was found dead from natural causes in his Minneapolis home on September 25, 2006[4]. He was a prominent member of the Friends of the Minneapolis Public Library, which established a John M. Ford Book Endowment after his death [1] with the donations to be used as interest-generating capital for yearly purchase of new books. This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Human kidneys viewed from behind with spine removed The kidneys are bean-shaped excretory organs in vertebrates. ... In medicine, dialysis is a type of renal replacement therapy which is used to provide an artificial replacement for lost kidney function due to renal failure. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Minneapolis Public Library (MPL) is a library system serving the residents of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


Work

The best-selling fantasy genre writer in the country, James Rigney (pen name: Robert Jordan), called Ford "the best writer in America — bar none." New York Times best-selling sci-fi author and Wisconsinite Neil Gaiman called Ford "my best critic … the best writer I knew."   ...

"Most normal people had the slight sense that something large and super-intelligent and trans-human had sort of flown over," said Patrick Nielsen Hayden... "There would be a point where basically the plot would become so knotted and complex he would lose all of us." [1] For other people named Robert Jordan, see Robert Jordan (disambiguation). ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is a British author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many graphic novels. ... Patrick Nielsen Hayden is a science fiction editor and fanzine writer. ...

Though Ford's novels varied in setting and style, several were of the Bildungsroman (coming-of-age) type: in Web of Angels, The Final Reflection, Princes of the Air, Growing Up Weightless, and The Last Hot Time, Ford wrote variations on the theme of growing up, learning about one's world and one's place in it, and taking responsibility for it — which involves taking on the power and wisdom to influence events, to help make the world a better place. A bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of education or novel of formation) is a novel which traces the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the main character from (usually) childhood to maturity. ... The Final Reflection is a 1984 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford which emphasizes developments of Klingon language and culture. ...


Otherwise, Ford's works are characterized by an aversion to doing things that have been done before. This is perhaps most notable in his two Star Trek novels, The Final Reflection (1984) and How Much for Just the Planet? (1987). The Final Reflection is the story of a small group of Klingons who prevent a war between the Klingon Empire and the Federation while the regular series characters are relegated to cameo appearances. (This novel introduced the fictional language Klingonaase.) In How Much for Just the Planet?, the Enterprise crew compete with a Klingon crew for control of a planet, whose colonists are not happy with this and defend their peace in inventive ways, which soon make everything a farce. Both novels present the Klingons in a more positive light, not just as the token evil menace of the week,[5] while giving strong hints that the United Federation of Planets is not quite the shining utopia of goodwill and interspecies fellowship generally depicted in the television series. Star Trek is an American science-fiction franchise spanning six television series, ten feature films, hundreds of novels, computer and video games, and other fan stories. ... How Much for Just the Planet? is a 1987 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford. ... Klingons (Klingon: tlhIngan) are a warrior race in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... This page is about the race. ... This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... Some authors use fictional languages as a device to underline differences in culture, by having their characters communicate in a fashion which is both alien and dislocated. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Klingon language. ... A farce is a comedy written for the stage, or a film, which aims to entertain the audience by means of unlikely and extravagant - yet often possible - situations, disguise and mistaken identity, verbal humour of varying degrees of sophistication, which may include puns and sexual innuendo, and a fast-paced... This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ...


Ford avoided repetition not only of the work of others, but also of his own work. Where many writers make a name for themselves by developing a known style that repeats in many books, Ford always surprised with his ability to use a variety of styles that best suited the world, characters, and situations he had chosen to write about. This might have limited his readership, however he was much respected by his fellow writers, editors, critics and fans.


Bibliography

Books

Berlins Sony Center in Potsdamer Platz reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Darrell Schweitzer (born August 27, 1952) is an American writer, editor, and essayist in the field of speculative fiction. ... George H. Scithers (born 1929) is a science fiction author and editor. ... Classic pulp space opera cover, with the usual cliche elements. ... Alternative history or alternate history can be: A History told from an alternative viewpoint, rather than from the view of imperialist, conqueror, or explorer. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires (archaic spelling: vampyres) are mythological or folkloric creatures, typically held to be the re-animated corpses of human beings and said to subsist on human and/or animal blood (hematophagy). ... The Medici coat of arms The Medici family was a powerful and influential Florentine family from the 13th to 17th century. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... The Final Reflection is a 1984 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford which emphasizes developments of Klingon language and culture. ... Star Trek is an American science-fiction franchise spanning six television series, ten feature films, hundreds of novels, computer and video games, and other fan stories. ... How Much for Just the Planet? is a 1987 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television that includes numerous, often-overlapping sub-genres. ... Liavek is a shared world brought to life in a series of five fantasy anthologies edited by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly. ... A Shared universe is a literary technique in which several different authors share settings and characters which appear in their respective works of fiction, often referring to events taking place in the other writers stories. ... Tor Doubles are a series of sf books published by Tor Books between 1988 and 1991, mostly in dos-a-dos format. ... Gene Wolfe (born May 7, 1931) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Bantam Spectra is the science-fiction division of Bantam Books, which is owned by Random House. ... A bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of education or novel of formation) is a novel which traces the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the main character from (usually) childhood to maturity. ... Bulk silicate composition (estimated wt%) SiO2 44. ... The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Tor Books is an imprint of Tom Doherty Associates, LLC which publishes popular fiction, and is particularly noted for its science fiction and fantasy titles. ... Contemporary fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy, also known as contemporary urban fantasy, modern-day fantasy, or indigenous fantasy. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...

Some shorter works

  • "A Cup of Worrynot Tea" in Liavek: The Players of Luck (1986, edited by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly)
  • "Green Is the Color", "Eel Island Shoals" (song), "Pot-Boil Blues" (song) in Liavek: Wizard's Row (1987, edited by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly)
  • "Riding the Hammer" in Liavek: Spells of Binding (1988, edited by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly)
  • "The Grand Festival: Sestina" (poem), "Divination Day: Invocation" (poem), "Birth Day: Sonnet" (poem), "Procession Day/Remembrance Night: Processonal/Recessional" (poem), "Bazaar Day: Ballad" (poem), "Festival Day: Catechism" (poem), "Restoration Day: Plainsong" in Liavek: Festival Week (1990, edited by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly)
  • "Scrabble with God", IASFM October 1985, reprinted in From the End of the Twentieth Century

Ford published a variety of short fiction and poetry, from short short stories that are essentially fantastic jokes, to novellas revealing a deep understanding of human frailties and emotions. His poem, "Winter Solstice, Camelot Station" won the World Fantasy Award for Short Fiction in 1989. Emma Bull (born 1954) is a science fiction and fantasy author whose best-known novel is War for the Oaks, one of the pioneering works of urban fantasy. ... Will Shetterly (born 1955) is a fantasy and comic book writer whose best-known novel is Dogland (1997). ... Emma Bull (born 1954) is a science fiction and fantasy author whose best-known novel is War for the Oaks, one of the pioneering works of urban fantasy. ... Will Shetterly (born 1955) is a fantasy and comic book writer whose best-known novel is Dogland (1997). ... Emma Bull (born 1954) is a science fiction and fantasy author whose best-known novel is War for the Oaks, one of the pioneering works of urban fantasy. ... Will Shetterly (born 1955) is a fantasy and comic book writer whose best-known novel is Dogland (1997). ... Emma Bull (born 1954) is a science fiction and fantasy author whose best-known novel is War for the Oaks, one of the pioneering works of urban fantasy. ... Will Shetterly (born 1955) is a fantasy and comic book writer whose best-known novel is Dogland (1997). ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub ... A novella is a short novel; a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... This World Fantasy Award is given to the fantasy short story voted best by a panel of judges, and presented each year at the World Fantasy Convention. ...


He published some children's fiction under pseudonyms that he did not make public, and two children's gamebooks under house names Michael J. Dodge (Star Trek: Voyage to Adventure, 1984) and Milo Dennison (The Case of the Gentleman Ghost, 1985). A pseudonym (Greek: false name) is a fictitious name used by an individual as an alternative to his or her legal name. ... A gamebook is a book with a branching storyline that serves as a medium for gameplay. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ...


Ford plotted three issues of Captain Confederacy alternate history comics in lated 1980s and wrote issue number 10 "Driving North." Captain Confederacy is an alternate history comic book by Will Shetterly and Vince Stone that was published between 1986 and 1992. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ...


Games

  • The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues (1985, West End Games, ISBN 0-87431-027-X), an adventure for the Paranoia roleplaying game
  • GURPS Time Travel with Steve Jackson (1991, Steve Jackson Games, ISBN 1556341156), a resource book for the GURPS roleplaying game
  • GURPS Y2K with Steve Jackson et al. (1999, Steve Jackson Games, ISBN 1556344066), a resource book for the GURPS roleplaying game
  • GURPS Traveller: Starports (2000, Steve Jackson Games, ISBN 1556344015), a resource book for the GURPS Traveller roleplaying game
  • GURPS Infinite Worlds with Steve Jackson and Kenneth Hite (2005, Steve Jackson Games, ISBN 1556347340), a resource book for the GURPS roleplaying game

Ford further wrote Klingon manuals for the Star Trek role-playing game, and a number of RPG articles, which appeared in Autoduel Quarterly, Pyramid, Roleplayer, and Journal of the Travellers' Aid Society. The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues was one of the first true missions for the Paranoia role-playing game. ... Paranoia is a humorous role-playing game set in a dystopian future similar to 1984, Brazil, Brave New World, the downunder civilization of A Boy and His Dog, and especially Logans Run; however, the tone of the game is rife with black humor, frequently tongue-in-cheek rather than... Steve Jackson (born ~1952) founded Steve Jackson Games in the early 1980s. ... Steve Jackson Games (SJG) is a game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. ... The Generic Universal Role-Playing System, commonly known as GURPS is a form of a role-playing game (RPG) designed to adapt to any imaginary gaming environment. ... Traveller is a series of related table-top roleplaying games. ... Kenneth Hite is a writer and role-playing game designer. ... Star Trek: The Role Playing Game is, as the name indicates, a role-playing game set in the fictional Star Trek universe published and edited by FASA Corporation from 1982 to 1989. ... A role-playing game (RPG, often roleplaying game) is a type of game in which the participants assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create or follow stories. ... Pyramid is a gaming magazine, publishing articles primarily on role-playing games, but including board games, card games, and other sorts of games. ...


In The Final Reflection he described a chess-like game played by Klingons, klin zha, which has been adopted by Klingon fandom. The Final Reflection is a 1984 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford which emphasizes developments of Klingon language and culture. ...


Awards

The Origins Awards, presented by the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts and Design, are presented at the Origins International Game Expo for outstanding work in the game industry. ... GURPS Infinite Worlds is a supplement for the Fourth Edition of the GURPS role-playing game, published by Steve Jackson Games in 2005. ... The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... The Origins Awards, presented by the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts and Design, are presented at the Origins International Game Expo for outstanding work in the game industry. ... This World Fantasy Award is given to the fantasy short story voted best by a panel of judges, and presented each year at the World Fantasy Convention. ... Parke Godwin is an author, known for his popular reinterpretations of the Robin Hood and King Arthur legends. ... The Rhysling Awards are an annual award given for the best science fiction poetry. ... The Origins Awards, presented by the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts and Design, are presented at the Origins International Game Expo for outstanding work in the game industry. ... This World Fantasy Award is given to the fantasy novel or novels voted best by a panel of judges, and presented each year at the World Fantasy Convention. ...

Nominations

This World Fantasy Award is given to the fantasy fiction collection voted best by a panel of judges, and presented each year at the World Fantasy Convention. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for best Novelette. ... Patrick Nielsen Hayden is a science fiction editor and fanzine writer. ... The Theodore Sturgeon Award is given each year for the best science fiction short story of the year. ... The Rhysling Awards are an annual award given for the best science fiction poetry. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ... Will Shetterly (born 1955) is a fantasy and comic book writer whose best-known novel is Dogland (1997). ... Emma Bull (born 1954) is a science fiction and fantasy author whose best-known novel is War for the Oaks, one of the pioneering works of urban fantasy. ... Asimovs Science Fiction is a science fiction magazine, first published in 1977 as Isaac Asimovs Science Fiction Magazine or IASFM for short. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Tad Vezner, Crafters of sci-fi attend obscure writer's eulogy: Peers laud Minneapolis author for his unpredictable works, St. Paul Pioneer Press, October 28, 2006. Discussion of the article and a few factual errors in it by fans
  2. ^ James Patrick Kelly, On the Net: Frequent Fliers, Asimov's 4/2003. (See also Ford's entries in the Asimov's index.)
  3. ^ Ford's comment at a "four things" meme blogpost on 25 December 2005
  4. ^ Elise Matthesen's message relayed on Making Light: John M. Ford, 1957-2006
  5. ^ It has been suggested that Ford's sympathetic portrayal of Klingon culture influenced the later canonical TV and movie depictions of honor-driven Klingons (such as Worf); certainly it influenced many Klingon fans. See The Final Reflection – Influence of the book and Burns's article linked below.

The St. ... Front cover of Burn (2005). ... It has been suggested that Memetic engineering be merged into this article or section. ... Worf (Klingon: worIv) is a Klingon Starfleet officer in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... The Final Reflection is a 1984 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford which emphasizes developments of Klingon language and culture. ...

External links

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... The New England Science Fiction Association, or NESFA, is a science fiction club centered in the New England area. ...

Texts by Ford online

Teresa Nielsen Hayden (born March 21, 1956) is an American science fiction editor, fanzine writer, and essayist. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Captain Confederacy is an alternate history comic book by Will Shetterly and Vince Stone that was published between 1986 and 1992. ... Strange Horizons is an online speculative fiction magazine. ... Diane Duane (b. ...

About Ford


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Ford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (789 words)
John Ford (February 1, 1894 – August 31, 1973) was one of the most accomplished American film directors of the 1930s to 1960s, known particularly as a director of the Westerns, although his tributes to the veterans of World War II and Americana are also equally effective.
John A. Feeney's grandmother, Barbara Morris, was said to be a member of a local (impoverished) gentry family, the Morris's of Spiddal, presently headed by Redmond Morris, 3rd Lord Killanin.
John Augustine and Abbey arrived in Boston and Portland within a few days of each other in May and June 1872, were married in 1875, and became American citizens three years later.
John Ford - definition of John Ford in Encyclopedia (573 words)
John Ford (February 1, 1894 - August 31, 1973) was one of the most accomplished American film directors of the 1930s to 1960s, known particularly as a director of the Westerns, although his tributes to the veterans of World War II and Americana are also equally effective.
In 1955, Ford was tapped to direct the classic Navy comedy Mister Roberts, starring Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon, William Powell, and James Cagney.
Ford cast Ward Bond as himself, under the character of John Dodge, in the 1957 movie The Wings of Eagles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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